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3.
Homeopathy ; 112(1): 1-2, 2023 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2243192
4.
Nature ; 610(7933): 605-606, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2227544
5.
J Virol ; 97(2): e0008923, 2023 02 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2223569

ABSTRACT

Viruses have brought humanity many challenges: respiratory infection, cancer, neurological impairment and immunosuppression to name a few. Virology research over the last 60+ years has responded to reduce this disease burden with vaccines and antivirals. Despite this long history, the COVID-19 pandemic has brought unprecedented attention to the field of virology. Some of this attention is focused on concern about the safe conduct of research with human pathogens. A small but vocal group of individuals has seized upon these concerns - conflating legitimate questions about safely conducting virus-related research with uncertainties over the origins of SARS-CoV-2. The result has fueled public confusion and, in many instances, ill-informed condemnation of virology. With this article, we seek to promote a return to rational discourse. We explain the use of gain-of-function approaches in science, discuss the possible origins of SARS-CoV-2 and outline current regulatory structures that provide oversight for virological research in the United States. By offering our expertise, we - a broad group of working virologists - seek to aid policy makers in navigating these controversial issues. Balanced, evidence-based discourse is essential to addressing public concern while maintaining and expanding much-needed research in virology.


Subject(s)
Research , Virology , Virus Diseases , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , Information Dissemination , Pandemics/prevention & control , Policy Making , Research/standards , Research/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Virology/standards , Virology/trends , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Virus Diseases/virology , Viruses
9.
Thromb Haemost ; 122(1): 1-4, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751806
10.
Nature ; 602(7898): 578, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713141
11.
Cell ; 184(25): 6010-6014, 2021 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1553721

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 information epidemic, or "infodemic," demonstrates how unlimited access to information may confuse and influence behaviors during a health emergency. However, the study of infodemics is relatively new, and little is known about their relationship with epidemics management. Here, we discuss unresolved issues and propose research directions to enhance preparedness for future health crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Infodemic , Information Dissemination/ethics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Epidemics/psychology , Humans , Information Dissemination/methods , Public Health , Research/trends , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Thyroid ; 32(1): 3-8, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528154

ABSTRACT

Background: Every year, the American Thyroid Association (ATA) Annual Meeting opening session features presentations covering the most recent advances in the three major areas of thyroidology: basic, clinical, and surgical. As the ATA did not have an annual meeting in 2020, because of the COVID19 pandemic, the 2021 meeting opened with a special "Two Years in Thyroidology" session. Methods: A PubMed electronic search was conducted to identify original basic science research studies on thyroid cancer published between October 2019 and September 2021. Methodologically rigorous studies that were deemed most likely to influence the field of basic science research in thyroid cancer were grouped into three thematic units: Genetics and Genomics, Molecular Biology and Signaling, and Preclinical and Translational Science. Four publications for each category were chosen for discussion. Results: Selected studies covered topics ranging from the genetics of thyroid cancer predisposition to the genomics of anaplastic thyroid cancer evolution, from novel molecular pathways involved in thyroid cancer pathogenesis to potentially game-changing imaging and therapeutic innovations. Conclusions: The past two years, in the face of unique COVID19 pandemic-associated hurdles, have witnessed a large number of important developments in basic and translational thyroid cancer research. These studies not only have shed novel light on a number of long-standing scientific questions but have also highlighted the major challenges and open questions that still remain to be addressed in the coming years.


Subject(s)
Research/trends , Societies/trends , Thyroid Neoplasms/therapy , Endocrinology/methods , Humans , Societies/organization & administration , Thyroid Neoplasms/physiopathology , United States
13.
Homeopathy ; 110(2): 75, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447386
15.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e182, 2021 08 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338509

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 research has been produced at an unprecedented rate and managing what is currently known is in part being accomplished through synthesis research. Here we evaluated how the need to rapidly produce syntheses has impacted the quality of the synthesis research. Thus, we sought to identify, evaluate and map the synthesis research on COVID-19 published up to 10 July 2020. A COVID-19 literature database was created using pre-specified COVID-19 search algorithms carried out in eight databases. We identified 863 citations considered to be synthesis research for evaluation in this project. Four-hundred and thirty-nine reviews were fully assessed with A MeaSurement Tool to Assess systematic Reviews (AMSTAR-2) and rated as very low-quality (n = 145), low-quality (n = 80), medium-quality (n = 208) and high-quality (n = 151). The quality of these reviews fell short of what is expected for synthesis research with key domains being left out of the typical methodology. The increase in risk of bias due to non-adherence to systematic review methodology is unknown and prevents the reader from assessing the validity of the review. The responsibility to assure the quality is held by both producers and publishers of synthesis research and our findings indicate there is a need to equip readers with the expertise to evaluate the review conduct before using it for decision-making purposes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Research/trends , Systematic Reviews as Topic/standards , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Research/standards
16.
Immunity ; 54(8): 1636-1651, 2021 08 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1336544

ABSTRACT

The development of effective vaccines to combat infectious diseases is a complex multi-year and multi-stakeholder process. To accelerate the development of vaccines for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a novel pathogen emerging in late 2019 and spreading globally by early 2020, the United States government (USG) mounted an operation bridging public and private sector expertise and infrastructure. The success of the endeavor can be seen in the rapid advanced development of multiple vaccine candidates, with several demonstrating efficacy and now being administered around the globe. Here, we review the milestones enabling the USG-led effort, the methods utilized, and ensuing outcomes. We discuss the current status of COVID-19 vaccine development and provide a perspective for how partnership and preparedness can be better utilized in response to future public-health pandemic emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Research , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Bioengineering , Biotechnology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Humans , Models, Molecular , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Public Health Surveillance , Research/statistics & numerical data , Research/trends , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Vaccinology
17.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 21(8): e209-e221, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331321

ABSTRACT

Health-care-associated infections are the most prevalent adverse events of hospital care, posing a substantial threat to patient safety and burden on society. Hand hygiene with alcohol-based hand rub is the most effective preventive strategy to reduce health-care-associated infections. Over the past two decades, various interventions have been introduced and studied to improve hand hygiene compliance among health-care workers. The global implementation of the WHO multimodal hand hygiene improvement strategy and constant efforts to replace the use of soap and water with alcohol-based hand rub have led to a faster and more efficient hand cleaning method. These strategies have strongly contributed to the success of behaviour change and a subsequent decrease in health-care-associated infections and cross-transmission of multidrug-resistant organisms worldwide. The WHO multimodal behaviour change strategy requires a series of elements including system change as a prerequisite for behaviour, change, education, monitoring and performance feedback, reminders in the workplace, and an institutional safety climate. Successful adoption of the promotion strategy requires adaptation to available resources and sociocultural contexts. This Review focuses on the major advances and challenges in hand hygiene research and practices in the past 20 years and sets out various ways forward for improving this lifesaving action.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Hand Hygiene/history , Health Personnel , Publications/statistics & numerical data , Guideline Adherence , Guidelines as Topic , Hand Disinfection/methods , Hand Hygiene/trends , History, 19th Century , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Research/trends
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