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1.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604443, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2199623

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic in women with non-malignant chronic pain, and to determine whether women exposed to traumatic situations prior to the outbreak would be at a higher risk of negative health impacts. Methods: A total of 365 women were divided into three subgroups according to whether or not they had experienced a traumatic event prior to COVID-19. They completed an online survey. Results: Significant differences were found between groups during lockdown: 1) more psychological abuse was experienced by the group of women who had experienced an interpersonal traumatic event prior to the pandemic than in the other subgroups; 2) physical activity levels were higher and scores on pain interference were lower in women in the non-traumatized subgroup than in the other subgroups; 3) pain interference was predicted by pain intensity, decreased social support, and resilience, whereas perceived well-being was predicted by pain interference. Conclusion: Women who had experienced a traumatic event prior to the pandemic suffered worse consequences of the COVID-19 lockdown, particularly greater pain interference, although resilience was shown to both mitigate pain interference and enhance perceived well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Pain/epidemiology , Pandemics
2.
Rech Soins Infirm ; 148(1): 89-106, 2022.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2143942

ABSTRACT

Introduction : At the beginning of 2020, a public health emergency was declared in France following the emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.Context : Nurses involved in an advanced practice mobilized their specific skills during this health crisis by drawing on the available resources.Objectives : To analyze personal resources used by those nurses in the process of skill mobilization during the pandemic.Method : Sequential mixed research, first quantitative and then qualitative, concerning nurses or students enrolled in an advanced practice curriculum.Results : Our analysis highlighted two groups of activity for those nurses : frontline workers against COVID-19 or coordination. Coordination seemed to present more opportunities to use the specific skills of advance practice nursing.Discussion : Adjustment strategies for stress (coping and hardiness) boost nurses' commitment to their professional practice. Disciplinary knowledge contributes to the enrichment of the knowledge necessary for the mobilization of skills.Conclusion : Future research should explore resources and the mobilization of skills in the implementation of advance practice nursing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Resilience, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , France , Humans , Pandemics , Practice Patterns, Nurses' , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2143121

ABSTRACT

Collective resilience is the ability of human beings to adapt and collectively cope with crises in adversity. Emotional expression is the core element with which to characterize the psychological dimension of collective resilience. This research proposed a stage model of collective resilience based on the temporal evolution of the public opinions of COVID-19 in China's first anti-pandemic cycle; using data from hot searches and commentaries on Sina Weibo, the changes in the emotional patterns of social groups are revealed through analyses of the sentiments expressed in texts. A grounded theory approach is used to elucidate the factors influencing collective resilience. The research results show that collective resilience during the pandemic exhibited an evolutionary process that could be termed, "preparation-process-recovery". Analyses of expressed sentiments reveal an evolutionary pattern of "positive emotion prevailing-negative emotion appearing-positive emotion recovering Collective resilience from a psycho-emotional perspective is the result of "basic cognition-intermediary condition-consequence" positive feedback, in which the basic cognition is expressed as will embeddedness and the intermediary conditions include the subject behavior and any associated derived behavioral characteristics and spiritual connotation. These results are significant both theoretically and practically with regard to the reconstruction of collective resilience when s' force majeure' event occur.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , Emotions , Adaptation, Psychological , China/epidemiology
4.
J Eval Clin Pract ; 28(6): 932-933, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2136967
5.
J Affect Disord ; 310: 422-428, 2022 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2131259

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze whether resilience modulates the levels of depression, anxiety, stress and the impact of events in physiotherapists who work with COVID-19 patients with those who do not. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from August 2020 up to October 2020. A total of 519 physiotherapists were enrolled and divided according to resilience and whether they worked with COVID-19 patients. Volunteers answered sociodemographic questionnaires, rating their depression, anxiety, and stress on a scale (DASS-21). The impact of event scale revised (IES-R) and 14-item resilience scale (14-RS) were also used. RESULTS: Physiotherapists with low resilience present scores significantly high of depression, anxiety, stress and impact of event compared to the high resilience group (P < .001). Additionally, working with COVID-19 patients also resulted in increased levels of depression, anxiety, stress, and impact of event compared with the NO COVID-19 group (P < .001). These responses were modulated by age, sex, number of absences from work, whether or not personal protective equipment was received, host leadership, and the practice and maintenance of regular physical activity. LIMITATIONS: The responses to the questionnaires were anonymous and self-administered. We cannot assess whether these people had a previous diagnosis of depression, anxiety and stress. CONCLUSIONS: Low resilience and work with COVID-19 patients were associated with high levels of depression, anxiety, and stress and worse psychological impacts of events. Several aspects modulate these responses and can contribute to improving the resilience and mental health of physiotherapists who are responsible for the care of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physical Therapists , Resilience, Psychological , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Curationis ; 45(1): e1-e8, 2022 Oct 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110406

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:  It is critical for intensive care unit (ICU) nurses to develop resilient coping strategies to cope with workplace adversities. The coping strategies will mitigate the development of maladaptive psychological disorders prone to working in a stressful environment. OBJECTIVES:  The aim of this study is to analyse previous literature conducted on strategies that enhance resilience in ICU nurses to cope with workplace adversities beyond the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The study was conducted by examining all available global literature in the context of the aim of the study. METHOD:  An integrative literature review was chosen for the study. Purposive sampling method was used to select the relevant databases to answer the review question, namely Google Scholar, EBSCOhost, Medline and Nursing/Academic Edition. The search terms used were 'strategies', 'resilience', 'intensive care unit nurses', 'coping', 'workplace adversities', 'beyond COVID-19' and post 'COVID-19'. RESULTS:  Three themes emerged from the study, namely promoting personal attributes, effective relational support and active psychological support. CONCLUSION:  Enhancing resilience among ICU nurses requires both intentional individualised care from the ICU nurses and a systematic approach by nursing management that will meet the psychological needs of ICU nurses when working in a stressful ICU environment.Contribution: The findings of the review have highlighted specific strategies of improving resilience in ICU nurses, which can ultimately create a safe working environment in the ICU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , Workplace/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Intensive Care Units
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110094

ABSTRACT

This study examined the association between resilience and psychological distress in healthcare workers, the general population, and patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. We searched the PubMed, Web of Science, PsycInfo, Science Direct, and Nursing and Allied Health databases. Included articles examined healthcare workers (e.g., physicians and nurses), the general population, and patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Studies of exposure to other infectious diseases related to epidemics or pandemics (e.g., SARS and MERS) were excluded. This study was performed following the Cooper matrix review method and PRISMA guidelines, followed by a meta-analysis of study results using R version 4.1.2. A random effect model was used for the pooled analysis. This study was registered with PROSPERO (registration No. CRD42021261429). Based on the meta-analysis, we found a moderate negative relationship between overall resilience and psychological distress (r = -0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.45 to -0.38, p < 0.001). For the subgroup analysis, a moderately significant negative relationship between overall resilience and psychological distress was found among healthcare workers (r = -0.39, 95% CI: -0.44 to -0.33, p < 0.001), which was weaker than in the general population (r = -0.45, 95% CI: -0.50 to -0.39, p < 0.001) and in patients (r = -0.43; 95% CI: -0.52 to -0.33; p < 0.001). This association was robust, although the heterogeneity among individual effect sizes was substantial (I2 = 94%, 99%, and 74%, respectively). This study revealed a moderate negative relationship between resilience and psychological distress in healthcare workers, the general population, and patients. For all these populations, interventions and resources are needed to improve individuals' resilience and ability to cope with psychological distress during the COVID-19 pandemic and in future disease outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
8.
Rev Gaucha Enferm ; 43: e20210202, 2022.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119244

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the resilience of people with diabetes mellitus during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: Cross-sectional study carried out with 235 people with diabetes using a form shared on social media with sociodemographic and clinical data and the Connor-Davidson resilience scale validated for the Brazilian context. Scale scores were compared with sociodemographic and clinical data using Student's t-test, analysis of variance and Mann-Whitney. RESULTS: The mean score on the resilience scale was 63.58+14.5. The highest resilience scores were evidenced in men, people with higher income, higher education, users of oral antidiabetics, who had healthy diet and who performed physical activity and follow-up with the health team. CONCLUSION: Mean resilience was lower than the score shown in the literature and groups with higher scores had better health behaviors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Resilience, Psychological , Male , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology
9.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(2): 273-279, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100758

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Turkey is one of the countries affected during the period of COVID-19 outbreak. The purpose of the current study is to investigate psychological resilience and depression in individuals during the period of COVID-19 outbreak in Turkey in relation to different variables. The study also aims to explore the relationship between psychological resilience and depression. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The current study was conducted on a total of 518 people over the social media through the Google e-forms. In the study, the "Short Psychological Resilience Scale" and the "Beck Depression Scale" were used to collect data. In the analysis of the collected data, t-test, One Way Anova, Mann-Whitney U Test, Kruskal Wallis-H Test, Pearson Correlation Coefficient were used. RESULTS: In the current study, psychological resilience and depression were investigated in relation to different variables. Psychological resilience was found to be higher male participants, educators,university graduates and groups with not mental health problems. Depression was found to be higher females, university students, high school and lower graduates,with mental health problems. When the relationship between psychological resilience and depression was investigated, it was found that there is a medium and negative correlation between them. Moreover, the cut-off point for the depression score was set to be 17 and the rate of the people having 17 points or higher scores was found to be 16.6%. CONCLUSION: In light of the findings of the current study, it can be suggested to offer more mental health care services to those having higher levels of depression. Studies can be conducted to improve online psychological support services. A medium and negative correlation was found between psychological resilience and depression in the current study, which shows that more importance should be attached to activities to improve psychological resilience.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
10.
JAMA ; 328(12): 1199-1200, 2022 09 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2084330

ABSTRACT

In this narrative medicine essay, a third-year family medicine resident on the threshold of his career meditates on the systemic racial inequities that stymie his ability to heal his most vulnerable and oppressed patients.


Subject(s)
Resilience, Psychological , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy
11.
Trends Cogn Sci ; 26(12): 1171-1189, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2083072

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a major societal disruption, raising the question of how people can maintain or quickly regain their mental health (i.e., be resilient) during such times. Researchers have used the pandemic as a use case for studying resilience in response to a global, synchronously starting, and chronic set of stressors on the individual and societal level. Our review of this recent literature reveals that mental distress trajectories during the pandemic largely resemble mental distress responses to individual-level macro-stressors, except for a lower prevalence of recovery trajectories. Results suggest more resilient responses in older adults, but trajectories are less consistent for younger and older ages compared with middle-aged adults. We call for more research integrating state-of-the-art operationalizations of resilience and using these to study resilience over the lifespan.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Middle Aged , Humans , Aged , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology
12.
Child Abuse Negl ; 134: 105925, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082483

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Child Protection Professionals (CPPs) was widespread. Evidence regarding how those professionals dealt with the pandemic adversities and consequences for their wellbeing are scarce. OBJECTIVE: We sought to analyze whether predictors of resilience had changed one year into the COVID-19 pandemic in Brazil. Specifically, we explored the resiliency of CPPs as the stress of the pandemic evolved from an acute stressor to a more chronic and persistent stressor. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: 263 CPPs from the five regions of Brazil engaged in this study. Participants had a mean age of 40 years and, on average, 13 years of experience in their field. METHODS: CPPs were recruited between March and April of 2021 via professional social media outlets to complete an online survey. CPPs answered questions regarding their perceptions of their work conditions, psychological distress, and resilience. Survey questions were adopted from a prior survey distributed in 2020. RESULTS: We replicated findings from our earlier study in the pandemic: A model of CPPs' resilient behaviors showed good indices of fit even one year into the pandemic. Despite this, paths related to individual importance for personal resilient behavior were not significant in this model. Unmet resilient needs significantly predicted general psychological distress. CONCLUSIONS: CPPs revealed some changing resiliency needs as the pandemic progressed. Results revealed that meeting resilience-related needs is key to decreasing the psychological distress of this population. This work adds to the literature on the understudied topic of CPPs' psychological distress and resilience during international challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Resilience, Psychological , Child , Humans , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Brazil/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071465

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic hit the world with severe health consequences, affecting some populations more than others. One understudied population is the academic community. This study, part of a larger project looking at COVID-19 in Sweden and internationally, aims to understand the individual and collective dimensions of resilience among academics in Sweden during the early wave of the pandemic. METHOD: A quantitative research design was applied for this cross-sectional study. We used simple random sampling, administered through an online survey, on academics at Swedish universities (n = 278, 64% women). We employed the CD-RISC 2 (the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale) to measure personal/individual resilience, additional items for social/collective resilience, and a meaning-making coping instrument (meaning, control, comfort/spirituality, intimacy/spirituality, life transformation). RESULTS: The results revealed a strong level of personal/individual resilience among men (M = 6.05) and a level just below strong among women (M = 5.90). By age group, those 35-49-year-olds showed strong resilience (M = 6.31). Family was the dominant social/collective resilience factor, followed by friends, nature, work/school, and, lastly, religion/spirituality. There was a positive and significant correlation between self-rated health and personal/individual resilience (r = 0.252, p = 0.001) and positive but weak correlations and negative significant correlations between personal/individual resilience and religious coping methods. CONCLUSIONS: During the pandemic, the family took priority in meaning-making, which is an interesting change in a strong individual-oriented society such as Sweden.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Male , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Sweden/epidemiology , Psychometrics/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071412

ABSTRACT

In light of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the enormous amount of uncertainty caused by it, mental health issues have become a great concern. Evidence regarding the effects of psychological resilience on the Thai population is scarce. We evaluated psychological resilience during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and its association with the risk of mental health outcomes, such as depression, anxiety, stress, and health-related well-being. This cross-sectional study was a part of the HOME-COVID-19 project, which conducted an online survey of 4004 members of the general population in Thailand using the Brief Resilience Coping Scale. Logistic regression was performed to identify the association between psychological resilience and mental health issues and well-being. Groups with prevalence rates of 43.9%, 39.2%, and 16.9% were classified as low, moderate, and high resilient copers, respectively. Using high resilient copers as a reference group, the low resilient copers had a higher chance of having mental health adversities. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) was 1.89 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39-2.56; p < 0.001) for depression, 2.13 (95% CI, 1.45-3.14; p < 0.001) for anxiety, 4.61 (95% CI, 3.30-6.45; p < 0.001) for perceived stress, and 3.18 (95% CI, 2.31-4.38; p < 0.001) for low well-being. For the medium resilient copers, only low well-being was found to be statistically significant (OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.16-2.20; p = 0.004). It is important that resilience be considered in the development of strategies for managing the COVID-19 pandemic to prevent or reduce adverse mental health outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Thailand/epidemiology , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology
16.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 81(6)2020 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066788

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In light of the current evolving coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and the need to learn from past infectious disease outbreaks to provide better psychological support for our frontline health care workers (HCW), we conducted a rapid review of extant studies that have reported on both psychological and coping responses in HCW during recent outbreaks. DATA SOURCES: We performed a systematic search of the available literature using PubMed, MEDLINE (Ovid), and Web of Science, combining key terms regarding recent infectious disease outbreaks and psychological and coping responses. Papers published from database inception to April 20, 2020, were considered for inclusion. Only studies in the English language and papers from peer-reviewed journals were included. STUDY SELECTION: We identified 95 (PubMed) and 49 papers (Web of Science) from the database search, of which 23 papers were eventually included in the review. DATA EXTRACTION: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were used for data extraction. The McMaster University critical appraisal tool was used to appraise quantitative studies. Guidelines by Higginbotham and colleagues were used to appraise qualitative studies. Only studies exploring the combined psychological and coping responses of HCW amid infectious diseases were included. RESULTS: Salient psychological responses that can persist beyond the outbreaks included anxiety/fears, stigmatization, depression, posttraumatic stress, anger/frustration, grief, and burnout, but also positive growth and transformation. Personal coping methods (such as problem solving, seeking social support, and positive thinking) alongside workplace measures (including infection control and safety, staff support and recognition, and clear communication) were reported to be helpful. CONCLUSIONS: Psychological support for HCW in the current COVID-19 pandemic and future outbreaks should focus on both individual (eg, psychoeducation on possible psychological responses, self-care) and institutional (eg, clear communication, providing access to resources for help, recognition of efforts of HCW) measures.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Disorders/etiology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Global Health , Humans , Infection Control , Mental Disorders/prevention & control , Mental Disorders/psychology , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066080

ABSTRACT

Resilience training is gaining attention as a strategy to build students' resistance to adversity and promote their mental well-being. However, owing to inconsistencies and variations in the content and delivery of resilience training, more work is needed to examine students' experiences and preferences to address issues relating to intervention fidelity. This study adopted a qualitative approach in exploring students' experience of synchronous and asynchronous versions of a digital resilience training program. Seventeen students were interviewed using a semi-structured virtual face-to-face interview via Zoom. The thematic analyses unveiled four themes: embarking on a journey toward resilience, discovering strategies to develop resilience, finding a balance to benefit from resilience skill enhancement, and instilling resilience in the everyday. Future resilience training should consider students' workload and interactivity to enhance their engagement. As being resilient is associated with better mental well-being, the findings of this study may support the development of future wellness programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Problem Solving , Students
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066012

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has greatly affected mental health worldwide. This study aimed to identify sociodemographic and psychosocial factors that influence the level of resilience among Singaporeans amidst the pandemic. An online questionnaire was administered to Singaporeans and permanent residents aged 21 and above. The online questionnaire collected information on sociodemographics, infection, and contact with COVID-19. Psychosocial variables-specifically optimism, self-efficacy, hope, and resilience-were also assessed through validated questionnaires. A total of 404 responses were collected in this study. Men were reported to have higher resilience compared to women (28.13 vs. 25.54, p-value < 0.001). Married individuals were observed to have higher resilience compared to their single counterparts (27.92 vs. 25.77, p-value < 0.001). Interestingly, participants who knew of family members/friends who had contracted COVID-19 were reported to be more resilient than those who did not (28.09 vs. 26.19, p-value = 0.013). Optimism, self-efficacy, and hope were also found to be associated with higher resilience (p-value < 0.001). In conclusion, one's sex, marital status, contact with COVID-19, level of optimism, self-efficacy, and hope were shown to significantly affect resilience. Given the long-drawn nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, interventions should aim to improve optimism, self-efficacy, and hopefulness in the community.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Demography , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics
19.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1): 793, 2022 10 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064740

ABSTRACT

Researchers have mainly focused on aging risk factors and COVID-19 consequences. However, older adults have proved their ability to overcome adversities along their life. Resilience is a protective variable that dampens the impact of stress. Based on MacLeod's et al. (2016) approach, we aimed to analyze the relationship between older adults' resilience and COVID-19 related-stressors as well as their physical, mental, and social characteristics. Eight hundred eighty-nine people aged 60 and over participated in this study. Older participants, women, having better perceived health and not losing a loved one because of the virus were associated with more resilience. Moreover, higher levels of gratitude, personal growth, life purpose and lower levels of depression were associated with greater scores in resilience. This study offers a change of perspective in which aging is perceived from a positive viewpoint by focusing on easily accessible resources that may help older adults to cope with adverse situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Adaptation, Psychological , Aged , Aging , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055251

ABSTRACT

The role of organizational resilience is important in an era of the new normal after COVID-19. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of organizational resilience and psychological resilience on perceived well-being and employee resilience in the workplace from the internal stakeholder perspective. A new research framework has been proposed. Cross-sectional research design was employed to collect responses from 115 employees from various organizations. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data. Organizational resilience is associated with perceived well-being and employee resilience. Psychological resilience is associated with perceived well-being and employee resilience. Employee resilience and perceived well-being are associated with work engagement. Complex mediation models are proposed. Theoretical contributions and managerial implications are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Organizational Culture , Workplace/psychology
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