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1.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 846, 2021 Dec 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1634164

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pregnant population experienced unique COVID-19 physical and psychosocial stressors such as direct health concerns related to the virus and loss of access to resources since the COVID-19 emerged as a global pandemic in early 2020. Despite these COVID-19-related stress and concerns, the maternal experience of bonding with their unborn children has not been well studied. This work aimed to study the association between mental health history, current mental health symptoms, psychological factors, COVID-19-related worries, and self-reported maternal-fetal bonding of pregnant women. METHODS: This online, survey-based cross-sectional study focused on women pregnant during the pandemic and assessed 686 women using data collected from May 19, 2020 to October 3, 2020. Enrolled respondents completed assessments in which they self-reported maternal-fetal bonding, mental health symptomatology, psychological factors, and COVID-19-related worries regarding health, pregnancy, and resources. RESULTS: Depressive symptoms in pregnant women were associated with lower quality maternal-fetal bonding, while a higher level of anxiety was positively associated with bonding; however, past history of depression or generalized anxiety diagnosis did not appear to be as relevant as active symptomatology. Maternal resilience, but not distress tolerance, appeared to be a protective factor resulting in improved bonding. Higher levels of worry regarding impact of COVID-19 on health were significantly associated with improved bonding, while worries regarding the impact of COVID-19 on the pregnancy or resources were not significantly associated with bonding. The study also found associations between different sociodemographic variables and bonding, including a strong positive association between first time motherhood and bonding and a negative association between higher education and income and bonding. CONCLUSIONS: This study was the first to report potential protective and risk factors to the maternal-fetal bonding process in women pregnant during the COVID-19 pandemic. Unique COVID-19 concerns exist; however, anxiety and COVID-19 concerns do not appear to undermine maternal-fetal bonding while active depressive symptomatology may negatively influence bonding; interventions increasing maternal resilience may be particularly valuable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Maternal-Fetal Relations/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pregnancy , Protective Factors , Resilience, Psychological , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260613, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638334

ABSTRACT

There is widespread recognition that stressors related to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) jeopardize the development of emerging adults, more particularly those living in disadvantaged communities. What is less well understood is what might support emerging adult resilience to COVID-19-related stressors. In response, this article reports a 5-week qualitative study with 24 emerging adults (average age: 20) living in a South African township. Using digital diaries and repeated individual interviews, young people shared their lived experiences of later (i.e., month 4 and 7) lockdown-related challenges (i.e., contagion fears; livelihood threats; lives-on-hold) and how they managed these challenges. An inductive thematic analysis showed that personal and collective compliance, generous ways-of-being, and tolerance-facilitators enabled emerging adult resilience to said challenges. Importantly, these resilience-enablers drew on resources associated with multiple systems and reflected the situational and cultural context of the township in question. In short, supporting emerging adult resilience to COVID-19-related stressors will require contextually aligned, multisystemic responses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Adolescent , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Medicine, African Traditional , South Africa/epidemiology , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Young Adult
3.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 75, 2022 01 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612203

ABSTRACT

We characterized > 150 countries' resilience to COVID-19 as the nationwide decay rate of daily cases or deaths from peak levels. Resilience to COVID-19 varies by a factor of ~ 40 between countries for cases/capita and ~ 25 for deaths/capita. Trust within society is positively correlated with country-level resilience to COVID-19, as is the adaptive increase in stringency of government interventions when epidemic waves occur. By contrast, countries where governments maintain greater background stringency tend to have lower trust within society and tend to be less resilient. All countries where > 40% agree "most people can be trusted" achieve a near complete reduction of new cases and deaths, but so do several less-trusting societies. As the pandemic progressed, resilience tended to decline, as adaptive increases in stringency also declined. These results add to evidence that trust can improve resilience to epidemics and other unexpected disruptions, of which COVID-19 is unlikely to be the last.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Trust , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health
4.
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv ; 60(1): 11-12, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607131

ABSTRACT

In the United States, the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic took a heavy toll on older adults, particularly those residing in long-term care facilities who were reduced to extended periods of isolation from families, friends, and health care providers. The concepts of resilience and hope became extremely relevant in the context of pandemic-related restrictions that exacerbated loneliness across all age groups. A review of evidence indicates that resilience is defined as an on-going, conscious process of adaptation in the face of adversity, whereas hope is defined as a resilience moderator through its process of making sense of a difficult situation. Cognitive-behavioral therapy and life review interventions were found to effectively enhance hope, thus contributing to increased resilience in older adults diagnosed with depression, bereavement, and/or medical conditions. Mental health providers at any level of practice should assess older adults for levels of loneliness, isolation, resilience, and hope and consider interventions to boost resilience and hope. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 60(1), 10-12.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Aged , Humans , Loneliness , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
5.
Nature ; 601(7891): 26, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605871
6.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(11): 537-540, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598846

ABSTRACT

Nurses and nurse leaders are working in unprecedented intense and demanding environments, and the COVID-19 pandemic continues to place strain on their mental well-being. If stressful work conditions remain at extraordinary high levels, nurses and leaders may ultimately leave their positions, creating even more uncertainty in the workforce. Enhancing individual resilience has become a superficial response in retaining nurses during a global nursing shortage. We argue that resilience is not solely an individual responsibility. Rather, resilience it is a mutual responsibility between the individual and the organization. In this article, we discuss how nurse leaders can foster organizational resilience while also enhancing their own individual resilience within the current pandemic environment, and as we transition to a post-COVID environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Workforce , Nurse Administrators , Nurses/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Global Health , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Mental Health , Nurse Administrators/organization & administration , Nurse Administrators/psychology
8.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24510, 2021 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595341

ABSTRACT

Due to its suddenness and unpredictability, COVID-19 caused strife and effects on public mental health, resulting in a surge of negative emotions. The study explores the relationship between physical exercise and negative emotions in home-based college students during the COVID-19 epidemic, as well as the mediating role of resilience, thus providing a new basis for understanding the role of physical exercise in improving negative emotions in college students; A total of 1214 college students were investigated with the Physical Exercise Questionnaire, Negative Emotion Scale and Resilience Scale; Both physical exercise and resilience were significantly negatively correlated with negative emotions in college students (r = - 0.25, - 0.33, P < 0.001), and there was a significant positive correlation between physical exercise and resilience (r = 0.47, P < 0.001). Physical exercise had a direct effect on the negative emotions of college students (ß = - 0.14, P < 0.001). Resilience had a partial mediating effect between physical exercise and the negative emotions of the college students, with a mediating effect value of 0.14 and a mediating effect contribution rate of 50.00%; The study found that physical exercise not only directly affected the negative emotions of college students but also improved their resilience by slowing down their negative emotions and promoting their mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Emotions , Female , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580726

ABSTRACT

Resilience and meaning in life are significant indicators of psychological well-being and health, which are particularly important in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, they have been explored by a growing number of scientists. There has been a research gap, however, that fails to show that time perspectives also have a significant impact on the perception and building of different life aspects. The current study investigated the associations between resilience, time perspectives and meaning in life and examined the moderating role of time perspective in the relationship between resilience and meaning in life. METHODS: Participants of this cross-sectional study were 363 adults aged 18-70. Resilience Measurement Scale (SPP-25), the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI), and the Purpose in Life Questionnaire (PIL) were used. RESULTS: The findings confirmed a positive relationship between resilience, meaning in life, and positive time perspectives (Present Hedonistic and Future) and a negative link with Past Negative and Present Fatalistic perspectives. The linear regression analyses showed that Past Negative and Past Positive perspectives significantly moderated the relationship between resilience and meaning in life. The moderating effect was also confirmed in the case of past time perspectives only. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate the relevance of positive resources, such as resilience and positive perception of the past, in keeping the meaning in life. Understanding the effect of psychological strengths in the context of the pandemic time can be a key to providing intervention and therapeutic services fostering mental health and well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Psychology, Positive , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
11.
Nurs Adm Q ; 46(1): 81-87, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550629

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced leaders to reconsider the various factors that attribute to work-life balance, a healthy work environment, and resilience among nurses. Posttraumatic growth (PTG) provides a lens through which clinicians and leaders can measure, articulate, and espouse resilient recovery through unprecedented times. This article suggests the use of PTG as a framework, measured by the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory to guide leaders as they implement job-specific resiliency interventions for professional nurses. This article also suggests 3 science-based interventions intended to increase PTG. Published data support the efficacy of these interventions: resilience retreats, resilience rounds, and "The Pause," while longitudinal impacts of PTG following these interventions remain currently unknown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Resilience, Psychological , Adaptation, Psychological , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Gac Med Mex ; 157(3): 220-224, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1535076

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has also affected mental health. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate Mexican population mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic by measuring symptoms of stress, depression, anxiety and insomnia, as well as resilience. METHODS: Cross-sectional, descriptive, observational study. A survey was carried out to collect sociodemographic data, and the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 (DASS 21), Athens Insomnia Scale and the 14-item Resilience Scale (RS-14) were applied. Central tendency and dispersion measures were obtained for quantitative variables and frequencies for qualitative variables. The chi-square test was used for bivariate analysis; alpha level was 0.05. RESULTS: 1,667 individuals with a mean age of 33.78 ± 10.79 years were analyzed. On DASS 21, a mean of 9.7 points (normal) was found, as well as 7.10 for anxiety (normal) and 6.73 for depression (normal). On Athens Insomnia Scale, a mean of 9.33 points (moderate alteration), and on the RS-14 scale, 69.13 points (high resilience) were obtained. CONCLUSIONS: Symptoms' intensity was lower than expected in comparison with that recorded in other populations, probably due to the high levels of resilience of the Mexican population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Resilience, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mexico/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
13.
Dev Psychol ; 57(10): 1648-1666, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527992

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented families around the world with extraordinary challenges related to physical and mental health, economic security, social support, and education. The current study capitalizes on a longitudinal, cross-national study of parenting, adolescent development, and young adult competence to document the association between personal disruption during the pandemic and reported changes in internalizing and externalizing behavior in young adults and their mothers since the pandemic began. It further investigates whether family functioning during adolescence 3 years earlier moderates this association. Data from 484 families in five countries (Italy, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States) reveal that higher levels of reported disruption during the pandemic are related to reported increases in internalizing and externalizing behaviors after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic for young adults (Mage = 20) and their mothers in all five countries, with the exception of one association in Thailand. Associations between disruption during the pandemic and young adults' and their mothers' reported increases in internalizing and externalizing behaviors were attenuated by higher levels of youth disclosure, more supportive parenting, and lower levels of destructive adolescent-parent conflict prior to the pandemic. This work has implications for fostering parent-child relationships characterized by warmth, acceptance, trust, open communication, and constructive conflict resolution at all times given their protective effects for family resilience during times of crisis. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Adolescent , Family Health , Female , Humans , Mothers , Pandemics , Parenting , Parents , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Young Adult
14.
Dev Psychol ; 57(10): 1563-1581, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527990

ABSTRACT

Many changes were thrust upon families by the COVID-19 pandemic, including mandated quarantines, social distancing, transitions to distance learning for children, and remote work. The current study used mixed methods to examine the challenges and resilience of families in the United States during the pandemic (May-July 2020), as well as predictors and moderators of parent/child psychological distress. Our sample included 469 parents (459 mothers) of children aged ∼2-13 years (239 girls, 228 boys, one nonbinary child, one "prefer not to answer" selection), who completed an online survey with closed-ended and open-ended portions. The sample had middle-to-high socioeconomic status and 86% of families were White/non-Hispanic. Qualitative (content and thematic analyses) and quantitative (descriptive statistics and regressions) findings revealed that, even in this relatively privileged sample, parents and families were experiencing struggles in many life domains (e.g., family, school) and shifts in family dynamics and routines, which were related to emotional and mental health. Families experienced many changes in their lives, some positive and some negative, and often exhibited resilience through managing these changes. Our moderation analyses indicated that COVID-19's daily impact was significantly associated with psychological distress for children and parents, and this association was stronger for older versus younger children. Less active/instructive parental media mediation was also related to less child psychological distress. Moving forward, practitioners can focus on preventive efforts including psychoeducation regarding healthy outlets for negative emotions during COVID-19, and practical help troubleshooting childcare and health care challenges impacting many families. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Resilience, Psychological , Child , Family Health , Female , Humans , Male , Mothers , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
15.
J Holist Nurs ; 39(4): 314-324, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526578

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study investigated the relationship between nursing students' profile variables and their state of mental well-being and resilience during the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic and how this impacts their understanding of holistic nursing care provision. Design: This study used a cross-sectional design and total enumeration sample (n = 439) from all enrolled nursing students in the College of Nursing of a state-run university. Method: The 10-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) and 14-item Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (WEMWBS) were used to collect data from the participants. A correlational analysis was employed to determine the relationship between the responses of the participants to their profile variables. Findings: There were no significant differences in age, gender, and year level in the 10-item CD-RISC and WEMWBS. Regarding the WEMWBS, the mean total score of those with 61-100% of the allowed units was significantly higher than those with 31-60%. Finally, the CD-RISC scores revealed that participants with a general point average (GPA) of A were significantly higher than those with a GPA of B+ or B. Conclusion: Academically performing students (those with a GPA of B and above) are more resilient. In addition, there is an existing linear relationship between high mental well-being and the ability to pursue higher academic loads.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Students, Nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Adv Health Care Manag ; 202021 Dec 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517973

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic burdens health-care workers (HCWs) worldwide. Amid high-stress conditions and unprecedented needs for crisis management, organizations face the grand challenge of supporting the mental health and well-being of their HCWs. The current literature on mental health and well-being primarily focuses on improving personal resilience among HCWs. However, this puts the responsibility for coping with COVID-19-related stress almost fully on the individual. This chapter discusses an important alternative framing of this issue - how health-care organizations (HCOs) can facilitate recovery from work processes (i.e., returning to a baseline level by engaging in nonwork activities after work) for their workers. Based on a narrative review of the occupational health psychology literature, we provide practical strategies for supporting the four key recovery experiences of detachment, control, mastery, and relaxation, as well as present general recommendations about how to promote recovery. These strategies can help HCOs facing the grand challenge of sustaining worker well-being and functioning during the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as during future pandemics and for workers facing high work pressure in general.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
19.
J Holist Nurs ; 39(4): 336-337, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505575
20.
BMC Res Notes ; 14(1): 409, 2021 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504847

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the mental health of people worldwide. Psychological resilience has been shown to buffer against the threat of the pandemic (i.e., COVID-19 fear) and sustain mental health. The extent to which psychological resilience factors impact mental health maintenance, however, is unclear, given broad differences in infection rates, prevention approaches, government interventions across different cultures and contexts. Our study examines resilience factors and how they protect individuals from COVID-19-related fear and sustain their mental health. DATA DESCRIPTION: Data were collected from 1583 (Mage = 32.22, SD = 12.90, Range = 19-82) respondents from Japan, China, the United States, and Malaysia between October to November 2020. We collected data across age and sex, marital status, number of children, and occupations. We also accounted for stay-at-home measures, change in income, COVID-19 infection status, place of residence, and subjective social status in the study. Our variables included mental health-related and resilience constructs, namely (i) fear of COVID-19, (ii) depression, anxiety, and stress; (iii) present, past, and future life satisfaction, (iv) sense of control, (v) positive emotions, (vi) ego-resilience, (vii) grit, (viii) self-compassion, (ix) passion, and (x) relational mobility. All questionnaires were assessed for their suitability across the four countries with the necessary translation checks. Results from this study can be instrumental in examining the impact of multiple resilience factors and their interaction with demographic variables in shaping mental health outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety , Child , Depression , Fear , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
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