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2.
Lit Med ; 38(2): 349-370, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450722

ABSTRACT

This enquiry considers how the dignity of the frail elderly is objectively grounded, socially constructed, and subjectively experienced. The lives of the frail trouble public consciousness. A terror of old age, felt by young or old, is liable to form a toxic affective culture of social death. Against such threats, the dignity of the frail requires defense. However, empathy- and capacities-based approaches to dignity fail to give a compelling account of humanity's membership in shared community. By contrast, the poetry of the Psalms and New Testament puts terror to flight by articulating how dignity is found within God's steadfast, worth-bestowing love which tenderly accompanies humanity in its shared dustiness from the womb to old age and beyond. The blessed dignity these sources describe is found to be more conceptually robust and affectively compelling than an individualistic eudaimonism. Cultivating an ecology of dignity in practice is finally shown to depend on a compassion which grows from the same fertile, imaginative ground.


Subject(s)
Empathy , Fear/psychology , Frail Elderly/psychology , Respect , Social Isolation/psychology , Aged , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Can Fam Physician ; 67(8): 559, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1368145
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(15)2021 07 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346478

ABSTRACT

The aged care system in Australia is in crisis and people living with dementia are especially vulnerable to breaches of human rights to autonomy, dignity, respect, and equitable access to the highest quality of health care including meeting needs on account of disability. To be powerful advocates for themselves and others, people with dementia and the wider community with vested interests in quality aged care must be informed about their rights and what should be expected from the system. Prior to the Australian Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety, the Empowered Project was established to empower and raise awareness amongst people with dementia and their families about changed behaviours, chemical restraint, consent, end of life care, and security of tenure. A primary care-embedded health media campaign and national seminar tour were undertaken to meet the project aims of awareness-raising and empowerment, based on 10 Essential Facts about changed behaviours and rights for people with dementia, established as part of the project. Knowledge translation was assessed to examine the need and potential benefit of such seminars. We demonstrated that this brief educational engagement improved community knowledge of these issues and provided attendees with the information and confidence to question the nature and quality of care provision. With the completion of the Royal Commission and corresponding recommendations with government, we believe the community is ready to be an active player in reframing Australia's aged care system with a human rights approach.


Subject(s)
Respect , Terminal Care , Aged , Australia , Humans , Informed Consent , Quality of Health Care
8.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 43(2): e301-e302, 2021 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1276214

ABSTRACT

The virtue of compassion is a valid antidote to lighten the burden of negative effects brought by the COVID-19 pandemic. However, real-life situations can attest that this is not always the kind of behavior for some people since the current situation is considered as 'survival of the fittest.' In its absence, the respect of freedom by public officials to every citizen is a great substitute most especially in the implementation of the government's vaccination program. This behavior actualizes every person's plan of protection without being pressured. This right needs to be provided and not taken away by the government.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Empathy , Freedom , Humans , Pandemics , Respect , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
10.
BMC Med Ethics ; 22(1): 36, 2021 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1166906

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Under COVID-19 pandemic, many organizations developed guidelines to deal with the ethical aspects of resources allocation. This study describes the results of an argument-based review of ethical guidelines developed at the European level. It aims to increase knowledge and awareness about the moral relevance of the outbreak, especially as regards the balance of equity and dignity in clinical practice and patient's care. METHOD: According to the argument-based review framework, we started our research from the following two questions: what are the ethical principles adopted by the ethical guidelines produced at the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak related to resource allocation? And what are the practical consequences in terms of 'priority' of access, access criteria, management of the decision-making process and patient care? RESULTS: Twenty-two ethical guidelines met our inclusion criteria and the results of our analysis are organized into 4 ethical concepts and related arguments: the equity principle and emerging ethical theories; triage criteria; respecting patient's dignity, and decision making and quality of care. CONCLUSION: Further studies can investigate the practical consequences of the application of the guidelines described, in terms of quality of care and health care professionals' moral distress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Guidelines as Topic , Moral Obligations , Respect , Europe , Humans , Pandemics , Resource Allocation/ethics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Nurs Sci Q ; 34(2): 123-124, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158174

ABSTRACT

The concept of shame and shaming has been prevalent in the healthcare literature and on social media platforms during the pandemic. There are innumerable ethical implications for the discipline of nursing to consider as the concept of shaming oneself and others is evident in healthcare situations. Shame is an enduring truth found in the humanbecoming ethos of human dignity. This article begins an analysis and discussion of the straight-thinking implications of shame and shaming others while desiring to honor others with human dignity as they traverse the chaotic healthcare system.


Subject(s)
Pandemics , Shame , Humans , Morals , Personhood , Respect
12.
J Prev Med Hyg ; 61(4): E501-E507, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102689

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Since December 2019, the COVID-19 outbreak has affected almost every country in the world, including Iran. General awareness and commitment to recommendations made by health officials have important role in control of the outbreak. The aim of the current study was to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of Iranians concerning COVID-19 after Nowruz (Persian New Year Holiday) in Iran and identifying its determining demographic and socioeconomic factors. Method: A cross-sectional study was designed. We translated and culturally adopted Zhong's questionnaire to Persian, which is designed to assess people's knowledge, attitude, and practice toward COVID-19. We used online Google forms to send the questionnaire via social platforms throughout the country. A total of 1015 Iranians participated in the study. Results: The mean knowledge score among our participants was 10.60, with an overall correct response rate of 88.35%. Higher knowledge score was associated with higher education, being a professor, and residing in cities. Lower knowledge score was associated with being unemployed, marital status other than single or married, and living in rural areas. Almost all of our participants had favorable attitudes and practices toward COVID-19. Conclusion: Overall, Iranians showed a satisfactory KAP towards COVID-19. We suggest more attention to informing people living in rural areas and unemployed, as they were related to more risky behaviors and had lower knowledge scores regarding COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Holidays/psychology , Respect , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Surg Radiol Anat ; 43(4): 523-527, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100959

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Due to COVID-19 pandemic, Thanks giving ceremony to cadaver was different this year in two ways: the students were partially exposed to cadaveric dissections (for 7 months) and later learned Anatomy via online classes due to lockdown (for 5 months) and secondly it was not feasible to gather for the ceremony so virtual platform was preferred. The purpose of this study was to discern the gratitude for cadaver and to recognize the importance of cadaveric dissection from the reflection of students who experienced hybrid anatomy learning amidst COVID-19. METHODS: The study was conducted on 48 first year medical students who were admitted to the college in August 2019 and were willing to participate. An online invitation was sent to students to participate in virtual thanks giving to cadaver ceremony on the last day of their anatomy class (August 2020). RESULTS: Though the students partially studied gross anatomy with the aid of dissections on the cadaver; however, they expressed respect and gratitude to the silent mentor in the form of a card, poem, drawing or paragraph and shared it via google classroom platform. The students wished if they could continue their anatomy course in dissection hall as paused due to COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Reflection of these students may mark impact on future anatomy students who may or may not get the chance for dissections. The thanks-giving gesture will also help to bind medical science and humanity especially during the crisis of pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anatomy/education , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dissection/ethics , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/ethics , Students, Medical/psychology , Anatomy/ethics , Bioethical Issues , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Cadaver , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Curriculum , Education, Distance/ethics , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Humanism , Humans , Learning , Pandemics/prevention & control , Respect
14.
Am J Hosp Palliat Care ; 38(12): 1503-1508, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1072905

ABSTRACT

A routine threat to palliative care research is participants not completing studies. The purpose of this analysis was to quantify attrition rates mid-way through a palliative care study on Dignity Therapy and describe the reasons cited for attrition. Enrolled in the study were a total of 365 outpatients with cancer who were receiving outpatient specialty palliative care (mean age 66.7 ± 7.3 years, 56% female, 72% White, 22% Black, 6% other race/ethnicity). These participants completed an initial screening for cognitive status, performance status, physical distress, and spiritual distress. There were 76 eligible participants who did not complete the study (58% female, mean age 67.9 ± 7.3 years, 76% White, 17% Black, and 7% other race). Of those not completing the study, the average scores were 74.5 ± 11.7 on the Palliative Performance Scale and 28.3 ± 1.5 on the Mini-Mental Status Examination, whereas 22% had high spiritual distress scores and 45% had high physical distress scores. The most common reason for attrition was death/decline of health (47%), followed by patient withdrawal from the study (21%), and patient lost to follow-up (21%). The overall attrition rate was 24% and within the a priori projected attrition rate of 20%-30%. Considering the current historical context, this interim analysis is important because it will serve as baseline data on attrition prior to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. Future research will compare these results with attrition throughout the rest of the study, allowing analysis of the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the study attrition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Palliative Care , Pandemics , Respect , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 43(2): e301-e302, 2021 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066394

ABSTRACT

The virtue of compassion is a valid antidote to lighten the burden of negative effects brought by the COVID-19 pandemic. However, real-life situations can attest that this is not always the kind of behavior for some people since the current situation is considered as 'survival of the fittest.' In its absence, the respect of freedom by public officials to every citizen is a great substitute most especially in the implementation of the government's vaccination program. This behavior actualizes every person's plan of protection without being pressured. This right needs to be provided and not taken away by the government.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Empathy , Freedom , Humans , Pandemics , Respect , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
16.
J Law Med ; 28(1): 9-20, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013719

ABSTRACT

The right to the highest attainable standard of health, existing under a number of international human rights instruments, including Art 12 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, has been incorporated in local law and in the constitutions of many countries. An important body of jurisprudence interpreting such rights and applying them in particular factual health scenarios is developing. Against the background of the South African Constitutional Court's 2002 landmark decision in Minister of Health v Treatment Action Campaign (No 2) (2002) 5 SA 721 in relation to access to HIV medications, this editorial reviews significant decisions in 2012 by Ngugi J of the Kenya High Court in PAO v Attorney General [2012] eKLR and by the Uganda Constitutional Court in 2020 in Center for Health, Human Rights and Development v Attorney General [2020] UGCC 12. It contends that this combination of high-profile judgments has breathed substance and significance into the right to the highest attainable standard of health, the entitlement to be treated with dignity and the right to life at a time when these rights may assume additional importance in the context of the availability and accessibility of vaccines for the COVID-19 virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respect , Human Rights , Humans , Jurisprudence , Reference Standards , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Nurs Sci Q ; 34(1): 20-22, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1015797

ABSTRACT

Human presence with others is vital in the healthcare experience for those who are giving and receiving services, especially during the upheaval unfolding concurrently with a pandemic. The author wishes to explore the notion of telepresence, uniquely defined as a potential living quality priority for those experiencing hospitalization and/or isolation from others. The ethical implications will be undergirded utilizing the humanbecoming enduring truths of reverence, betrayal, awe, and shame.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Empathy/ethics , Hospitalization , Personhood , Social Isolation , Telemedicine , Humans , Respect
18.
Headache ; 60(8): 1837-1845, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-968987

ABSTRACT

On March 11, 2020, the infection caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) virus was declared a pandemic. Throughout this pandemic, healthcare professionals (HCPs) have experienced difficulties stemming from poor communications, resource scarcity, lack of transparency, disbelief, and threats to the safety of their loved ones, their patients, and themselves. As part of these hardships, negative statements have been heard repeatedly. This paper describes 11 scenarios of unhelpful and dysfunctional messages heard by the authors and their colleagues during the COVID-19 pandemic, reported to us by a combination of peers, administrative leadership, and the public. We explain why not to use such messaging, and we suggest more helpful and compassionate expressions based upon recommendations published by scientific organizations and well-established psychological principles. The first 10 scenarios discussed include (1) lack of understanding regarding the extent of the pandemic; (2) shaming over not seeing patients in person; (3) lack of clear and consistent communication from leadership on pandemic-related practice changes; (4) opinions that personal protective equipment (PPE) use by HCPs causes fear or is unnecessary; (5) forcing in-person care without appropriate PPE; (6) the risk of exposure to asymptomatic individuals as it relates to opening clinics; (7) media gag orders; (8) pay and benefit reductions; (9) spreading of misinformation about the COVID-19 pandemic; and (10) workload expectations. The 11th scenario addresses HCPs' psychological and physical reactions to this challenging and prolonged stressful situation. We close by discussing the need for support and compassion at this difficult and unpredictable time and by offering suggestions to foster resilience and feelings of self-efficacy among HCPs.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Professional-Patient Relations , COVID-19/psychology , Communication , Empathy , Humans , Respect , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control
19.
Front Public Health ; 8: 509, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-846465

ABSTRACT

On 9 March 2020, Italy passed the Prime Minister's Decree n. 648, establishing urgent measures to contain the transmission of COVID-19 and prevent biological hazards, including very restrictive interventions on public Holy Masses and funerals. Italy banned burial procedures based (i) on the recent acknowledgment about the virus environmental stability as well as (ii) its national civil contingency plan. Hence, only the cremation process is admitted for COVID-19 deaths. Viewing of the body is permitted only for mourners, which are allowed to perform the prayer at the closing of the coffin and the prayer at the tomb (cf. Rite of Succession, first part n. 3 and n. 5). The dead cannot be buried in their personal clothes; however, priests have been authorized to put the family clothes on top of the corpse, as if they were dressed. Burying personal items is also illegal. The dignity of the dead, their cultural and religious traditions, and their families should be always respected and protected. Among all the threats, COVID-19 epidemic in Italy revealed the fragility of human beings under enforced isolation and, for the first time, the painful deprivation of families to accompany their loved ones to the last farewell. Ethics poses new challenges in times of epidemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Respect , SARS-CoV-2
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