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1.
Med Pr ; 72(6): 721-728, 2021 Dec 22.
Article in Polish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599921

ABSTRACT

Intensive care units are characterized by the high risk of infections in patients. Pneumonia is one of the most common forms of infection with a high risk of death. Hence, to improve patient safety, specific packages of procedures, the so-called "bundle care," are recommended by experts in the field. The usage of selected protective procedures carries the risk of transmitting microbes from patients to staff, which in the case of pathogens such as SARS-CoV-2 can have serious health consequences for staff. Therefore, medical staff of intensive care units should strictly follow recommendation concerning healthcare workers safety and the rules of isolation, which in the current pandemic should be supplemented with specific elements. The paper presents an overview of the optimization of patient care and staff safety within the so-called "bundle care" in the COVID-19 pandemic. Med Pr. 2021;72(6):721-8.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Health Personnel , Humans , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Curr Opin Crit Care ; 28(1): 9-16, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573943

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: More than 230 million people have tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 infection globally by September 2021. The infection affects primarily the function of the respiratory system, where ∼20% of infected individuals develop coronavirus-19 disease (COVID-19) pneumonia. This review provides an update on the pathophysiology of the COVID-19 acute lung injury. RECENT FINDINGS: In patients with COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to the intensive care unit, the PaO2/FiO2 ratio is typically <26.7 kPa (200 mmHg), whereas lung volume appears relatively unchanged. This hypoxaemia is likely determined by a heterogeneous mismatch of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion, mainly associated with immunothrombosis, endothelialitis and neovascularisation. During the disease, lung weight, elastance and dead space can increase, affecting respiratory drive, effort and dyspnoea. In some severe cases, COVID-19 pneumonia may lead to irreversible pulmonary fibrosis. SUMMARY: This review summarises the fundamental pathophysiological features of COVID-19 in the context of the respiratory system. It provides an overview of the key clinical manifestations of COVID-19 pneumonia, including gas exchange impairment, altered pulmonary mechanics and implications of abnormal chemical and mechanical stimuli. It also critically discusses the clinical implications for mechanical ventilation therapy.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury , COVID-19 , Humans , Lung , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6641-6652, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544314

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury (AKI) may develop in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is associated with in-hospital death. We investigated the incidence of AKI in 223 hospitalized COVID-19 patients and analyzed the influence factors of AKI. The incidence of cytokine storm syndrome and its correlation with other clinicopathologic variables were also investigated. We retrospectively enrolled adult patients with virologically confirmed COVID-19 who were hospitalized at three hospitals in Wuhan and Guizhou, China between February 13, 2020, and April 8, 2020. We included 124 patients with moderate COVID-19 and 99 with severe COVID-19. AKI was present in 35 (15.7%) patients. The incidence of AKI was 30.3% for severe COVID-19 and 4.0% for moderate COVID-19 (p < 0.001). Furthermore, cytokine storm was found in 30 (13.5%) patients and only found in the severe group. Kidney injury at admission (odds ratio [OR]: 3.132, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.150-8.527; p = 0.025), cytokine storm (OR: 4.234, 95% CI: 1.361-13.171; p = 0.013), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (OR: 7.684, 95% CI: 2.622-22.523; p < 0.001) were influence factors of AKI. Seventeen (48.6%) patients who received invasive mechanical ventilation developed AKI, of whom 64.7% (11/17) died. Up to 86.7% of AKI patients with cytokine storms may develop a secondary bacterial infection. The leukocyte counts were significantly higher in AKI patients with cytokine storm than in those without (13.0 × 109/L, interquartile range [IQR] 11.3 vs. 8.3 × 109/L, IQR 7.5, p = 0.005). Approximately 1/6 patients with COVID-19 eventually develop AKI. Kidney injury at admission, cytokine storm and ARDS are influence factors of AKI. Cytokine storm and secondary bacterial infections may be responsible for AKI development in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Bacterial Infections/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Adult , Aged , China , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
5.
Artif Organs ; 45(12): 1522-1532, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526346

ABSTRACT

Disturbed oxygenation is foremost the leading clinical presentation in COVID-19 patients. However, a small proportion also develop carbon dioxide removal problems. The Advanced Organ Support (ADVOS) therapy (ADVITOS GmbH, Munich, Germany) uses a less invasive approach by combining extracorporeal CO2 -removal and multiple organ support for the liver and the kidneys in a single hemodialysis device. The aim of our study is to evaluate the ADVOS system as treatment option in-COVID-19 patients with multi-organ failure and carbon dioxide removal problems. COVID-19 patients suffering from severe respiratory insufficiency, receiving at least two treatments with the ADVOS multi system (ADVITOS GmbH, Munich, Germany), were eligible for study inclusion. Briefly, these included patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) according to KDIGO guidelines, and moderate or severe ARDS according to the Berlin definition, who were on invasive mechanical ventilation for more than 72 hours. In total, nine COVID-19 patients (137 ADVOS treatment sessions with a median of 10 treatments per patient) with moderate to severe ARDS and carbon dioxide removal problems were analyzed. During the ADVOS treatments, a rapid correction of acid-base balance and a continuous CO2 removal could be observed. We observed a median continuous CO2 removal of 49.2 mL/min (IQR: 26.9-72.3 mL/min) with some treatments achieving up to 160 mL/min. The CO2 removal significantly correlated with blood flow (Pearson 0.421; P < .001), PaCO2 (0.341, P < .001) and HCO 3 - levels (0.568, P < .001) at the start of the treatment. The continuous treatment led to a significant reduction in PaCO2 from baseline to the last ADVOS treatment. In conclusion, it was feasible to remove CO2 using the ADVOS system in our cohort of COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure. This efficient removal of CO2 was achieved at blood flows up to 300 mL/min using a conventional hemodialysis catheter and without a membrane lung or a gas phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Carbon Dioxide/blood , Extracorporeal Circulation/instrumentation , Lung/physiopathology , Multiple Organ Failure/therapy , Renal Dialysis/instrumentation , Respiration, Artificial , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Extracorporeal Circulation/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/physiopathology , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
6.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e048591, 2021 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495462

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Pre-emptive inhaled antibiotics may be effective to reduce the occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia among critically ill patients. Meta-analysis of small sample size trials showed a favourable signal. Inhaled antibiotics are associated with a reduced emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the benefit of a 3-day course of inhaled antibiotics among patients undergoing invasive mechanical ventilation for more than 3 days on the occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Academic, investigator-initiated, parallel two group arms, double-blind, multicentre superiority randomised controlled trial. Patients invasively ventilated more than 3 days will be randomised to receive 20 mg/kg inhaled amikacin daily for 3 days or inhaled placebo (0.9% Sodium Chloride). Occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia will be recorded based on a standardised diagnostic framework from randomisation to day 28 and adjudicated by a centralised blinded committee. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The protocol and amendments have been approved by the regional ethics review board and French competent authorities (Comité de protection des personnes Ouest I, No.2016-R29). All patients will be included after informed consent according to French law. Results will be disseminated in international scientific journals. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBERS: EudraCT 2016-001054-17 and NCT03149640.


Subject(s)
Amikacin , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated , Administration, Inhalation , Amikacin/administration & dosage , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/prevention & control , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
8.
Respir Care ; 66(12): 1898-1911, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485304

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prone positioning is a therapy utilized globally to improve gas exchange, minimize ventilator-induced lung injury, and reduce mortality in ARDS, particularly during the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Whereas the respiratory benefits of prone positioning in ARDS have been accepted, the concurrent complications could be undervalued. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the adverse events (AEs) related to prone positioning in ARDS and, secondarily, to collect strategies and recommendations to mitigate these AEs. METHODS: In this scoping review, we searched recommendation documents and original studies published between June 2013 and November 2020 from 6 relevant electronic databases and the websites of intensive care societies. RESULTS: We selected 41 documents from 121 eligible documents, comprising 13 recommendation documents and 28 original studies (involving 1,578 subjects and 994 prone maneuvers). We identified > 40 individual AEs, and the highest-pooled occurrence rates were those of severe desaturation (37.9%), barotrauma (30.5%), pressure sores (29.7%), ventilation-associated pneumonia (28.2%), facial edema (16.7%), arrhythmia (15.4%), hypotension (10.2%), and peripheral nerve injuries (8.1%). The reported mitigation strategies during prone positioning included alternate face rotation (18 [43.9%]), repositioning every 2 h (17 [41.5%]), and the use of pillows under the chest and pelvis (14 [34.1%]). The reported mitigation strategies for performing the prone maneuver comprised one person being at the headboard (23 [56.1%]), the use of a pre-maneuver safety checklist (18 [43.9%]), vital sign monitoring (15 [36.6%]), and ensuring appropriate ventilator settings (12 [29.3%]). CONCLUSIONS: We identified > 40 AEs reported in prone positioning ARDS studies, including additional AEs not yet reported by previous systematic reviews. The pooled AE proportions collected in this review could guide research and clinical practice decisions, and the strategies to mitigate AEs could promote future consensus-based recommendations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Adult , Humans , Patient Positioning , Prone Position , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 29(6): 437-444, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462570

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Dysphonia has been described as a major symptom of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). A literature review examining this topic was undertaken and is presented here, combined with insights from our experience in managing patients with laryngeal complications following mechanical ventilation for severe COVID-19 pneumonitis. RECENT FINDINGS: Naunheim et al. reported that patients who are most at risk of needing intubation with COVID-19 disease are those with patient-specific risk factors and these are at an increased risk for subsequent laryngotracheal injury following intubation (1). In our cohort of 105 patients referred with laryngological symptoms postintubation for COVID-19 pneumonitis, 40% presented as urgent reviews, of which almost half had severe postintubation complications requiring surgery. Perceptual voice ratings and patient-reported voice ratings varied widely, but there was no significant change in voice scores postoperatively. The reflux symptom index (RSI) scores did improve significantly (p = 0.0266). The need for surgery was associated with the presence of comorbidities for instance hypertension, diabetes and obesity in our cohort. This is in support of reported association of comorbidity as a risk factor for intubation and subsequent development of postintubation airway complications. SUMMARY: Dysphonia following COVID-19 infection may have multiple causes. Literature reports demonstrate intubation injury, sensory neuropathy, and postviral neuropathy are associated with voice changes. Our personal experience has confirmed postintubation injury markedly affects glottic function with resultant dysphonia attributable to scar formation, posterior glottic stenosis, granulation and subglottic stenosis. Frequent surgical intervention is required for airway patency and may have short-term further deleterious effects on phonation, although in our cohort this is not statistically significant analysing Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain, Voice Handicap Index-10 or Airway, Voice, Swallow scores. Maximal antireflux medications and advice statistically improved RSI scores postoperatively.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dysphonia , Larynx , Dysphonia/etiology , Dysphonia/therapy , Humans , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
10.
Intensive Care Med ; 47(10): 1167-1168, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453695
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444226

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has caused a certain proportion of patients to be hospitalized in intensive care units (ICU) and may cause musculoskeletal and neurological deficits following intubation and mechanical ventilation. The aim of this study was to quantify and describe the presence of shoulder pain in patients released from hospitals after suffering COVID-19. Patients with positive Apley tests were sent to a physiatrist for a clinical evaluation, ultrasound and electromyography (EMG). This evaluation was completed with a pain scale, joint range and shoulder muscle strength evaluations. Of the one-hundred-sixteen patients, seventy eight entered the respiratory rehabilitation program. Twenty patients were sent to the multidisciplinary shoulder team for positive Apley scratch tests. Of these twenty patients, one had only an EMG, ten had only ultrasounds, seven had an EMG and ultrasound and two did not need complementary tests. The twenty patients were sent to the physical therapist, with all presenting pain and diminished joint range and muscle strength in the affected shoulder. In this context, shoulder pain could be associated with the prone position in the ICU. We suggest time control and position change for patients on mechanical ventilation in a prone position with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiration, Artificial , Humans , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Shoulder Pain/epidemiology , Shoulder Pain/etiology , Survivors
12.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257253, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443836

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Studies have shown that acute kidney injury (AKI) occurrence post SARS-CoV-2 infection is complex and has a poor prognosis. Therefore, more studies are needed to understand the rate and the predications of AKI involvement among hospitalized COVID-19 patients and AKI's impact on prognosis while under different types of medications. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study is a retrospective observational cohort study conducted at Bahrain Defence Force (BDF) Royal Medical Services. Medical records of COVID-19 patients admitted to BDF hospital, treated, and followed up from April 2020 to October 2020 were retrieved. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression with covariate adjustment, and the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence (95% CI) interval were reported. RESULTS: Among 353 patients admitted with COVID-19, 47.6% developed AKI. Overall, 51.8% of patients with AKI died compared to 2.2% of patients who did not develop AKI (p< 0.001 with OR 48.6 and 95% CI 17.2-136.9). Besides, deaths in patients classified with AKI staging were positively correlated and multivariate regression analysis revealed that moderate to severe hypoalbuminemia (<32 g/L) was independently correlated to death in AKI patients with an OR of 10.99 (CI 95% 4.1-29.3, p<0.001). In addition, 78.2% of the dead patients were on mechanical ventilation. Besides age as a predictor of AKI development, diabetes and hypertension were the major risk factors of AKI development (OR 2.04, p<0.01, and 0.05 for diabetes and hypertension, respectively). Also, two or more comorbidities substantially increased the risk of AKI development in COVID-19 patients. Furthermore, high levels upon hospital admission of D-Dimer, Troponin I, and ProBNP and low serum albumin were associated with AKI development. Lastly, patients taking ACEI/ARBs had less chance to develop AKI stage II/III with OR of 0.19-0.27 (p<0.05-0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of AKI in hospitalized COVID-19 patients and the mortality rate among AKI patients were high and correlated with AKI staging. Furthermore, laboratory testing for serum albumin, hypercoagulability and cardiac injury markers maybe indicative for AKI development. Therefore, clinicians should be mandated to perform such tests on admission and follow-up in hospitalized patients.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/metabolism , Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , Adult , Aged , Bahrain/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/trends , Hospitals , Humans , Incidence , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
13.
ASAIO J ; 67(10): 1097-1099, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443141

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 can be associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome, which increases the likelihood of morbidity and mortality. Ventilator-induced lung injury is a known complication of mechanical ventilation (MV) and can further compound lung injury and recovery. Escalation to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can be required in patients who deteriorate on MV. We report our experience with complete avoidance of MV using an ECMO First strategy deployed in an awake nonintubated COVID-19 patient with severe pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Lung Injury/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Humans , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury/etiology , Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury/prevention & control
14.
JAMA ; 326(11): 1013-1023, 2021 09 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441906

ABSTRACT

Importance: In patients who require mechanical ventilation for acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, further reduction in tidal volumes, compared with conventional low tidal volume ventilation, may improve outcomes. Objective: To determine whether lower tidal volume mechanical ventilation using extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal improves outcomes in patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Design, Setting, and Participants: This multicenter, randomized, allocation-concealed, open-label, pragmatic clinical trial enrolled 412 adult patients receiving mechanical ventilation for acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, of a planned sample size of 1120, between May 2016 and December 2019 from 51 intensive care units in the UK. Follow-up ended on March 11, 2020. Interventions: Participants were randomized to receive lower tidal volume ventilation facilitated by extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for at least 48 hours (n = 202) or standard care with conventional low tidal volume ventilation (n = 210). Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was all-cause mortality 90 days after randomization. Prespecified secondary outcomes included ventilator-free days at day 28 and adverse event rates. Results: Among 412 patients who were randomized (mean age, 59 years; 143 [35%] women), 405 (98%) completed the trial. The trial was stopped early because of futility and feasibility following recommendations from the data monitoring and ethics committee. The 90-day mortality rate was 41.5% in the lower tidal volume ventilation with extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal group vs 39.5% in the standard care group (risk ratio, 1.05 [95% CI, 0.83-1.33]; difference, 2.0% [95% CI, -7.6% to 11.5%]; P = .68). There were significantly fewer mean ventilator-free days in the extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal group compared with the standard care group (7.1 [95% CI, 5.9-8.3] vs 9.2 [95% CI, 7.9-10.4] days; mean difference, -2.1 [95% CI, -3.8 to -0.3]; P = .02). Serious adverse events were reported for 62 patients (31%) in the extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal group and 18 (9%) in the standard care group, including intracranial hemorrhage in 9 patients (4.5%) vs 0 (0%) and bleeding at other sites in 6 (3.0%) vs 1 (0.5%) in the extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal group vs the control group. Overall, 21 patients experienced 22 serious adverse events related to the study device. Conclusions and Relevance: Among patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, the use of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal to facilitate lower tidal volume mechanical ventilation, compared with conventional low tidal volume mechanical ventilation, did not significantly reduce 90-day mortality. However, due to early termination, the study may have been underpowered to detect a clinically important difference. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02654327.


Subject(s)
Carbon Dioxide/blood , Extracorporeal Circulation , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Aged , Early Termination of Clinical Trials , Extracorporeal Circulation/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/mortality , Tidal Volume
15.
BMC Pulm Med ; 21(1): 307, 2021 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440925

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The main clinical consequences of severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection are pneumonia and respiratory failure even requiring mechanical ventilation. In this context, the lung parenchyma is highly prone to ventilator-related injury, with pneumothorax and persistent air leak as the most serious adverse events. So far, endobronchial valve (EBV) positioning has proved efficacious in treating air leaks with a high success rate. CASE PRESENTATION: We report, for the first time, two cases of patients affected by SARS-CoV-2-related pneumonia complicated with bacterial super-infection, experiencing pneumothorax and persistent air leaks after invasive mechanical ventilation. Despite the severity of respiratory failure both patients underwent rigid interventional bronchoscopy and were successfully treated through EBV positioning. CONCLUSIONS: Persistent air leaks may result from lung tissue damage due to a complex interaction between inflammation and ventilator-related injury (VILI), especially in the advanced stages of ARDS. EBV positioning seems to be a feasible and effective minimally invasive therapeutic option for treating this subset of patients.


Subject(s)
Bronchial Fistula/surgery , COVID-19/therapy , Pleural Diseases/surgery , Pneumothorax/surgery , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Aged , Bronchoscopy/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Respiratory Tract Fistula/surgery , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
16.
Crit Care Clin ; 37(4): 749-776, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433017

ABSTRACT

The pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is marked by inflammation-mediated disruptions in alveolar-capillary permeability, edema formation, reduced alveolar clearance and collapse/derecruitment, reduced compliance, increased pulmonary vascular resistance, and resulting gas exchange abnormalities due to shunting and ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Mechanical ventilation, especially in the setting of regional disease heterogeneity, can propagate ventilator-associated injury patterns including barotrauma/volutrauma and atelectrauma. Lung injury due to the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 resembles other causes of ARDS, though its initial clinical characteristics may include more profound hypoxemia and loss of dyspnea perception with less radiologically-evident lung injury, a pattern not described previously in ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Injury , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Lung , Lung Injury/etiology , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Artif Organs ; 45(12): 1522-1532, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429491

ABSTRACT

Disturbed oxygenation is foremost the leading clinical presentation in COVID-19 patients. However, a small proportion also develop carbon dioxide removal problems. The Advanced Organ Support (ADVOS) therapy (ADVITOS GmbH, Munich, Germany) uses a less invasive approach by combining extracorporeal CO2 -removal and multiple organ support for the liver and the kidneys in a single hemodialysis device. The aim of our study is to evaluate the ADVOS system as treatment option in-COVID-19 patients with multi-organ failure and carbon dioxide removal problems. COVID-19 patients suffering from severe respiratory insufficiency, receiving at least two treatments with the ADVOS multi system (ADVITOS GmbH, Munich, Germany), were eligible for study inclusion. Briefly, these included patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) according to KDIGO guidelines, and moderate or severe ARDS according to the Berlin definition, who were on invasive mechanical ventilation for more than 72 hours. In total, nine COVID-19 patients (137 ADVOS treatment sessions with a median of 10 treatments per patient) with moderate to severe ARDS and carbon dioxide removal problems were analyzed. During the ADVOS treatments, a rapid correction of acid-base balance and a continuous CO2 removal could be observed. We observed a median continuous CO2 removal of 49.2 mL/min (IQR: 26.9-72.3 mL/min) with some treatments achieving up to 160 mL/min. The CO2 removal significantly correlated with blood flow (Pearson 0.421; P < .001), PaCO2 (0.341, P < .001) and HCO 3 - levels (0.568, P < .001) at the start of the treatment. The continuous treatment led to a significant reduction in PaCO2 from baseline to the last ADVOS treatment. In conclusion, it was feasible to remove CO2 using the ADVOS system in our cohort of COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure. This efficient removal of CO2 was achieved at blood flows up to 300 mL/min using a conventional hemodialysis catheter and without a membrane lung or a gas phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Carbon Dioxide/blood , Extracorporeal Circulation/instrumentation , Lung/physiopathology , Multiple Organ Failure/therapy , Renal Dialysis/instrumentation , Respiration, Artificial , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Extracorporeal Circulation/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/physiopathology , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
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