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1.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 90(3)2020 Sep 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745210

ABSTRACT

'Tree-in-bud' (TIB) appearance in computed tomography (CT) chest is most commonly a manifestation of infection. We here describe an unusual cause of TIB during the COVID-19 pandemic. A young male patient who had a history of fever, cough, and respiratory distress presented in the emergency department. As these symptoms matched with coronavirus infection, the COVID-19 test was done, which was found negative. He was then moved to the intensive care unit where he developed severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and was put on mechanical ventilation. Further workup did not reveal any source of infection, as all his cultures were negative, but his CT chest showed a tree-in-bud appearance. After obtaining a detailed history from his friends, the patient was found a chronic abuser of inhaled cocaine and treated with intravenous steroids. Subsequently, he was weaned from the ventilator and discharged from the intensive care unit after becoming asymptomatic.


Subject(s)
Cocaine Smoking/adverse effects , Cocaine-Related Disorders/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Lung Injury/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/diagnostic imaging , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Cocaine-Related Disorders/complications , Diagnosis, Differential , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Lung Injury/etiology , Lung Injury/therapy , Male , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/therapy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
2.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 637, 2020 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733046

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: An ongoing outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is spreading globally. Recently, several articles have mentioned that the early acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by COVID-19 significantly differ from those of ARDS due to other causes. Actually, we newly observed that some mechanically ventilated COVID-19 patients recovering from severe ARDS (more than 14 days after invasive ventilation) often experienced evidently gradual increases in CO2 retention and minute ventilation. However, the underlying mechanics remain unclear. CASE PRESENTATION: To explain these pathophysiological features and discuss the ventilatory strategy during the late phase of severe ARDS in COVID-19 patients, we first used a metabolic module on a General Electric R860 ventilator (Engstrom Carestation; GE Healthcare, USA) to monitor parameters related to gas metabolism, lung mechanics and physiological dead space in two COVID-19 patients. We found that remarkably decreased ventilatory efficiency (e.g., the ratio of dead space to tidal volume 70-80%, arterial to end-tidal CO2 difference 18-23 mmHg and ventilatory ratio 3-4) and hypermetabolism (oxygen consumption 300-400 ml/min, CO2 elimination 200-300 ml/min) may explain why these patients experienced more severe respiratory distress and CO2 retention in the late phase of ARDS caused by COVID-19. CONCLUSION: During the recovery period of ARDS among mechanically-ventilated COVID-19 patients, attention should be paid to the monitoring of physiological dead space and metabolism. Tidal volume (8-9 ml/kg) could be increased appropriately under the limited plateau pressure; however, barotrauma should still be kept in mind.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/therapy , Aged , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Female , Humans , Monitoring, Physiologic , Oxygen Consumption , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Tidal Volume , Ventilators, Mechanical
3.
Trials ; 21(1): 743, 2020 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-731238

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to explore the effectiveness and safety of high dose dexamethasone treatment for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome secondary to SARS-Cov-2 pneumonia. TRIAL DESIGN: Multicentre, randomized clinical trial, controlled, open label, parallel group, to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of high dose dexamethasone in adult patients with confirmed COVID-19, with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. PARTICIPANTS: We will include patients with SARS-Cov-2 pneumonia who develop acute respiratory distress syndrome, in several intensive care units (ICU) in Buenos Aires, Argentina (CEMIC, Clinica Bazterrica, Sanatorio Sagrado Corazon) Inclusion criteria: Men and women, age ≥ 18 years old. Confirmed diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection, by RT-PCR. Diagnosis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (hypoxemic respiratory failure not explained by cardiac disease + PaO2/FiO2 ratio < 300 with a Positive End-Expiratory Pressure ≥ 5 cm H2O + bilateral pulmonary infiltrates) Length of mechanical ventilation of at least 72 hours Informed consent (next of kin / legal guardian) Exclusion criteria: Pregnant or breast-feeding women. Terminal disease (advanced cancer; under palliative care; cardiovascular, respiratory, or renal disease with a life expectancy less ≤ 1 year). Therapeutic limitation (advance directives or do not resuscitate order) Severe immunosuppression (HIV infection, long-term use of immunosuppressive agents, active cancer). Patients under chronic treatment with glucocorticoids for other diseases (≥ 8 mg prednisone, or equivalent) Participation in another randomized clinical trial. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: Eligible patients will be randomized to receive standard ICU patient care (group 1) or standard ICU patient care plus high dose dexamethasone (group 2). Group 1: dexamethasone up to 6 mg/24 hours for up to 10 days + ventilatory, hemodynamic, nutritional, and antimicrobial support according to international guidelines. Group 2: dexamethasone 16 mg/24 hours for 5 days followed by dexamethasone 8 mg/24 hours for 5 days + ventilatory, hemodynamic, nutritional, and antimicrobial support according to international guidelines. MAIN OUTCOME: The main result is ventilator-free days at 28 days (Days without ventilator support in the first 28 days following randomization). Secondary outcomes are 28-days and 90-days mortality, frequency of nosocomial infections in the first 28 days after randomization, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score variation and prone position in the first 10-days, viral shedding 28-days after randomization, and delirium and muscle weakness at ICU discharge. RANDOMISATION: Treatment will be assigned according to site stratified randomization by permuted random blocks sequence 1:1 generated with a table in R language concealed in a randomization tool in REDCap (Research Electronic Data CAPture) platform. BLINDING (MASKING): This is an open trial, so no masking of treatment assignment will be used. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): Assuming a 3 days difference in ventilator-free days between treatment groups, with a mean of 9 days, and a standard deviation of 9 days; the necessary sample size would be 284 subjects (142 per group), with a power of 80% and a two-tailed alpha error of 0.05. TRIAL STATUS: The protocol with code 1264, version 3.0 on date: May 13, 2020 is approved by the local Ethics Committee. The trial is in the recruitment phase. Recruitment began May 22, 2020 and is anticipated to be complete by the end of December 2021. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial was registered under the title "Dexamethasone for COVID-19 Related ARDS: a Multicenter, Randomized Clinical Trial" with ClinicalTrials number NCT04395105, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04395105 , registered on 20 May 2020. FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/drug therapy , Argentina , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Delirium/epidemiology , Humans , Mortality , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Pandemics , Patient Positioning , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Prone Position , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Virus Shedding
4.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 1869-1877, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-730432

ABSTRACT

Critically ill patients with coronavirus diseases 2019 (COVID-19) are of grave concern. Those patients usually underwent a stage of excessive inflammation before developing acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this study, we test the hypothesis that short-term, low-to-moderate-dose corticosteroids would benefit patients when used in the early phase of excessive inflammation, namely, the therapeutic window. Among a Shanghai cohort and a validation cohort, we enrolled COVID-19 patients showing marked radiographic progression. Short-term, low-to-moderate-dose corticosteroids were considered for them. After identifying the possible markers for the therapeutic window, we then divided the patients, based on whether they were treated with corticosteroids within the therapeutic window, into the early-start group and control group. We identified that the therapeutic window for corticosteroids was characterized by a marked radiographic progression and lactase dehydrogenase (LDH) less than two times the upper limit of normal (ULN). The Shanghai cohort comprised of 68 patients, including 47 in the early-start group and 21 in the control group. The proportion of patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation was significantly lower in the early-start group than in the control group (10.6% vs. 33.3%, difference, 22.7%, 95% confidence interval 2.6-44.8%). Among the validation cohort of 51 patients, similar difference of the primary outcome was observed (45.0% vs. 74.2%, P = 0.035). Among COVID-19 patients with marked radiologic progression, short-term, low-to-moderate-dose corticosteroids benefits patients with LDH levels of less than two times the ULN, who may be in the early phase of excessive inflammation.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Biomarkers , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disease Progression , Humans , Inflammation/prevention & control , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Radiography , Reproducibility of Results , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Treatment Outcome
5.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord ; 20(1): 389, 2020 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-730201

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Fulminant (life-threatening) COVID-19 can be associated with acute respiratory failure (ARF), multi-system organ failure and cytokine release syndrome (CRS). We present a rare case of fulminant COVID-19 associated with reverse-takotsubo-cardiomyopathy (RTCC) that improved with therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE). CASE PRESENTATION: A 40 year old previous healthy male presented in the emergency room with 4 days of dry cough, chest pain, myalgias and fatigue. He progressed to ARF requiring high-flow-nasal-cannula (flow: 60 L/minute, fraction of inspired oxygen: 40%). Real-Time-Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (RT-PCR) assay confirmed COVID-19 and chest X-ray showed interstitial infiltrates. Biochemistry suggested CRS: increased C-reactive protein, lactate dehydrogenase, ferritin and interleukin-6. Renal function was normal but lactate levels were elevated. Electrocardiogram demonstrated non-specific changes and troponin-I levels were slightly elevated. Echocardiography revealed left ventricular (LV) basal and midventricular akinesia with apex sparing (LV ejection fraction: 30%) and depressed cardiac output (2.8 L/min) consistent with a rare variant of stress-related cardiomyopathy: RTCC. His ratio of partial arterial pressure of oxygen to fractional inspired concentration of oxygen was < 120. He was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for mechanical ventilation and vasopressors, plus antivirals (lopinavir/ritonavir), and prophylactic anticoagulation. Infusion of milrinone failed to improve his cardiogenic shock (day-1). Thus, rescue TPE was performed using the Spectra Optia™ Apheresis System equipped with the Depuro D2000 Adsorption Cartridge (Terumo BCT Inc., USA) without protective antibodies. Over 5 days he received daily TPE (each lasting 4 hours). His lactate levels, oxygenation, and LV function normalized and he was weaned off vasopressors. His inflammation markers improved, and he was extubated on day-7. RT-PCR was negative on day-17. He was discharged to home isolation in good condition. CONCLUSION: Stress-cardiomyopathy may complicate the course of fulminant COVID-19 with associated CRS. If inotropic therapy fails, TPE without protective antibodies may help rescue the critically ill patient.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Cardiotonic Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Plasma Exchange , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/therapy , Shock, Cardiogenic/therapy , Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy/therapy , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnosis , Drug Combinations , Echocardiography , Humans , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , Shock, Cardiogenic/etiology , Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy/diagnostic imaging , Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy/etiology
6.
Biomolecules ; 10(8)2020 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-717704

ABSTRACT

Recently, the stabilization of the endothelium has been explicitly identified as a therapeutic goal in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Adrecizumab (HAM8101) is a first-in-class humanized monoclonal anti-Adrenomedullin (anti-ADM) antibody, targeting the sepsis- and inflammation-based vascular and capillary leakage. Within a "treatment on a named-patient basis" approach, Adrecizumab was administered to eight extreme-critically ill COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The patients received a single dose of Adrecizumab, which was administered between 1 and 3 days after the initiation of mechanical ventilation. The SOFA (median 12.5) and SAPS-II (median 39) scores clearly documented the population at highest risk. Moreover, six of the patients suffered from acute renal failure, of whom five needed renal replacement therapy. The length of follow-up ranged between 13 and 27 days. Following the Adrecizumab administration, one patient in the low-dose group died at day 4 due to fulminant pulmonary embolism, while four were in stable condition, and three were discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU). Within 12 days, the SOFA score, as well as the disease severity score (range 0-16, mirroring critical resources in the ICU, with higher scores indicating more severe illness), decreased in five out of the seven surviving patients (in all high-dose patients). The PaO2/FiO2 increased within 12 days, while the inflammatory parameters C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and interleukin-6 decreased. Importantly, the mortality was lower than expected and calculated by the SOFA score. In conclusion, in this preliminary uncontrolled case series of eight shock patients with life-threatening COVID-19 and ARDS, the administration of Adrecizumab was followed by a favorable outcome. Although the non-controlled design and the small sample size preclude any definitive statement about the potential efficacy of Adrecizumab in critically ill COVID-19 patients, the results of this case series are encouraging.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/drug therapy , Sepsis/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Critical Illness , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Sepsis/etiology
7.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 1869-1877, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713723

ABSTRACT

Critically ill patients with coronavirus diseases 2019 (COVID-19) are of grave concern. Those patients usually underwent a stage of excessive inflammation before developing acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this study, we test the hypothesis that short-term, low-to-moderate-dose corticosteroids would benefit patients when used in the early phase of excessive inflammation, namely, the therapeutic window. Among a Shanghai cohort and a validation cohort, we enrolled COVID-19 patients showing marked radiographic progression. Short-term, low-to-moderate-dose corticosteroids were considered for them. After identifying the possible markers for the therapeutic window, we then divided the patients, based on whether they were treated with corticosteroids within the therapeutic window, into the early-start group and control group. We identified that the therapeutic window for corticosteroids was characterized by a marked radiographic progression and lactase dehydrogenase (LDH) less than two times the upper limit of normal (ULN). The Shanghai cohort comprised of 68 patients, including 47 in the early-start group and 21 in the control group. The proportion of patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation was significantly lower in the early-start group than in the control group (10.6% vs. 33.3%, difference, 22.7%, 95% confidence interval 2.6-44.8%). Among the validation cohort of 51 patients, similar difference of the primary outcome was observed (45.0% vs. 74.2%, P = 0.035). Among COVID-19 patients with marked radiologic progression, short-term, low-to-moderate-dose corticosteroids benefits patients with LDH levels of less than two times the ULN, who may be in the early phase of excessive inflammation.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Biomarkers , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disease Progression , Humans , Inflammation/prevention & control , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Radiography , Reproducibility of Results , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Treatment Outcome
8.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(8)2020 Aug 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713318

ABSTRACT

A 33-year-old pregnant woman was hospitalised with fever, cough, myalgia and dyspnoea at 23.5 weeks of gestation (WG). Development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mandated invasive mechanical ventilation. A nasopharyngeal swab proved positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 by reverse transcription-PCR. The patient developed hypertension and biological disorders suggesting pre-eclampsia and HELLP (haemolysis, elevated liver enzyme levels and low platelet levels) syndrome. Pre-eclampsia was subsequently ruled out by a low ratio of serum soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 to placental growth factor. Given the severity of ARDS, delivery by caesarean section was contemplated. Because the ratio was normal and the patient's respiratory condition stabilised, delivery was postponed. She recovered after 10 days of mechanical ventilation. She spontaneously delivered a healthy boy at 33.4 WG. Clinical and laboratory manifestations of COVID-19 infection can mimic HELLP syndrome. Fetal extraction should not be systematic in the absence of fetal distress or intractable maternal disease. Successful evolution was the result of a multidisciplinary teamwork.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Live Birth , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Adult , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnostic imaging , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Radiography, Thoracic , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/diagnostic imaging , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/therapy
9.
Arch Bronconeumol ; 56 Suppl 2: 11-18, 2020 07.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-699748

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory tract infection caused by a newly emergent coronavirus, that was first recognized in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. Currently, the World Health Organization (WHO) has defined the infection as a global pandemic and there is a health and social emergency for the management of this new infection. While most people with COVID-19 develop only mild or uncomplicated illness, approximately 14% develop severe disease that requires hospitalization and oxygen support, and 5% require admission to an intensive care unit. In severe cases, COVID-19 can be complicated by the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), sepsis and septic shock, and multiorgan failure. This consensus document has been prepared on evidence-informed guidelines developed by a multidisciplinary panel of health care providers from four Spanish scientific societies (Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine [SEMICYUC], Spanish Society of Pulmonologists [SEPAR], Spanish Society of Emergency [SEMES], Spanish Society of Anesthesiology, Reanimation, and Pain [SEDAR]) with experience in the clinical management of patients with COVID-19 and other viral infections, including SARS, as well as sepsis and ARDS. The document provides clinical recommendations for the noninvasive respiratory support (noninvasive ventilation, high flow oxygen therapy with nasal cannula) in any patient with suspected or confirmed presentation of COVID-19 with acute respiratory failure. This consensus guidance should serve as a foundation for optimized supportive care to ensure the best possible chance for survival and to allow for reliable comparison of investigational therapeutic interventions as part of randomized controlled trials.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Noninvasive Ventilation/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Acute Disease , Adult , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Noninvasive Ventilation/standards , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Societies, Medical , Spain
10.
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak ; 30(6): 46-47, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691103

ABSTRACT

Hypoxemia is the most common cause for hospitalization in COVID-19 patients. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the most common complication in COVID-19 patients. Close monitoring of respiratory decompensation is essential. Supplemental oxygen, high flow nasal canula, non-invasive ventilation and endotracheal intubation are the most commonly suggested methods to improve oxygenation. Early intubation with pre-oxygenation, modified rapid sequence intubation and intubation using a video laryngoscope has been advised as a strategy including lung protective ventilation, prone position ventilation, adequate sedation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Strict personal precautions and challenges related to airway management has been currently studied. The authors summarize here the issues of mechanical ventilation and some strategies to resolve them. Key Words: Mechanical ventilation, COVID-19, Hypoxemia.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Hypoxia/therapy , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Humans , Hypoxia/complications , Pandemics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/complications , Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury/prevention & control
11.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e925047, 2020 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689085

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and compare these parameters in an elderly group with those in a younger group. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective, single-center observational study included 69 hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from a tertiary hospital in Wuhan, China, between January 14, 2020, and February 26, 2020. Epidemiological, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data, as well as treatments, complications, and outcomes were extracted from electronic medical records and compared between elderly patients (aged ≥60 years) and younger patients (aged <60 years). Patients were followed until March 19, 2020. RESULTS Elderly patients had more complications than younger patients, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS; 9/25, 36% vs. 5/44, 11.4%) and cardiac injury (7/25, 28% vs. 1/44, 2.3%), and they were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit (6/25, 24% vs. 2/44, 4.5%). As of March 19, 2020, 60/69 (87%) of the patients had been discharged, 6/69 (8.7%) had died, and 3/69 (4.3%) remained in the hospital. Of those who were discharged or died, the median duration of hospitalization was 13.5 days (interquartile range, 10-18 days). CONCLUSIONS Elderly patients with confirmed COVID-19 were more likely to develop ARDS and cardiac injury than younger patients and were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit. In addition to routine monitoring and respiratory support, cardiac monitoring and supportive care should be a focus in elderly patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Age Factors , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiology , Combined Modality Therapy , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Heart Diseases/etiology , Humans , Inpatients , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/epidemiology , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
13.
Pneumologie ; 74(7): 423-428, 2020 Jul.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680639

ABSTRACT

We report the case of a 60-year old female patient with advanced severe lung injury as a consequence of COVID-19-pneumonia. The patient was initially treated with highflow oxygen via nasal cannula (HFNC) and CPAP for two days but had to be intubated and mechanically ventilated. After failure of mechanical ventilation because of persistant severe hypoxemia treatment was switched to ECMO which was applicated for 24 days. Prognostic parameters indicated a favourable trend after day 14. After discontinuation of ECMO and 11 days of intermittent assisted ventilation via tracheostoma and low dose oxygen (1 l/min), the patient could be transferred to rehabilitation. The last chest radiograph prior to transferral revealed a nearly complete resolution of bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Our case demonstrates that severe COVID-19-associated lung injury can be reversible even after prolonged ECMO.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Lung/physiopathology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Treatment Outcome
14.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 56(8)2020 Jul 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680490

ABSTRACT

Treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to COVID-19 pneumonia (CARDS) represents a clinical challenge, requiring often invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). Since the pathogenesis of CARDS it probably involves a direct viral attack to pulmonary and endothelium cells, and immune-mediated inflammation with dysfunctional coagulation, it was suggested to interfere with interleukin-6 (IL-6) activity by using the IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody tocilizumab (TCZ). We reported the case of a 54-year-old 100 kg male COVID-19 patient (BMI 29) with severe respiratory insufficiency featuring dyspnea and hypoxia (SpO2 89% on room; PaO2 53 mmHg). Despite treatment with antiviral and non-invasive ventilation (NIV), after 24 h there was a progressive worsening of clinical conditions with higher fever (40 °C), increased dyspnea, and hypoxia (PaO2/FiO2 or P/F ratio of 150). The patient was at the limit to be sedated and intubated for IMV. He was treated with tocilizumab (8 mg/Kg i.v., single shot 800 mg) and NIV in the prone positioning. After only 96 h, the clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings showed incredible improvement. There was an important gain in oxygenation (P/F 300), a decrease of C-reactive protein values, and a decrease of the fever. Both the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and the derived NLR ratio dropped down to 44%. Chest imaging confirmed the favorable response. This case suggested that for CARDS management efforts are needed for reducing its underlying inflammatory processes. Through a multiprofessional approach, the combination of IL-6-targeting therapies with calibrated ventilatory strategies may represent a winning strategy for improving outcomes.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Administration, Intravenous , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Combined Modality Therapy , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Humans , Hypoxia/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Noninvasive Ventilation/methods , Pandemics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/diagnostic imaging , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/therapy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Treatment Outcome
15.
Int J Med Sci ; 17(12): 1773-1782, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680183

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is one of the major reasons for ventilation and intubation management of COVID-19 patients but there is no noninvasive imaging monitoring protocol for ARDS. In this study, we aimed to develop a noninvasive ARDS monitoring protocol based on traditional quantitative and radiomics approaches from chest CT. Methods: Patients diagnosed with COVID-19 from Jan 20, 2020 to Mar 31, 2020 were enrolled in this study. Quantitative and radiomics data were extracted from automatically segmented regions of interest (ROIs) of infection regions in the lungs. ARDS existence was measured by Pa02/Fi02 <300 in artery blood samples. Three different models were constructed by using the traditional quantitative imaging metrics, radiomics features and their combinations, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to assess the effectiveness of the models. Decision curve analysis (DCA) was used to test the clinical value of the proposed model. Results: The proposed models were constructed using 352 CT images from 86 patients. The median age was 49, and the male proportion was 61.9%. The training dataset and the validation dataset were generated by randomly sampling the patients with a 2:1 ratio. Chi-squared test showed that there was no significant difference in baseline of the enrolled patients between the training and validation datasets. The areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) of the traditional quantitative model, radiomics model and combined model in the validation dataset was 0.91, 0.91 and 0.94, respectively. Accordingly, the sensitivities were 0.55, 0.82 and 0.58, while the specificities were 0.97, 0.86 and 0.98. The DCA curve showed that when threshold probability for a doctor or patients is within a range of 0 to 0.83, the combined model adds more net benefit than "treat all" or "treat none" strategies, while the traditional quantitative model and radiomics model could add benefit in all threshold probability. Conclusions: It is feasible to monitor ARDS from CT images using radiomics or traditional quantitative analysis in COVID-19. The radiomics model seems to be the most practical one for possible clinical use. Multi-center validation with a larger number of samples is recommended in the future.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Adult , Algorithms , Area Under Curve , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Datasets as Topic , Female , Humans , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , ROC Curve , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Sampling Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Translational Medical Research/methods , Workflow
16.
Clin Rheumatol ; 39(9): 2811-2815, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-679749

ABSTRACT

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, further understanding of its complications points towards dysregulated immune response as a major component. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is also a disease of immune dysregulation leading to multisystem compromise. We present a case of new-onset SLE concomitantly with COVID-19 and development of antiphospholipid antibodies. An 18-year-old female that presented with hemodynamic collapse and respiratory failure, progressed to cardiac arrest, and had a pericardial tamponade drained. She then progressed to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, severe ventricular dysfunction, and worsening renal function with proteinuria and hematuria. Further studies showed bilateral pleural effusions, positive antinuclear and antidouble-stranded DNA antibodies, lupus anticoagulant, and anticardiolipin B. C3 and C4 levels were low. SARS-Cov-2 PCR was positive after 2 negative tests. She also developed multiple deep venous thrombosis, in the setting of positive antiphospholipid antibodies and lupus anticoagulant. In terms of pathophysiology, COVID-19 is believed to cause a dysregulated cytokine response which could potentially be exacerbated by the shift in Th1 to Th2 response seen in SLE. Also, it is well documented that viral infections are an environmental factor that contributes to the development of autoimmunity; however, COVID-19 is a new entity, and it is not known if it could trigger autoimmune conditions. Additionally, it is possible that SARS-CoV-2, as it happens with other viruses, might lead to the formation of antiphospholipid antibodies, potentially contributing to the increased rates of thrombosis seen in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiphospholipid Syndrome/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Adolescent , Anemia/etiology , Antibodies, Anticardiolipin/immunology , Antibodies, Antinuclear/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antiphospholipid Syndrome/complications , Antiphospholipid Syndrome/diagnosis , Antiphospholipid Syndrome/therapy , Anuria/etiology , Betacoronavirus , Cardiac Tamponade/diagnostic imaging , Cardiac Tamponade/etiology , Cardiac Tamponade/therapy , Complement C3/immunology , Complement C4/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , DNA/immunology , Echocardiography , Fatal Outcome , Female , Heart Arrest/etiology , Hematuria/etiology , Humans , Lupus Coagulation Inhibitor/immunology , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/blood , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/diagnosis , Pandemics , Patient Positioning , Pericardiocentesis , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prone Position , Proteinuria/etiology , Renal Dialysis , Renal Insufficiency/etiology , Renal Insufficiency/therapy , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/etiology
17.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 26: 1076029620936776, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-657787

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has proven to be particularly challenging given the complex pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2. Early data have demonstrated how the host response to this novel coronavirus leads to the proliferation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, massive endothelial damage, and generalized vascular manifestations. While SARS-CoV-2 primarily targets the upper and lower respiratory tract, other organ systems are also affected. SARS-CoV-2 relies on 2 host cell receptors for successful attachment: angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and transmembrane protease serine 2. Clinicopathologic reports have demonstrated associations between severe COVID-19 and viral coagulopathy, resulting in pulmonary embolism; venous, arterial, and microvascular thrombosis; lung endothelial injury; and associated thrombotic complications leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Viral coagulopathy is not novel given similar observations with SARS classic, including the consumption of platelets, generation of thrombin, and increased fibrin degradation product exhibiting overt disseminated intravascular coagulation-like syndrome. The specific mechanism(s) behind the thrombotic complications in COVID-19 patients has yet to be fully understood. Parenteral anticoagulants, such as heparin and low-molecular-weights heparins, are widely used in the management of COVID-19 patients. Beyond the primary (anticoagulant) effects of these agents, they may exhibit antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and cytoprotective effects. Direct oral anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents are also useful in the management of these patients. Tissue plasminogen activator and other fibrinolytic modalities may also be helpful in the overall management. Catheter-directed thrombolysis can be used in patients developing pulmonary embolism. Further investigations are required to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of COVID-19-associated thrombotic complications.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Thrombophilia/etiology , Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers/pharmacology , Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/etiology , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/physiopathology , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Catheterization, Swan-Ganz , Combined Modality Therapy , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Hyperbaric Oxygenation , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Thrombolytic Therapy/instrumentation , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Thrombophilia/physiopathology , Thrombophilia/therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thrombosis/physiopathology , Venous Thrombosis/virology , Virus Internalization/drug effects
18.
Pneumologie ; 74(7): 423-428, 2020 Jul.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-647907

ABSTRACT

We report the case of a 60-year old female patient with advanced severe lung injury as a consequence of COVID-19-pneumonia. The patient was initially treated with highflow oxygen via nasal cannula (HFNC) and CPAP for two days but had to be intubated and mechanically ventilated. After failure of mechanical ventilation because of persistant severe hypoxemia treatment was switched to ECMO which was applicated for 24 days. Prognostic parameters indicated a favourable trend after day 14. After discontinuation of ECMO and 11 days of intermittent assisted ventilation via tracheostoma and low dose oxygen (1 l/min), the patient could be transferred to rehabilitation. The last chest radiograph prior to transferral revealed a nearly complete resolution of bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Our case demonstrates that severe COVID-19-associated lung injury can be reversible even after prolonged ECMO.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Lung/physiopathology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Treatment Outcome
19.
Front Immunol ; 11: 1518, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-644235

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a member of the genus Betacoronavirus within the family Coronaviridae. It is an enveloped single-stranded positive-sense RNA virus. Since December of 2019, a global expansion of the infection has occurred with widespread dissemination of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). COVID-19 often manifests as only mild cold-like symptomatology, but severe disease with complications occurs in 15% of cases. Respiratory failure occurs in severe disease that can be accompanied by a systemic inflammatory reaction characterized by inflammatory cytokine release. In severe cases, fatality is caused by the rapid development of severe lung injury characteristic of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although ARDS is a complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection, it is not viral replication or infection that causes tissue injury; rather, it is the result of dysregulated hyperinflammation in response to viral infection. This pathology is characterized by intense, rapid stimulation of the innate immune response that triggers activation of the Nod-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome pathway and release of its products including the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-1ß. Here we review the literature that describes the pathogenesis of severe COVID-19 and NLRP3 activation and describe an important role in targeting this pathway for the treatment of severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Inflammasomes/antagonists & inhibitors , Inflammasomes/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Animals , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Heterocyclic Compounds, 4 or More Rings/pharmacology , Heterocyclic Compounds, 4 or More Rings/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/pharmacology , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/therapeutic use , Interleukin-1beta/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Mice , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pyroptosis/drug effects , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/metabolism , Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane/pharmacology , Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane/therapeutic use , Sulfones/pharmacology , Sulfones/therapeutic use
20.
Front Immunol ; 11: 1439, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-644233

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, following a cluster of pneumonia cases in China caused by a novel coronavirus (CoV), named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the infection disseminated worldwide and, on March 11th, 2020, the World Health Organization officially declared the pandemic of the relevant disease named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In Europe, Italy was the first country facing a true health policy emergency, and, as at 6.00 p.m. on May 2nd, 2020, there have been more than 209,300 confirmed cases of COVID-19. Due to the increasing number of patients experiencing a severe outcome, global scientific efforts are ongoing to find the most appropriate treatment. The usefulness of specific anti-rheumatic drugs came out as a promising treatment option together with antiviral drugs, anticoagulants, and symptomatic and respiratory support. For this reason, we feel a duty to share our experience and our knowledge on the use of these drugs in the immune-rheumatologic field, providing in this review the rationale for their use in the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adaptive Immunity/drug effects , Adult , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Interleukin-1/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology
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