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2.
Front Immunol ; 12: 738093, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518484

ABSTRACT

Disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus (COVID-19) led to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. A systemic hyper-inflammation characterizes severe COVID-19 disease, often associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Blood biomarkers capable of risk stratification are of great importance in effective triage and critical care of severe COVID-19 patients. Flow cytometry and next-generation sequencing were done on peripheral blood cells and urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), and cytokines were measured from and mass spectrometry-based proteomics was done on plasma samples from an Indian cohort of COVID-19 patients. Publicly available single-cell RNA sequencing data were analyzed for validation of primary data. Statistical analyses were performed to validate risk stratification. We report here higher plasma abundance of suPAR, expressed by an abnormally expanded myeloid cell population, in severe COVID-19 patients with ARDS. The plasma suPAR level was found to be linked to a characteristic plasma proteome, associated with coagulation disorders and complement activation. Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis to predict mortality identified a cutoff value of suPAR at 1,996.809 pg/ml (odds ratio: 2.9286, 95% confidence interval 1.0427-8.2257). Lower-than-cutoff suPAR levels were associated with a differential expression of the immune transcriptome as well as favorable clinical outcomes, in terms of both survival benefit (hazard ratio: 0.3615, 95% confidence interval 0.1433-0.912) and faster disease remission in our patient cohort. Thus, we identified suPAR as a key pathogenic circulating molecule linking systemic hyperinflammation to the hypercoagulable state and stratifying clinical outcomes in severe COVID-19 patients with ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Receptors, Urokinase Plasminogen Activator/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/immunology , Blood Proteins/analysis , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/immunology , Middle Aged , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Proteome/analysis , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
3.
Crit Care Med ; 49(7): 1149-1158, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494026

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Circulating nucleosomes and their component histones have been implicated as pathogenic in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. However, their role in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome is unknown. DESIGN: We performed a prospective cohort study in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome, with plasma collection within 24 hours of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. We associated nucleosome levels with severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome and with nonpulmonary organ failures and tested for association of nucleosomes with PICU mortality and ventilator-free days at 28 days in univariate and multivariable analyses. We also performed proteomics of DNA-bound plasma proteins in a matched case-control study of septic children with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome in order to identify specific histone proteins elevated in acute respiratory distress syndrome. SETTING: Large academic tertiary-care PICU. PATIENTS: Intubated children meeting Berlin criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We enrolled 333 children with acute respiratory distress syndrome, with 69 nonsurvivors (21%). Plasma nucleosomes were correlated with acute respiratory distress syndrome severity and with the number of nonpulmonary organ failures at acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. Nucleosomes were higher (p < 0.001) in nonsurvivors (0.40 [interquartile range, 0.20-0.71] arbitrary units) relative to survivors (0.10 [interquartile range, 0.04-0.25] arbitrary units). Nucleosomes were associated with PICU mortality in multivariable analysis (adjusted odds ratio 1.84 per 1 sd increase; 95% CI, 1.38-2.45; p < 0.001). Nucleosomes were also associated with a lower probability of being extubated alive by day 28 after multivariable adjustment (adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63-0.88; p = 0.001). Proteomic analysis demonstrated higher levels of the core nucleosome histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 in septic children with acute respiratory distress syndrome, relative to septic children without acute respiratory distress syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma nucleosomes are associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome severity, nonpulmonary organ failures, and worse outcomes in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome.


Subject(s)
Histones/blood , Nucleosomes/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Adolescent , Airway Extubation , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , DNA/blood , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Male , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Proteomics , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Sepsis/blood , Sepsis/complications , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate
4.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20866, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479816

ABSTRACT

A causal relationship between plasma ceramide concentration and respiratory distress symptoms in COVID-19 patients is inferred. In this study, plasma samples of 52 individuals infected with COVID-19 were utilized in a lipidomic analysis. Lipids belonging to the ceramide class exhibited a 400-fold increase in total plasma concentration in infected patients. Further analysis led to the demonstration of concentration dependency for severe COVID-19 respiratory symptoms in a subclass of ceramides. The subclasses Cer(d18:0/24:1), Cer(d18:1/24:1), and Cer(d18:1/22:0) were shown to be increased by 48-, 40-, and 33-fold, respectively, in infected plasma samples and to 116-, 91- and 50-fold, respectively, in plasma samples with respiratory distress. Hence, monitoring plasma ceramide concentration, can be a valuable tool for measuring effects of therapies on COVID-19 respiratory distress patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Ceramides/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Chromatography, Liquid , Drug Design , Female , Humans , Ions , Lipids/chemistry , Male , Metabolomics , Middle Aged , Principal Component Analysis , Software , Tandem Mass Spectrometry , Virus Diseases , Young Adult
5.
Front Immunol ; 12: 687397, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477818

ABSTRACT

Severe COVID-19 is characterized by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)-like hyperinflammation and endothelial dysfunction, that can lead to respiratory and multi organ failure and death. Interstitial lung diseases (ILD) and pulmonary fibrosis confer an increased risk for severe disease, while a subset of COVID-19-related ARDS surviving patients will develop a fibroproliferative response that can persist post hospitalization. Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted lysophospholipase D, largely responsible for the extracellular production of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a pleiotropic signaling lysophospholipid with multiple effects in pulmonary and immune cells. In this review, we discuss the similarities of COVID-19, ARDS and ILDs, and suggest ATX as a possible pathologic link and a potential common therapeutic target.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/blood , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lysophospholipids/metabolism , Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases/blood , Pulmonary Fibrosis/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction/immunology
6.
Biomark Med ; 15(16): 1509-1517, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477715

ABSTRACT

Background: The contribution of endothelial injury in the pathogenesis of COVID-19-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and resulting respiratory failure remains unclear. Plasma endostatin, an endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis and endothelial dysfunction is upregulated during hypoxia, inflammation and progress of pulmonary disease. Aim: To investigate if plasma endostatin is associated to hypoxia, inflammation and 30-day mortality in patients with severe COVID-19 infection. Method: Samples for blood analysis and plasma endostatin quantification were collected from adult patients with ongoing COVID-19 (n = 109) on admission to intensive care unit (day 1). Demographic characteristics and 30-day mortality data were extracted from medical records. The ability of endostatin to predict mortality was analyzed using receiving operating characteristics and Kaplan-Meier analysis with a cutoff at 46.2 ng/ml was used to analyze the association to survival. Results: Plasma endostatin levels correlated with; PaO2/FiO2 (r = -0.3, p < 0.001), arterial oxygen tension (r = -0.2, p = 0.01), lactate (r = 0.2, p = 0.04), C-reactive protein (r = 0.2, p = 0.04), ferritin (r = 0.2, p = 0.09), D-dimer (r = 0.2, p = 0.08) and IL-6 (r = 0.4, p < 0.001). Nonsurvivors at 30 days had higher plasma endostatin levels than survivors (72 ± 26 vs 56 ± 16 ng/ml, p = 0.01). Receiving operating characteristic curve (area under the curve 0.7) showed that plasma endostatin >46.2 ng/ml predicts mortality with a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 71%. In patients with plasma endostatin >46.2 ng/ml probability of survival was lower (p = 0.02) in comparison to those with endostatin <46.2 ng/ml. Conclusion: Our results suggest that plasma endostatin is an early biomarker for disease severity in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endostatins/blood , Hypoxia , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Disease-Free Survival , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/blood , Hypoxia/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Survival Rate
7.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257056, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438346

ABSTRACT

We present an interpretable machine learning algorithm called 'eARDS' for predicting ARDS in an ICU population comprising COVID-19 patients, up to 12-hours before satisfying the Berlin clinical criteria. The analysis was conducted on data collected from the Intensive care units (ICU) at Emory Healthcare, Atlanta, GA and University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN and the Cerner® Health Facts Deidentified Database, a multi-site COVID-19 EMR database. The participants in the analysis consisted of adults over 18 years of age. Clinical data from 35,804 patients who developed ARDS and controls were used to generate predictive models that identify risk for ARDS onset up to 12-hours before satisfying the Berlin criteria. We identified salient features from the electronic medical record that predicted respiratory failure among this population. The machine learning algorithm which provided the best performance exhibited AUROC of 0.89 (95% CI = 0.88-0.90), sensitivity of 0.77 (95% CI = 0.75-0.78), specificity 0.85 (95% CI = 085-0.86). Validation performance across two separate health systems (comprising 899 COVID-19 patients) exhibited AUROC of 0.82 (0.81-0.83) and 0.89 (0.87, 0.90). Important features for prediction of ARDS included minimum oxygen saturation (SpO2), standard deviation of the systolic blood pressure (SBP), O2 flow, and maximum respiratory rate over an observational window of 16-hours. Analyzing the performance of the model across various cohorts indicates that the model performed best among a younger age group (18-40) (AUROC = 0.93 [0.92-0.94]), compared to an older age group (80+) (AUROC = 0.81 [0.81-0.82]). The model performance was comparable on both male and female groups, but performed significantly better on the severe ARDS group compared to the mild and moderate groups. The eARDS system demonstrated robust performance for predicting COVID19 patients who developed ARDS at least 12-hours before the Berlin clinical criteria, across two independent health systems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Machine Learning , Models, Biological , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Records Systems, Computerized , Middle Aged , Oxygen/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Rate , Risk Factors
8.
J Clin Invest ; 130(11): 6151-6157, 2020 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435146

ABSTRACT

Emerging data indicate that complement and neutrophils contribute to the maladaptive immune response that fuels hyperinflammation and thrombotic microangiopathy, thereby increasing coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) mortality. Here, we investigated how complement interacts with the platelet/neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs)/thrombin axis, using COVID-19 specimens, cell-based inhibition studies, and NET/human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC) cocultures. Increased plasma levels of NETs, tissue factor (TF) activity, and sC5b-9 were detected in patients. Neutrophils of patients yielded high TF expression and released NETs carrying active TF. Treatment of control neutrophils with COVID-19 platelet-rich plasma generated TF-bearing NETs that induced thrombotic activity of HAECs. Thrombin or NETosis inhibition or C5aR1 blockade attenuated platelet-mediated NET-driven thrombogenicity. COVID-19 serum induced complement activation in vitro, consistent with high complement activity in clinical samples. Complement C3 inhibition with compstatin Cp40 disrupted TF expression in neutrophils. In conclusion, we provide a mechanistic basis for a pivotal role of complement and NETs in COVID-19 immunothrombosis. This study supports strategies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 that exploit complement or NETosis inhibition.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Complement Membrane Attack Complex , Coronavirus Infections , Extracellular Traps , Neutrophils , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Thromboplastin , Thrombosis , Aged , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19 , Complement Activation/drug effects , Complement Membrane Attack Complex/immunology , Complement Membrane Attack Complex/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Peptides, Cyclic/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Receptor, Anaphylatoxin C5a/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptor, Anaphylatoxin C5a/blood , Receptor, Anaphylatoxin C5a/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombin/immunology , Thrombin/metabolism , Thromboplastin/immunology , Thromboplastin/metabolism , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/virology
9.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 7(1)2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388517

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the major cause of mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. It appears that development of 'cytokine storm' in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia precipitates progression to ARDS. However, severity scores on admission do not predict severity or mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. Our objective was to determine whether patients with SARS-CoV-2 ARDS are clinically distinct, therefore requiring alternative management strategies, compared with other patients with ARDS. We report a single-centre retrospective study comparing the characteristics and outcomes of patients with ARDS with and without SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: Two intensive care unit (ICU) cohorts of patients at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham were analysed: SARS-CoV-2 patients admitted between 11 March and 21 April 2020 and all patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) from bacterial or viral infection who developed ARDS between 1 January 2017 and 1 November 2019. All data were routinely collected on the hospital's electronic patient records. RESULTS: A greater proportion of SARS-CoV-2 patients were from an Asian ethnic group (p=0.002). SARS-CoV-2 patients had lower circulating leucocytes, neutrophils and monocytes (p<0.0001), but higher CRP (p=0.016) on ICU admission. SARS-CoV-2 patients required a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (p=0.01), but had lower vasopressor requirements (p=0.016). DISCUSSION: The clinical syndromes and respiratory mechanics of SARS-CoV-2 and CAP-ARDS are broadly similar. However, SARS-CoV-2 patients initially have a lower requirement for vasopressor support, fewer circulating leukocytes and require prolonged ventilation support. Further studies are required to determine whether the dysregulated inflammation observed in SARS-CoV-2 ARDS may contribute to the increased duration of respiratory failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Critical Care/methods , Patient Outcome Assessment , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Leukocytes/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/metabolism , Neutrophils/metabolism , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Respiratory Mechanics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time , United Kingdom , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use
10.
Jpn J Infect Dis ; 74(4): 293-298, 2021 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380101

ABSTRACT

The prognostic value of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) needs to be clarified. In this retrospective study, COVID-19 patients treated at Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University from January 7 to February 8, 2020 with measurements of serum IL-6 levels within 1 week after admission were included. Data regarding demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory tests, complications, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. Sixty-six patients diagnosed with COVID-19 were included in this study (31 patients were females). They were divided into a normal group (serum IL-6 <10 pg/mL, n = 35) and an abnormal group (serum IL-6 <10 pg/mL, n = 31). Compared with the normal group, the incidence of critical cases (P <0.001), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (P = 0.001), acute cardiac injury (P = 0.002), cardiac insufficiency (P = 0.039), mechanical ventilation rate (P = 0.002), and mortality (P = 0.021) was significantly increased in the abnormal group. Serum IL-6 concentration was an independent predictor of fatal outcome (P = 0.04). The optimal cutoff value of serum IL-6 concentration for predicting fatal outcomes was 26.09 pg/mL (P <0.001). In COVID-19, elevated serum IL-6 levels were associated with critical illness, use of mechanical ventilation, and complications, including heart injury and ARDS, and could predict a fatal outcome. Early detection of serum IL-6 levels after admission should be necessary in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Interleukin-6/blood , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Critical Illness/mortality , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Morbidity , Prognosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
12.
Respir Med ; 187: 106556, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340826

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Galectin-3 is ß-galactoside-binding lectin with several roles in immune-inflammatory response. To date, there is no evidence of Galectin-3 role as a prognostic biomarker in COVID-19 disease. The aim of this study is to clarify the prognostic role of Galectin-3 in patients with COVID 19 acute respiratory failure. METHODS: We enrolled 156 consecutive patients with COVID-19 disease. Routine laboratory test, arterial blood gas, chest X-ray or Computed Tomography and Galectin-3 dosage were performed. The primary outcome was to assess Galectin-3 predictive power for 30-day mortality. Secondary outcomes were 30-day Intensive Care Unit admission and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome stratification according to Galectin-3 dosage. We performed Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests for continuous variables comparison. Fisher's exact test or Chi-square test were used for categorical variables analysis. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves estimated Galectin-3 predictive power for the endpoints. With a fixed cut-off of 35.3 ng/ml, Kaplan-Meier with Log-Rank test and Cox Regression were performed to assess mortality and Intensive Care Unit admission risk. RESULTS: Galectin-3 correlated with many other prognostic predictors tested in our analysis. Moreover, patients with serum levels of Galectin-3 above 35.3 ng/ml had increased risk for mortality, Intensive Care Unit admission and severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates the role of Galectin-3 as a predictor of mortality, Intensive Care Unit access and ARDS stratification in patients with COVID 19 acute respiratory failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Galectins/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Proteins , COVID-19/complications , Critical Care , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Survival Rate
13.
Thromb Haemost ; 121(8): 1031-1042, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1324458

ABSTRACT

Hemostatic changes induced by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support have been yet poorly documented in coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) patients who have a baseline complex hypercoagulable state. In this prospective monocentric study of patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) rescued by ECMO, we performed longitudinal measurements of coagulation and fibrinolysis markers throughout the course of ECMO support in 20 COVID-19 and 10 non-COVID-19 patients. Blood was sampled before and then 24 hours, 7, and 14 days after ECMO implantation. Clinical outcomes were prospectively assessed until discharge from the intensive care unit or death. The median age of participants was 47 (35-56) years, with a median body mass index of 30 (27-35) kg/m2, and a Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score of 12 (8-16). Baseline levels of von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen, factor VIII, prothrombin F1 + 2, thrombin-antithrombin, D-dimer, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) were elevated in both COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 ARDS patients, indicating that endothelial activation, endogenous thrombin generation, and fibrinolysis shutdown occur in all ARDS patients before ECMO implantation. From baseline to day 7, thrombin generation (prothrombin F1 + 2, p < 0.01) and fibrin formation markers (fibrin monomers, p < 0.001) significantly increased, further resulting in significant decreases in platelet count (p < 0.0001) and fibrinogen level (p < 0.001). PAI-1 levels significantly decreased from baseline to day 7 (p < 0.0001) in all ARDS patients. These changes were more marked in COVID-19 patients, resulting in 14 nonfatal and 3 fatal bleeding. Additional studies are warranted to determine whether monitoring of thrombin generation and fibrinolysis markers might help to early predict bleeding complications in COVID-19 patients supported by ECMO.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Fibrinolysis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Female , Hemorrhage/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , von Willebrand Factor/analysis
14.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(12): 4435-4438, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296356

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed at explaining the mechanism of therapeutic effect of Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells (UC-MSC) in subjects with COVID-19 Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Patients with COVID-19 ARDS present with a hyperinflammatory response characterized by high levels of circulating pro-inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor α and ß (TNFα and TNFß). Inflammatory functions of these TNFs can be inhibited by soluble TNF Receptor 2 (sTNFR2). In patients with COVID-19 ARDS, UC-MSC appear to impart a robust anti-inflammatory effect, and treatment is associated with remarkable clinical improvements. We investigated the levels of TNFα, TNFß and sTNFR2 in blood plasma samples collected from subjects with COVID-19 ARDS enrolled in our trial of UC-MSC treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed plasma samples from subjects with COVID-19 ARDS (n=24) enrolled in a Phase 1/2a randomized controlled trial of UC-MSC treatment. Plasma samples were obtained at Day 0 (baseline, before UC-MSC or control infusion), and Day 6 post infusion. Plasma concentrations of sTNFR2, TNFα, and TNFß were evaluated using a quantitative multiplex protein array. RESULTS: Our data indicate that at Day 6 after infusion, UC-MSC recipients develop significantly increased levels of plasma sTNFR2 and significantly decreased levels of TNFα and TNFß, compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: These observations suggest that sTNFR2 plays a mechanistic role in mediating UC-MSC effect on TNFα and TNFß plasma levels, determining a decrease in inflammation in COVID-19 ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Lymphotoxin-alpha/blood , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type II/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , Umbilical Cord/transplantation , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Umbilical Cord/cytology
15.
Front Immunol ; 12: 691879, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282387

ABSTRACT

Increasing human Adenovirus (HAdV) infections complicated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) even fatal outcome were reported in immunocompetent adolescent and adult patients. Here, we characterized the cytokine/chemokine expression profiles of immunocompetent patients complicated with ARDS during HAdV infection and identified biomarkers for disease severity/progression. Forty-eight cytokines/chemokines in the plasma samples from 19 HAdV-infected immunocompetent adolescent and adult patients (ten complicated with ARDS) were measured and analyzed in combination with clinical indices. Immunocompetent patients with ARDS caused by severe acute respiratory disease coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-2, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (panH1N1) or bacteria were included for comparative analyses. Similar indices of disease course/progression were found in immunocompetent patients with ARDS caused by HAdV, SARS-CoV-2 or panH1N infections, whereas the HAdV-infected group showed a higher prevalence of viremia, as well as increased levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK). Expression levels of 33 cytokines/chemokines were increased significantly in HAdV-infected patients with ARDS compared with that in healthy controls, and many of them were also significantly higher than those in SARS-CoV-2-infected and panH1N1-infected patients. Expression of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1ß, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), monokine induced by IFN-γ (MIG), IL-6, macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), IL-10, IL-1α and IL-2Ra was significantly higher in HAdV-infected patients with ARDS than that in those without ARDS, and negatively associated with the ratio of the partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood/fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2). Analyses of the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) showed that expression of IL-10, M-CSF, MIG, HGF, IL-1ß, IFN-γ and IL-2Ra could predict the progression of HAdV infection, with the highest area under the curve (AUC) of 0.944 obtained for IL-10. Of note, the AUC value for the combination of IL-10, IFN-γ, and M-CSF reached 1. In conclusion, the "cytokine storm" occurred during HAdV infection in immunocompetent patients, and expression of IL-10, M-CSF, MIG, HGF, IL-1ß, IFN-γ and IL-2Ra was closely associated with disease severity and could predict disease progression.


Subject(s)
Adenovirus Infections, Human/blood , Cytokines/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Adenovirus Infections, Human/complications , Adenovirus Infections, Human/pathology , Adenoviruses, Human , Adolescent , Adult , Bacteria , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/complications , Bacterial Infections/pathology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/pathology , Male , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Viremia/blood , Viremia/complications , Viremia/pathology , Young Adult
16.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 12606, 2021 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270673

ABSTRACT

Increasing evidence has shown that Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) severity is driven by a dysregulated immunologic response. We aimed to assess the differences in inflammatory cytokines in COVID-19 patients compared to contemporaneously hospitalized controls and then analyze the relationship between these cytokines and the development of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) and mortality. In this cohort study of hospitalized patients, done between March third, 2020 and April first, 2020 at a quaternary referral center in New York City we included adult hospitalized patients with COVID-19 and negative controls. Serum specimens were obtained on the first, second, and third hospital day and cytokines were measured by Luminex. Autopsies of nine cohort patients were examined. We identified 90 COVID-19 patients and 51 controls. Analysis of 48 inflammatory cytokines revealed upregulation of macrophage induced chemokines, T-cell related interleukines and stromal cell producing cytokines in COVID-19 patients compared to the controls. Moreover, distinctive cytokine signatures predicted the development of ARDS, AKI and mortality in COVID-19 patients. Specifically, macrophage-associated cytokines predicted ARDS, T cell immunity related cytokines predicted AKI and mortality was associated with cytokines of activated immune pathways, of which IL-13 was universally correlated with ARDS, AKI and mortality. Histopathological examination of the autopsies showed diffuse alveolar damage with significant mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltration. Additionally, the kidneys demonstrated glomerular sclerosis, tubulointerstitial lymphocyte infiltration and cortical and medullary atrophy. These patterns of cytokine expression offer insight into the pathogenesis of COVID-19 disease, its severity, and subsequent lung and kidney injury suggesting more targeted treatment strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cytokines/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/pathology , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Case-Control Studies , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , New York City , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Treatment Outcome
17.
Cytokine ; 148: 155618, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260707

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute respiratory disease; approximately 5% of patients developing severe COVID-19. It is known that cytokine release is associated with disease severity, but the relationship between the different clinical phenotypes and inflammatory endotypes is not well understood. OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the association between inflammatory biomarker-based endotypes and severe COVID-19 phenotypes. METHODS: Interleukin (IL) -6, C-reactive protein (CRP), C-X-C motif chemokine (CXCL) 9, IL-18, C-C motif chemokine (CCL) 3, CCL17, IL-10, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured in 57 COVID-19 patients, and their association with clinical characteristics was examined using a cluster analysis. RESULTS: Significantly higher blood levels of the eight inflammatory markers were noted in patients who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) than in those who did not develop ARDS (non-ARDS). Using a cluster analysis, the patient groups were classified into four clusters, of which two had patients with high IL-6 and CRP levels. In the cluster with high levels of Type 1 (T1) inflammatory markers such as CXCL9 and IL-18, 85% of the patients had ARDS, 65% of the patients developed acute kidney injury (AKI), and 78% of the patients developed pulmonary fibrosis. CONCLUSIONS: In the cluster with high levels of T1 inflammatory markers, the patients frequently suffered from tissue damage, manifested as ARDS and AKI. Our findings identified distinct T1 inflammatory endotypes of COVID-19 and suggest the importance of controlling inflammation by monitoring T1 biomarkers and treating accordingly to limit the severity of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Inflammation/pathology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/complications , Pulmonary Fibrosis/physiopathology , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Cluster Analysis , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/complications , Lung Compliance , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Fibrosis/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
18.
Virol J ; 18(1): 117, 2021 06 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259206

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To date, specific cytokines associated with development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and extrapulmonary multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) in COVID-19 patients have not been systematically described. We determined the levels of inflammatory cytokines in patients with COVID-19 and their relationships with ARDS and extrapulmonary MOD. METHODS: The clinical and laboratory data of 94 COVID-19 patients with and without ARDS were analyzed. The levels of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor α [TNF-α]) were measured on days 1, 3, and 5 following admission. Seventeen healthy volunteers were recruited as controls. Correlations in the levels of inflammatory cytokines with clinical and laboratory variables were analyzed, furthermore, we also explored the relationships of different cytokines with ARDS and extrapulmonary MOD. RESULTS: The ARDS group had higher serum levels of all 4 inflammatory cytokines than the controls, and these levels steadily increased after admission. The ARDS group also had higher levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 than the non-ARDS group, and the levels of these cytokines correlated significantly with coagulation parameters and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The levels of IL-6 and TNF-α correlated with the levels of creatinine and urea nitrogen, and were also higher in ARDS patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). All 4 inflammatory cytokines had negative correlations with PaO2/FiO2. IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α had positive correlations with the APACHE-II score. Relative to survivors, non-survivors had higher levels of IL-6 and IL-10 at admission, and increasing levels over time. CONCLUSIONS: The cytokine storm apparently contributed to the development of ARDS and extrapulmonary MOD in COVID-19 patients. The levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 correlated with DIC, and the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were associated with AKI. Relative to survivors, patients who died within 28 days had increased levels of IL-6 and IL-10.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokines/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Aged , Blood Urea Nitrogen , COVID-19/pathology , Creatinine/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnosis , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Female , Humans , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Male , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood
20.
JCI Insight ; 6(9)2021 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228934

ABSTRACT

SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a novel viral pathogen that causes a clinical disease called coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Although most COVID-19 cases are asymptomatic or involve mild upper respiratory tract symptoms, a significant number of patients develop severe or critical disease. Patients with severe COVID-19 commonly present with viral pneumonia that may progress to life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Patients with COVID-19 are also predisposed to venous and arterial thromboses that are associated with a poorer prognosis. The present study identified the emergence of a low-density inflammatory neutrophil (LDN) population expressing intermediate levels of CD16 (CD16Int) in patients with COVID-19. These cells demonstrated proinflammatory gene signatures, activated platelets, spontaneously formed neutrophil extracellular traps, and enhanced phagocytic capacity and cytokine production. Strikingly, CD16Int neutrophils were also the major immune cells within the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, exhibiting increased CXCR3 but loss of CD44 and CD38 expression. The percentage of circulating CD16Int LDNs was associated with D-dimer, ferritin, and systemic IL-6 and TNF-α levels and changed over time with altered disease status. Our data suggest that the CD16Int LDN subset contributes to COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, systemic inflammation, and ARDS. The frequency of that LDN subset in the circulation could serve as an adjunct clinical marker to monitor disease status and progression.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Female , GPI-Linked Proteins/blood , Hospitalization , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/classification , Pandemics , Phagocytosis , Platelet Activation , Receptors, IgG/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Severity of Illness Index
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