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1.
Crit Care ; 26(1): 148, 2022 05 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862142

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A higher-than-usual resistance to standard sedation regimens in COVID-19 patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has led to the frequent use of the second-line anaesthetic agent ketamine. Simultaneously, an increased incidence of cholangiopathies in mechanically ventilated patients receiving prolonged infusion of high-dose ketamine has been noted. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate a potential dose-response relationship between ketamine and bilirubin levels. METHODS: Post hoc analysis of a prospective observational cohort of patients suffering from COVID-19-associated ARDS between March 2020 and August 2021. A time-varying, multivariable adjusted, cumulative weighted exposure mixed-effects model was employed to analyse the exposure-effect relationship between ketamine infusion and total bilirubin levels. RESULTS: Two-hundred forty-three critically ill patients were included into the analysis. Ketamine was infused to 170 (70%) patients at a rate of 1.4 [0.9-2.0] mg/kg/h for 9 [4-18] days. The mixed-effects model revealed a positively correlated infusion duration-effect as well as dose-effect relationship between ketamine infusion and rising bilirubin levels (p < 0.0001). In comparison, long-term infusion of propofol and sufentanil, even at high doses, was not associated with increasing bilirubin levels (p = 0.421, p = 0.258). Patients having received ketamine infusion had a multivariable adjusted competing risk hazard of developing a cholestatic liver injury during their ICU stay of 3.2 [95% confidence interval, 1.3-7.8] (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: A causally plausible, dose-effect relationship between long-term infusion of ketamine and rising total bilirubin levels, as well as an augmented, ketamine-associated, hazard of cholestatic liver injury in critically ill COVID-19 patients could be shown. High-dose ketamine should be refrained from whenever possible for the long-term analgosedation of mechanically ventilated COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ketamine , Propofol , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Bilirubin , COVID-19/complications , Critical Illness , Humans , Hypnotics and Sedatives/adverse effects , Ketamine/adverse effects , Liver , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Retrospective Studies
2.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 109: 108805, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814595

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction is a key pathogenic mechanism in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), resulting in fibrosis in lung tissues, including in the context of COVID-19. Pirfenidone (PFD) has become a novel therapeutic agent for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and can improve lung function, inhibit fibrosis and inhibit inflammation. Recently, endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) was shown to play a crucial role in various respiratory diseases. However, the role of PFD in the course of EndMT in LPS-induced ARDS remains poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to explore the anti-EndMT effects of PFD on pulmonary fibrosis after LPS-induced ARDS. First, we determined that PFD significantly reduced LPS-induced ARDS, as shown by significant pathological alterations, and alleviated the oxidative stress and inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, PFD decreased pulmonary fibrosis in LPS-induced ARDS by inhibiting EndMT and reduced the expression levels of Hedgehog (HH) pathway target genes, such as Gli1 and α-SMA, after LPS induction. In summary, this study confirmed that inhibiting the HH pathway by PFD could decrease pulmonary fibrosis by downregulating EndMT in LPS-induced ARDS. In conclusion, we demonstrate that PFD is a promising agent to attenuate pulmonary fibrosis following ARDS in the future.


Subject(s)
Hedgehog Proteins , Pulmonary Fibrosis , Pyridones , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Animals , Hedgehog Proteins/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides , Pulmonary Fibrosis/chemically induced , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Pyridones/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Signal Transduction
3.
J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep ; 10: 23247096211051928, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714632

ABSTRACT

A 49-year-old man with no significant past medical history received dexamethasone as part of his treatment for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Less than 3 weeks later, the patient developed acute respiratory distress syndrome. Radiological and serological testing led to a diagnosis of acute hypoxic miliary coccidioidomycosis. A 52-year-old man with a past medical history of chronic kidney disease (CKD) was treated with prednisone for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Within 2 weeks, this patient developed bilateral lower extremity weakness. Radiology, serology, and lumbar puncture proved a diagnosis of reactivated coccidioidomycosis with miliary pattern and coccidioidomycosis meningoencephalitis with arachnoiditis. Whether treatment with glucocorticoids caused reactivation of coccidioidomycosis is discussed in this case series.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coccidioidomycosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coccidioidomycosis/diagnosis , Coccidioidomycosis/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/adverse effects , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , SARS-CoV-2
6.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(2)2022 Feb 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673374

ABSTRACT

We present the case of a 62-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis who developed a leukaemoid reaction and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration that had been given to treat neutropenia secondary to methotrexate and leflunomide toxicity. Later it was established that he had Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, which was treated to complete resolution with a course of corticosteroids and antibiotics. This case highlights the potential risk of G-CSF administration in an immune compromised individual in the midst of bone marrow recovery in the context of active infection. Recognition of immune escape syndromes is vital and requires an understanding of potential triggers and risk factors.


Subject(s)
Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/adverse effects , Neutropenia , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Leflunomide , Male , Methotrexate , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/complications , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy
7.
J Med Chem ; 65(4): 2971-2987, 2022 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616927

ABSTRACT

Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is one of the most common complications in COVID-19. Elastase has been recognized as an important target to prevent ALI/ARDS in the patient of COVID-19. Cyclotheonellazole A (CTL-A) is a natural macrocyclic peptide reported to be a potent elastase inhibitor. Herein, we completed the first total synthesis of CTL-A in 24 linear steps. The key reactions include three-component MAC reactions and two late-stage oxidations. We also provided seven CTL-A analogues and elucidated preliminary structure-activity relationships. The in vivo ALI mouse model further suggested that CTL-A alleviated acute lung injury with reductions in lung edema and pathological deterioration, which is better than sivelestat, one approved elastase inhibitor. The activity of CTL-A against elastase, along with its cellular safety and well-established synthetic route, warrants further investigation of CTL-A as a candidate against COVID-19 pathogeneses.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Leukocyte Elastase/antagonists & inhibitors , Peptides, Cyclic/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Serine Proteinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Acute Lung Injury/chemically induced , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Animals , Bleomycin , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Line , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Leukocyte Elastase/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Peptides, Cyclic/chemical synthesis , Peptides, Cyclic/chemistry , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Serine Proteinase Inhibitors/chemical synthesis , Serine Proteinase Inhibitors/chemistry
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(23)2021 Nov 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560687

ABSTRACT

Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are severe respiratory disorders that are caused by aspiration, sepsis, trauma, and pneumonia. A clinical feature of ALI/ARDS is the acute onset of severe hypoxemia, and the mortality rate, which is estimated at 38-50%, remains high. Although prostaglandins (PGs) are detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with ALI/ARDS, the role of PGF2α in ALI remains unclear. We aimed to clarify the role of PGF2α/PGF2α receptor (FP) signaling in acid-induced ALI using an FP receptor antagonist, AL8810. Intratracheal injection of hydrochloric acid (HCl) increased neutrophil migration into the lungs, leading to respiratory dysfunction. Pre-administration of AL8810 further increased these features. Moreover, pre-treatment with AL8810 enhanced the HCl-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil migratory factors in the lungs. Administration of HCl decreased the gene expression of lung surfactant proteins, which was further reduced by co-administration of AL8810. Administration of AL8810 also increased lung edema and reduced mRNA expression of epithelial sodium channel in the lungs, indicating that AL8810 reduced fluid clearance. Furthermore, AL8810 also increased lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of adhesion molecules such as intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. These results indicate that inhibition of FP receptors by AL8810 exacerbated HCl-induced ALI.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Lung/drug effects , Pneumonia/metabolism , Receptors, Prostaglandin/antagonists & inhibitors , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/chemically induced , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Hydrochloric Acid/toxicity , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Pneumonia/chemically induced , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/pathology , Prostaglandins F/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology
10.
Trials ; 22(1): 288, 2021 Apr 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388815

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The primary objective is to demonstrate that, in patients with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 resulting in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), administration of 120mg/kg of body weight of intravenous Prolastin®(plasma-purified alpha-1 antitrypsin) reduces circulating plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6). Secondary objectives are to determine the effects of intravenous Prolastin® on important clinical outcomes including the incidence of adverse events (AEs) and serious adverse events (SAEs). TRIAL DESIGN: Phase 2, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot trial. PARTICIPANTS: The study will be conducted in Intensive Care Units in hospitals across Ireland. Patients with a laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2-infection, moderate to severe ARDS (meeting Berlin criteria for a diagnosis of ARDS with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio <200 mmHg), >18 years of age and requiring invasive or non-invasive mechanical ventilation. All individuals meeting any of the following exclusion criteria at baseline or during screening will be excluded from study participation: more than 96 hours has elapsed from onset of ARDS; age < 18 years; known to be pregnant or breastfeeding; participation in a clinical trial of an investigational medicinal product (other than antibiotics or antivirals) within 30 days; major trauma in the prior 5 days; presence of any active malignancy (other than nonmelanoma skin cancer) which required treatment within the last year; WHO Class III or IV pulmonary hypertension; pulmonary embolism prior to hospital admission within past 3 months; currently receiving extracorporeal life support (ECLS); chronic kidney disease receiving dialysis; severe chronic liver disease with Child-Pugh score > 12; DNAR (Do Not Attempt Resuscitation) order in place; treatment withdrawal imminent within 24 hours; Prisoners; non-English speaking patients or those who do not adequately understand verbal or written information unless an interpreter is available; IgA deficiency. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: Intervention: Either a once weekly intravenous infusion of Prolastin® at 120mg/kg of body weight for 4 weeks or a single dose of Prolastin® at 120mg/kg of body weight intravenously followed by once weekly intravenous infusion of an equal volume of 0.9% sodium chloride for a further 3 weeks. Comparator (placebo): An equal volume of 0.9% sodium chloride intravenously once per week for four weeks. MAIN OUTCOMES: The primary effectiveness outcome measure is the change in plasma concentration of IL-6 at 7 days as measured by ELISA. Secondary outcomes include: safety and tolerability of Prolastin® in the respective groups (as defined by the number of SAEs and AEs); PaO2/FiO2 ratio; respiratory compliance; sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score; mortality; time on ventilator in days; plasma concentration of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) as measured by nephelometry; plasma concentrations of interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß), interleukin-8 (IL-8), interleukin-10 (IL-10), soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNFR1, a surrogate marker for TNF-α) as measured by ELISA; development of shock; acute kidney injury; need for renal replacement therapy; clinical relapse, as defined by the need for readmission to the ICU or a marked decline in PaO2/FiO2 or development of shock or mortality following a period of sustained clinical improvement; secondary bacterial pneumonia as defined by the combination of radiographic findings and sputum/airway secretion microscopy and culture. RANDOMISATION: Following informed consent/assent patients will be randomised. The randomisation lists will be prepared by the study statistician and given to the unblinded trial personnel. However, the statistician will not be exposed to how the planned treatment will be allocated to the treatment codes. Randomisation will be conducted in a 1:1:1 ratio, stratified by site and age. BLINDING (MASKING): The investigator, treating physician, other members of the site research team and patients will be blinded to treatment allocation. The clinical trial pharmacy personnel and research nurses will be unblinded to facilitate intervention and placebo preparation. The unblinded individuals will keep the treatment information confidential. The infusion bag will be masked at the time of preparation and will be administered via a masked infusion set to maintain blinding. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): A total of 36 patients will be recruited and randomised in a 1:1:1 ratio to each of the trial arms. TRIAL STATUS: In March 2020, version 1.0 of the trial protocol was submitted to the local research ethics committee (REC), Health Research Consent Declaration Committee (HRCDC) and the Health Products regulatory Authority (HPRA). REC approval was granted on April 1st 2020, HPRA approval was granted on April 24th 2020 and the HRCDC provided a conditional declaration on April 17th 2020. In July 2020 a substantial amendment (version 2.0) was submitted to the REC, HRCDC and HPRA. Protocol changes in this amendment included: the addition of trial sites; extending the duration of the trial to 12 months from 3 months; removal of inclusion criteria requiring the need for vasopressors; amendment of randomisation schedule to stratify by age only and not BMI and sex; correction of grammatical error in relation to infusion duration; to allow for inclusion of subjects who may have been enrolled in a clinical trial involving either antibiotics or anti-virals in the past 30 days; to allow for inclusion of subjects who may be currently enrolled in a clinical trial involving either antibiotics or anti-virals; to remove the need for exclusion based on alpha-1 antitrypsin phenotype; removal of mandatory isoelectric focusing of plasma to confirm Pi*MM status at screening; removal of need for mandatory echocardiogram at screening; amendment on procedures around plasma analysis to reflect that this will be conducted at the central site laboratory (as trial is multi-site and no longer single site); wording amended to reflect that interim analysis of cytokine levels taken at 7 days may be conducted. HRCDC approved version 2.0 on September 14th 2020, and HPRA approved on October 22nd 2020. REC approved the substantial amendment on November 23rd. In November 2020, version 3.0 of the trial protocol was submitted to the REC and HPRA. The rationale for this amendment was to allow for patients with moderate to severe ARDS from SARS-CoV-2 with non-invasive ventilation. HPRA approved this amendment on December 1st 2020 and the REC approved the amendment on December 8th 2020. Patient recruitment commenced in April 2020 and the last patient will be recruited to the trial in April 2021. The last visit of the last patient is anticipated to occur in April 2021. At time of writing, patient recruitment is now complete, however follow-up patient visits and data collection are ongoing. TRIAL REGISTRATION: EudraCT 2020-001391-15 (Registered 31 Mar 2020). FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol (version 3.0 23.11.2020) is attached as an additional file accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol. The study protocol has been reported in accordance with the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Clinical Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) guidelines (Additional file 2).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/therapeutic use , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Ireland , Pilot Projects , Plasma , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/administration & dosage
12.
J Intensive Care Med ; 36(10): 1167-1175, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348262

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has a widely variable clinical syndrome that is difficult to distinguish from bacterial sepsis, leading to high rates of antibiotic use. Early studies indicate low rates of secondary bacterial infections (SBIs) but have included heterogeneous patient populations. Here, we catalogue all SBIs and antibiotic prescription practices in a population of mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19 induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients with COVID-19 ARDS requiring mechanical ventilation from 3 Seattle, Washington hospitals in 2020. Data were obtained via electronic and manual review of the electronic medical record. We report the incidence and site of SBIs, mortality, and antibiotics per day using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: We identified 126 patients with COVID-19 induced ARDS during the study period. Of these patients, 61% developed clinical infection confirmed by bacterial culture. Ventilator associated pneumonia was confirmed in 55% of patients, bacteremia in 20%, and urinary tract infection (UTI) in 17%. Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated bacterial species. A total of 97% of patients received antibiotics during their hospitalization, and patients received nearly one antibiotic per day during their hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS: Mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19 induced ARDS are at high risk for secondary bacterial infections and have extensive antibiotic exposure.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections , COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects , Humans , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Molecules ; 26(15)2021 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346516

ABSTRACT

We recently developed a molecule (GT-73) that blocked leukocyte transendothelial migration from blood to the peripheral tissues, supposedly by affecting the platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) function. GT-73 was tested in an LPS-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mouse model. The rationale for this is based on the finding that the mortality of COVID-19 patients is partly caused by ARDS induced by a massive migration of leukocytes to the lungs. In addition, the role of tert-butyl and methyl ester moieties in the biological effect of GT-73 was investigated. A human leukocyte, transendothelial migration assay was applied to validate the blocking effect of GT-73 derivatives. Finally, a mouse model of LPS-induced ARDS was used to evaluate the histological and biochemical effects of GT-73. The obtained results showed that GT-73 has a unique structure that is responsible for its biological activity; two of its chemical moieties (tert-butyl and a methyl ester) are critical for this effect. GT-73 is a prodrug, and its lipophilic tail covalently binds to PECAM-1 via Lys536. GT-73 significantly decreased the number of infiltrating leukocytes in the lungs and reduced the inflammation level. Finally, GT-73 reduced the levels of IL-1ß, IL-6, and MCP-1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In summary, we concluded that GT-73, a blocker of white blood cell transendothelial migration, has a favorable profile as a drug candidate for the treatment of ARDS in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Leukocytes/drug effects , Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1/antagonists & inhibitors , Pyrimidines/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Transendothelial and Transepithelial Migration/drug effects , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Adhesion/drug effects , Cell Adhesion/immunology , Cell Movement/drug effects , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Leukocytes/immunology , Lipopolysaccharides/adverse effects , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1/immunology , Pyrimidines/chemistry , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Physiol Rep ; 9(13): e14802, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305905

ABSTRACT

In severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life-prolonging treatment, especially among COVID-19 patients. Evaluation of lung injury progression is challenging with current techniques. Diagnostic imaging or invasive diagnostics are risky given the difficulties of intra-hospital transportation, contraindication of biopsies, and the potential for the spread of infections, such as in COVID-19 patients. We have recently shown that particle flow rate (PFR) from exhaled breath could be a noninvasive, early detection method for ARDS during mechanical ventilation. We hypothesized that PFR could also measure the progress of lung injury during ECMO treatment. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was thus used to induce ARDS in pigs under mechanical ventilation. Eight were connected to ECMO, whereas seven animals were not. In addition, six animals received sham treatment with saline. Four human patients with ECMO and ARDS were also monitored. In the pigs, as lung injury ensued, the PFR dramatically increased and a particular spike followed the establishment of ECMO in the LPS-treated animals. PFR remained elevated in all animals with no signs of lung recovery. In the human patients, in the two that recovered, PFR decreased. In the two whose lung function deteriorated while on ECMO, there was increased PFR with no sign of recovery in lung function. The present results indicate that real-time monitoring of PFR may be a new, complementary approach in the clinic for measurement of the extent of lung injury and recovery over time in ECMO patients with ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Lung Injury/physiopathology , Lung/physiopathology , Particulate Matter/analysis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Animals , Blood Gas Analysis/methods , COVID-19/chemically induced , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Lung/drug effects , Lung Injury/chemically induced , Particulate Matter/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Swine
16.
Immunity ; 54(7): 1463-1477.e11, 2021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263294

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), an inflammatory condition with high mortality rates, is common in severe COVID-19, whose risk is reduced by metformin rather than other anti-diabetic medications. Detecting of inflammasome assembly in post-mortem COVID-19 lungs, we asked whether and how metformin inhibits inflammasome activation while exerting its anti-inflammatory effect. We show that metformin inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation and interleukin (IL)-1ß production in cultured and alveolar macrophages along with inflammasome-independent IL-6 secretion, thus attenuating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and SARS-CoV-2-induced ARDS. By targeting electron transport chain complex 1 and independently of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) or NF-κB, metformin blocked LPS-induced and ATP-dependent mitochondrial (mt) DNA synthesis and generation of oxidized mtDNA, an NLRP3 ligand. Myeloid-specific ablation of LPS-induced cytidine monophosphate kinase 2 (CMPK2), which is rate limiting for mtDNA synthesis, reduced ARDS severity without a direct effect on IL-6. Thus, inhibition of ATP and mtDNA synthesis is sufficient for ARDS amelioration.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , DNA, Mitochondrial/biosynthesis , Inflammasomes/drug effects , Metformin/pharmacology , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Pneumonia/prevention & control , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , DNA, Mitochondrial/metabolism , Humans , Inflammasomes/metabolism , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Metformin/therapeutic use , Mice , Nucleoside-Phosphate Kinase/metabolism , Pneumonia/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
17.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 7777, 2021 04 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174704

ABSTRACT

Due to frequent and often severe lung affections caused by COVID-19, murine models of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are increasingly used in experimental lung research. The one induced by a single lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure is practical. However, whether it is preferable to administer LPS intranasally or intratracheally remains an open question. Herein, female C57Bl/6 J mice were exposed intranasally or intratracheally to one dose of either saline or 3 mg/kg of LPS. They were studied 24 h later. The groups treated with LPS, either intranasally or intratracheally, exhibited a pronounced neutrophilic inflammation, signs of lung tissue damage and protein extravasation into the alveoli, and mild lung dysfunction. The magnitude of the response was generally not different between groups exposed intranasally versus intratracheally. However, the variability of some the responses was smaller in the LPS-treated groups exposed intranasally versus intratracheally. Notably, the saline-treated mice exposed intratracheally demonstrated a mild neutrophilic inflammation and alterations of the airway epithelium. We conclude that an intranasal exposure is as effective as an intratracheal exposure in a murine model of ARDS induced by LPS. Additionally, the groups exposed intranasally demonstrated less variability in the responses to LPS and less complications associated with the sham procedure.


Subject(s)
Inflammation/chemically induced , Lipopolysaccharides/adverse effects , Lung/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Administration, Intranasal , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Inflammation/pathology , Lipopolysaccharides/administration & dosage , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Proteins/analysis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology
18.
Nanomedicine ; 34: 102388, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142161

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating pulmonary disease with significant in-hospital mortality and is the leading cause of death in COVID-19 patients. Excessive leukocyte recruitment, unregulated inflammation, and resultant fibrosis contribute to poor ARDS outcomes. Nanoparticle technology with cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNP) offers a mechanism by which unstable therapeutics such as the anti-inflammatory microRNA-146a can be locally delivered to the injured lung without systemic uptake. In this study, we evaluated the potential of the radical scavenging CNP conjugated to microRNA-146a (termed CNP-miR146a) in preventing acute lung injury (ALI) following exposure to bleomycin. We have found that intratracheal delivery of CNP-miR146a increases pulmonary levels of miR146a without systemic increases, and prevents ALI by altering leukocyte recruitment, reducing inflammation and oxidative stress, and decreasing collagen deposition, ultimately improving pulmonary biomechanics.


Subject(s)
Bleomycin/adverse effects , Cerium , Drug Delivery Systems , MicroRNAs , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Animals , Bleomycin/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Cerium/chemistry , Cerium/pharmacology , Disease Models, Animal , Male , Mice , MicroRNAs/chemistry , MicroRNAs/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/genetics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
19.
Nanomedicine ; 33: 102351, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1009771

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a deadly respiratory illness associated with refractory hypoxemia and pulmonary edema. The recent pandemic outbreak of COVID-19 is associated with severe pneumonia and inflammatory cytokine storm in the lungs. The anti-inflammatory phytomedicine nimbolide (NIM) may not be feasible for clinical translation due to poor pharmacokinetic properties and lack of suitable delivery systems. To overcome these barriers, we have developed nimbolide liposomes conjugated with iRGD peptide (iRGD-NIMLip) for targeting lung inflammation. It was observed that iRGD-NIMLip treatment significantly inhibited oxidative stress and cytokine storm compared to nimbolide free-drug (f-NIM), nimbolide liposomes (NIMLip), and exhibited superior activity compared to dexamethasone (DEX). iRGD-NIMLip abrogated the LPS induced p65 NF-κB, Akt, MAPK, Integrin ß3 and ß5, STAT3, and DNMT1 expression. Collectively, our results demonstrate that iRGD-NIMLip could be a promising novel drug delivery system to target severe pathological consequences observed in ARDS and COVID-19 associated cytokine storm.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , Limonins/administration & dosage , Liposomes/chemistry , Oligopeptides/chemistry , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Cell Line , Drug Delivery Systems , Endotoxins , Humans , Limonins/chemistry , Limonins/therapeutic use , Lung/drug effects , Lung/pathology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , RAW 264.7 Cells , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology
20.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0242318, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-955356

ABSTRACT

The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by intense dysregulated inflammation leading to acute lung injury (ALI) and respiratory failure. There are no effective pharmacologic therapies for ARDS. Colchicine is a low-cost, widely available drug, effective in the treatment of inflammatory conditions. We studied the effects of colchicine pre-treatment on oleic acid-induced ARDS in rats. Rats were treated with colchicine (1 mg/kg) or placebo for three days prior to intravenous oleic acid-induced ALI (150 mg/kg). Four hours later they were studied and compared to a sham group. Colchicine reduced the area of histological lung injury by 61%, reduced lung edema, and markedly improved oxygenation by increasing PaO2/FiO2 from 66 ± 13 mmHg (mean ± SEM) to 246 ± 45 mmHg compared to 380 ± 18 mmHg in sham animals. Colchicine also reduced PaCO2 and respiratory acidosis. Lung neutrophil recruitment, assessed by myeloperoxidase immunostaining, was greatly increased after injury from 1.16 ± 0.19% to 8.86 ± 0.66% and significantly reduced by colchicine to 5.95 ± 1.13%. Increased lung NETosis was also reduced by therapy. Circulating leukocytosis after ALI was not reduced by colchicine therapy, but neutrophils reactivity and CD4 and CD8 cell surface expression on lymphocyte populations were restored. Colchicine reduces ALI and respiratory failure in experimental ARDS in relation with reduced lung neutrophil recruitment and reduced circulating leukocyte activation. This study supports the clinical development of colchicine for the prevention of ARDS in conditions causing ALI.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Colchicine/pharmacology , Lung/drug effects , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Acute Lung Injury/blood , Acute Lung Injury/chemically induced , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Lung/pathology , Neutrophil Infiltration/drug effects , Neutrophils/drug effects , Oleic Acid/toxicity , Rats , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology
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