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1.
Trials ; 23(1): 35, 2022 Jan 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since December 2019, SARS-CoV-2 virus has infected millions of people worldwide. In patients with COVID-19 pneumonia in need of oxygen therapy or mechanical ventilation, dexamethasone 6 mg per day is currently recommended. However, the dose of 6 mg of dexamethasone is currently being reappraised and may miss important therapeutic potential or may prevent potential deleterious effects of higher doses of corticosteroids. METHODS: REMED is a prospective, open-label, randomised controlled trial testing the superiority of dexamethasone 20 mg (dexamethasone 20 mg on days 1-5, followed by dexamethasone 10 mg on days 6-10) vs 6 mg administered once daily intravenously for 10 days in adult patients with moderate or severe ARDS due to confirmed COVID-19. Three hundred participants will be enrolled and followed up for 360 days after randomization. Patients will be randomised in a 1:1 ratio into one of the two treatment arms. The following stratification factors will be applied: age, Charlson Comorbidity Index, CRP levels and trial centre. The primary endpoint is the number of ventilator-free days (VFDs) at 28 days after randomisation. The secondary endpoints are mortality from any cause at 60 days after randomisation; dynamics of the inflammatory marker, change in WHO Clinical Progression Scale at day 14; and adverse events related to corticosteroids and independence at 90 days after randomisation assessed by the Barthel Index. The long-term outcomes of this study are to assess long-term consequences on mortality and quality of life at 180 and 360 days. The study will be conducted in the intensive care units (ICUs) of ten university hospitals in the Czech Republic. DISCUSSION: We aim to compare two different doses of dexamethasone in patients with moderate to severe ARDS undergoing mechanical ventilation regarding efficacy and safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION: EudraCT No. 2020-005887-70. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04663555. Registered on December 11, 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Adult , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/adverse effects , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
2.
Adv Respir Med ; 89(6): 589-596, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595790

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 pandemic has spread like wildfire worldwide and has affected millions of people. The novel corona virus mainly affects the lungs leading to life threatening disease like acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The aftermath of the disease in form of pulmonary fibrosis is upcoming cause of further increase in morbidity and mortality. Nintedanib is an oral antifibrotics with proven role in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, however its use in COVID-19 related pulmonary fibrosis has not been studied. We report our early experience of use of nintedanib in COVID-19 related pulmonary fibrosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Indoles/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory System Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diet therapy , Humans , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology
4.
Cells ; 10(12)2021 11 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542428

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious lung condition characterized by severe hypoxemia leading to limitations of oxygen needed for lung function. In this study, we investigated the effect of anandamide (AEA), an endogenous cannabinoid, on Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-mediated ARDS in female mice. Single-cell RNA sequencing data showed that the lung epithelial cells from AEA-treated mice showed increased levels of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and tight junction proteins. MiSeq sequencing data on 16S RNA and LEfSe analysis demonstrated that SEB caused significant alterations in the microbiota, with increases in pathogenic bacteria in both the lungs and the gut, while treatment with AEA reversed this effect and induced beneficial bacteria. AEA treatment suppressed inflammation both in the lungs as well as gut-associated mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). AEA triggered several bacterial species that produced increased levels of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), including butyrate. Furthermore, administration of butyrate alone could attenuate SEB-mediated ARDS. Taken together, our data indicate that AEA treatment attenuates SEB-mediated ARDS by suppressing inflammation and preventing dysbiosis, both in the lungs and the gut, through the induction of AMPs, tight junction proteins, and SCFAs that stabilize the gut-lung microbial axis driving immune homeostasis.


Subject(s)
Arachidonic Acids/therapeutic use , Endocannabinoids/therapeutic use , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Gastrointestinal Tract/pathology , Lung/pathology , Polyunsaturated Alkamides/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/microbiology , Animals , Arachidonic Acids/pharmacology , Butyrates/metabolism , Cecum/pathology , Cell Separation , Colon/drug effects , Colon/pathology , Discriminant Analysis , Dysbiosis/complications , Dysbiosis/microbiology , Endocannabinoids/pharmacology , Enterotoxins , Female , Gastrointestinal Tract/drug effects , Lymph Nodes/drug effects , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Lymphocyte Activation/drug effects , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Pneumonia/microbiology , Polyunsaturated Alkamides/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects
5.
Mol Biol Rep ; 48(12): 8221-8225, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525563

ABSTRACT

Arglabin (l(R),10(S)-epoxy-5(S),5(S),7(S)-guaia-3(4),ll(13)-dien-6,12-olide), is a natural sesquiterpene γ-lactone which was first isolated from Artemisia glabella. The compound has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of the NLR Family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome and production of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1ß and IL-18. A more hydrophilic derivative of the compound also exhibited antitumor activity in the breast, colon, ovarian, and lung cancer. Some other synthetic derivatives of the compound have also been synthesized with antitumor, cytotoxic, antibacterial, and antifungal activities. Since both NLRP3 inflammasome and cytokine storm are associated with the pathogenesis of COVID-19 and its lethality, compounds like arglabin might have therapeutic potential to attenuate the inflammasome-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome and/or the cytokine storm associated with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Artemisia , COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokines , Humans , Inflammasomes/drug effects , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/drug effects , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Pandemics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane/chemistry , Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects
6.
Cell Transplant ; 30: 9636897211054481, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511642

ABSTRACT

Biological and cellular interleukin-6 (IL-6)-related therapies have been used to treat severe COVID-19 pneumonia with hyperinflammatory syndrome and acute respiratory failure, which prompted further exploration of the role of IL-6 in human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (hUCMSC) therapy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were responders cocultured with hUCMSCs or exogenous IL-6. A PBMC suppression assay was used to analyze the anti-inflammatory effects via MTT assay. The IL-6 concentration in the supernatant was measured using ELISA. The correlation between the anti-inflammatory effect of hUCMSCs and IL-6 levels and the relevant roles of IL-6 and IL-6 mRNA expression was analyzed using the MetaCore functional network constructed from gene microarray data. The location of IL-6 and IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) expression was further evaluated. We reported that hUCMSCs did not initially exert any inhibitory effect on PHA-stimulated proliferation; however, a potent inhibitory effect on PHA-stimulated proliferation was observed, and the IL-6 concentration reached approximately 1000 ng/mL after 72 hours. Exogenous 1000 ng/mL IL-6 inhibited PHA-stimulated inflammation but less so than hUCMSCs. The inhibitory effects of hUCMSCs on PHA-stimulated PBMCs disappeared after adding an IL-6 neutralizing antibody or pretreatment with tocilizumab (TCZ), an IL-6R antagonist. hUCMSCs exert excellent anti-inflammatory effects by inducing higher IL-6 levels, which is different from TCZ. High concentration of IL-6 cytokine secretion plays an important role in the anti-inflammatory effect of hUCMSC therapy. Initial hUCMSC therapy, followed by TCZ, seems to optimize the therapeutic potential to treat COVID-19-related acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Interleukin-6/biosynthesis , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Cells, Cultured , Coculture Techniques , Combined Modality Therapy , DNA, Complementary/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Inflammation , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/pharmacology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/cytology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/drug effects , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Lymphocyte Activation/drug effects , Phytohemagglutinins/pharmacology , RNA, Messenger/biosynthesis , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Interleukin-6/biosynthesis , Receptors, Interleukin-6/genetics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Umbilical Cord/cytology
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 714833, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506100

ABSTRACT

Background: The most severe cases of Coronavirus-Disease-2019 (COVID-19) develop into Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). It has been proposed that oxygenation may be inhibited by extracellular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the form of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Dornase alfa (Pulmozyme, Genentech) is recombinant human deoxyribonuclease I that acts as a mucolytic by cleaving and degrading extracellular DNA. We performed a pilot study to evaluate the effects of dornase alfa in patients with ARDS secondary to COVID-19. Methods: We performed a pilot, non-randomized, case-controlled clinical trial of inhaled dornase for patients who developed ARDS secondary to COVID-19 pneumonia. Results: Improvement in arterial oxygen saturation to inhaled fraction of oxygen ratio (PaO2/FiO2) was noted in the treatment group compared to control at day 2 (95% CI, 2.96 to 95.66, P-value = 0.038), as well as in static lung compliance at days 3 through 5 (95% CI, 4.8 to 19.1 mL/cmH2O, 2.7 to 16.5 mL/cmH2O, and 5.3 to 19.2 mL/cmH2O, respectively). These effects were not sustained at 14 days. A reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) myeloperoxidase-DNA (DNA : MPO) complexes (95% CI, -14.7 to -1.32, P-value = 0.01) was observed after therapy with dornase alfa. Conclusion: Treatment with dornase alfa was associated with improved oxygenation and decreased DNA : MPO complexes in BALF. The positive effects, however, were limited to the time of drug delivery. These data suggest that degradation of extracellular DNA associated with NETs or other structures by inhaled dornase alfa can be beneficial. We propose a more extensive clinical trial is warranted. Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT04402970.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Deoxyribonuclease I/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Administration, Inhalation , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , DNA/metabolism , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen Consumption/drug effects , Peroxidase/metabolism , Pilot Projects , Recombinant Proteins/therapeutic use , Young Adult
8.
BMC Pulm Med ; 21(1): 354, 2021 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505545

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been used as an immunomodulatory therapy to counteract severe systemic inflammation in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). But its use in COVID-19 related acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is not well established. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of electronic health records of COVID-19 patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) at Hazm Mebaireek General Hospital, Qatar, between March 7, 2020 and September 9, 2020. Patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation for moderate-to-severe ARDS were divided into two groups based on whether they received IVIG therapy or not. The primary outcome was all-cause ICU mortality. Secondary outcomes studied were ventilator-free days and ICU-free days at day-28, and incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI). Propensity score matching was used to adjust for confounders, and the primary outcome was compared using competing-risks survival analysis. RESULTS: Among 590 patients included in the study, 400 received routine care, and 190 received IVIG therapy in addition to routine care. One hundred eighteen pairs were created after propensity score matching with no statistically significant differences between the groups. Overall ICU mortality in the study population was 27.1%, and in the matched cohort, it was 25.8%. Mortality was higher among IVIG-treated patients (36.4% vs. 15.3%; sHR 3.5; 95% CI 1.98-6.19; P < 0.001). Ventilator-free days and ICU-free days at day-28 were lower (P < 0.001 for both), and incidence of AKI was significantly higher (85.6% vs. 67.8%; P = 0.001) in the IVIG group. CONCLUSION: IVIG therapy in mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19 related moderate-to-severe ARDS was associated with higher ICU mortality. A randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm this observation further.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Administration, Intravenous , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Propensity Score , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
9.
Intensive Care Med ; 46(12): 2284-2296, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1451948

ABSTRACT

Current literature addressing the pharmacological principles guiding glucocorticoid (GC) administration in ARDS is scant. This paucity of information may have led to the heterogeneity of treatment protocols and misinterpretation of available findings. GCs are agonist compounds that bind to the GC receptor (GR) producing a pharmacological response. Clinical efficacy depends on the magnitude and duration of exposure to GR. We updated the meta-analysis of randomized trials investigating GC treatment in ARDS, focusing on treatment protocols and response. We synthesized the current literature on the role of the GR in GC therapy including genomic and non-genomic effects, and integrated current clinical pharmacology knowledge of various GCs, including hydrocortisone, methylprednisolone and dexamethasone. This review addresses the role dosage, timing of initiation, mode of administration, duration, and tapering play in achieving optimal response to GC therapy in ARDS. Based on RCTs' findings, GC plasma concentration-time profiles, and pharmacodynamic studies, optimal results are most likely achievable with early intervention, an initial bolus dose to achieve close to maximal GRα saturation, followed by a continuous infusion to maintain high levels of response throughout the treatment period. In addition, patients receiving similar GC doses may experience substantial between-patient variability in plasma concentrations affecting clinical response. GC should be dose-adjusted and administered for a duration targeting clinical and laboratory improvement, followed by dose-tapering to achieve gradual recovery of the suppressed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. These findings have practical clinical relevance. Future RCTs should consider these pharmacological principles in the study design and interpretation of findings.


Subject(s)
Glucocorticoids , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System , Methylprednisolone , Pituitary-Adrenal System , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy
11.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0254985, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448572

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The goal of this study was to determine if IL-22:Fc would Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: No therapies exist for ARDS and treatment is purely supportive. Interleukin-22 (IL-22) plays an integral component in recovery of the lung from infection. IL-22:Fc is a recombinant protein with a human FC immunoglobulin that increases the half-life of IL-22. STUDY DESIGN: ARDS was induced in C57BL/6 mice with intra-tracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at a dose of 33.3 or 100 ug. In the low-dose LPS group (LDG), IL-22:FC was administered via tail vein injection at 30 minutes (n = 9) and compared to sham (n = 9). In the high-dose LPS group (HDG), IL-22:FC was administered (n = 11) then compared to sham (n = 8). Euthanasia occurred after bronchioalveolar lavage (BAL) on post-injury day 4. RESULTS: In the LDG, IL-22:FC resulted in decreased protein leak (0.15 vs. 0.25 ug/uL, p = 0.02). BAL protein in animals receiving IL-22:Fc in the HDG was not different. For the HDG, animals receiving IL-22:Fc had lower BAL cell counts (539,636 vs 3,147,556 cells/uL, p = 0.02). For the HDG, IL-6 (110.6 vs. 527.1 pg/mL, p = 0.04), TNF-α (5.87 vs. 25.41 pg/mL, p = 0.04), and G-CSF (95.14 vs. 659.6, p = 0.01) levels were lower in the BAL fluid of IL-22:Fc treated animals compared to sham. CONCLUSIONS: IL-22:Fc decreases lung inflammation and lung capillary leak in ARDS. IL-22:Fc may be a novel therapy for ARDS.


Subject(s)
Immunoglobulin Fc Fragments/pharmacology , Interleukins/pharmacology , Lung Injury/drug therapy , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Animals , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology , Female , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Lung Injury/pathology , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphocytes/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Neutrophils/immunology , Pneumonia/pathology , Receptors, Interleukin/metabolism , Recombinant Proteins/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Mucosa/pathology
13.
Ther Adv Respir Dis ; 15: 17534666211042533, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440885

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to assess the effect of a short-term treatment with low-moderate corticosteroid (CS) doses by both a quantitative and qualitative assessment of chest HRCT of COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: CORTICOVID is a single-center, cross-sectional, retrospective study involving severe/critical COVID-19 patients with mild/moderate ARDS. Lung total severity score was obtained according to Chung and colleagues. Moreover, the relative percentages of lung total severity score by ground glass opacities, consolidations, crazy paving, and linear bands were computed. Chest HRCT scores, P/F ratio, and laboratory parameters were evaluated before (pre-CS) and 7-10 days after (post-CS) methylprednisolone of 0.5-0.8 mg/kg/day. FINDINGS: A total of 34 severe/critical COVID-19 patients were included in the study, of which 17 received Standard of Care (SoC) and 17 CS therapy in add-on. CS treatment disclosed a significant decrease in HRCT total severity score [median = 6 (IQR: 5-7.5) versus 10 (IQR: 9-13) in SoC, p < 0.001], as well in single consolidations [median = 0.33 (IQR: 0-0.92) versus 6.73 (IQR: 2.49-8.03) in SoC, p < 0.001] and crazy paving scores [mean = 0.19 (SD = 0.53) versus 1.79 (SD = 2.71) in SoC, p = 0.010], along with a significant increase in linear bands [mean = 2.56 (SD = 1.65) versus 0.97 (SD = 1.30) in SoC, p = 0.006]. GGO score instead did not significantly differ at the end of treatment between the two groups. Most post-CS GGO, however, derived from previous consolidations and crazy paving [median = 1.5 (0.35-3.81) versus 2 (1.25-3.8) pre-CS; p = 0.579], while pre-CS GGO significantly decreased after methylprednisolone therapy [median = 0.66 (0.05-1.33) versus 1.5 (0.35-3.81) pre-CS; p = 0.004]. CS therapy further determined a significant improvement in P/F levels [median P/F = 310 (IQR: 235.5-370) versus 136 (IQR: 98.5-211.75) in SoC; p < 0.001], and a significant increase in white blood cells, lymphocytes, and neutrophils absolute values. CONCLUSION: The improvement of all chest HRCT findings further supports the role of CS adjunctive therapy in severe/critical COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/drug therapy , Case-Control Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
14.
Trials ; 22(1): 643, 2021 Sep 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435265

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a complex clinical diagnosis with various possible etiologies. One common feature, however, is pulmonary permeability edema, which leads to an increased alveolar diffusion pathway and, subsequently, impaired oxygenation and decarboxylation. A novel inhaled peptide agent (AP301, solnatide) was shown to markedly reduce pulmonary edema in animal models of ARDS and to be safe to administer to healthy humans in a Phase I clinical trial. Here, we present the protocol for a Phase IIB clinical trial investigating the safety and possible future efficacy endpoints in ARDS patients. METHODS: This is a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind intervention study. Patients with moderate to severe ARDS in need of mechanical ventilation will be randomized to parallel groups receiving escalating doses of solnatide or placebo, respectively. Before advancing to a higher dose, a data safety monitoring board will investigate the data from previous patients for any indication of patient safety violations. The intervention (application of the investigational drug) takes places twice daily over the course of 7 days, ensued by a follow-up period of another 21 days. DISCUSSION: The patients to be included in this trial will be severely sick and in need of mechanical ventilation. The amount of data to be collected upon screening and during the course of the intervention phase is substantial and the potential timeframe for inclusion of any given patient is short. However, when prepared properly, adherence to this protocol will make for the acquisition of reliable data. Particular diligence needs to be exercised with respect to informed consent, because eligible patients will most likely be comatose and/or deeply sedated at the time of inclusion. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This trial was prospectively registered with the EU Clinical trials register (clinicaltrialsregister.eu). EudraCT Number: 2017-003855-47 .


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Edema , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Double-Blind Method , Edema , Humans , Peptides, Cyclic , Permeability , Pulmonary Edema/diagnosis , Pulmonary Edema/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
16.
Crit Care Clin ; 37(4): 877-893, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1414517

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a heterogenous syndrome with many etiologies for which there are no definitive pharmacologic treatments, despite decades of research. We explore some adjunctive pharmacologic therapies, including neuromuscular blockade, corticosteroids, and inhaled pulmonary vasodilators. Additionally, we explore some investigative therapies, including Vitamin C, beta-agonists, statins, mesenchymal stromal cells, and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. We do discuss the potential role of steroids in acute respiratory distress syndrome with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 as a trigger. The standard of care, however, remains supportive care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Humans , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2
17.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 8(1)2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1408530

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) related to SARS-CoV-2 infection has some unusual characteristics that differentiate it from the pathophysiology described in the more 'typical' ARDS. Among multiple hypotheses, a close similarity has been suggested between COVID-19 ARDS and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). With this opinion paper, we investigated the pathophysiological similarities between infant respiratory diseases (RDS and direct neonatal ARDS (NARDS)) and COVID-19 in adults. We also analysed, for the first time, similarities in the response to exogenous surfactant administration in terms of improved static compliance in RDS and direct NARDS, and adult COVID-19 ARDS. In conclusion, we believe that if the pathological processes are similar both from the pathophysiological point of view and from the response in respiratory mechanics to a recruitment treatment such as surfactant, perhaps the latter could be considered a plausible option and lead to recruitment in clinical trials currently ongoing on patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Surfactants , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pulmonary Surfactants/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/drug therapy
18.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256977, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394551

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Although most patients with COVID-19 develop asymptomatic or mild disease, some patients develop severe disease. The effectiveness of various therapeutic agents, including antiviral drugs, steroids, and anti-inflammatories for COVID-19, have been being confirmed. The effect of administering steroids in early disease is unclear. This study therefore aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and risk of exacerbation of steroids administered preceding antiviral drugs in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: This retrospective, single-center, observational study included consecutive patients with COVID-19 between March 2020 and March 2021. Patients were divided into a steroids-first group and antiviral-drugs-first group. Mortality, duration of hospitalization, incidence rate and duration of intensive care unit (ICU) admission, intubation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) induction of the two groups were compared. RESULTS: A total of 258 patients were admitted during the study period. After excluding patients who received symptomatic treatment only, who were taking immunosuppressive drugs, or who were administered antiviral drugs only, 68 patients were included in the analysis, 16 in the steroids-first group and 52 in the antiviral-drugs-first group. The rate of intubation, ICU admission and ECMO induction were significantly higher in the steroids-first group than in the antiviral-drugs-first group (81.3% vs. 33.3, p<0.001, 75.0% vs. 29.4%, p = 0.001, and 31.3% vs. 7.8%, p = 0.017, respectively). Furthermore, patients who received steroids within ten days after starting antiviral drugs had significantly lower rates of ICU admission, intubation, and ECMO induction. (81.3% vs. 42.9% p = 0.011, 75.0% vs. 37.1% p = 0.012, and 31.3% vs. 8.6% p = 0.039, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Administering steroids prior to antiviral drugs soon after symptom onset can aggravate disease severity. When administration of steroids is considered soon after symptom onset, it may be safer to initiate antiviral drugs first.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Aged , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
19.
Trials ; 22(1): 288, 2021 Apr 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388815

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The primary objective is to demonstrate that, in patients with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 resulting in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), administration of 120mg/kg of body weight of intravenous Prolastin®(plasma-purified alpha-1 antitrypsin) reduces circulating plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6). Secondary objectives are to determine the effects of intravenous Prolastin® on important clinical outcomes including the incidence of adverse events (AEs) and serious adverse events (SAEs). TRIAL DESIGN: Phase 2, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot trial. PARTICIPANTS: The study will be conducted in Intensive Care Units in hospitals across Ireland. Patients with a laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2-infection, moderate to severe ARDS (meeting Berlin criteria for a diagnosis of ARDS with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio <200 mmHg), >18 years of age and requiring invasive or non-invasive mechanical ventilation. All individuals meeting any of the following exclusion criteria at baseline or during screening will be excluded from study participation: more than 96 hours has elapsed from onset of ARDS; age < 18 years; known to be pregnant or breastfeeding; participation in a clinical trial of an investigational medicinal product (other than antibiotics or antivirals) within 30 days; major trauma in the prior 5 days; presence of any active malignancy (other than nonmelanoma skin cancer) which required treatment within the last year; WHO Class III or IV pulmonary hypertension; pulmonary embolism prior to hospital admission within past 3 months; currently receiving extracorporeal life support (ECLS); chronic kidney disease receiving dialysis; severe chronic liver disease with Child-Pugh score > 12; DNAR (Do Not Attempt Resuscitation) order in place; treatment withdrawal imminent within 24 hours; Prisoners; non-English speaking patients or those who do not adequately understand verbal or written information unless an interpreter is available; IgA deficiency. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: Intervention: Either a once weekly intravenous infusion of Prolastin® at 120mg/kg of body weight for 4 weeks or a single dose of Prolastin® at 120mg/kg of body weight intravenously followed by once weekly intravenous infusion of an equal volume of 0.9% sodium chloride for a further 3 weeks. Comparator (placebo): An equal volume of 0.9% sodium chloride intravenously once per week for four weeks. MAIN OUTCOMES: The primary effectiveness outcome measure is the change in plasma concentration of IL-6 at 7 days as measured by ELISA. Secondary outcomes include: safety and tolerability of Prolastin® in the respective groups (as defined by the number of SAEs and AEs); PaO2/FiO2 ratio; respiratory compliance; sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score; mortality; time on ventilator in days; plasma concentration of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) as measured by nephelometry; plasma concentrations of interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß), interleukin-8 (IL-8), interleukin-10 (IL-10), soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNFR1, a surrogate marker for TNF-α) as measured by ELISA; development of shock; acute kidney injury; need for renal replacement therapy; clinical relapse, as defined by the need for readmission to the ICU or a marked decline in PaO2/FiO2 or development of shock or mortality following a period of sustained clinical improvement; secondary bacterial pneumonia as defined by the combination of radiographic findings and sputum/airway secretion microscopy and culture. RANDOMISATION: Following informed consent/assent patients will be randomised. The randomisation lists will be prepared by the study statistician and given to the unblinded trial personnel. However, the statistician will not be exposed to how the planned treatment will be allocated to the treatment codes. Randomisation will be conducted in a 1:1:1 ratio, stratified by site and age. BLINDING (MASKING): The investigator, treating physician, other members of the site research team and patients will be blinded to treatment allocation. The clinical trial pharmacy personnel and research nurses will be unblinded to facilitate intervention and placebo preparation. The unblinded individuals will keep the treatment information confidential. The infusion bag will be masked at the time of preparation and will be administered via a masked infusion set to maintain blinding. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): A total of 36 patients will be recruited and randomised in a 1:1:1 ratio to each of the trial arms. TRIAL STATUS: In March 2020, version 1.0 of the trial protocol was submitted to the local research ethics committee (REC), Health Research Consent Declaration Committee (HRCDC) and the Health Products regulatory Authority (HPRA). REC approval was granted on April 1st 2020, HPRA approval was granted on April 24th 2020 and the HRCDC provided a conditional declaration on April 17th 2020. In July 2020 a substantial amendment (version 2.0) was submitted to the REC, HRCDC and HPRA. Protocol changes in this amendment included: the addition of trial sites; extending the duration of the trial to 12 months from 3 months; removal of inclusion criteria requiring the need for vasopressors; amendment of randomisation schedule to stratify by age only and not BMI and sex; correction of grammatical error in relation to infusion duration; to allow for inclusion of subjects who may have been enrolled in a clinical trial involving either antibiotics or anti-virals in the past 30 days; to allow for inclusion of subjects who may be currently enrolled in a clinical trial involving either antibiotics or anti-virals; to remove the need for exclusion based on alpha-1 antitrypsin phenotype; removal of mandatory isoelectric focusing of plasma to confirm Pi*MM status at screening; removal of need for mandatory echocardiogram at screening; amendment on procedures around plasma analysis to reflect that this will be conducted at the central site laboratory (as trial is multi-site and no longer single site); wording amended to reflect that interim analysis of cytokine levels taken at 7 days may be conducted. HRCDC approved version 2.0 on September 14th 2020, and HPRA approved on October 22nd 2020. REC approved the substantial amendment on November 23rd. In November 2020, version 3.0 of the trial protocol was submitted to the REC and HPRA. The rationale for this amendment was to allow for patients with moderate to severe ARDS from SARS-CoV-2 with non-invasive ventilation. HPRA approved this amendment on December 1st 2020 and the REC approved the amendment on December 8th 2020. Patient recruitment commenced in April 2020 and the last patient will be recruited to the trial in April 2021. The last visit of the last patient is anticipated to occur in April 2021. At time of writing, patient recruitment is now complete, however follow-up patient visits and data collection are ongoing. TRIAL REGISTRATION: EudraCT 2020-001391-15 (Registered 31 Mar 2020). FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol (version 3.0 23.11.2020) is attached as an additional file accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol. The study protocol has been reported in accordance with the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Clinical Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) guidelines (Additional file 2).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/therapeutic use , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Ireland , Pilot Projects , Plasma , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/administration & dosage
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