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1.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 41(4): e146-e148, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706949

ABSTRACT

Respiratory viruses were detected by multiplex-polymerase chain reaction from oropharyngeal swabs in 114/168 (67.9%) children with acute respiratory infection presenting to 5 pediatric practices in Germany between November 2020 and April 2021. In contrast to rhino- (48.8%), adeno- (14.3%) and endemic coronaviruses (14.9%), SARS-CoV-2 and influenza virus were detected only once; respiratory syncytial virus was not detected. This demonstrates differing impacts of pandemic infection control measures on the spread of respiratory viruses.


Subject(s)
Primary Health Care , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/etiology , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/etiology , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Disease Susceptibility , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/virology , Male , Pandemics , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Virus Diseases/therapy
3.
J Med Virol ; 93(8): 4748-4755, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1610624

ABSTRACT

Respiratory infections are one of the most frequent reasons for medical consultations in children. In low resource settings such as in Lao People's Democratic Republic, knowledge gaps and the dearth of laboratory capacity to support differential diagnosis may contribute to antibiotic overuse. We studied the etiology, temporal trends, and genetic diversity of viral respiratory infections in children to provide evidence for prevention and treatment guidelines. From September 2014 to October 2015, throat swabs and nasopharyngeal aspirates from 445 children under 10 years old with symptoms of acute respiratory infection were collected at the Children Hospital in Vientiane. Rapid antigen tests were performed for influenza A and B and respiratory syncytial virus. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) were performed to detect 16 viruses. Influenza infections were detected with a higher sensitivity using PCR than with the rapid antigen test. By RT-PCR screening, at least one pathogen could be identified for 71.7% of cases. Human rhinoviruses were most frequently detected (29.9%), followed by influenza A and B viruses combined (15.9%). We identify and discuss the seasonality of some of the infections. Altogether these data provide a detailed characterization of respiratory pathogens in Lao children and we provide recommendations for vaccination and further studies.


Subject(s)
Coinfection/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Viruses/genetics , Acute Disease/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Coinfection/virology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/virology , Laos/epidemiology , Male , Prevalence , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/diagnosis , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Viruses/classification , Viruses/isolation & purification
4.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 41(3): e95-e101, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1615776

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The clinical impact of common human coronavirus (cHCoV) remains unclear. We studied the clinical manifestations of pediatric cHCoV infections and the possible modifying effects of codetected human rhinovirus (RV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). METHODS: We used data from an 11-year-long prospective study of hospitalized children with community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed with real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for cHCoV OC43, NL63, HKU1 and 229E, and 15 other respiratory viruses. We assessed disease severity based on the clinical factors hospitalization length, oxygen requirement, other respiratory support and supplementary fluids. RESULTS: cHCoV was detected in 341 (8%) of 4312 children. Among 104 children with single cHCoV detections, 58 (56%) had lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and 20 (19%) developed severe disease. The proportion with severe disease was lower among single cHCoV detections compared with single RSV detections (338 of 870; 39%), but similar to single RV detections (136 of 987; 14%). Compared with single cHCoV, codetected cHCoV-RSV was more often associated with LRTI (86 of 89; 97%) and severe disease (adjusted odds ratio, 3.3; 95% confidence interval: 1.6-6.7). LRTI was more frequent in codetected cHCoV-RV (52 of 68; 76%) than single cHCoV, but the risk of severe disease was lower (adjusted odds ratios, 0.3; 95% confidence interval: 0.1-1.0). CONCLUSIONS: cHCoV was associated with severe LRTI in hospitalized children. Viral codetections were present in two-thirds. Codetections of cHCoV-RV were associated with lower proportions of severe disease, suggesting a modifying effect of RV on HCoV.


Subject(s)
Coinfection/virology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Picornaviridae Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Adolescent , Child , Child, Hospitalized , Child, Preschool , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Norway/epidemiology , Picornaviridae Infections/epidemiology , Picornaviridae Infections/therapy , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/therapy
5.
Science ; 375(6577): 161-167, 2022 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1648160

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the critical need for broad-spectrum therapeutics against respiratory viruses. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major threat to pediatric patients and older adults. We describe 4'-fluorouridine (4'-FlU, EIDD-2749), a ribonucleoside analog that inhibits RSV, related RNA viruses, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), with high selectivity index in cells and human airway epithelia organoids. Polymerase inhibition within in vitro RNA-dependent RNA polymerase assays established for RSV and SARS-CoV-2 revealed transcriptional stalling after incorporation. Once-daily oral treatment was highly efficacious at 5 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) in RSV-infected mice or 20 mg/kg in ferrets infected with different SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern, initiated 24 or 12 hours after infection, respectively. These properties define 4'-FlU as a broad-spectrum candidate for the treatment of RSV, SARS-CoV-2, and related RNA virus infections.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/drug therapy , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Uracil Nucleotides/pharmacology , Administration, Oral , Animals , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Ferrets , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Mononegavirales/drug effects , Mononegavirales/physiology , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/genetics , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Transcription, Genetic , Uracil Nucleotides/administration & dosage , Uracil Nucleotides/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects
6.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262258, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606499

ABSTRACT

Although patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), influenza A, influenza B and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) show comparable or very similar manifestations, the therapeutic approaches of these respiratory viral infections are different, which requires an accurate diagnosis. Recently, the novel multiplex real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay AMPLIQUICK® Respiratory Triplex (BioSynex SA, Illkirch-Graffenstaden, France) allows simultaneous detection and differentiation of SARS-CoV-2, influenza A, influenza B, and RSV in respiratory tract samples. We herein evaluated the performance of the AMPLIQUICK® Respiratory Triplex for the detection of the four viruses in respiratory specimens, using Allplex™ Respiratory Panel 1 and 2019-nCoV assays (Seegene, Seoul, Korea) as reference comparator assays. A total of 359 archived predetermined respiratory samples, including 83, 145, 19 and 95 positive specimens for SARS-CoV-2, influenza A, influenza B and RSV respectively, were included. The AMPLIQUICK® Respiratory Triplex showed high concordance with the reference assays, with an overall agreement for SARS-CoV-2, influenza A, influenza B, and RSV at 97.6%, 98.8%, 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, and high κ values ranging from 0.93 to 1.00, indicating an almost perfect agreement between assays. Furthermore, high correlations of cycle threshold (Ct) values were observed for positive samples of the four viruses between the AMPLIQUICK® Respiratory Triplex and comparator assays, with an overall high agreement between Ct values assessed by Bland-Altman analyses. In conclusion, these observations demonstrate that the multiplex AMPLIQUICK® Respiratory Triplex is a reliable assay for the qualitative detection and differentiation of SARS-CoV-2, influenza A, influenza B, and RSV in respiratory specimens, which may prove useful for streamlining diagnostics during the winter influenza-seasons.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Influenza, Human/virology , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques , Nasopharynx/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity
8.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591709

ABSTRACT

RSV is a leading cause of respiratory tract disease in infants and the elderly. RSV has limited therapeutic interventions and no FDA-approved vaccine. Gaps in our understanding of virus-host interactions and immunity contribute to the lack of biological countermeasures. This review updates the current understanding of RSV immunity and immunopathology with a focus on interferon responses, animal modeling, and correlates of protection.


Subject(s)
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/immunology , Adaptive Immunity , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interferons/immunology , Interferons/metabolism , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/prevention & control , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/physiology
9.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24442, 2021 12 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1577650

ABSTRACT

Therapeutic interventions targeting viral infections remain a significant challenge for both the medical and scientific communities. While specific antiviral agents have shown success as therapeutics, viral resistance inevitably develops, making many of these approaches ineffective. This inescapable obstacle warrants alternative approaches, such as the targeting of host cellular factors. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the major respiratory pathogen of infants and children worldwide, causes respiratory tract infection ranging from mild upper respiratory tract symptoms to severe life-threatening lower respiratory tract disease. Despite the fact that the molecular biology of the virus, which was originally discovered in 1956, is well described, there is no vaccine or effective antiviral treatment against RSV infection. Here, we demonstrate that targeting host factors, specifically, mTOR signaling, reduces RSV protein production and generation of infectious progeny virus. Further, we show that this approach can be generalizable as inhibition of mTOR kinases reduces coronavirus gene expression, mRNA transcription and protein production. Overall, defining virus replication-dependent host functions may be an effective means to combat viral infections, particularly in the absence of antiviral drugs.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus/metabolism , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/metabolism , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism , Viral Proteins/metabolism , A549 Cells , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral/drug effects , Humans , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , RNA Interference , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , Rapamycin-Insensitive Companion of mTOR Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , Rapamycin-Insensitive Companion of mTOR Protein/genetics , Rapamycin-Insensitive Companion of mTOR Protein/metabolism , Regulatory-Associated Protein of mTOR/antagonists & inhibitors , Regulatory-Associated Protein of mTOR/genetics , Regulatory-Associated Protein of mTOR/metabolism , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/drug therapy , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/pathology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/drug effects , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/isolation & purification , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics , Viral Proteins/genetics
10.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(6): e2234, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574124

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (Covid-19) pandemic is the most serious event of the year 2020, causing considerable global morbidity and mortality. The goal of this review is to provide a comprehensive summary of reported associations between inter-individual immunogenic variants and disease susceptibility or symptoms caused by the coronavirus strains severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus-2, and two of the main respiratory viruses, respiratory syncytial virus and influenza virus. The results suggest that the genetic background of the host could affect the levels of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and might modulate the progression of Covid-19 in affected patients. Notably, genetic variations in innate immune components such as toll-like receptors and mannose-binding lectin 2 play critical roles in the ability of the immune system to recognize coronavirus and initiate an early immune response to clear the virus and prevent the development of severe symptoms. This review provides promising clues related to the potential benefits of using immunotherapy and immune modulation for respiratory infectious disease treatment in a personalized manner.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Influenza, Human/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Biological Variation, Individual , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Gene Expression , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/virology , Mannose-Binding Lectin/genetics , Mannose-Binding Lectin/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae/drug effects , Orthomyxoviridae/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/drug therapy , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/genetics , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/drug effects , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/immunology , SARS Virus/drug effects , SARS Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/drug therapy , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/genetics , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Toll-Like Receptors/genetics , Toll-Like Receptors/immunology
11.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(23): 24931-24942, 2021 12 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573020

ABSTRACT

Since the Coronavirus 19 (COVID-19) pandemic, several SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (SARS-CoV-2 VOC) have been reported. The B.1.1.7 variant has been associated with increased mortality and transmission risk. Furthermore, cluster and possible co-infection cases could occur in the next influenza season or COVID-19 pandemic wave, warranting efficient diagnosis and treatment decision making. Here, we aimed to detect SARS-CoV-2 and other common respiratory viruses using multiplex RT-PCR developed on the LabTurbo AIO 48 open system. We performed a multicenter study to evaluate the performance and analytical sensitivity of the LabTurbo AIO 48 system for SARS-CoV-2, influenza A/B, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) using 652 nasopharyngeal swab clinical samples from patients. The LabTurbo AIO 48 system demonstrated a sensitivity of 9.4 copies/per PCR for N2 of SARS-CoV-2; 24 copies/per PCR for M of influenza A and B; and 24 copies/per PCR for N of RSV. The assay presented consistent performance in the multicenter study. The multiplex RT-PCR applied on the LabTurbo AIO 48 open platform provided highly sensitive, robust, and accurate results and enabled high-throughput detection of B.1.1.7, influenza A/B, and RSV with short turnaround times. Therefore, this automated molecular diagnostic assay could enable streamlined testing if COVID-19 becomes a seasonal disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Influenza A virus/genetics , Influenza A virus/isolation & purification , Influenza, Human/virology , Influenzavirus B/genetics , Influenzavirus B/isolation & purification , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/genetics , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sensitivity and Specificity , Young Adult
12.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(48): e328, 2021 Dec 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572278

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic era, the simultaneous detection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), influenza virus (Flu), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is important in the rapid differential diagnosis in patients with respiratory symptoms. Three multiplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assays have been recently developed commercially in Korea: PowerChek™ SARS-CoV-2, Influenza A&B Multiplex Real-time PCR Kit (PowerChek; KogeneBiotech); STANDARD™ M Flu/SARS-CoV-2 Real-time Detection Kit (STANDARD M; SD BioSensor); and Allplex™ SARS-CoV-2/FluA/FluB/RSV Assay (Allplex; Seegene). We evaluated the analytical and clinical performances of these kits. METHODS: A limit of detection tests were performed and cross-reactivity analysis was executed using clinical respiratory samples. Ninety-seven SARS-CoV-2-positive, 201 SARS-CoV-2-negative, 71 influenza A-positive, 50 influenza B-positive, 78 RSV-positive, and 207 other respiratory virus-positive nasopharyngeal swabs were tested using the three assays. The AdvanSure™ respiratory viruses rRT-PCR assay (AdvanSure; LG Life Sciences) was used as a comparator assay for RSV. RESULTS: Except in influenza B, in SARS-CoV-2 and influenza A, there were no significant differences in detecting specific genes of the viruses among the three assays. All three kits did not cross-react with common respiratory viruses. All three kits had greater than 92% positive percent agreement and negative percent agreement and ≥ 0.95 kappa value in the detection of SARS-CoV-2 and flu A/B. Allplex detected RSV more sensitively than AdvanSure. CONCLUSION: The overall performance of three multiplex rRT-PCR assays for the concurrent detection of SARS-CoV-2, influenza A/B, and RSV was comparable. These kits will promote prompt differential diagnosis of COVID-19, influenza, and RSV infection in the COVID-19 pandemic era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Nasopharynx/virology , RNA, Viral/analysis , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Cross Reactions , Humans , Influenza A virus/genetics , Influenza A virus/isolation & purification , Influenza B virus/genetics , Influenza B virus/isolation & purification , Influenza, Human/virology , Limit of Detection , Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Polyproteins/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Reagent Kits, Diagnostic , Republic of Korea , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/genetics , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Matrix Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/genetics
13.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 23741, 2021 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565734

ABSTRACT

The mechanisms explaining excess morbidity and mortality in respiratory infections among males are poorly understood. Innate immune responses are critical in protection against respiratory virus infections. We hypothesised that innate immune responses to respiratory viruses may be deficient in males. We stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 345 participants at age 16 years in a population-based birth cohort with three live respiratory viruses (rhinoviruses A16 and A1, and respiratory syncytial virus) and two viral mimics (R848 and CpG-A, to mimic responses to SARS-CoV-2) and investigated sex differences in interferon (IFN) responses. IFN-α responses to all viruses and stimuli were 1.34-2.06-fold lower in males than females (P = 0.018 - < 0.001). IFN-ß, IFN-γ and IFN-induced chemokines were also deficient in males across all stimuli/viruses. Healthcare records revealed 12.1% of males and 6.6% of females were hospitalized with respiratory infections in infancy (P = 0.017). In conclusion, impaired innate anti-viral immunity in males likely results in high male morbidity and mortality from respiratory virus infections.


Subject(s)
Imidazoles/immunology , Immunity, Innate , Oligodeoxyribonucleotides/immunology , Picornaviridae Infections/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/immunology , Rhinovirus/immunology , Adolescent , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Interferons/immunology , Interferons/metabolism , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Male , Picornaviridae Infections/mortality , Picornaviridae Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/mortality , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/immunology , Respiratory Tract Infections/mortality , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors
14.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258798, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515477

ABSTRACT

Two main mechanisms contribute to the continuous evolution of influenza viruses: accumulation of mutations in the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes (antigenic drift) and genetic re-assortments (antigenic shift). Epidemiological surveillance is important in identifying new genetic variants of influenza viruses with potentially increased pathogenicity and transmissibility. In order to characterize the 2019/20 influenza epidemic in Romania, 1042 respiratory samples were collected from consecutive patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections in the National Institute for Infectious Diseases "Prof. Dr. Matei Balș", Bucharest Romania and tested for influenza A virus, influenza B virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) by real-time PCR. Out of them, 516 cases were positive for influenza, with relatively equal distribution of influenza A and B. Two patients had influenza A and B co-infection and 8 patients had influenza-RSV co-infection. The most severe cases, requiring supplemental oxygen administration or intensive care, and the most deaths were reported in patients aged 65 years and over. Subtyping showed the predominance of A(H3N2) compared to A(H1N1)pdm09 pdm09 (60.4% and 39.6% of all subtyped influenza A isolates, respectively), and the circulation of Victoria B lineage only. Influenza B started to circulate first (week 47/2019), with influenza A appearing slightly later (week 50/2019), followed by continued co-circulation of A and B viruses throughout the season. Sixty-eight samples, selected to cover the entire influenza season and all circulating viral types, were analysed by next generation sequencing (NGS). All A(H1N1)pdm09 sequences identified during this season in Romania were clustered in the 6b1.A clade (sub-clades: 6b1.A.183P -5a and 6b1.A.187A). For most A(H1N1)pdm09 sequences, the dominant epitope was Sb (pepitope = 0.25), reducing the vaccine efficacy by approximately 60%. According to phylogenetic analysis, influenza A(H3N2) strains circulating in this season belonged predominantly to clade 3C.3A, with only few sequences in clade 3C.2A1b. These 3C.2A1b sequences, two of which belonged to vaccinated patients, harbored mutations in antigenic sites leading to potential reduction of vaccine efficacy. Phylogenetic analysis of influenza B, lineage Victoria, sequences showed that the circulating strains belonged to clade V1A3. As compared to the other viral types, fewer mutations were observed in B/Victoria strains, with limited impact on vaccine efficiency based on estimations.


Subject(s)
Epidemics , Hospitalization , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype/genetics , Influenza B virus/genetics , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/history , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/history , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/genetics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Child, Preschool , Coinfection , Female , History, 21st Century , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Influenza, Human/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Phylogeny , RNA, Viral/genetics , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Romania/epidemiology , Young Adult
15.
Med Microbiol Immunol ; 210(5-6): 277-282, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449965

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has forced the implementation of unprecedented public health measures strategies which might also have a significant impact on the spreading of other viral pathogens such as influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) . The present study compares the incidences of the most relevant respiratory viruses before and during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in emergency room patients. We analyzed the results of in total 14,946 polymerase chain reaction point-of-care tests (POCT-PCR) for Influenza A, Influenza B, RSV and SARS-CoV-2 in an adult and a pediatric emergency room between December 1, 2018 and March 31, 2021. Despite a fivefold increase in the number of tests performed, the positivity rate for Influenza A dropped from 19.32% (165 positives of 854 tests in 2018/19), 14.57% (149 positives of 1023 in 2019-20) to 0% (0 positives of 4915 tests) in 2020/21. In analogy, the positivity rate for Influenza B and RSV dropped from 0.35 to 1.47%, respectively, 10.65-21.08% to 0% for both in 2020/21. The positivity rate for SARS-CoV2 reached 9.74% (110 of 1129 tests performed) during the so-called second wave in December 2020. Compared to the two previous years, seasonal influenza and RSV incidence was eliminated during the COVID-19 pandemic. Corona-related measures and human behavior patterns could lead to a significant decline or even complete suppression of other respiratory viruses such as influenza and RSV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Point-of-Care Testing/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/virology , Orthomyxoviridae/genetics , Orthomyxoviridae/isolation & purification , Orthomyxoviridae/physiology , Pandemics , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/genetics , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/isolation & purification , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/physiology , Retrospective Studies
18.
Food Environ Virol ; 13(3): 322-328, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257868

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to investigate human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) prevalence among the other respiratory viruses such as parainfluenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and non-enteric adenoviruses in clinical specimens of Egyptian children and raw sewage samples. One hundred clinical specimens were collected from Egyptian children suffering from upper and lower respiratory viral infections in the years 2005-2006 to detect HCoV-NL63 genome using RT-PCR. All the specimens were negative for the virus. Also, a complete absence of HCoV-NL63 genome was observed in the twenty-four raw sewage samples collected from two wastewater treatment plants within Greater Cairo from February 2006 to January 2007. Using nested RT-PCR, parainfluenza virus type 1, respiratory syncytial virus type A, adenovirus type 4, and adenovirus type 7 were detected in 3%, 2%, 5%, and 2% of the clinical specimens, respectively. Of these viruses, only adenovirus type 4 was detected in 1/24 (4.17%) of the raw sewage samples, while a complete absence of the other investigated respiratory viruses was observed in the raw sewage samples. The low percentage of positivity in the clinical specimens, the concentration method of the raw sewage samples, and the indirect routes of transmission may be the reasons for the absence of respiratory viruses in raw sewage samples. On the other hand, enteric adenoviruses were detected in 21/24 (87.5%) of the raw sewage samples with a higher prevalence of adenovirus type 41 than adenovirus type 40. A direct route of transmission of enteric viruses to raw sewage may be the reason for the high positivity percentage of enteric adenoviruses in raw sewage samples.


Subject(s)
Adenoviridae , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus NL63, Human , Parainfluenza Virus 1, Human , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Sewage/virology , Adenoviridae Infections/virology , Child, Preschool , Cities , Egypt/epidemiology , Humans , Infant , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respirovirus Infections/virology , Specimen Handling , Viruses
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 683902, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282386

ABSTRACT

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a public health concern that causes acute lower respiratory tract infection. So far, no vaccine candidate under development has reached the market and the only licensed product to prevent RSV infection in at-risk infants and young children is a monoclonal antibody (Synagis®). Polyclonal human anti-RSV hyper-immune immunoglobulins (Igs) have also been used but were superseded by Synagis® owing to their low titer and large infused volume. Here we report a new drug class of immunoglobulins, derived from human non hyper-immune plasma that was generated by an innovative bioprocess, called Ig cracking, combining expertises in plasma-derived products and affinity chromatography. By using the RSV fusion protein (F protein) as ligand, the Ig cracking process provided a purified and concentrated product, designated hyper-enriched anti-RSV IgG, composed of at least 15-20% target-specific-antibodies from normal plasma. These anti-RSV Ig displayed a strong in vitro neutralization effect on RSV replication. Moreover, we described a novel prophylactic strategy based on local nasal administration of this unique hyper-enriched anti-RSV IgG solution using a mouse model of infection with bioluminescent RSV. Our results demonstrated that very low doses of hyper-enriched anti-RSV IgG can be administered locally to ensure rapid and efficient inhibition of virus infection. Thus, the general hyper-enriched Ig concept appeared a promising approach and might provide solutions to prevent and treat other infectious diseases. IMPORTANCE: Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the major cause of acute lower respiratory infections in children, and is also recognized as a cause of morbidity in the elderly. There are still no vaccines and no efficient antiviral therapy against this virus. Here, we described an approach of passive immunization with a new class of hyper-enriched anti-RSV immunoglobulins (Ig) manufactured from human normal plasma. This new class of immunoglobulin plasma derived product is generated by an innovative bioprocess, called Ig cracking, which requires a combination of expertise in both plasma derived products and affinity chromatography. The strong efficacy in a small volume of these hyper-enriched anti-RSV IgG to inhibit the viral infection was demonstrated using a mouse model. This new class of immunoglobulin plasma-derived products could be applied to other pathogens to address specific therapeutic needs in the field of infectious diseases or even pandemics, such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/administration & dosage , Immunization, Passive , Immunoglobulin G/administration & dosage , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/prevention & control , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/immunology , Administration, Intranasal , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/isolation & purification , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/isolation & purification , Lung/drug effects , Lung/virology , Neutralization Tests , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Turbinates/drug effects , Turbinates/virology , Viral Fusion Proteins/immunology , Virus Replication/drug effects
20.
Life Sci ; 280: 119744, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281492

ABSTRACT

Viral respiratory tract infections have significantly impacted global health as well as socio-economic growth. Respiratory viruses such as the influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and the recent SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19) typically infect the upper respiratory tract by entry through the respiratory mucosa before reaching the lower respiratory tract, resulting in respiratory disease. Generally, vaccination is the primary method in preventing virus pathogenicity and it has been shown to remarkably reduce the burden of various infectious diseases. Nevertheless, the efficacy of conventional vaccines may be hindered by certain limitations, prompting the need to develop novel vaccine delivery vehicles to immunize against various strains of respiratory viruses and to mitigate the risk of a pandemic. In this review, we provide an insight into how polymer-based nanoparticles can be integrated with the development of vaccines to effectively enhance immune responses for combating viral respiratory tract infections.


Subject(s)
Nanoparticles/chemistry , Polymers/chemistry , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Vaccination , Viral Vaccines/administration & dosage , Animals , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Carriers/chemistry , Humans , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Influenza, Human/virology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/prevention & control , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Vaccination/methods , Viral Vaccines/therapeutic use
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