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1.
Viruses ; 12(8)2020 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512665

ABSTRACT

Acute viral bronchiolitis causes significant mortality in the developing world, is the number one cause of infant hospitalisation in the developed world, and is associated with the later development of chronic lung diseases such as asthma. A vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the leading cause of viral bronchiolitis in infancy, remains elusive, and hence new therapeutic modalities are needed to limit disease severity. However, much remains unknown about the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Neutrophilic inflammation is the predominant phenotype observed in infants with both mild and severe disease, however, a clear understanding of the beneficial and deleterious effects of neutrophils is lacking. In this review, we describe the multifaceted roles of neutrophils in host defence and antiviral immunity, consider their contribution to bronchiolitis pathogenesis, and discuss whether new approaches that target neutrophil effector functions will be suitable for treating severe RSV bronchiolitis.


Subject(s)
Bronchiolitis, Viral/immunology , Bronchiolitis, Viral/pathology , Immunity, Innate , Neutrophils/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/pathology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/immunology , Acute Disease , Animals , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Inflammation/virology , Lung/virology , Mice , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/pathogenicity
2.
Front Immunol ; 11: 575074, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256374

ABSTRACT

Combined cellular and humoral host immune response determine the clinical course of a viral infection and effectiveness of vaccination, but currently the cellular immune response cannot be measured on simple blood samples. As functional activity of immune cells is determined by coordinated activity of signaling pathways, we developed mRNA-based JAK-STAT signaling pathway activity assays to quantitatively measure the cellular immune response on Affymetrix expression microarray data of various types of blood samples from virally infected patients (influenza, RSV, dengue, yellow fever, rotavirus) or vaccinated individuals, and to determine vaccine immunogenicity. JAK-STAT1/2 pathway activity was increased in blood samples of patients with viral, but not bacterial, infection and was higher in influenza compared to RSV-infected patients, reflecting known differences in immunogenicity. High JAK-STAT3 pathway activity was associated with more severe RSV infection. In contrast to inactivated influenza virus vaccine, live yellow fever vaccine did induce JAK-STAT1/2 pathway activity in blood samples, indicating superior immunogenicity. Normal (healthy) JAK-STAT1/2 pathway activity was established, enabling assay interpretation without the need for a reference sample. The JAK-STAT pathway assays enable measurement of cellular immune response for prognosis, therapy stratification, vaccine development, and clinical testing.


Subject(s)
Dengue Virus/immunology , Immunity, Cellular , Orthomyxoviridae/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/immunology , Rotavirus/immunology , Viral Vaccines/therapeutic use , Virus Diseases/immunology , Yellow fever virus/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , Dengue/blood , Dengue/immunology , Dengue/prevention & control , Dengue/virology , Dengue Vaccines/therapeutic use , Dengue Virus/pathogenicity , Diagnosis, Differential , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/immunology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Influenza, Human/virology , Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis , Orthomyxoviridae/pathogenicity , Predictive Value of Tests , RNA, Messenger/blood , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/blood , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/prevention & control , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/pathogenicity , Rotavirus/pathogenicity , Rotavirus Infections/blood , Rotavirus Infections/immunology , Rotavirus Infections/prevention & control , Rotavirus Infections/virology , Rotavirus Vaccines , Signal Transduction/genetics , Virus Diseases/blood , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Virus Diseases/virology , Yellow Fever/blood , Yellow Fever/immunology , Yellow Fever/prevention & control , Yellow Fever/virology , Yellow Fever Vaccine/therapeutic use , Yellow fever virus/pathogenicity
4.
J Gen Virol ; 102(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-873186

ABSTRACT

Although enveloped viruses canonically mediate particle entry through virus-cell fusion, certain viruses can spread by cell-cell fusion, brought about by receptor engagement and triggering of membrane-bound, viral-encoded fusion proteins on the surface of cells. The formation of pathogenic syncytia or multinucleated cells is seen in vivo, but their contribution to viral pathogenesis is poorly understood. For the negative-strand paramyxoviruses respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and Nipah virus (NiV), cell-cell spread is highly efficient because their oligomeric fusion protein complexes are active at neutral pH. The recently emerged severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has also been reported to induce syncytia formation in infected cells, with the spike protein initiating cell-cell fusion. Whilst it is well established that fusion protein-specific antibodies can block particle attachment and/or entry into the cell (canonical virus neutralization), their capacity to inhibit cell-cell fusion and the consequences of this neutralization for the control of infection are not well characterized, in part because of the lack of specific tools to assay and quantify this activity. Using an adapted bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, based on a split GFP-Renilla luciferase reporter, we have established a micro-fusion inhibition test (mFIT) that allows the identification and quantification of these neutralizing antibodies. This assay has been optimized for high-throughput use and its applicability has been demonstrated by screening monoclonal antibody (mAb)-mediated inhibition of RSV and NiV fusion and, separately, the development of fusion-inhibitory antibodies following NiV vaccine immunization in pigs. In light of the recent emergence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a similar assay was developed for SARS-CoV-2 and used to screen mAbs and convalescent patient plasma for fusion-inhibitory antibodies. Using mFITs to assess antibody responses following natural infection or vaccination is favourable, as this assay can be performed entirely at low biocontainment, without the need for live virus. In addition, the repertoire of antibodies that inhibit cell-cell fusion may be different to those that inhibit particle entry, shedding light on the mechanisms underpinning antibody-mediated neutralization of viral spread.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Antibodies, Viral/pharmacology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Henipavirus Infections/diagnosis , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/diagnosis , Viral Fusion Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Fusion , Convalescence , Genes, Reporter , Green Fluorescent Proteins/genetics , Green Fluorescent Proteins/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Henipavirus Infections/immunology , Henipavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Immune Sera/chemistry , Luciferases/genetics , Luciferases/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Nipah Virus/immunology , Nipah Virus/pathogenicity , Protein Conformation , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Swine , Viral Fusion Protein Inhibitors/chemistry , Viral Fusion Protein Inhibitors/metabolism , Viral Fusion Protein Inhibitors/pharmacology , Viral Fusion Proteins/genetics , Viral Fusion Proteins/immunology
5.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 132, 2020 Feb 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-827577

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the leading worldwide causes of childhood morbidity and mortality. Its disease burden varies by age and etiology and is time dependent. We aimed to investigate the annual and seasonal patterns in etiologies of pediatric CAP requiring hospitalization. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study in 30,994 children (aged 0-18 years) with CAP between 2010 and 2015 at 23 nationwide hospitals in South Korea. Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) pneumonia was clinically classified as macrolide-sensitive MP, macrolide-less effective MP (MLEP), and macrolide-refractory MP (MRMP) based on fever duration after initiation of macrolide treatment, regardless of the results of in vitro macrolide sensitivity tests. RESULTS: MP and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) were the two most commonly identified pathogens of CAP. With the two epidemics of MP pneumonia (2011 and 2015), the rates of clinical MLEP and MRMP pneumonia showed increasing trends of 36.4% of the total MP pneumonia. In children < 2 years of age, RSV (34.0%) was the most common cause of CAP, followed by MP (9.4%); however, MP was the most common cause of CAP in children aged 2-18 years of age (45.3%). Systemic corticosteroid was most commonly administered for MP pneumonia. The rate of hospitalization in intensive care units was the highest for RSV pneumonia, and ventilator care was most commonly needed in cases of adenovirus pneumonia. CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides fundamental data to establish public health policies to decrease the disease burden due to CAP and improve pediatric health.


Subject(s)
Community-Acquired Infections/etiology , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology , Adenoviridae Infections/drug therapy , Adenoviridae Infections/epidemiology , Adenoviridae Infections/etiology , Adolescent , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Child , Child, Preschool , Community-Acquired Infections/drug therapy , Community-Acquired Infections/epidemiology , Female , Hospitals, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Macrolides/therapeutic use , Male , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/drug therapy , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/etiology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/pathogenicity , Retrospective Studies , Seasons
6.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses ; 14(6): 747-756, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713679

ABSTRACT

The controlled human infection model and specifically the human viral challenge model are not dissimilar to standard clinical trials while adding another layer of complexity and safety considerations. The models deliberately infect volunteers, with an infectious challenge agent to determine the effect of the infection and the potential benefits of the experimental interventions. The human viral challenge model studies can shorten the time to assess the efficacy of a new vaccine or treatment by combining this with the assessment of safety. The newly emerging SARS-CoV-2 virus is highly contagious, and an urgent race is on to develop a new vaccine against this virus in a timeframe never attempted before. The use of the human viral challenge model has been proposed to accelerate the development of the vaccine. In the early 2000s, the authors successfully developed a pathogenic human viral challenge model for another virus for which there was no effective treatment and established it to evaluate potential therapies and vaccines against respiratory syncytial virus. Experience gained in the development of that model can help with the development of a COVID-19 HVCM and the authors describe it here.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Models, Biological , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Selection , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/drug effects , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety , Viral Load/drug effects , Viral Vaccines/adverse effects , Viral Vaccines/therapeutic use
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