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1.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259910, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581787

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Clinical observations have shown that there is a relationship between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and atypical lymphocytes in the peripheral blood; however, knowledge about the time course of the changes in atypical lymphocytes and the association with the clinical course of COVID-19 is limited. OBJECTIVE: Our purposes were to investigate the dynamics of atypical lymphocytes in COVID-19 patients and to estimate their clinical significance for diagnosis and monitoring disease course. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively identified 98 inpatients in a general ward at Kashiwa Municipal Hospital from May 1st, 2020, to October 31st, 2020. We extracted data on patient demographics, symptoms, comorbidities, blood test results, radiographic findings, treatment after admission and clinical course. We compared clinical findings between patients with and without atypical lymphocytes, investigated the behavior of atypical lymphocytes throughout the clinical course of COVID-19, and determined the relationships among the development of pneumonia, the use of supplemental oxygen and the presence of atypical lymphocytes. RESULTS: Patients with atypical lymphocytes had a significantly higher prevalence of pneumonia (80.4% vs. 42.6%, p < 0.0001) and the use of supplemental oxygen (25.5% vs. 4.3%, p = 0.0042). The median time to the appearance of atypical lymphocytes after disease onset was eight days, and atypical lymphocytes were observed in 16/98 (16.3%) patients at the first visit. Atypical lymphocytes appeared after the confirmation of lung infiltrates in 31/41 (75.6%) patients. Of the 13 oxygen-treated patients with atypical lymphocytes, approximately two-thirds had a stable or improved clinical course after the appearance of atypical lymphocytes. CONCLUSION: Atypical lymphocytes frequently appeared in the peripheral blood of COVID-19 patients one week after disease onset. Patients with atypical lymphocytes were more likely to have pneumonia and to need supplemental oxygen; however, two-thirds of them showed clinical improvement after the appearance of atypical lymphocytes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Leukocyte Disorders/diagnosis , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Leukocyte Disorders/complications , Leukocyte Disorders/epidemiology , Leukocyte Disorders/virology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/pathology , Lymphocytes/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/blood , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/complications , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
2.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580428

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to compare the clinical severity in patients who were coinfected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and rhinovirus or monoinfected with a single one of these viruses. METHODS: The study period ranged from 1 March 2020 to 28 February 2021 (one year). SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory viruses were identified by real-time reverse-transcription-PCR as part of the routine work at Marseille University hospitals. Bacterial and fungal infections were detected by standard methods. Clinical data were retrospectively collected from medical files. This study was approved by the ethical committee of our institute. RESULTS: A total of 6034/15,157 (40%) tested patients were positive for at least one respiratory virus. Ninety-three (4.3%) SARS-CoV-2-infected patients were coinfected with another respiratory virus, with rhinovirus being the most frequent (62/93, 67%). Patients coinfected with SARS-CoV-2 and rhinovirus were significantly more likely to report a cough than those with SARS-CoV-2 monoinfection (62% vs. 31%; p = 0.0008). In addition, they were also significantly more likely to report dyspnea than patients with rhinovirus monoinfection (45% vs. 36%; p = 0.02). They were also more likely to be transferred to an intensive care unit and to die than patients with rhinovirus monoinfection (16% vs. 5% and 7% vs. 2%, respectively) but these differences were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: A close surveillance and investigation of the co-incidence and interactions of SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory viruses is needed. The possible higher risk of increased clinical severity in SARS-CoV-2-positive patients coinfected with rhinovirus warrants further large scale studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/virology , Picornaviridae Infections/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Coinfection/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Picornaviridae Infections/diagnosis , Picornaviridae Infections/virology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Retrospective Studies , Rhinovirus , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
3.
Semin Respir Crit Care Med ; 42(6): 747-758, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585686

ABSTRACT

Respiratory tract infection is one of the most common diseases in human worldwide. Many viruses are implicated in these infections, including emerging viruses, such as the novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Identification of the causative viral pathogens of respiratory tract infections is important to select a correct management of patients, choose an appropriate treatment, and avoid unnecessary antibiotics use. Different diagnostic approaches present variable performance in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and time-to-result, that have to be acknowledged to be able to choose the right diagnostic test at the right time, in the right patient. This review describes currently available rapid diagnostic strategies and syndromic approaches for the detection of viruses commonly responsible for respiratory diseases.


Subject(s)
Early Diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sensitivity and Specificity , Time Factors
5.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(47): 1623-1628, 2021 Nov 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1534933

ABSTRACT

Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is associated with a broad spectrum of illnesses, including mild to severe acute respiratory illness (ARI) and acute flaccid myelitis (AFM). Enteroviruses, including EV-D68, are typically detected in the United States during late summer through fall, with year-to-year fluctuations. Before 2014, EV-D68 was infrequently reported to CDC (1). However, numbers of EV-D68 detection have increased in recent years, with a biennial pattern observed during 2014-2018 in the United States, after the expansion of surveillance and wider availability of molecular testing. In 2014, a national outbreak of EV-D68 was detected (2). EV-D68 was also reported in 2016 via local (3) and passive national (4) surveillance. EV-D68 detections were limited in 2017, but substantial circulation was observed in 2018 (5). To assess recent levels of circulation, EV-D68 detections in respiratory specimens collected from patients aged <18 years* with ARI evaluated in emergency departments (EDs) or admitted to one of seven U.S. medical centers† within the New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN) were summarized. This report provides a provisional description of EV-D68 detections during July-November in 2018, 2019 and 2020, and describes the demographic and clinical characteristics of these patients. In 2018, a total of 382 EV-D68 detections in respiratory specimens obtained from patients aged <18 years with ARI were reported by NVSN; the number decreased to six detections in 2019 and 30 in 2020. Among patients aged <18 years with EV-D68 in 2020, 22 (73%) were non-Hispanic Black (Black) persons. EV-D68 detections in 2020 were lower than anticipated based on the biennial circulation pattern observed since 2014. The circulation of EV-D68 in 2020 might have been limited by widespread COVID-19 mitigation measures; how these changes in behavior might influence the timing and levels of circulation in future years is unknown. Ongoing monitoring of EV-D68 detections is warranted for preparedness for EV-D68-associated ARI and AFM.


Subject(s)
Disease Outbreaks , Enterovirus D, Human/isolation & purification , Enterovirus Infections/epidemiology , Population Surveillance/methods , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Enterovirus D, Human/genetics , Enterovirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , United States/epidemiology
6.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259908, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511834

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The incidence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections in the Belgian community is mainly estimated based on test results of patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19)-like symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of the SARS-CoV-2 reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) positivity ratio and distribution of viral loads within a cohort of asymptomatic patients screened prior hospitalization or surgery, stratified by age category. MATERIALS/METHODS: We retrospectively studied data on SARS-CoV-2 real-time RT-PCR detection in respiratory tract samples of asymptomatic patients screened pre-hospitalization or pre-surgery in nine Belgian hospitals located in Flanders over a 12-month period (1 April 2020-31 March 2021). RESULTS: In total, 255925 SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR test results and 2421 positive results for which a viral load was reported, were included in this study. An unweighted overall SARS-CoV-2 real-time RT-PCR positivity ratio of 1.27% was observed with strong spatiotemporal differences. SARS-CoV-2 circulated predominantly in 80+ year old individuals across all time periods except between the first and second COVID-19 wave and in 20-30 year old individuals before the second COVID-19 wave. In contrast to the first wave, a significantly higher positivity ratio was observed for the 20-40 age group in addition to the 80+ age group compared to the other age groups during the second wave. The median viral load follows a similar temporal evolution as the positivity rate with an increase ahead of the second wave and highest viral loads observed for 80+ year old individuals. CONCLUSION: There was a high SARS-CoV-2 circulation among asymptomatic patients with a predominance and highest viral loads observed in the elderly. Moreover, ahead of the second COVID-19 wave an increase in median viral load was noted with the highest overall positivity ratio observed in 20-30 year old individuals, indicating they could have been the hidden drivers of this wave.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Belgium/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Tract Infections/pathology , Respiratory Tract Infections/surgery , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Young Adult
7.
Virol J ; 18(1): 159, 2021 08 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496199

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The multifaceted non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) taken during the COVID-19 pandemic not only decrease the spreading of the SARS-CoV-2, but have impact on the prevalence of other viruses. This study aimed to explore the prevalence of common respiratory viruses among hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in China during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Respiratory specimens were obtained from children with LRTI at Children's Hospital of Fudan University for detection of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus (ADV), parainfluenza virus (PIV) 1 to 3, influenza virus A (FluA), influenza virus B (FluB), human metapneumovirus (MPV) and rhinovirus (RV). The data were analyzed and compared between the year of 2020 (COVID-19 pandemic) and 2019 (before COVID-19 pandemic). RESULTS: A total of 7107 patients were enrolled, including 4600 patients in 2019 and 2507 patients in 2020. Compared with 2019, we observed an unprecedented reduction of RSV, ADV, FluA, FluB, and MPV infections in 2020, despite of reopening of schools in June, 2020. However, the RV infection was significantly increased in 2020 and a sharp increase was observed especially after reopening of schools. Besides, the PIV infection showed resurgent characteristic after September of 2020. The mixed infections were significantly less frequent in 2020 compared with the year of 2019. CONCLUSIONS: The NPIs during the COVID-19 pandemic have great impact on the prevalence of common respiratory viruses in China. Meanwhile, we do need to be cautious of a possible resurgence of some respiratory viruses as the COVID-19 restrictions are relaxed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Age Distribution , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Infant , Male , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons , Viruses/classification , Viruses/isolation & purification
8.
Infect Dis Clin North Am ; 35(4): 1055-1075, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487740

ABSTRACT

Health care-acquired viral respiratory infections are common and cause increased patient morbidity and mortality. Although the threat of viral respiratory infection has been underscored by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, respiratory viruses have a significant impact in health care settings even under normal circumstances. Studies report decreased nosocomial transmission when aggressive infection control measures are implemented, with more success noted when using a multicomponent approach. Influenza vaccination of health care personnel furthers decrease rates of transmission; thus, mandatory vaccination is becoming more common. This article discusses the epidemiology, transmission, and control of health care-associated respiratory viral infections.


Subject(s)
Cross Infection/prevention & control , Cross Infection/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/transmission , Guideline Adherence , Health Personnel/standards , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/transmission , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vaccination , Viruses/classification , Viruses/pathogenicity
9.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(2): e0083121, 2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476399

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiological agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has infected all age groups and disproportionately impacted vulnerable populations globally. Polymicrobial infections may play an important role in the development of SARS-CoV-2 infection in susceptible hosts. These coinfections may increase the risk of disease severity and pose challenges to the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of COVID-19. There have been limited SARS-CoV-2 coinfection studies. In this retrospective study, residual nucleic acid extracts from 796 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19-positive specimens, collected between March 2020 and February 2021, were analyzed using a Luminex NxTAG respiratory pathogen panel (RPP). Of these, 745 returned valid results and were used for analysis; 53 (7.1%) were positive for one or more additional pathogens. Six different respiratory viruses were detected among the 53 SARS-CoV-2-positive patient specimens, and 7 of those specimens tested positive for more than one additional respiratory virus. The most common pathogens include rhinovirus/enterovirus (RV/EV) (n = 22, 41.51%), human metapneumovirus (hMPV) (n = 18, 33.9%), and adenovirus (n = 12, 22.6%). Interestingly, there were no SARS-CoV-2 coinfections involving influenza A or influenza B in the study specimens. The median age of the SARS-CoV-2-positive patients with coinfections was 38 years; 53% identified as female, and 47% identified as male. Based on our retrospective analysis, respiratory coinfections associated with SARS-CoV-2-positive patients were more common in young children (≤9 years old), with white being the most common race. Our findings will likely prompt additional investigation of polymicrobial infection associated with SARS-CoV-2 during seasonal respiratory pathogen surveillance by public health laboratories. IMPORTANCE This examination of respiratory pathogen coinfections in SARS-CoV-2 patients will likely shed light on our understanding of polymicrobial infection associated with COVID-19. Our results should prompt public health authorities to improve seasonal respiratory pathogen surveillance practices and address the risk of disease severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Coinfection/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/complications , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Adenoviridae/genetics , Adenoviridae/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Enterovirus/genetics , Enterovirus/isolation & purification , Female , Humans , Male , Metapneumovirus/genetics , Metapneumovirus/isolation & purification , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Rhinovirus/genetics , Rhinovirus/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Wisconsin , Young Adult
10.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470994

ABSTRACT

Two serious public health challenges have emerged in the current COVID-19 pandemic namely, deficits in SARS-CoV-2 variant monitoring and neglect of other co-circulating respiratory viruses. Additionally, accurate assessment of the evolution, extent, and dynamics of the outbreak is required to understand the transmission of the virus. To address these challenges, we evaluated 533 samples using a high-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS) respiratory viral panel (RVP) that includes 40 viral pathogens. The performance metrics revealed a PPA, NPA, and accuracy of 95.98%, 85.96%, and 94.4%, respectively. The clade for pangolin lineage B that contains certain distant variants, including P4715L in ORF1ab, Q57H in ORF3a, and S84L in ORF8 covarying with the D614G spike protein mutation, were the most prevalent early in the pandemic in Georgia, USA. The isolates from the same county formed paraphyletic groups, indicating virus transmission between counties. The study demonstrates the clinical and public health utility of the NGS-RVP to identify novel variants that can provide actionable information to prevent or mitigate emerging viral threats and models that provide insights into viral transmission patterns and predict transmission/resurgence of regional outbreaks as well as providing critical information on co-circulating respiratory viruses that might be independent factors contributing to the global disease burden.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Genome, Viral/genetics , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Limit of Detection , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
11.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1469382

ABSTRACT

Respiratory viruses are known to be the most frequent causative mediators of lung infections in humans, bearing significant impact on the host cell signaling machinery due to their host-dependency for efficient replication. Certain cellular functions are actively induced by respiratory viruses for their own benefit. This includes metabolic pathways such as glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis (FAS) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, among others, which are modified during viral infections. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of metabolic pathway modifications mediated by the acute respiratory viruses respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), rhinovirus (RV), influenza virus (IV), parainfluenza virus (PIV), coronavirus (CoV) and adenovirus (AdV), and highlight potential targets and compounds for therapeutic approaches.


Subject(s)
Citric Acid Cycle/physiology , Energy Metabolism/physiology , Fatty Acids/biosynthesis , Glycolysis/physiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/pathology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Adenoviridae/metabolism , Coronavirus/metabolism , Humans , Orthomyxoviridae/metabolism , Parainfluenza Virus 1, Human/metabolism , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/metabolism , Rhinovirus/metabolism
12.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5026, 2021 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363491

ABSTRACT

Nationwide prospective surveillance of all-age patients with acute respiratory infections was conducted in China between 2009‒2019. Here we report the etiological and epidemiological features of the 231,107 eligible patients enrolled in this analysis. Children <5 years old and school-age children have the highest viral positivity rate (46.9%) and bacterial positivity rate (30.9%). Influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus and human rhinovirus are the three leading viral pathogens with proportions of 28.5%, 16.8% and 16.7%, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Klebsiella pneumoniae are the three leading bacterial pathogens (29.9%, 18.6% and 15.8%). Negative interactions between viruses and positive interactions between viral and bacterial pathogens are common. A Join-Point analysis reveals the age-specific positivity rate and how this varied for individual pathogens. These data indicate that differential priorities for diagnosis, prevention and control should be highlighted in terms of acute respiratory tract infection patients' demography, geographic locations and season of illness in China.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Virus Diseases/virology , Viruses/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Seasons , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics , Young Adult
13.
J Med Virol ; 93(10): 5798-5804, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432412

ABSTRACT

Rapid diagnostics for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are paramount for reducing the spread of the current pandemic. During additional seasonal epidemics with influenza A/B and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the clinical signs and symptoms cannot be distinguished easily from SARS-CoV-2. Therefore, a new assay combining four targets in the form of the new Xpert Xpress SARS-CoV-2/Flu/RSV assay was evaluated. The assay was compared to the Xpert Xpress SARS-CoV-2, Xpert Xpress Flu/RSV, Seegene Flu/RSV, influenza A/B r-gene® and RSV/hMPV r-gene®. A total of 295 nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were tested at four institutes throughout Europe including 72 samples positive for SARS-CoV-2, 65 for influenza A, 47 for influenza B, and 77 for RSV. The sensitivity of the new assay was above 95% for all targets, with the highest for SARS-CoV-2 (97.2%). The overall correlation of SARS-CoV-2 Ct values between Xpert Xpress SARS-CoV-2 assay and Xpert Xpress SARS-CoV-2/Flu/RSV assay was high. The agreement between Ct values above 30 showed the multiplex giving higher Ct values for SARS-CoV-2 on average than the singleplex assay. In conclusion, the new assay is a rapid and reliable alternative with less hands-on time for the detection of not one, but four upper respiratory tract pathogens that may circulate at the same time.


Subject(s)
Influenza A virus/isolation & purification , Influenza B virus/isolation & purification , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/isolation & purification , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Europe/epidemiology , Humans , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction , Nasopharynx/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity
14.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(9): e2124650, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412566

ABSTRACT

Importance: Every year, respiratory viruses exact a heavy burden on Canadian hospitals during winter months. Generalizable seasonal patterns of respiratory virus transmission may estimate the evolution of SARS-CoV-2 or other emerging pathogens. Objective: To describe the annual and biennial variation in respiratory virus seasonality in a northern climate. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study is an epidemiological assessment using population-based surveillance of patients with medically attended respiratory tract infection from 2005 through 2017 in Alberta, Canada. Incident cases of respiratory virus infection and infant respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalizations in Alberta were extracted from the Data Integration for Alberta Laboratories platform and Alberta Health Services Discharge Abstract Database, respectively. A deterministic susceptible-infected-recovered-susceptible mathematical model with seasonal forcing function was fitted to the data for each virus. The possible future seasonal course of SARS-CoV-2 in northern latitudes was modeled on the basis of these observations. The analysis was conducted between December 15, 2020, and February 10, 2021. Exposures: Seasonal respiratory pathogens. Main Outcomes and Measures: Incidence (temporal pattern) of respiratory virus infections and RSV hospitalizations. Results: A total of 37 719 incident infections with RSV, human metapneumovirus, or human coronaviruses 229E, NL63, OC43, or HKU1 among 35 375 patients (18 069 [51.1%] male; median [interquartile range], 1.29 [0.42-12.2] years) were documented. A susceptible-infected-recovered-susceptible model mirrored the epidemiological data, including a striking biennial variation with alternating severe and mild winter peaks. Qualitative description of the model and numerical simulations showed that strong seasonal contact rate and temporary immunity lasting 6 to 12 months were sufficient to explain biennial seasonality in these various respiratory viruses. The seasonality of 10 212 hospitalizations among children younger than 5 years with RSV was also explored. The median (interquartile range) rate of hospitalizations per 1000 live births was 18.6 (17.6-19.9) and 11.0 (10.4-11.7) in alternating even (severe) and odd (less-severe) seasons, respectively (P = .001). The hazard of admission was higher for children born in severe (even) seasons compared with those born in less-severe (odd) seasons (hazard ratio, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.61-1.75; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this modeling study of respiratory viruses in Alberta, Canada, the seasonality followed a pattern estimated by simple mathematical models, which may be informative for anticipating future waves of pandemic SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Seasons , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Alberta/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Statistics, Nonparametric , Virus Diseases/epidemiology
15.
Arch Immunol Ther Exp (Warsz) ; 69(1): 25, 2021 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1411512

ABSTRACT

The term host defense peptides arose at the beginning to refer to those peptides that are part of the host's immunity. Because of their broad antimicrobial capacity and immunomodulatory activity, nowadays, they emerge as a hope to combat resistant multi-drug microorganisms and emerging viruses, such as the case of coronaviruses. Since the beginning of this century, coronaviruses have been part of different outbreaks and a pandemic, and they will be surely part of the next pandemics, this review analyses whether these peptides and their derivatives are ready to be part of the treatment of the next coronavirus pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemical synthesis , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/immunology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/chemical synthesis , Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/immunology , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Immunomodulation , Respiratory Tract Infections/drug therapy , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/immunology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology
16.
Arch Virol ; 166(11): 3085-3092, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1391877

ABSTRACT

Adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza virus are common causes of respiratory infections. The COVID-19 pandemic had a significant impact on their prevalence. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemic changes of common respiratory viruses in the Affiliated Hospital of Hangzhou Normal University in Hangzhou, China, from October of 2017 to February of 2021. We collected statistics from 121,529 patients in the outpatient and inpatient departments of the hospital who had throat or nose swabs collected for testing for four virus antigens by the colloidal gold method. Of these, 13,200 (10.86%) were positive for influenza A virus, 8,402 (6.91%) were positive for influenza B virus, 6,056 (4.98%) were positive for adenovirus, and 4,739 (3.90%) were positive for respiratory syncytial virus. The positivity rates of the influenza A virus (0-14 years old, P = 0.376; over 14 years old, P = 0.197) and respiratory syncytial virus (0-14 years old, P = 0.763; over 14 years old, P = 0.465) did not differ significantly by gender. After January of 2020, influenza virus infection decreased significantly. The positivity rate of respiratory syncytial virus remained high, and its epidemic season was similar to before. Strict respiratory protection and regulation of crowd activities have a great impact on the epidemic characteristics of viruses. After major changes in the public health environment, virus epidemics and their mutations should be monitored closely, extensively, and continuously.


Subject(s)
Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Adenoviridae/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Influenza A virus/isolation & purification , Influenza B virus/isolation & purification , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons , Sex Factors , Young Adult
18.
Int J Infect Dis ; 104: 198-206, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385702

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Synthesis of the available evidence on the effectiveness of medical and cloth facemask use by the general public in community settings is required to learn lessons for future respiratory epidemics/pandemics. METHOD: Search terms relating to facemasks, infection and community settings were used for PubMed, the Cochrane Library Database and Google Scholar. A meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effects model. RESULTS: The review included 12 primary studies on the effectiveness of medical facemask use to prevent influenza, influenza-like illness, SARS-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2 transmission. The meta-analysis demonstrated that facemask use significantly reduces the risk of transmitting these respiratory infections (pooled OR = 0.66, 95% CI 0.54-0.81). Of the 12 studies, 10 clinical trials suggested that respiratory infection incidence is lower with high medical facemask compliance, early use and use in combination with intensive hand hygiene. One cohort study conducted during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic demonstrated that facemasks are effective in reducing SARS-CoV-2 transmission when used before those who are infected develop symptoms. One case-control study reported that controls used medical facemasks more often than cases infected with SARS-CoV (p < 0.05). No primary study on cloth facemask effectiveness to prevent respiratory infection transmission was found. CONCLUSION: Based on the available evidence, medical facemask use by healthy and sick individuals is recommended for preventing respiratory infection transmission in community settings. Medical facemask effectiveness is dependent on compliance and utilization in combination with preventive measures such as intensive hand hygiene. No direct evidence is currently available in humans supporting the recommendation of cloth facemask use to prevent respiratory infection transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Masks , Pandemics/prevention & control , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Cohort Studies , Hand Hygiene , Humans , Influenza, Human/transmission , Influenza, Human/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/transmission , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/transmission , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology
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