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1.
PLoS One ; 17(6): e0269125, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2162535

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This scoping review explores the constitution of a meaningful life as perceived by adults with acquired neurological impairment following an injury or a disease. INTRODUCTION: A neurological injury or disease imposes extensive life changes on the affected person and his or her close relatives. Including the patients' perception of a meaningful life is crucial to facilitate adjustment of any rehabilitation initiatives to the patients' wishes, hopes, needs, and preferences. Even so, the descriptions and common traits of a meaningful life from the impaired person's perspective are scarcely covered in the literature. Hence, a scoping review of existing knowledge is needed to facilitate quality rehabilitation and research initiatives. INCLUSION CRITERIA: All studies, regardless of their design, are included provided they describe a meaningful life as considered or experienced by persons aged 18 years or more with neurological impairment. METHODS: A PICo framework defines the search algorithms used in the databases MEDLINE, Cinahl, PsycINFO and Embase. Using Covidence, the scoping review systematically organizes the identified articles to provide a broad description of the study phenomenon. Furthermore, titles, abstracts, and full-text articles are screened independently by two reviewers to determine if they meet the inclusion criteria. In case of disagreement, a third and fourth reviewer are consulted. The scoping will be reported according to the PRISMA- SCR checklist.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Research Design , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Review Literature as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic
2.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e064578, 2022 11 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2137771

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, substance use health services for treatment of alcohol use disorder and problematic alcohol use (AUD/PAU) were fragmented and challenging to access. The pandemic magnified system weaknesses, often resulting in disruptions of treatment as alcohol use during the pandemic rose. When treatment services were available, utilisation was often low for various reasons. Virtual care was implemented to offset the drop in in-person care, however accessibility was not universal. Identification of the characteristics of treatment services for AUD/PAU that impact accessibility, as perceived by the individuals accessing or providing the services, will provide insights to enable improved access. We will perform a scoping review that will identify characteristics of services for treatment of AUD/PAU that have been identified as barriers to or facilitators of service access from the perspectives of these groups. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will follow scoping review methodological guidance from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Using the OVID platform, we will search Ovid MEDLINE including Epub Ahead of Print and In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Embase Classic+Embase, APA PsychInfo, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and CINAHL (Ebsco Platform). Multiple reviewers will screen citations. We will seek studies reporting data collected from individuals with AUD/PAU or providers of treatment for AUD/PAU on service-level factors affecting access to care. We will map barriers to and facilitators of access to AUD/PAU treatment services identified in the relevant studies, stratified by service type and key measures of inequity across service users. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This research will enhance awareness of existing evidence regarding barriers to and facilitators of access to services for the treatment of alcohol use disorder and problematic alcohol use. Findings will be disseminated through publications, conference presentations and a stakeholder meeting. As this is a scoping review of published literature, no ethics approval was required.


Subject(s)
Alcoholism , COVID-19 , Humans , Alcoholism/therapy , Pandemics , COVID-19/therapy , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Health Services , Review Literature as Topic
3.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0263549, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119319

ABSTRACT

Since the COVID-19 pandemic there has been a rapid uptake and utilisation of telemedicine in all aspects of healthcare. This presents a key opportunity in surgical site infection surveillance. Remote follow up methods have been used via telephone, with photographs and questionnaires for post-operative reviews with varying results. This review therefore aims to comprehensively synthesise available evidence for the diagnostic accuracy of all forms of SSI telemedicine monitoring. The protocol has been established as per both PRISMA-P (S1 Table) and the Cochrane handbook for reviews of diagnostic test accuracy. Medline, Embase, CENTRAL and CINAHL will be searched using a complete search strategy developed with librarian input, in addition to google scholar and hand searching. All study designs with patients over 18 and undergone a primarily closed surgical procedure will be eligible. Index tests will include all forms of telemedicine and a subgroup analysis performed for each of these. Comparative tests must include face to face review, and all reference standards will be included again for sub-group analyses. Search results will be screened by two investigators independently with a third providing consensus review on disagreements. Methodological quality will be assessed using the QUADAS-2 tool, first validated by two investigators as per the Cochrane handbook. Exploratory analysis will formulate summary receiver operating characteristic curves and forest plots with estimates of sensitivity and specificity of the included studies. Sources of heterogeneity will be identifying and investigated through further analysis. Potential benefits of telemedicine integration in surgical practice will reduce cost and travel time to patients in addition to avoiding wasted clinic appointments, important considerations in a peri-pandemic era. To avoid missed or further complications, there must be confidence in the ability to diagnose infection. This review will systematically determine whether telemedicine is accurate for surgical site infection diagnosis, which methods are well established and if further research is indicated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Surgical Wound Infection/diagnosis , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Pandemics , COVID-19/diagnosis , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Telemedicine/methods , Review Literature as Topic
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115230

ABSTRACT

There has been increasing interest over the past decade with regard to the health and wellbeing implications of time spent outdoors in nature for children. Universal systematic reviews of evidence report benefits to physical health, social-emotional mental health and wellbeing, cognition and academic learning. Internationally, there is indicative evidence to suggest outdoor engagement with nature may also impact children's language and communication skills, skills that are critical to development, education, social relationships and life opportunities. Yet, at present such evidence has not been synthesised. Despite evidence for the benefits of the outdoors, the amount of time children are spending outdoors is in rapid decline, and has been further exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Alongside this are increasing numbers of children starting primary education with significant speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) which remain persistent over time. With established wide-reaching benefits of nature to children's physical and mental health and psychological development, there is a need to further explore the more specific impacts of the natural environment on children's language, communication and social skills, which could provide a unique opportunity to consider nature as a universal public health intervention for SLCN. The current review will aim to synthesise existing qualitative and quantitative evidence of the impact of time spent in natural outdoor spaces on the language, communication and social skills of 2-11-year-old children. Literature will be searched across seven databases and considered for inclusion against inclusion and exclusion criteria. Potential implications of the review include informing public health practice and policy for child development and education, informing priorities for speech, language, and communication interventions, and providing directions for future international research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Skills , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Communication , Humans , Language , Pandemics , Review Literature as Topic
5.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e059987, 2022 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108277

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has posed an unparalleled threat to all dimensions of human health and well-being. The Pan American Health Organization has acknowledged the crucial role of rehabilitation therapies for COVID-19 and emphasised the importance of exercise programmes for COVID-19 survivors. This scoping review outlines our strategy for systematically reviewing published and unpublished literature to investigate the volume of evidence for exercise interventions for COVID-19 survivors. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This scoping review will be conducted based on the framework developed by Arksey and O'Malley. Six databases (PubMed/Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, Cochrane Central, ProQuest and CINAHL) will be searched in August 2022 and articles will be considered for inclusion published till July 2022. Studies will be screened by two independent reviewers at the title/abstract and full-text screening stages, as well as data extraction and critical assessment. Data will be extracted in a data extraction form and presented as figures and tables with narratives. This scoping review will give a thorough understanding of the current literature on exercise interventions for COVID-19 survivors, as well as identify knowledge gaps that will guide future research. Preliminary searches will be conducted after the publication of this scoping review protocol. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: No human or animal participants were involved in this review. Therefore, ethical committee approval is not required. Transparency will be followed at every review stage. Review findings will be disseminated through peer-review publications or through conference presentations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care , Survivors , Exercise Therapy , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090149

ABSTRACT

The sequelae of COVID-19 disease significantly impact the quality of life of people, requiring long-term longitudinal care for recovery and rehabilitation. Primary health care is fundamental in the reception, monitoring, and multi-professional follow-up of post-COVID-19 symptoms and complications. This study proposes a scoping review protocol to identify and map the care process of monitoring and multi-professional follow-up of post-COVID-19 sequelae within the scope of primary health care worldwide. This protocol was based on the Joanna Briggs Institute Manual and guided by PRISMA-ScR. Articles, theses, dissertations, and official documents searched in several databases (MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, LILACS, Web of Science, Embase, and gray literature) will be included. Two independent reviewers will organize and select studies according to inclusion and exclusion criteria using the Rayyan software. The selected publications will be organized and summarized using a checklist proposed by the PRISMA-ScR. Simple descriptive statistics will analyze the quantitative data, while thematic analysis will be used for the qualitative data. The final scoping review will present the main findings, challenges, limitations, and potential research gaps related to the care of people with post-COVID-19 sequelae.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Primary Health Care , Research Design , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Review Literature as Topic
7.
BMJ Open ; 12(10): e065610, 2022 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088816

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Depression is a common mental disorder and is a major cause of years lived with disability. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an increase in the prevalence of depression worldwide. Our aim is to identify and synthesise the determinants of depression, the diagnostic assessment tools used to evaluate depression, and the interventions carried out since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in the population aged 60 and older. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A systematic review of the literature will be conducted. The following databases will be searched: CINAHL Plus with Full Text, MedicLatina, MEDLINE with Full Text, and Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection. The search strategy will include the following Medical Subject Headings or similar terms: "Depression", "Depressive Disorder", "Depressive Symptoms", "Older Adults", "Aging", "Elderly", Pandemic" and "COVID-19". Two independent reviewers will ascertain whether the resulting articles meet inclusion and exclusion criteria, and perform the analysis of data quality. Disagreements will be resolved by a third reviewer. All studies reported between December 2019 and March 2022 meeting the following criteria will be included: studies in adults aged 60 and over, and articles written in English, Portuguese, Spanish or German. Information on determinants of depression, assessment instruments used to assess depressive symptoms and/or interventions to decrease depression are reported. Studies will not be excluded based on geographical area study context (eg, community, culture or specific environment). All studies related to diagnostic assessment, care planning and/or intervention strategies specifically for older adults with depression will be included. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: As only secondary data will be analysed, no ethical approval is required for this study. This scientific article is a systematic review protocol for which data have not yet been extracted or analysed. The results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42022299775.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Humans , Middle Aged , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic
8.
BMJ Open ; 12(10): e064186, 2022 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088814

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The transition from paediatric to adult diabetes care in youth-onset diabetes (type 1 diabetes mellitus, Y-T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus, Y-T2DM) is associated with worsening glycaemic control, missed clinical visits, decreased medication adherence and the emergence of cardiometabolic complications. The socio-ecological challenges that influence transitioning to adult diabetes care may be distinct between Y-T1DM and Y-T2DM. The goal of this scoping review is to map the state of the literature on transitioning care in Y-T2DM compared with Y-T1DM and to identify the main sources and types of evidence available. The objectives are : (1) to identify the factors within the socio-ecological framework (individual, relationship, community, societal) associated with transitioning to adult care in Y-T2DM compared with Y- T1DM, and (2) to identify knowledge gaps related to transitioning to adult care. METHODS: The scoping review protocol and reporting will follow the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses for scoping reviews guidelines. A systematic search of scientific databases (PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, Scopus and APA PsycNet will be undertaken for articles between 1 January 1990 and 30 September 2022. Study designs will include peer-reviewed experimental and quasi-experimental published studies without language or country-specific restrictions. We will exclude articles on other diabetes subtypes and will exclude non-peer reviewed articles such as opinion papers, anecdotal reports or supplementary commentaries. ANALYSIS: References will be collated, sorted and extracted using Covidence. Factors associated with transition from paediatric to adult diabetes care in Y-T1DM and Y-T2DM will be identified using the socio-ecological framework and results will be presented in narrative format, tables, and summary graphs. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval will not be applicable for this review. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: https://osf.io/k2pwc.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Transitional Care , Adult , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy , Research Design , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Review Literature as Topic
9.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e061361, 2022 09 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053213

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There is a significant growth in the use of digital technology and methods in health-related research, further driven by the COVID-19 pandemic. This has offered a potential to apply digital health research in hidden, marginalised and excluded populations who are traditionally not easily reached due to economic, societal and legal barriers. To better inform future digital health studies of these vulnerable populations, we proposed a scoping review to comprehensively map published evidence and guidelines on the applications and challenges of digital health research methods to hard-to-reach communities. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This review will follow the Arksey and O' Malley methodological framework for scoping reviews. The framework for the review will employ updated methods developed by the Joanna Briggs Institute including the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis Scoping Review checklist. PubMed, the Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, Google Scholar and Greenfile are the identified databases for peer-reviewed quantitative and qualitative studies in-scope of the review. Grey literature focused on guidance and best practice in digital health research, and hard-to-reach populations will also be searched following published protocols. The review will focus on literature published between 1 February 2012 and 1 February 2022. Two reviewers are engaged in the review. After screening the title and abstract to determine the eligibility of each article, a thorough full-text review of eligible articles will be conducted using a data extraction framework. Key extracted information will be mapped in tabular and visualised summaries to categorise the breadth of literature and identify key digital methods, including their limitations and potential, for use in hard-to-reach populations. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This scoping review does not require ethical approval. The results of the scoping review will consist of peer-reviewed publications, presentations and knowledge mobilisation activities including a lay summary posted via social media channels and production of a policy brief.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Policy , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic
10.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e060690, 2022 09 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053209

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Major advancements in technology have led to considerations how telemedicine (TM) and other technology platforms can be meaningfully integrated in treatment for psychiatric disorders. The COVID-19 pandemic has placed a further focus on use of TM in psychiatry. Despite the widespread use of TM, little is known about its effect compared with traditional in-person (IP) consultation. The objective of this systematic review is to examine if individual psychiatric outpatient interventions for adults using TM are comparable to IP in terms of (1) psychopathology outcomes, (2) levels of patient satisfaction, (3) working alliance and (4) dropout from treatment. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This review will only include randomised controlled trials for adult participants with mood disorders, anxiety or personality disorders. The primary outcome is psychopathology, and secondary outcomes include patient satisfaction, treatment alliance and dropout rate. Systematic searches were conducted in MEDLINE, APA PsycINFO, Embase, Web of Science and CINAHL. The inverse-variance method will be used to conduct the meta-analysis. Effect sizes will be calculated as standardised mean difference (Hedges' g) for the primary outcome, mean difference for patient satisfaction and working alliance, and risk ratio for the dropout rate. Effect sizes will be supplemented with 95% CI. We will calculate the I² statistic to quantify heterogeneity and Chi-square statistic (χ²) to test for heterogeneity for the primary outcome. Potential clinical and methodological heterogeneity moderators will be assessed in subgroup and sensitivity analysis. The risk of bias will be assessed by Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool V.2, and confidence in cumulative evidence will be assessed by Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: No ethical approval is required for this systematic review protocol. Data sets will be deposited in the Zenodo repository. The findings of this study will be published in a peer-review scientific journal. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021256357.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Adult , Anxiety , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Personality Disorders/therapy , Referral and Consultation , Review Literature as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic
11.
PLoS One ; 17(9): e0275105, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043213

ABSTRACT

Pregnant women are particularly vulnerable to infection. Furthermore, infection from pertussis, influenza and COVID-19 increases the likelihood of adverse consequences to the mother and developing baby such as stillbirth, ICU admission, and pre-term caesarean birth. Increased rates of transmission and risk of adverse consequences from infection justifies the provision of national maternal vaccination programmes. Additionally, maternal vaccination helps protect the infant until they are able to receive their own vaccinations; a time when they are most at risk of mortality from influenza and pertussis. Vaccination during pregnancy has been repeatedly demonstrated as safe and effective in reducing harm, although rates of uptake remain low compared to the general population. The current protocol describes the methodology for an umbrella review aiming to explore the barriers and facilitators of vaccination during pregnancy for pertussis, influenza, and COVID-19. Systematic reviews that investigate the barriers and facilitators of at least one of either pertussis, influenza, or COVID-19 will be included in this review. Multiple databases will be searched, and included reviews assessed for quality (using the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) quality assessment for systematic reviews) and degree of overlap of included primary studies. Included reviews will be analysed according to the WHO SAGE model of determinants of vaccine hesitancy and separated by whether these explore influenza and pertussis, or COVID-19. The outcomes of this review will help inform the development of interventions to increase uptake of vaccination during pregnancy, and on whether interventions need to be tailored depending on the infectious disease. The key findings will identify the specific barriers and facilitators of vaccination hesitancy by considering contextual influences (e.g. sociodemographic variables), individual/social group influences (e.g. trust in the institutions), and vaccine-specific issues (e.g. safety and recommendations).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Whooping Cough , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Infant , Influenza, Human/chemically induced , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Pertussis Vaccine/therapeutic use , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Review Literature as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Vaccination , Whooping Cough/epidemiology , Whooping Cough/prevention & control
12.
Syst Rev ; 11(1): 203, 2022 09 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043140

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Long-term care facilities (LTCFs) have been severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic with serious consequences for the residents. Some LTCFs performed better than others, experiencing lower case and death rates due to COVID-19. A comprehensive understanding of the factors that have affected the transmission of COVID-19 in LTCFs is lacking, as no published studies have applied a multidimensional conceptual framework to evaluate the performance of LTCFs during the pandemic. Much research has focused on infection prevention and control strategies or specific disease outcomes (e.g., death rates). To address these gaps, our scoping review will identify and analyze the performance factors that have influenced the management of COVID-19 in LTCFs by adopting a multidimensional conceptual framework. METHODS: We will query the CINAHL, MEDLINE (Ovid), CAIRN, Science Direct, and Web of Science databases for peer-reviewed articles written in English or French and published between January 1, 2020 and December 31, 2021. We will include articles that focus on the specified context (COVID-19), population (LTCFs), interest (facilitators and barriers to performance of LTCFs), and outcomes (dimensions of performance according to a modified version of the Ministère de la santé et des services sociaux du Québec conceptual framework). Each article will be screened by at least two co-authors independently followed by data extraction of the included articles by one co-author and a review by the principal investigator. RESULTS: We will present the results both narratively and with visual aids (e.g., flowcharts, tables, conceptual maps). DISCUSSION: Our scoping review will provide a comprehensive understanding of the factors that have affected the performance of LTCFs during the COVID-19 pandemic. This knowledge can help inform the development of more effective infection prevention and control measures for future pandemics and outbreaks. The results of our review may lead to improvements in the care and safety of LTCF residents and staff. SCOPING REVIEW REGISTRATION: Research Registry researchregistry7026.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Facilities , Humans , Long-Term Care/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Review Literature as Topic , Skilled Nursing Facilities
13.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e060566, 2022 09 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042863

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 disease was declared as a pandemic by WHO since March 2020 and can have a myriad of clinical presentations affecting various organ systems. Patients with COVID-19 are known to have an increased risk of thromboembolism, including cardiovascular, pulmonary and cerebral ischaemic events. However, an increasing number of case studies have reported that COVID-19 infection is also associated with gastrointestinal ischaemia. This scoping review aims to collate the current evidence of COVID-19-related gastrointestinal ischaemia and raise awareness among healthcare professionals of this lesser known, but serious, non-pulmonary complication of COVID-19 infection. METHODS: The proposed scoping review will be conducted as per the Arksey and O'Malley methodological framework (2005) the Joanna Briggs Institute methodology for scoping reviews. A systematic search will be undertaken on different databases including EMBASE, PubMed and MEDLINE. Two independent reviewers will screen titles, abstracts and full-text articles according to the inclusion criteria and extract relevant data from the included articles. Results will be presented in a tabular form with a narrative discussion. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval will not be required for this scoping review. This scoping review will provide an extensive overview of the association between COVID-19 infection and bowel ischaemia. Further ethical and methodological challenges will also be discussed in our findings to define a new research agenda. Findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at both national and international conferences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Peer Review , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic
14.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e062106, 2022 09 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038311

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: One of the most commonly reported COVID-19-related changes to all maternity services has been an increase in the use of digital clinical consultations such as telephone or video calling; however, the ways in which they can be optimally used along maternity care pathways remain unclear. It is imperative that digital service innovations do not further exacerbate (and, ideally, should tackle) existing inequalities in service access and clinical outcomes. Using a realist approach, this project aims to synthesise the evidence around implementation of digital clinical consultations, seeking to illuminate how they can work to support safe, personalised and appropriate maternity care and to clarify when they might be most appropriately used, for whom, when, and in what contexts? METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The review will be conducted in four iterative phases, with embedded stakeholder involvement: (1) refining the review focus and generating initial programme theories, (2) exploring and developing the programme theories in light of evidence, (3) testing/refining the programme theories and (4) constructing actionable recommendations. The review will draw on four sources of evidence: (1) published literature (searching nine bibliographic databases), (2) unpublished (grey) literature, including research, audit, evaluation and policy documents (derived from Google Scholar, website searches and e-thesis databases), (3) expertise contributed by service user and health professional stakeholder groups (n=20-35) and (4) key informant interviews (n=12). Included papers will consist of any study design, in English and from 2010 onwards. The review will follow the Realist and Meta-narrative Evidence Synthesis Evolving Standards quality procedures and reporting guidance. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval has been obtained from the University of Nottingham, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences Ethics Committee (FMHS 426-1221). Informed consent will be obtained for all key informant interviews. Findings will be disseminated in a range of formats relevant to different audiences. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021288702.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Maternal Health Services , Obstetrics , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Referral and Consultation , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic
15.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e060526, 2022 09 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038304

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Much is known around public health preparedness and response phases. However, between the two phases is operational readiness that comprises the immediate actions needed to respond to a developing risk or hazard. Currently, emergency readiness is embedded in multiple frameworks and policy documents related to the health emergency cycle. However, knowledge about operational readiness' critical readiness components and actions required by countries to respond to public health eminent threat is not well known. Therefore, we aim to define and identify the critical elements of 'operational readiness' for public health emergencies, including COVID-19, and identify lessons learnt from addressing it, to inform the WHO Operational Readiness Framework. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a scoping review following the Joanna Briggs Institute guidance. Reporting will be according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR) checklist. MEDLINE, Embase and Web of Science databases and grey literature will be searched and exported into an online systematic review software (eg, Rayyan in this case) for review. The review team, which apart from scoping review methodological experts include content experts in health systems and public health and emergency medicine, prepared an a priori study protocol in consultation with WHO representatives. ATLAS.ti V.9 will be used to conduct thematic data analysis as well as store, organise and retrieve data. Data analysis and presentation will be carried out by five reviewers. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This review will reveal new insights, knowledge and lessons learnt that will translate into an operational framework for readiness actions. In consultation with WHO, findings will be disseminated as appropriate (eg, through professional bodies, conferences and research papers). No ethics approvals are required as no humans will be involved in data collection. PROTOCOL REGISTRATION: This rapid scoping review has been registered on Open Science Framework (doi:10.17605/OSF.IO/6SYAH).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Public Health , Humans , Review Literature as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic
16.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e065779, 2022 09 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038323

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, virtual care has gained increased attention, particularly in primary care for the ongoing delivery of routine services. Nurses have had an increased presence in virtual care and have contributed meaningfully to the delivery of team-based care in primary care; however, their exact contributions in virtual models of primary care remain unclear. The Nursing Role Effectiveness Model, applied in a virtual care and primary care context, outlines the association between structural variables, nursing roles and patient outcomes. The aim of this scoping review is to identify and synthesise the international literature surrounding nurse contributions to virtual models of primary care. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The Joanna Briggs Institute scoping review methodology will guide this review. We performed preliminary searches in April 2022 and will use CINAHL, MEDLINE, Embase and APA PsycInfo for the collection of sources for this review. We will also consider grey literature, such as dissertations/theses and organisational reports, for inclusion. Studies will include nurses across all designations (ie, nurse practitioners, registered nurses, practical nurses). To ensure studies capture roles, nurses should be actively involved in healthcare delivery. Sources require a virtual care and primary care context; studies involving the use of digital technology without patient-provider interaction will be excluded. Following a pilot test, trained reviewers will independently screen titles/abstracts for inclusion and extract relevant data. Data will be organised using the Nursing Role Effectiveness Model, outlining the virtual care and primary care context (structure component) and the nursing role concept (process component). ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This review will involve the collection and analysis of secondary sources that have been published and/or are publicly available. Therefore, ethics approval is not required. Scoping review findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at relevant conferences, targeting international primary care stakeholders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Research Design , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Primary Health Care , Review Literature as Topic
17.
PLoS One ; 17(9): e0274468, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021972

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a highly contagious infectious disease that emerged in 2019. This disease is causing devastating health, socio-economic, and economic crises. More specifically COVID-19 is affecting both the quality and length of human life. The overall health impact of this disease is measured by the disability-adjusted life years which is the sum of the life years lost due to disability (the effect on the health quality) and the years life lost due to premature death (effect on the length of life). The purpose of this review is to summarise DALYs-based health impact publications and produce compiled and informative literature that can aid the health regulators to make evidence-based decisions on mitigating COVID-19. METHODS: The review will be conducted using the PRISMA 2020 guidelines. The DALYs-based original observational and cross-sectional studies will be collected for assessing the health impact of COVID-19. Both the life quality and length impacts of COVID-19 will be reviewed. The life quality impact of COVID-19 will be measured using the life years lost due to disability (pre-recovery illness, pre-death illness, and post-acute consequences), and its impact on the length of life will be measured with years of life lost due to premature death (shortening of life expectancy). The combined health impact of COVID-19 on the quality and length of life will be measured in disability-adjusted life years. DISCUSSION: The impacts of COVID-19 on the two health outcomes (quality and length of life) will indicate the level of COVID-19 health burden. The increase or decrease of COVID-19 health impact might be due to the sample size differences of different studies and the omission of years lost due to post-acute consequences in some studies. After having a summarized systematic review health decision-makers will apply an impact-based response to COVID-19. TRAIL REGISTRATION: Systematic review registration: This protocol is pre-registered in PROSPERO with the registration number CRD42022324931.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disabled Persons , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disability-Adjusted Life Years , Humans , Quality-Adjusted Life Years , Review Literature as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic
18.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273691, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021935

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is spreading rapidly worldwide, and the population is generally susceptible to SARS-CoV-2, especially those with cancer. Hence, our study aims to design a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of the clinical characteristics and prognoses of lung cancer patients with COVID-19. METHODS: The protocol is prepared following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The literature will be searched in Embase, Pubmed, the Cochrane Library, LitCovid, and CNKI for potentially eligible articles. The quality of the articles will be used in the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale (NOS) and Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Statistical analysis will be performed through RevMan 5 software. This review protocol has been registered in PROSPERO (CRD42022306866). DISCUSSION: To clarify whether COVID-19 affects the clinical symptoms and prognoses of lung cancer patients. Further study is needed to establish the best evidence-based for the management of lung cancer patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The definitive conclusion will be important to physicians effectively manage lung cancer patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/therapy , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic
19.
PLoS One ; 17(9): e0273046, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021904

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Given the unprecedented nature of the COVID-19 crisis and the importance of early implementation of prevention programs, it is essential to understand better its potential impacts on various food security dimensions and indicators. METHODS: Research databases, including Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Cochrane Public Health Register, PubMed/MEDLINE, SCOPUS, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of science, and Google Scholar, will be searched using a search strategy and keywords developed in collaboration with librarians. The review will include all field and community trials and observational studies in all population groups. Searching electronic databases, study selection, and data extraction will be conducted by two researchers independently. Four critical appraisal tools will be used to assess the quality of included studies according to the study design: The Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) Prevalence Critical Appraisal tool, the JBI critical appraisal checklist for randomized control/pseudo-randomized trial, descriptive/case series, and comparable cohort/case-control. These tools were initially designed for use in systematic reviews. A narrative synthesis will be implemented to summarize findings if meta-analyses are not appropriate. DISCUSSION: The current systematic review results can be used to predict the effect of COVID-19 on the individuals' and households' food security, especially in vulnerable populations, and develop effective interventions. This review can provide information for policymakers to better understand the factors influencing the implementation of these interventions and inform decision-making to improve food security. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: The present study registration number in the international prospective register of systematic reviews (PROSPERO) is CRD42020185843.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Food Security , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health , Review Literature as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic
20.
PLoS One ; 17(6): e0269821, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021802

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Outpatient care for children and adolescents with chronic conditions needs to be continuous and programmed, encompassing comprehensive care, with periodically scheduled consultations, exams, and procedures, to promote quality of life and reduce mortality. In the context of the new coronavirus pandemic, however, outpatient care for children and adolescents with chronic conditions, in person, was hampered in favor of social isolation, a necessary sanitary measure to reduce and prevent the spread of Coronavirus Disease 2019. In response to this need, studies suggest telehealth in pediatrics as a fertile and expanding field especially in times of pandemics. Here, we aimed to map the evidence related to telehealth in outpatient care for children and adolescents with chronic conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic, to identify which strategies were implemented and their impacts on the continuity of care. METHODS: A scoping review protocol is reported and guided by the Scoping Reviews Manual of the Joanna Briggs Institute. The search for evidence will cover the following databases: MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane Libary; Embase; Web of Science; Scopus; Cinahl and PsycINFO, plus additional sources, such as The British Library, Google Scholar, and Preprints [medRXiv]. No date or language restrictions will be employed in this scoping review. Two independent researchers will conduct the search strategy, study selection, data charting, and data synthesis. RESULTS: The findings will be presented through tables, charts, narrative summaries, and assessed based on the type of data charted as well as outcomes. Additionally, the meaning of these findings will be considered as they relate to the guiding question, the characterization and measurement of the impact of different telehealth modalities used in outpatient care for children and adolescents with chronic conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the implications for practice and further research. DISCUSSION: To the best of our knowledge, this will be the first scoping review to look specifically at the telehealth modalities to be used in outpatient care for children and adolescents with chronic conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic. We expect that our results will be of interest to practitioners as well as researchers concerned with this particular emerging issue in the pandemic context. Also, the plans for the dissemination of this study comprise peer-reviewed publication and conference presentations. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Open Science Framework Registration: osf.io/5pqgu.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Ambulatory Care , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Chronic Disease , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic
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