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1.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 74(5): e21-e36, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1802065

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To provide guidance to rheumatology providers on the use of COVID-19 vaccines for patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs). METHODS: A task force was assembled that included 9 rheumatologists/immunologists, 2 infectious disease specialists, and 2 public health physicians. After agreeing on scoping questions, an evidence report was created that summarized the published literature and publicly available data regarding COVID-19 vaccine efficacy and safety, as well as literature for other vaccines in RMD patients. Task force members rated their agreement with draft consensus statements on a 9-point numerical scoring system, using a modified Delphi process and the RAND/University of California Los Angeles Appropriateness Method, with refinement and iteration over 2 sessions. Consensus was determined based on the distribution of ratings. RESULTS: Despite a paucity of direct evidence, statements were developed by the task force and agreed upon with consensus to provide guidance for use of the COVID-19 vaccines, including supplemental/booster dosing, in RMD patients and to offer recommendations regarding the use and timing of immunomodulatory therapies around the time of vaccination. CONCLUSION: These guidance statements are intended to provide direction to rheumatology health care providers on how to best use COVID-19 vaccines and to facilitate implementation of vaccination strategies for RMD patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Rheumatic Diseases , Rheumatology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , Muscular Diseases , United States , Vaccination
2.
J Rheumatol ; 49(6): 555-557, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792341
3.
Intern Med J ; 52(4): 559-565, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788866

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telehealth in rheumatology has been a topic of interest for many years, but the COVID-19 pandemic placed it in the forefront. AIMS: To evaluate patient perception of rheumatology telehealth and determine predictive factors for future telehealth acceptability. METHODS: A questionnaire containing 30 questions was sent to public and private rheumatology patients who attended telehealth appointments between April and May 2020. The questionnaire aimed to obtain information on baseline demographics, traditional appointment details, telehealth appointment details and appointment satisfaction using a 5-point Likert scale. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted. RESULTS: The questionnaire was sent to 1452 patients, of whom 494 (34%) patients responded. More than 70% of responses indicated overall satisfaction in specialist care through telehealth, and 88.7% perceived this suitable during a pandemic. Less than 50% of patients were agreeable for future telehealth either through telephone or video conference after the pandemic is over. Higher odds ratio for future telehealth acceptability was associated with visual impairment, perceived cost-effectiveness and previous time lost at work for a face-to-face appointment. CONCLUSION: During the unprecedented time of the pandemic, telehealth appointments (telephone/video) assisted in providing ongoing patient care remotely, with high level of satisfaction seen in this study. The patient's experience and perception of telehealth was strongly influenced by financial incentives, and certain subgroups of patients were more accepting for future telehealth appointments. Nevertheless, low level of future telehealth acceptability also highlighted the potential dissatisfaction among patients in telehealth compared with the traditional appointments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rheumatology , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Outpatients , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
4.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 81(5): 601-613, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784782

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Autoinflammatory type I interferonopathies, chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature/proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (CANDLE/PRAAS), stimulator of interferon genes (STING)-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI) and Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) are rare and clinically complex immunodysregulatory diseases. With emerging knowledge of genetic causes and targeted treatments, a Task Force was charged with the development of 'points to consider' to improve diagnosis, treatment and long-term monitoring of patients with these rare diseases. METHODS: Members of a Task Force consisting of rheumatologists, neurologists, an immunologist, geneticists, patient advocates and an allied healthcare professional formulated research questions for a systematic literature review. Then, based on literature, Delphi questionnaires and consensus methodology, 'points to consider' to guide patient management were developed. RESULTS: The Task Force devised consensus and evidence-based guidance of 4 overarching principles and 17 points to consider regarding the diagnosis, treatment and long-term monitoring of patients with the autoinflammatory interferonopathies, CANDLE/PRAAS, SAVI and AGS. CONCLUSION: These points to consider represent state-of-the-art knowledge to guide diagnostic evaluation, treatment and management of patients with CANDLE/PRAAS, SAVI and AGS and aim to standardise and improve care, quality of life and disease outcomes.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System , Nervous System Malformations , Rheumatology , Skin Diseases , Erythema Nodosum , Fingers/abnormalities , Humans , Quality of Life
5.
Rheumatol Int ; 42(6): 999-1007, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1782790

ABSTRACT

Since the COVID-19 pandemic started, there have been changes in clinical practice to limit transmission, such as switching from face-to-face to remote consultations. We aimed to study the influence of technical factors on remote consultations in our experience during the pandemic. 12 clinicians completed data collection forms after consultations, recording the technology used (video vs phone); technical problems encountered; discharge or subsequent appointment status; and technical aspects of the consultation process using 0-10 numerical rating scales (NRS) (Time Adequate; Relevant History; Physical Exam; Management Plan; and Communication Quality). Data were collated on an MS Access 2016 database and transferred to SPSS version 25 for statistics. Of 285 forms valid for analysis, 48 (16.8%) had video consultations. Of 259 forms with technical problems data recorded, 48 (18.5%) had a technical problem. Video patients were significantly younger (mean 49.3 vs 61.3 years, p < 0.001), had higher scores on Physical Exam scale (mean 4.0 vs 2.6, p < 0.001), but had no significant difference on Management Plan scale (7.3 vs 7.2). Those with technical problems were more common among video consultations (33.3% vs 15.4%, p = 0.005), had lower scores on Time Adequate scale (7.7 vs 8.7, p < 0.001) and Communication Quality scale (7.1 vs 8.4, p < 0.001), but had no significant difference on Management Plan scale (7.3 vs 7.2). The strongest correlation of Management Plan scale was with Communication Quality scale (Rho = 0.64). Of the NRS, a 1-point reduction in scores on Management Plan scale was the strongest predictor of subsequent face-to-face appointment (Odds Ratio 1.88, 95% CI 1.58-2.24), and this remained an independent predictor in multivariate analysis (adjusted OR 1.90, 1.57-2.31). Having a technical problem was inversely associated with the outcome of a subsequent face-to-face appointment (OR 0.17, 0.04-0.74), and this remained significant after adjustment for Management Plan in multivariate analysis (adjusted OR 0.09, 0.12-0.54). Video patients were younger suggesting a preference for video amongst younger patients. Although technical problems were more common with video, having a video consultation or a technical problem had no significant impact on management plan. Scoring lower on the Management Plan scale was the strongest predictor of, and independently associated with, requesting a subsequent face-to-face appointment. The inverse relationship of technical problems with subsequent face-to-face appointment request will need validation in further studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Remote Consultation , Rheumatology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communication , Humans , Pandemics
6.
RMD Open ; 8(1)2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779411

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: While COVID-19 vaccination prevents severe infections, poor immunogenicity in immunocompromised people threatens vaccine effectiveness. We analysed the clinical characteristics of patients with rheumatic disease who developed breakthrough COVID-19 after vaccination against SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: We included people partially or fully vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2 who developed COVID-19 between 5 January and 30 September 2021 and were reported to the Global Rheumatology Alliance registry. Breakthrough infections were defined as occurring ≥14 days after completion of the vaccination series, specifically 14 days after the second dose in a two-dose series or 14 days after a single-dose vaccine. We analysed patients' demographic and clinical characteristics and COVID-19 symptoms and outcomes. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 infection was reported in 197 partially or fully vaccinated people with rheumatic disease (mean age 54 years, 77% female, 56% white). The majority (n=140/197, 71%) received messenger RNA vaccines. Among the fully vaccinated (n=87), infection occurred a mean of 112 (±60) days after the second vaccine dose. Among those fully vaccinated and hospitalised (n=22, age range 36-83 years), nine had used B cell-depleting therapy (BCDT), with six as monotherapy, at the time of vaccination. Three were on mycophenolate. The majority (n=14/22, 64%) were not taking systemic glucocorticoids. Eight patients had pre-existing lung disease and five patients died. CONCLUSION: More than half of fully vaccinated individuals with breakthrough infections requiring hospitalisation were on BCDT or mycophenolate. Further risk mitigation strategies are likely needed to protect this selected high-risk population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rheumatic Diseases , Rheumatology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Registries , Rheumatic Diseases/complications , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Rheumatic Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Z Rheumatol ; 81(2): 157-163, 2022 Mar.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748494

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telemedicine was implemented in outpatient care during the lockdown between March and May 2020. The aim of the study was to assess patients from a private practice and the university outpatient department with respect to patient satisfaction with telemedicine, COVID-19 worries and vaccination behavior and to compare the teleconsultation by a medical assistant for rheumatology (RFA) and a physician. METHODS: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatric arthropathy or spondylarthritis without treatment modifications since the previous presentation were offered a telemedical replacement appointment within the framework of this study in the case of appointment cancellation by the treating center. Participants were randomized to a telemedicine appointment by a physician or an RFA (RFA university only). The patient history was carried out by telephone and standardized using a questionnaire. The disease activity was determined using the modified clinical disease activity score (CDAI) and the BASDAI. Subsequently, all patients received a pseudonymized evaluation questionnaire. RESULTS: In total 112/116 (96%) patients participated. Of these 88/112 (79%) returned the questionnaire. The RFAs conducted 19/112 (17%) of the telephone calls. The treatment was modified in 19/112 (17%) patients. Concerns about contracting COVID-19 correlated with high disease activity (p = 0.031) including the presence of painful joints (p = 0.001) and high pain levels (VAS ≥7, p = 0.009). These patients would have also cancelled their appointment themselves (p = 0.015). Patient satisfaction with the consultation was good (mean 4.3/5.0 modified FAPI) independent of the institution, the duration of the consultation and the consultation partner. Patients with a high pain intensity were the least satisfied (p = 0.036). Only 42/100 (38.2%) of the patients had been vaccinated against pneumococci and 59/100 (53.6%) against influenza. CONCLUSION: Telemedical care within the framework of a telephone consultation is well-suited for selected patients. With respect to patient satisfaction the delegation of a telemedical consultation to an RFA is possible. There is a need for improvement with respect to the vaccination behavior.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Remote Consultation , Rheumatology , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Patient Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telephone , Vaccination
8.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 74(3): 375-382, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718241

Subject(s)
Rheumatology , Humans
9.
Curr Opin Rheumatol ; 34(3): 171-178, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705440

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We summarize the recent literature published in the last 2 years on healthcare disparities observed in the delivery of rheumatology care by telemedicine. We highlight recent research dissecting the underpinnings of healthcare disparities and identify potentially modifiable contributing factors. RECENT FINDINGS: The COVID-19 pandemic has had major impacts on care delivery and has led to a pronounced increase in telemedicine use in rheumatology practice. Telemedicine services are disproportionately underutilized by racial/ethnic minority groups and among patients with lower socioeconomic status. Disparities in telemedicine access and use among vulnerable populations threatens to exacerbate existing outcome inequalities affecting people with rheumatic disease. SUMMARY: Telemedicine has the potential to expand rheumatology services by reaching traditionally underserved communities. However, some areas lack the infrastructure and technology to engage in telemedicine. Addressing health equity and the digital divide may help foster more inclusive telemedicine care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rheumatology , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Minority Groups , Pandemics
11.
J Rheumatol ; 49(4): 424-431, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674899

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess rheumatology provider experience and practices at Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: We performed an anonymized follow-up national cross-sectional survey (November 5, 2020 to January 1, 2021) to assess provider resilience, experience, practices, views, and opinions about changes to medications and laboratory monitoring of veterans with rheumatic diseases. RESULTS: Of the 143 eligible VA rheumatology providers, 114 (80%) responded. Compared to the original survey, fewer providers reported using telephone visits (78% vs 91%, P = 0.009), and more used clinical video telehealth (CVT; 16% vs 7%, P = 0.04) or in-person visits (76% vs 59%, P = 0.007). Most providers were somewhat or very comfortable with the quality of clinical encounters for established but not new patients for telephone, video-based VA Video Connect (VVC), and CVT. The mean 2-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale score was 6.85 (SD 1.06, range 0-8), significantly higher than the original April-May 2020 survey score of 6.35 (SD 1.26; P = 0.004). When adjusted for age, sex, and ethnicity, high provider resilience was associated with significantly higher odds of comfort with technology and the quality of the VVC visit for the following: (1) established patients (odds ratio [OR] 1.72, 95% CI, 0.67-4.40 and OR 4.13, 95% CI 1.49-11.44, respectively) and (2) new patients (OR 2.79, 95% CI 1.11-7.05, and OR 2.69, 95% CI 1.06-6.82, respectively). CONCLUSION: Reassuringly, VA rheumatology providers became increasingly comfortable with video visits during the first 10 months of the COVID-19 pandemic. High provider resilience, and its association with better quality CVTs, raise the possibility that video visits might be an acceptable substitute for in-person visits under appropriate circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rheumatology , Telemedicine , Veterans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Pandemics
12.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 74(4): e1-e20, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669371

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To provide guidance on the management of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C), a condition characterized by fever, inflammation, and multiorgan dysfunction that manifests late in the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Recommendations are also provided for children with hyperinflammation during COVID-19, the acute, infectious phase of SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: The Task Force is composed of 9 pediatric rheumatologists and 2 adult rheumatologists, 2 pediatric cardiologists, 2 pediatric infectious disease specialists, and 1 pediatric critical care physician. Preliminary statements addressing clinical questions related to MIS-C and hyperinflammation in COVID-19 were developed based on evidence reports. Consensus was built through a modified Delphi process that involved anonymous voting and webinar discussion. A 9-point scale was used to determine the appropriateness of each statement (median scores of 1-3 for inappropriate, 4-6 for uncertain, and 7-9 for appropriate). Consensus was rated as low, moderate, or high based on dispersion of the votes. Approved guidance statements were those that were classified as appropriate with moderate or high levels of consensus, which were prespecified before voting. RESULTS: The guidance was approved in June 2020 and updated in November 2020 and October 2021, and consists of 41 final guidance statements accompanied by flow diagrams depicting the diagnostic pathway for MIS-C and recommendations for initial immunomodulatory treatment of MIS-C. CONCLUSION: Our understanding of SARS-CoV-2-related syndromes in the pediatric population continues to evolve. This guidance document reflects currently available evidence coupled with expert opinion, and will be revised as further evidence becomes available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rheumatology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Child , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , United States
13.
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) ; 74(4): 572-578, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669343

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: A treat-to-target (TTT) approach improves outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In prior work, we found that a learning collaborative (LC) program improved implementation of TTT. We conducted a shorter virtual LC to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of this model for quality improvement and to assess TTT during virtual visits. METHODS: We tested a 6-month virtual LC in ambulatory care. The LC was conducted during the 2020-2021 COVID-19 pandemic when many patient visits were conducted virtually. All LC meetings used videoconferencing and a website to share data. The LC comprised a 6-hour kickoff session and 6 monthly webinars. The LC discussed TTT in RA, its rationale, and rapid cycle improvement as a method for implementing TTT. Practices provided de-identified patient visit data. Monthly webinars reinforced topics and demonstrated data on TTT adherence. This was measured as the percentage of TTT processes completed. We compared TTT adherence between in-person visits versus virtual visits. RESULTS: Eighteen sites participated in the LC, representing 45 rheumatology clinicians. Sites inputted data on 1,826 patient visits, 78% of which were conducted in-person and 22% of which were held in a virtual setting. Adherence with TTT improved from a mean of 51% at baseline to 84% at month 6 (P for trend < 0.001). Each aspect of TTT also improved. Adherence with TTT during virtual visits was lower (65%) than during in-person visits (79%) (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Implementation of TTT for RA can be improved through a relatively low-cost virtual LC. This improvement in TTT implementation was observed despite the COVID-19 pandemic, but we did observe differences in TTT adherence between in-person visits and virtual visits.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Rheumatology , Telemedicine , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/diagnosis , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
14.
Clin Rheumatol ; 41(5): 1271-1283, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653525

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine encompasses a variety of modalities that allow for the remote assessment and treatment of patients. The technologies, services, and tools available for telemedicine in the USA are increasingly becoming an integral part of the healthcare system to bridge the gaps in care that can arise from geographic and/or socioeconomic obstacles and provider shortages. Telemedicine can be applied to a spectrum of clinical areas, including rheumatic diseases. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease with predominately skin and joint manifestations. PsA is often misdiagnosed and/or undiagnosed, which can lead to worse patient outcomes, including irreversible joint erosion and damage. The difficulties in diagnosing and managing PsA are confounded by the emergence and increased use of telemedicine because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Telemedicine presents the opportunity to increase access to healthcare by rheumatologists and dermatologists to improve training and education regarding PsA and to decrease time attributed to office visits associated with PsA. However, challenges in diagnosing PsA without a thorough in-person physical examination by a trained rheumatologist or dermatologist exist. We provide an overview of the ways telemedicine can be incorporated into clinical care and optimized for patients with PsA; characteristic clinical features of PsA, with a focus on skin and joint signs and symptoms; screening tools to be used in routine clinical care; assessments that can be used to evaluate quality of life, functional ability, and disease activity in PsA; and resources and recommendations for the development of future telemedicine use in rheumatology and dermatology. Key Points • Patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are often misdiagnosed and/or undiagnosed. • Telemedicine can improve access to healthcare by rheumatologists and dermatologists. • Telemedicine can be incorporated into clinical care and optimized for managing PsA.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , COVID-19 , Dermatology , Psoriasis , Rheumatology , Telemedicine , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Arthritis, Psoriatic/therapy , Dermatologists , Humans , Pandemics , Psoriasis/diagnosis , Quality of Life , Rheumatologists
15.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 232, 2021 Dec 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630738

ABSTRACT

In this article, we describe the advances in the field of pediatrics that have been published in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2020. We report progresses in understanding allergy, autoinflammatory disorders, critical care, endocrinology, genetics, infectious diseases, microbiota, neonatology, neurology, nutrition, orthopedics, respiratory tract illnesses, rheumatology in childhood.


Subject(s)
Pediatrics/trends , COVID-19 , Child Nutrition Sciences , Critical Care , Endocrinology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Infectious Disease Medicine , Neonatology , Neurology , Orthopedics , Rare Diseases , Respiratory Tract Diseases , Rheumatology
16.
Adv Rheumatol ; 62(1): 3, 2022 01 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638265

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To provide guidelines on the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination in patients with immune-mediated rheumatic diseases (IMRD) to rheumatologists considering specific scenarios of the daily practice based on the shared-making decision (SMD) process. METHODS: A task force was constituted by 24 rheumatologists (panel members), with clinical and research expertise in immunizations and infectious diseases in immunocompromised patients, endorsed by the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology (BSR), to develop guidelines for COVID-19 vaccination in patients with IMRD. A consensus was built through the Delphi method and involved four rounds of anonymous voting, where five options were used to determine the level of agreement (LOA), based on the Likert Scale: (1) strongly disagree; (2) disagree, (3) neither agree nor disagree (neutral); (4) agree; and (5) strongly agree. Nineteen questions were addressed and discussed via teleconference to formulate the answers. In order to identify the relevant data on COVID-19 vaccines, a search with standardized descriptors and synonyms was performed on September 10th, 2021, of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, and LILACS to identify studies of interest. We used the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale to assess the quality of nonrandomized studies. RESULTS: All the nineteen questions-answers (Q&A) were approved by the BSR Task Force with more than 80% of panelists voting options 4-agree-and 5-strongly agree-, and a consensus was reached. These Guidelines were focused in SMD on the most appropriate timing for IMRD patients to get vaccinated to reach the adequate covid-19 vaccination response. CONCLUSION: These guidelines were developed by a BSR Task Force with a high LOA among panelists, based on the literature review of published studies and expert opinion for COVID-19 vaccination in IMRD patients. Noteworthy, in the pandemic period, up to the time of the review and the consensus process for this document, high-quality evidence was scarce. Thus, it is not a substitute for clinical judgment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rheumatic Diseases , Vaccination/methods , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Rheumatology , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Rev Med Suisse ; 18(764-5): 69-73, 2022 Jan 19.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632257

ABSTRACT

In rheumatology, this year has seen an expansion of knowledge about the effects of COVID and the vaccine response in patients with autoimmune diseases, but also a re-examination of the usual doses of glucocorticoids in vasculitides and new treatments strategies for diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, spondylarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. New criteria for imaging assessment in spondylarthritis and new management guidelines for patients with low back pain have also been proposed.


En rhumatologie, dans les nouveautés que nous avons choisi de mettre en avant, cette année a vu l'élargissement des connaissances sur le Covid et la réponse vaccinale chez les patients avec maladies autoimmunes, la remise en question des doses habituelles des corticostéroïdes dans les vascularites et la possibilité de nouveaux traitements ou stratégies de prise en charge, dans le lupus érythémateux systémique, les spondylarthrites et la polyarthrite rhumatoïde. De nouveaux critères pour l'évaluation de l'imagerie des spondylarthrites ont aussi été proposés et des précisions quant au type de prise en charge nécessaire pour les patients lombalgiques ont également été apportées.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Rheumatology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Int J Rheum Dis ; 25(3): 247-258, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1629480

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic led to rapid and widespread adoption of telemedicine in rheumatology care. The Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology (APLAR) working group was tasked with developing evidence-based recommendations for rheumatology practice to guide maintenance of the highest possible standards of clinical care and to enable broad patient reach. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of English-language articles related to telehealth in rheumatology was conducted on MEDLINE/PubMed, Web Of Science and Scopus. The strength of the evidence was graded using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations (GRADE) approach as well as the Oxford Levels of Evidence. The recommendations were developed using a modified Delphi technique to establish consensus. RESULTS: Three overarching principles and 13 recommendations were developed based on identified literature and consensus agreement. The overarching principles address telemedicine frameworks, decision-making, and modality. Recommendations 1-4 address patient suitability, triage, and when telemedicine should be offered to patients. Recommendations 5-10 cover the procedure, including the means, data safety, fail-safe mechanisms, and treat-to-target approach. Recommendations 11-13 focus on training and education related to telerheumatology. CONCLUSION: These recommendations provide guidance for the approach and use of telemedicine in rheumatology care to guide highest possible standards of clinical care and to enable equitable patient reach. However, since evidence in telemedicine care in rheumatology is limited and emerging, most recommendations will need further consideration when more data are available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rheumatology/standards , Telemedicine/standards , Asia , Consensus , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Rheumatol Int ; 42(3): 379-390, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616122

ABSTRACT

To develop Best Practice Guidelines (BPG) for the use of Telehealth in Rheumatology in the Arab region, to identify the main barriers and facilitators of telehealth, and to provide rheumatologists with a practical toolkit for the implementation of telehealth. Guidelines were drafted by a core steering committee from the Arab League of Associations for Rheumatology (ArLAR) after performing a literature search. A multidisciplinary task force (TF), including 18 rheumatologists, 2 patients, and 2 regulators from 15 Arab countries, assessed the BPG using 3 rounds of anonymous online voting by modified Delphi process. The statements were included in the final BPG without further voting if ≥ 80% of TF members indicated high agreement. The voting on barriers and facilitators was performed through one voting round. The toolkit was developed based on available literature and discussions during the Delphi rounds. Four General Principles and twelve Statements were formulated. A teleconsultation was specifically defined for the purpose of these guidelines. The concept of choice in telehealth was highlighted, emphasizing patient confidentiality, medical information security, rheumatologist's clinical judgment, and local jurisdictional regulations. The top barrier for telehealth was the concern about the quality of care. The toolkit emphasized technical aspects of teleconsultation and proposed a triage system. The ArLAR BPG provide rheumatologists with a series of strategies about the most reliable, productive, and rational approaches to apply telehealth.


Subject(s)
Rheumatology/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Arab World , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Delphi Technique , Humans
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