Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 10 de 10
Filter
1.
Postgrad Med ; 133(8): 994-1000, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450321

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a rare but severe condition resulting in excessive response of the immune system after SARS-CoV-2 infection. We report a single-center cohort of children with MIS-C, describing the spectrum of presentation, therapies, clinical course, and short-term outcomes. METHODS: This is a prospective observational study from to a tertiary pediatric rheumatology center including patients (aged 1 month to 21 years) diagnosed with MIS-C between April 2020-April 2021. Demographic, clinical, laboratory results and follow-up data were collected through the electronic patient record system and analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 67 patients with MIS-C were included in the study. Fever was detected in all patients; gastrointestinal system symptoms were found in 67.2% of the patients, rash in 38.8%, conjunctivitis in 31.3%, hypotension in 26.9% myocarditis, and/or pericarditis in 22.4%, respectively. Respiratory symptoms were only in five patients (7.5%). Kawasaki Disease like presentation was found 37.3% of the patients. The mean duration of hospitalization was 11.8 7.07 days. Fifty-seven patients (85%) received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), 45 (67%) received corticosteroids, 17 (25.3%) received anakinra, and one (1.5%) received tocilizumab. Seven of the patients (10.4%) underwent therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE). In 21 (31.3%) patients, a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) was required in a median of 2 days. The first finding to improve was fever, while the first parameter to decrease was ferritin (median 6.5 days (IQR, 4-11.2 days)). Sixty-five patients were discharged home with a median duration of hospital stay of 10 days (IQR, 7-15 days). CONCLUSION: Patients with MIS-C may have severe cardiac findings and intensive care requirements in admission and hospital follow-up. The vast majority of these findings improve with effective treatment without any sequelae until discharge and in a short time in follow-up. Although the pathogenesis and treatment plan of the disease are partially elucidated, follow-up studies are needed in terms of long-term prognosis and relapse probabilities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatology/statistics & numerical data , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Administration, Intravesical , Adolescent , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulins/administration & dosage , Immunoglobulins/therapeutic use , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/administration & dosage , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/therapeutic use , Male , Oxytocin/administration & dosage , Oxytocin/analogs & derivatives , Oxytocin/therapeutic use , Plasma Exchange , Prospective Studies
2.
Rheumatol Int ; 41(12): 2091-2103, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1446141

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak turned out the greatest pandemic for decades. It challenged enormously the global health system, forcing it to adjust to the new realities. We aimed to analyze articles covering COVID-19 papers in the rheumatological field and outline emerging topics raising within this frame. We applied the bibliometric database Scopus for our literature search and conducted it on the 5th of June using the following keywords: "rheumatic" OR "rheumatology" OR "rheumatoid arthritis" OR "systemic lupus erythematosus" OR "myositis" OR "systemic sclerosis" OR "vasculitis" OR "arthritis" OR "ankylosing spondylitis" AND "COVID-19". We analyzed all selected articles according to various aspects: type of document, authorship, journal, citations score, rheumatology field, country of origin, language, and keywords. With the help of the software tool VOSviewer version 1.6.15, we have built the visualizing network of authors and keywords co-occurrence. The measurement of the social impact of articles was made using Altmetric data. This study included 1430 retrieved articles with open access mostly. The top five journals in this field were Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (n = 65), Rheumatology International (n = 51), Clinical Rheumatology (n = 50), Lancet Rheumatology (n = 50), and Frontiers In Immunology (n = 33). Most studies originate from countries with a high incidence of COVID-19 among the general population (the USA-387; Italy-268; UK-184; France-114; Germany-110; India-98 and Spain-96, China-94, Canada-73 Turkey-66). Original Articles (42.1%) were the most common articles' type, following by Letters (24.4%), Reviews (21.7%), Notes (6%), Editorials (4.8%), Erratum (1%). According to the citations scores, articles dedicated to the clinical course of COVID-19 in patients with rheumatic diseases were of the highest importance for the scientific rheumatologic community. Rheumatoid arthritis (n = 527), systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 393), vasculitis (n = 267), myositis (n = 71), systemic sclerosis (n = 68), and psoriatic arthritis (n = 68) were the most widely discussed rheumatic diseases in the view of COVID-19. The analysis of Altmetric and citations scores revealed a moderate correlation between them. This article provides a comprehensive bibliometric and altmetric analysis of COVID-19 related articles in the rheumatology field and summarizes data about features of rheumatology service in the time of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Bibliometrics , COVID-19 , Rheumatology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Rheumatology/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatology/trends , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Rheumatol Int ; 41(10): 1755-1761, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384393

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 global pandemic resulted in major disruptions to medical care. We aimed to understand changes in outpatient care delivery and use of telemedicine in U.S. rheumatology practices during this period. Rheumatology Informatics System Effectiveness (RISE) is a national, EHR-enabled registry that passively collects data on all patients seen by participating practices. Included practices were required to have been participating in RISE from January 2019 through August 2020 (N = 213). We compared total visit counts and telemedicine visits during March-August 2020 to March-August 2019 and stratified by locations in states with shelter-in-place (SIP) orders. We assessed characteristics of patients within each practice, including primary rheumatic diagnosis and disease activity scores, where available. We included 213 practices with 945,160 patients. Overall, we found visit counts decreased by 10.9% (from 1,302,455 to 1,161,051) between March and August 2020 compared to 2019; this drop was most dramatic during the month of April (- 22.3%). Telemedicine visits increased from 0% to a mean of 12.1%. Practices in SIP states had more dramatic decreases in visits, (11.5% vs. 5.3%). We found no major differences in primary diagnoses or disease activity across the two periods. We detected a meaningful decrease in rheumatology visits in March-August 2020 during the SARS-CoV-2 global pandemic compared to the year prior with a concomitant increase in the use of telemedicine. Future work should address possible adverse consequences to patient outcomes due to decreased contact with clinicians.


Subject(s)
Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatology/organization & administration , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Registries , Rheumatology/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
5.
S Afr Med J ; 111(8): 720-723, 2021 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355170

ABSTRACT

Herbal medicines made from the bark of the Cinchona tree, and later quinine, have been widely used for centuries to treat medical conditions such as tropical malaria. More recently, chloroquine (CQ) and its synthetic derivatives have been used as antimalarials and to treat systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and in the past 14 months or so, COVID-19 pneumonia. Anecdotal evidence and the erratic covering through social media of its potential efficacy in the treatment of COVID-19 pneumonia have resulted in the widespread off-label use of CQ in South Africa and worldwide. This study aimed to show that access to CQ as a chronic medication for rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases was limited during the COVID-19 pandemic, and that this resulted in an increased incidence of flares in these patients, affecting their morbidity and potentially leading to mortality.


Subject(s)
Chloroquine/pharmacology , Rheumatology/standards , Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Antirheumatic Agents/pharmacology , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Humans , Musculoskeletal Diseases/drug therapy , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Rheumatology/methods , Rheumatology/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 Drug Treatment
6.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(3): e23742, 2021 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138661

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The worldwide burden of musculoskeletal diseases is increasing. The number of newly registered rheumatologists has stagnated. Primary care, which takes up a key role in early detection of rheumatic disease, is working at full capacity. COVID-19 and its containment impede rheumatological treatment. Telemedicine in rheumatology (telerheumatology) could support rheumatologists and general practitioners. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate acceptance and preferences related to the use of telerheumatology care among German rheumatologists and general practitioners. METHODS: A nationwide, cross-sectional, self-completed, paper-based survey on telerheumatology care was conducted among outpatient rheumatologists and general practitioners during the pre-COVID-19 period. RESULTS: A total of 73.3% (349/476) of survey participants rated their knowledge of telemedicine as unsatisfactory, poor, or very poor. The majority of survey participants (358/480, 74.6%) answered that they do not currently use telemedicine, although 62.3% (291/467) would like to. Barriers to the implementation of telemedicine include the purchase of technology equipment (182/292, 62.3%), administration (181/292, 62.0%), and poor reimbursement (156/292, 53.4%). A total of 69.6% (117/168) of the surveyed physicians reckoned that telemedicine could be used in rheumatology. Surveyed physicians would prefer to use telemedicine to communicate directly with other physicians (370/455, 81.3%) than to communicate with patients (213/455, 46.8%). Among treatment phases, 64.4% (291/452) of participants would choose to use telemedicine during follow-up. Half of the participants would choose telecounseling as a specific approach to improve rheumatology care (91/170, 53.5%). CONCLUSIONS: Before COVID-19 appeared, our results indicated generally low use but high acceptance of the implementation of telerheumatology among physicians. Participants indicated that the lack of a structural framework was a barrier to the effective implementation of telerheumatology. Training courses should be introduced to address the limited knowledge on the part of physicians in the use of telemedicine. More research into telerheumatology is required. This includes large-scale randomized controlled trials, economic analyses, and the exploration of user preferences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , General Practitioners/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatologists/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , Attitude of Health Personnel , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , General Practitioners/psychology , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Rheumatologists/psychology , Rheumatology/methods , Rheumatology/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
8.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 73(3): 374-380, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064321

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Racial/ethnic minorities experience more severe outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the general US population. This study was undertaken to examine the association between race/ethnicity and COVID-19 hospitalization, ventilation status, and mortality in people with rheumatic disease. METHODS: US patients with rheumatic disease and COVID-19 were entered into the COVID-19 Global Rheumatology Alliance physician registry between March 24, 2020 and August 26, 2020 were included. Race/ethnicity was defined as White, African American, Latinx, Asian, or other/mixed race. Outcome measures included hospitalization, requirement for ventilatory support, and death. Multivariable regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) adjusted for age, sex, smoking status, rheumatic disease diagnosis, comorbidities, medication use prior to infection, and rheumatic disease activity. RESULTS: A total of 1,324 patients were included, of whom 36% were hospitalized and 6% died; 26% of hospitalized patients required mechanical ventilation. In multivariable models, African American patients (OR 2.74 [95% CI 1.90-3.95]), Latinx patients (OR 1.71 [95% CI 1.18-2.49]), and Asian patients (OR 2.69 [95% CI 1.16-6.24]) had higher odds of hospitalization compared to White patients. Latinx patients also had 3-fold increased odds of requiring ventilatory support (OR 3.25 [95% CI 1.75-6.05]). No differences in mortality based on race/ethnicity were found, though power to detect associations may have been limited. CONCLUSION: Similar to findings in the general US population, racial/ethnic minorities with rheumatic disease and COVID-19 had increased odds of hospitalization and ventilatory support. These results illustrate significant health disparities related to COVID-19 in people with rheumatic diseases. The rheumatology community should proactively address the needs of patients currently experiencing inequitable health outcomes during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , Ethnicity/statistics & numerical data , Racial Groups/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatic Diseases/ethnology , Rheumatology/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Registries , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatic Diseases/mortality , Rheumatic Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
9.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 80(7): 930-942, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054617

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine factors associated with COVID-19-related death in people with rheumatic diseases. METHODS: Physician-reported registry of adults with rheumatic disease and confirmed or presumptive COVID-19 (from 24 March to 1 July 2020). The primary outcome was COVID-19-related death. Age, sex, smoking status, comorbidities, rheumatic disease diagnosis, disease activity and medications were included as covariates in multivariable logistic regression models. Analyses were further stratified according to rheumatic disease category. RESULTS: Of 3729 patients (mean age 57 years, 68% female), 390 (10.5%) died. Independent factors associated with COVID-19-related death were age (66-75 years: OR 3.00, 95% CI 2.13 to 4.22; >75 years: 6.18, 4.47 to 8.53; both vs ≤65 years), male sex (1.46, 1.11 to 1.91), hypertension combined with cardiovascular disease (1.89, 1.31 to 2.73), chronic lung disease (1.68, 1.26 to 2.25) and prednisolone-equivalent dosage >10 mg/day (1.69, 1.18 to 2.41; vs no glucocorticoid intake). Moderate/high disease activity (vs remission/low disease activity) was associated with higher odds of death (1.87, 1.27 to 2.77). Rituximab (4.04, 2.32 to 7.03), sulfasalazine (3.60, 1.66 to 7.78), immunosuppressants (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, ciclosporin, mycophenolate or tacrolimus: 2.22, 1.43 to 3.46) and not receiving any disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) (2.11, 1.48 to 3.01) were associated with higher odds of death, compared with methotrexate monotherapy. Other synthetic/biological DMARDs were not associated with COVID-19-related death. CONCLUSION: Among people with rheumatic disease, COVID-19-related death was associated with known general factors (older age, male sex and specific comorbidities) and disease-specific factors (disease activity and specific medications). The association with moderate/high disease activity highlights the importance of adequate disease control with DMARDs, preferably without increasing glucocorticoid dosages. Caution may be required with rituximab, sulfasalazine and some immunosuppressants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatic Diseases/mortality , Rheumatology/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Comorbidity , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Registries , Rheumatic Diseases/virology
10.
Rheumatol Int ; 41(2): 329-334, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-871457

ABSTRACT

To evaluate the public interest in rheumatic diseases during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Google Trends was queried to analyze search trends in the United States for numerous rheumatic diseases and also the interest in a rheumatologist. Three 8-week periods in 2020 ((March 15-May 9), (May 10-July 4), and (July 5-August 29)) were compared to similar periods of the prior 4 years (2016-2019). Compared to a similar time period between 2016 and 2019, a significant decrease was found in the relative search volume for more than half of the search terms during the initial March 15-May 9, 2020 period. However, this trend appeared to reverse during the July 5-August 29, 2020 period where the relative volume for nearly half of the search terms were not statistically significant compared to similar periods of the prior 4 years. In addition, this period showed a significant increase in relative volume for the terms: Axial spondyloarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome, scleroderma, Kawasaki disease, Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and rheumatologist. There was a significant decrease in relative search volume for many rheumatic diseases between March 15 and May 9, 2020 when compared to similar periods during the prior 4 years. However, the trends reversed after the initial period ended. There was an increase in relative search for the term "rheumatologist" between July and August 2020 suggesting the need for rheumatologists during the COVID-19 pandemic. Policymakers and healthcare providers should address the informational demands on rheumatic diseases and needs for rheumatologists by the general public during pandemics like COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Information Seeking Behavior , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatic Diseases/psychology , Rheumatology/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Search Engine
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL