Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480795

ABSTRACT

Among millions of sufferers of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), the challenge is not only constantly coping with CRS-related symptoms, such as congested nose, sinus pain, and headaches, but also various complications, such as attention difficulties and possible depression. These complications suggest that neural activity in the central nervous system may be altered in those patients, leading to unexpected conditions, such as neurodegeneration in elderly patients. Recently, some studies linked the presence of CRS and cognitive impairments that could further develop into Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly and is characterised by progressive memory loss, cognitive behavioural deficits, and significant personality changes. The microbiome, especially those in the gut, has been recognised as a human organ and plays an important role in the development of various conditions, including AD. However, less attention has been paid to the microbiome in the nasal cavity. Increased nasal inflammatory responses due to CRS may be an initial event that changes local microbiome homeostasis, which may further affect neuronal integrity in the central nervous system resulting in AD. Evidence suggests a potential of ß-amyloid deposition starting in olfactory neurons, which is then expanded from the nasal cavity to the central nervous system. In this paper, we reviewed currently available evidence that suggests this potential mechanism to advise the need to investigate the link between these two conditions.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/microbiology , Nose/microbiology , Rhinitis/complications , Sinusitis/complications , Alzheimer Disease/etiology , Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Amyloid beta-Peptides/metabolism , Brain/pathology , Chronic Disease , Humans , Microbiota , Rhinitis/microbiology , Rhinitis/pathology , Sinusitis/microbiology , Sinusitis/pathology
2.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(11): 981-986, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402000

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 infection can result in immunosuppression. Rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis is a frequent co-infection, even after recovery. METHODS: An ambispective interventional study was conducted of 41 coronavirus patients with rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis at a tertiary care centre from March to May 2021. RESULTS: There were 28 males and 13 females with a mean age of 48.2 years (range, 21-68 years). Twelve had long-standing diabetes mellitus and 28 had been recently diagnosed. Thirty-six had received systemic corticosteroids for coronavirus disease 2019. Nasal signs were present in 95 per cent of patients, ophthalmic symptoms and signs in 87 per cent, palatal necrosis in 46.3 per cent, facial signs in 24.3 per cent, nerve palsies in 60.9 per cent, and intracranial involvement in 21.9 per cent. Treatment with amphotericin B was based on clinical features and co-morbidities. Endonasal debridement was performed in 51.2 per cent of patients, total maxillectomy in 14.6 per cent and orbital exenteration in 9.7 per cent. At the last follow up, 37 patients (90.24 per cent) were on antifungal therapy; 4 (9.75 per cent) did not survive. CONCLUSION: Early detection may improve survival. Follow up of high-risk patients after coronavirus disease 2019 infection is paramount.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Epidemics , Mucorales , Mucormycosis/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , Brain Diseases/epidemiology , Brain Diseases/microbiology , COVID-19/microbiology , Coinfection/microbiology , Debridement , Eye Infections, Fungal/epidemiology , Eye Infections, Fungal/microbiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mucormycosis/microbiology , Orbital Diseases/epidemiology , Orbital Diseases/microbiology , Rhinitis/epidemiology , Rhinitis/microbiology , Young Adult
3.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102267, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377695

ABSTRACT

AIMS: 1: Describe the epidemiology and determine risk factors for COVID-19 associated mucormycosis. 2: Elaborate the clinical spectrum of Rhino-Orbital-Cerebral Mucormycosis (ROCM), pattern of neuroaxis involvement and it's radiological correlates. METHODS: Observational study. Consecutive, confirmed cases of mucormycosis (N = 55) were included. A case of mucormycosis was defined as one who had clinical and radiological features consistent with mucormycosis along with demonstration of the fungus in tissue via KOH mount/culture/histopathological examination (HPE). Data pertaining to epidemiology, risk factors, clinico-radiological features were analysed using percentage of total cases. RESULTS: Middle aged, diabetic males with recent COVID-19 infection were most affected. New onset upper jaw toothache was a striking observation in several cases. Among neurological manifestations headache, proptosis, vision loss, extraocular movement restriction; cavernous sinus, meningeal and parenchymal involvement were common. Stroke in ROCM followed a definitive pattern with watershed infarction. CONCLUSIONS: New onset upper jaw toothache and loosening of teeth should prompt an immediate search for mucormycosis in backdrop of diabetic patients with recent COVID-19 disease, aiding earlier diagnosis and treatment initiation. Neuroaxis involvement was characterized by a multitude of features pertaining to involvement of optic nerve, extraocular muscles, meninges, brain parenchyma and internal carotid artery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Mucormycosis/epidemiology , Mucormycosis/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Central Nervous System Fungal Infections/epidemiology , Central Nervous System Fungal Infections/etiology , Eye Infections, Fungal/epidemiology , Eye Infections, Fungal/etiology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/microbiology , Orbit/microbiology , Orbital Diseases/epidemiology , Orbital Diseases/microbiology , Prevalence , Rhinitis/epidemiology , Rhinitis/etiology , Rhinitis/microbiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Socioeconomic Factors
5.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 105(2): 449-453, 2021 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371040

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 first emerged in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. Since that time, the frequency of bacterial and fungal coinfections has been continuously increasing. Although invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is being increasingly recognized in association with COVID-19, there is limited information regarding COVID-19-associated mucormycosis. We describe a 50-year-old woman with uncontrolled diabetes who received systemic corticosteroids and remdesevir during her admission for COVID-19. A few days after discharge, the patient was readmitted because of facial swelling and numbness, and a diagnosis of COVID-19-associated rhinosinusitis mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus arrhizus (formerly called Rhizopus oryzae) was confirmed with sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA. This report aimed to address the importance of short-term follow-up for COVID-19 patients who have received systemic corticosteroids, particularly those with predisposing conditions, because early detection and prompt, aggressive treatment are essential for the management of invasive fungal infections.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Rhinitis/etiology , Rhizopus oryzae/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Sinusitis/etiology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/adverse effects , DNA, Fungal/genetics , DNA, Ribosomal Spacer/genetics , Diabetes Mellitus , Fatal Outcome , Female , Humans , Invasive Fungal Infections/etiology , Middle Aged , Mucormycosis , Rhinitis/diagnosis , Rhinitis/microbiology , Sinusitis/diagnosis , Sinusitis/microbiology
6.
Mycoses ; 64(11): 1366-1377, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305494

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 patients, especially the patients requiring hospitalisation, have a high risk of several complications such as opportunistic bacterial and fungal infections. Mucormycosis is a rare and opportunistic fungal infection that mainly affects diabetic and immunocompromised patients. An increase has been observed in the number of rhino-orbital mucormycosis in patients with COVID-19 admitted to Imam Khomeini Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran, since October 2020. This is a report of the frequency, risk factors, clinical manifestations, treatment and prognosis of COVID-19 associated with mucormycosis infection. METHODS: The medical records of COVID-19 patients with rhino-orbital mucormycosis who were diagnosed in an educational therapeutic hospital in Kermanshah, west of Iran were surveyed. Several parameters were analysed including demographic, clinical, therapeutic and laboratory characteristics. RESULTS: Twelve patients with COVID-19-associated rhino-orbital mucormycosis were identified from 12 October to 18 November 2020. All cases reported as proven mucormycosis had a history of hospitalisation due to COVID-19. Comorbidities mainly included diabetes mellitus (83.33%) and hypertension (58.33%). Seventy-five per cent of patients received corticosteroids for COVID- 19 treatment. The sites of involvement were rhino-sino-orbital (83%) and rhino-sino (17%). Amphotericin B/liposomal amphotericin B alone or in combination with surgical debridement or orbital exenteration was used as the first-line therapy. The overall mortality rate was 66.7% (8/12). CONCLUSIONS: We found a high incidence of mucormycosis among COVID-19 patients. Diabetes mellitus and corticosteroid use were the dominant predisposing factor of mucormycosis. Mucormycosis is a life-threatening and opportunistic infection; therefore, physicians should know the signs and symptoms of the disease so that a timely diagnosis and therapy can be performed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Mucormycosis/epidemiology , Orbital Diseases/epidemiology , Orbital Diseases/microbiology , Rhinitis/epidemiology , Rhinitis/microbiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Incidence , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Mucormycosis/complications , Mucormycosis/diagnostic imaging , Orbital Diseases/complications , Orbital Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Retrospective Studies , Rhinitis/complications , Rhinitis/diagnostic imaging
7.
Laryngoscope ; 131(12): 2652-2658, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233217

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Occurrence of invasive fungal respiratory superinfections in patients with COVID-19 has gained increasing attention in the latest studies. Yet, description of acute invasive fungal sinusitis with its management in those patients is still scarce. This study aims to describe this recently increasing clinical entity in relation to COVID-19 patients. STUDY DESIGN: Longitudinal prospective study. METHODS: Prospective longitudinal study included patients diagnosed with acute invasive fungal rhinosinusitis after a recent COVID-19 infection. Antifungal agents given included amphotericin B, voriconazole, and/or posaconazole. Surgical treatment was restricted to patients with PCR negative results for COVID-19. Endoscopic, open, and combined approaches were utilized to eradicate infection. Follow-up for survived patients was maintained regularly for the first postoperative month. RESULTS: A total of 36 patients with a mean age of 52.92 ± 11.30 years old were included. Most common associated disease was diabetes mellitus (27.8%). Mycological analysis revealed infection with Mucor and Aspergillus species in 77.8% and 30.6% of patients, respectively. Sino-nasal, orbital, cerebral, and palatine involvement was found in 100%, 80.6%, 27.8%, and 33.3% of patients, respectively. The most common reported symptoms and signs are facial pain (75%), facial numbness (66.7%), ophthalmoplegia, and visual loss (63.9%). All patients were treated simultaneously by surgical debridement with antifungal medications except for two patients with PCR-positive swab for COVID-19. These two patients received antifungal therapy alone. Overall survival rate was 63.89% (23/36). CONCLUSION: Clinical suspicion of acute invasive fungal sinusitis among COVID-19 patients and early management with antifungal therapy and surgical debridement is essential for better outcomes and higher survival. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4 Laryngoscope, 131:2652-2658, 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , Invasive Fungal Infections/epidemiology , Rhinitis/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sinusitis/epidemiology , Acute Disease , Adult , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , Debridement , Female , Humans , Invasive Fungal Infections/microbiology , Invasive Fungal Infections/therapy , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Rhinitis/microbiology , Rhinitis/therapy , Sinusitis/microbiology , Sinusitis/therapy
8.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 42(6): 103080, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230345

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (AIFRS) is aggressive morbidity affecting immunocompromised patients. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may allow secondary fungal disease through a propensity to cause respiratory infection by affecting the immune system leading to dysregulation and reduced numbers of T lymphocytes, CD4+T, and CD8+T cells, altering the innate immunity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of acute invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (AIFRS) in COVID-19 patients. METHODOLOGY: Data for acute invasive rhinosinusitis was obtained from the Otorhinolaryngology departments at our tertiary hospital at the period from January 2017 to December 2020. Then the risk factors of comorbid diseases and fungal types between post-COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 groups regarding the incidence of AIFRS are compared. RESULTS: Consequently, the incidence of AIFRS showed a more significant difference (P < 0.05) in post-COVID-19 patients than in non-COVID-19 especially in immunocompromised patients, diabetic, renal, and liver dysfunction patients as well as patients with risk factors of AIFRS. The most common organisms affecting patients with AIFRS are Rhizopus oryzae, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Absidia mucor. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of AIFRS is markedly prominent in post-COVID-19 patients than in those of non-COVID-19, especially in immunocompromised, diabetic, renal, and liver dysfunction patients and patients with risk factors for rhinosinusitis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Disease Outbreaks , Invasive Fungal Infections , Rhinitis/epidemiology , Rhinitis/microbiology , Sinusitis/epidemiology , Sinusitis/microbiology , Absidia , Acute Disease , Aged , Aspergillus fumigatus , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Immunocompromised Host/immunology , Incidence , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Rhinitis/diagnostic imaging , Rhinitis/immunology , Rhizopus oryzae , Risk Factors , Sinusitis/diagnostic imaging , Sinusitis/immunology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL