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1.
Front Immunol ; 13: 832223, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809390

ABSTRACT

Better methods to interrogate host-pathogen interactions during Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections are imperative to help understand and prevent this disease. Here we implemented RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) using Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT) long-reads to measure differential host gene expression, transcript polyadenylation and isoform usage within various epithelial cell lines permissive and non-permissive for SARS-CoV-2 infection. SARS-CoV-2-infected and mock-infected Vero (African green monkey kidney epithelial cells), Calu-3 (human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells), Caco-2 (human colorectal adenocarcinoma epithelial cells) and A549 (human lung carcinoma epithelial cells) were analyzed over time (0, 2, 24, 48 hours). Differential polyadenylation was found to occur in both infected Calu-3 and Vero cells during a late time point (48 hpi), with Gene Ontology (GO) terms such as viral transcription and translation shown to be significantly enriched in Calu-3 data. Poly(A) tails showed increased lengths in the majority of the differentially polyadenylated transcripts in Calu-3 and Vero cell lines (up to ~101 nt in mean poly(A) length, padj = 0.029). Of these genes, ribosomal protein genes such as RPS4X and RPS6 also showed downregulation in expression levels, suggesting the importance of ribosomal protein genes during infection. Furthermore, differential transcript usage was identified in Caco-2, Calu-3 and Vero cells, including transcripts of genes such as GSDMB and KPNA2, which have previously been implicated in SARS-CoV-2 infections. Overall, these results highlight the potential role of differential polyadenylation and transcript usage in host immune response or viral manipulation of host mechanisms during infection, and therefore, showcase the value of long-read sequencing in identifying less-explored host responses to disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , Caco-2 Cells , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Polyadenylation , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Ribosomal Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Vero Cells
2.
J Biol Chem ; 297(6): 101399, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509947

ABSTRACT

The nonstructural protein 1 (nsp1) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is a critical viral protein that suppresses host gene expression by blocking the assembly of the ribosome on host mRNAs. To understand the mechanism of inhibition of host gene expression, we sought to identify cellular proteins that interact with nsp1. Using proximity-dependent biotinylation followed by proteomic analyses of biotinylated proteins, here we captured multiple dynamic interactions of nsp1 with host cell proteins. In addition to ribosomal proteins, we identified several pre-mRNA processing proteins that interact with nsp1, including splicing factors and transcription termination proteins, as well as exosome, and stress granule (SG)-associated proteins. We found that the interactions with transcription termination factors are primarily governed by the C-terminal region of nsp1 and are disrupted by the mutation of amino acids K164 and H165 that are essential for its host shutoff function. We further show that nsp1 interacts with Ras GTPase-activating protein SH3 domain-binding protein 1 (G3BP1) and colocalizes with G3BP1 in SGs under sodium arsenite-induced stress. Finally, we observe that the presence of nsp1 disrupts the maturation of SGs over a long period. Isolation of SG core at different times shows a gradual loss of G3BP1 in the presence of nsp1.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Biotinylation , COVID-19/virology , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Proteomics , Ribosomal Proteins/metabolism , SARS Virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , /metabolism
3.
Science ; 372(6548): 1306-1313, 2021 06 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228853

ABSTRACT

Programmed ribosomal frameshifting is a key event during translation of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) RNA genome that allows synthesis of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and downstream proteins. Here, we present the cryo-electron microscopy structure of a translating mammalian ribosome primed for frameshifting on the viral RNA. The viral RNA adopts a pseudoknot structure that lodges at the entry to the ribosomal messenger RNA (mRNA) channel to generate tension in the mRNA and promote frameshifting, whereas the nascent viral polyprotein forms distinct interactions with the ribosomal tunnel. Biochemical experiments validate the structural observations and reveal mechanistic and regulatory features that influence frameshifting efficiency. Finally, we compare compounds previously shown to reduce frameshifting with respect to their ability to inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication, establishing coronavirus frameshifting as a target for antiviral intervention.


Subject(s)
Frameshifting, Ribosomal , RNA, Viral/genetics , Ribosomes/ultrastructure , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Proteins/biosynthesis , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Codon, Terminator , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/biosynthesis , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Fluoroquinolones/pharmacology , Frameshifting, Ribosomal/drug effects , Genome, Viral , Humans , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted , Models, Molecular , Nucleic Acid Conformation , Open Reading Frames , Protein Folding , RNA, Messenger/chemistry , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA, Ribosomal, 18S/chemistry , RNA, Ribosomal, 18S/genetics , RNA, Ribosomal, 18S/metabolism , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Ribosomal Proteins/metabolism , Ribosomes/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Viral Proteins/genetics , Virus Replication/drug effects
4.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(6)2021 02 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1042832

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a beta-CoV that recently emerged as a human pathogen and is the causative agent of the COVID-19 pandemic. A molecular framework of how the virus manipulates host cellular machinery to facilitate infection remains unclear. Here, we focus on SARS-CoV-2 NSP1, which is proposed to be a virulence factor that inhibits protein synthesis by directly binding the human ribosome. We demonstrate biochemically that NSP1 inhibits translation of model human and SARS-CoV-2 messenger RNAs (mRNAs). NSP1 specifically binds to the small (40S) ribosomal subunit, which is required for translation inhibition. Using single-molecule fluorescence assays to monitor NSP1-40S subunit binding in real time, we determine that eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs) allosterically modulate the interaction of NSP1 with ribosomal preinitiation complexes in the absence of mRNA. We further elucidate that NSP1 competes with RNA segments downstream of the start codon to bind the 40S subunit and that the protein is unable to associate rapidly with 80S ribosomes assembled on an mRNA. Collectively, our findings support a model where NSP1 proteins from viruses in at least two subgenera of beta-CoVs associate with the open head conformation of the 40S subunit to inhibit an early step of translation, by preventing accommodation of mRNA within the entry channel.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Ribosomes/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Eukaryotic Initiation Factors/metabolism , Humans , Pandemics , Peptide Chain Initiation, Translational/genetics , Protein Biosynthesis , Protein Processing, Post-Translational , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , Ribosomal Proteins/genetics , Ribosomal Proteins/metabolism , Ribosome Subunits, Small, Eukaryotic/metabolism , Ribosomes/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(1)2020 Dec 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1041240

ABSTRACT

Thymosin α1 (Tα1) is an immunostimulatory peptide for the treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections and used as an immune enhancer, which also offers prospects in the context of COVID-19 infections and cancer. Manufacturing of this N-terminally acetylated 28-residue peptide is demanding, and its short plasma half-life limits in vivo efficacy and requires frequent dosing. Here, we combined the PASylation technology with enzymatic in situ N-acetylation by RimJ to produce a long-acting version of Tα1 in Escherichia coli at high yield. ESI-MS analysis of the purified fusion protein indicated the expected composition without any signs of proteolysis. SEC analysis revealed a 10-fold expanded hydrodynamic volume resulting from the fusion with a conformationally disordered Pro/Ala/Ser (PAS) polypeptide of 600 residues. This size effect led to a plasma half-life in rats extended by more than a factor 8 compared to the original synthetic peptide due to retarded kidney filtration. Our study provides the basis for therapeutic development of a next generation thymosin α1 with prolonged circulation. Generally, the strategy of producing an N-terminally protected PASylated peptide solves three major problems of peptide drugs: (i) instability in the expression host, (ii) rapid degradation by serum exopeptidases, and (iii) low bioactivity because of fast renal clearance.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacokinetics , Thymalfasin/pharmacokinetics , Acetylation , Acetyltransferases/metabolism , Adjuvants, Immunologic/genetics , Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , Escherichia coli/metabolism , Escherichia coli Proteins/metabolism , Female , Half-Life , Mass Spectrometry , Microscopy, Electron, Scanning , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Peptides/chemistry , Proteolysis , Rats , Rats, Wistar , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/blood , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/isolation & purification , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/pharmacokinetics , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/ultrastructure , Ribosomal Proteins/metabolism , Thymalfasin/blood , Thymalfasin/chemistry , Thymalfasin/genetics , Virus Diseases/drug therapy
6.
J Gen Virol ; 102(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-910383

ABSTRACT

The emerging pathogen severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused social and economic disruption worldwide, infecting over 9.0 million people and killing over 469 000 by 24 June 2020. Unfortunately, no vaccine or antiviral drug that completely eliminates the transmissible disease coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been developed to date. Given that coronavirus nonstructural protein 1 (nsp1) is a good target for attenuated vaccines, it is of great significance to explore the detailed characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 nsp1. Here, we first confirmed that SARS-CoV-2 nsp1 had a conserved function similar to that of SARS-CoV nsp1 in inhibiting host-protein synthesis and showed greater inhibition efficiency, as revealed by ribopuromycylation and Renilla luciferase (Rluc) reporter assays. Specifically, bioinformatics and biochemical experiments showed that by interacting with 40S ribosomal subunit, the lysine located at amino acid 164 (K164) was the key residue that enabled SARS-CoV-2 nsp1 to suppress host gene expression. Furthermore, as an inhibitor of host-protein expression, SARS-CoV-2 nsp1 contributed to cell-cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase, which might provide a favourable environment for virus production. Taken together, this research uncovered the detailed mechanism by which SARS-CoV-2 nsp1 K164 inhibited host gene expression, laying the foundation for the development of attenuated vaccines based on nsp1 modification.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Lysine/genetics , Ribosomal Proteins/genetics , Ribosome Subunits, Small, Eukaryotic/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Amino Acid Sequence , Amino Acid Substitution , Computational Biology/methods , G1 Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , Genes, Reporter , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Luciferases/genetics , Luciferases/metabolism , Lysine/metabolism , Mutation , Ribosomal Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Ribosomal Proteins/metabolism , Ribosome Subunits, Small, Eukaryotic/metabolism , Ribosome Subunits, Small, Eukaryotic/virology , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Signal Transduction , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
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