Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 50
Filter
1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 846604, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776058

ABSTRACT

The objectives of the study were to characterize events related to patient safety reported by medical imaging personnel in Finland in 2007-2017, the number and quality of reported injuries, the risk assessment, and the planned improvement of operations. The information was collected from a healthcare patient safety incident register system. The data contained information on the nature of the patient safety errors, harms and near-misses in medical imaging, the factors that lead to the events, the consequences for the patient, the level of risks, and future measures. The number of patient safety incident reports included in the study was 7,287. Of the incident reports, 75% concerned injuries to patients and 25% were near-misses. The most common consequence of adverse events and near-misses were minor harm (37.2%) related to contrast agent, or no harm (27.9%) related to equipment malfunction. Supervisors estimated the risks as low (47.7%) e.g., data management, insignificant (35%) e.g., verbal communication or moderate (15.7%) e.g., the use of contrast agent. The most common suggestion for learning from the incident was discussing it with the staff (58.1%), improving operations (5.7%) and submitting it to a higher authority (5.4%). Improving patient safety requires timely, accurate and clear reporting of various patient safety incidents. Based on incident reports, supervisors can provide feedback to staff, develop plans to prevent accidents, and monitor the impact of measures taken. Information on the development of occupational safety should be disseminated to all healthcare professionals so that the same mistakes are not repeated.


Subject(s)
Diagnostic Imaging , Patient Safety , Humans , Medical Staff , Risk Management/methods
3.
Can J Cardiol ; 37(10): 1629-1634, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406216

ABSTRACT

The mRNA vaccines against COVID-19 infection have been effective in reducing the number of symptomatic cases worldwide. With widespread uptake, case series of vaccine-related myocarditis/pericarditis have been reported, particularly in adolescents and young adults. Men tend to be affected with greater frequency, and symptom onset is usually within 1 week after vaccination. Clinical course appears to be mild in most cases. On the basis of the available evidence, we highlight a clinical framework to guide providers on how to assess, investigate, diagnose, and report suspected and confirmed cases. In any patient with highly suggestive symptoms temporally related to COVID-19 mRNA vaccination, standardized workup includes serum troponin measurement and polymerase chain reaction testing for COVID-19 infection, routine additional lab work, and a 12-lead electrocardiogram. Echocardiography is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for patients with unexplained troponin elevation and/or pathologic electrocardiogram changes. Cardiovascular specialist consultation and hospitalization should be considered on the basis of the results of standard investigations. Treatment is largely supportive, and myocarditis/pericarditis that is diagnosed according to defined clinical criteria should be reported to public health authorities in every jurisdiction. Finally, we recommend COVID-19 vaccination in all individuals in accordance with the Health Canada and National Advisory Committee on Immunization guidelines. In patients with suspected myocarditis/pericarditis after the first dose of an mRNA vaccine, deferral of a second dose is recommended until additional reports become available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Myocarditis , Pericarditis , Risk Management , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Canada/epidemiology , Diagnosis, Differential , Disease Notification/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Myocarditis/diagnosis , Myocarditis/etiology , Myocarditis/microbiology , Pericarditis/diagnosis , Pericarditis/etiology , Pericarditis/microbiology , Risk Management/methods , Risk Management/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sex Factors , Young Adult , /adverse effects
4.
Natl Med J India ; 34(1): 10-14, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359327

ABSTRACT

Background: . Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) was first described in December 2019 and has evolved into an ongoing global pandemic. Cancer patients on chemotherapy are immunocompromised and are at the highest risk of Covid-19-related complications. We describe our experience with the management of haematology-oncology and stem cell transplant (SCT) patients receiving curative chemotherapy in a hospital with a high influx of Covid-19 patients. Methods: . We did a prospective observational study at a 99-bedded cancer centre of a tertiary care teaching hospital from April 2020 to September 2020. Preventive measures taken were categorized as follows: (i) staff: screening, mandatory use of personal protective equipment (PPE), risk stratification of potential exposure and testing and isolation as needed; (ii) patients: mandatory viral polymerase chain reaction testing, segregation of positive and untested patients and testing of family members; and (iii) environment: mandatory regular cleaning, visitor restriction, telemedicine services and reassignment of priority to clinic visits. Treatment of the underlying conditions was continued with added precautions. Results: . A total of 54 patients were included in the analysis, including 48 with haematological malignancies and 6 for stem cell therapy. Preventive measures were universally applied, and chemotherapy with a curative intent was initiated as per protocol. Three patients were detected to have Covid-19 infection before admission and one after the institution of chemotherapy. Nine patients died after the first cycle of chemotherapy, 2 due to severe Covid-19-related illness and 7 due to complications of chemotherapy or disease progression. Conclusions: . In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, treatment for haematological malignancies must continue while balancing the risk of Covid-19 infections. Our report emphasizes the effectiveness of measures such as hand hygiene, social isolation, patient segregation, use of masks and PPE and universal pre-treatment testing for Covid-19 in reducing the risk of infection in a high-risk clinical setting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hematologic Neoplasms , Infection Control , Risk Management , Stem Cell Transplantation , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Contact Tracing/methods , Female , Hematologic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Hematologic Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Immunocompromised Host/immunology , India/epidemiology , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Risk Management/methods , Risk Management/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Stem Cell Transplantation/statistics & numerical data
5.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 22(9): 701-705, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1339452

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has thoroughly and deeply affected the provision of healthcare services worldwide. In order to limit the in-hospital infections and to redistribute the healthcare professionals, cardiac percutaneous intervention in Pediatric and Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ACHD) patients were limited to urgent or emergency ones. The aim of this article is to describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Pediatric and ACHD cath laboratory activity during the so-called 'hard lockdown' in Italy. Eleven out of 12 Italian institutions with a dedicated Invasive Cardiology Unit in Congenital Heart Disease actively participated in the survey. The interventional cardiology activity was reduced by more than 50% in 6 out of 11 centers. Adolescent and ACHD patients suffered the highest rate of reduction. There was an evident discrepancy in the management of the hard lockdown, irrespective of the number of COVID-19 positive cases registered, with a higher reduction in Southern Italy compared with the most affected regions (Lombardy, Piedmont, Veneto and Emilia Romagna). Although the pandemic was brilliantly addressed in most cases, we recognize the necessity for planning new, and hopefully homogeneous, strategies in order to be prepared for an upcoming new outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Emergency Medical Services , Heart Defects, Congenital , Infection Control , Risk Management/methods , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Civil Defense/methods , Civil Defense/trends , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Emergency Medical Services/statistics & numerical data , Female , Heart Defects, Congenital/epidemiology , Heart Defects, Congenital/surgery , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Am J Infect Control ; 49(2): 151-157, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1336189

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: An outbreak of corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Wuhan, China has spread quickly across the world, the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared this a pandemic. COVID-19 can be transmitted from human to human and cause nosocomial infection that has brought great challenges to infection control in medical institutions. Due to the professional characteristics, the research hospital still received a large number of trauma emergency tasks during the outbreak. It is urgent to establish a graded prevention and control guidance of surgery. METHODS: Review the implementation of surgical grading control measures in this hospital during the epidemic of COVID-19. RESULTS: The surgical prevention measures based on patients with different risks included prescreening and preoperative risk assessment, preparation of operating room, medical staff protection and environmental disinfection measures, etc. From January 20 to March 5, 2020, a total of 4,720 operations had been performed in this hospital, of which 1,565 were emergency operations and 22 for medium-risk and high-risk patients who may have the 2019 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. And there is no medical staff exposed during the implementation of protective measures. CONCLUSIONS: Through the risk assessment of surgical patients and adopting surgical grading control measures, the risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 spread during the surgical process can be reduced greatly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Risk Management/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Health Plan Implementation , Humans , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Procedures, Operative/adverse effects
7.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(5): 357-362, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301397

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We explored teachers' emotional reactions to the COVID-19 pandemic, and the association between COVID-19 risk management and these emotional reactions. METHODS: We used cross-sectional data from 2665 teachers working at public schools. Participants responded to a questionnaire in May 2020. The analyses were adjusted for sex, age, cohabitation, and region. RESULTS: Knowledge about adequate test behavior and feeling secure regarding colleagues' actions to hinder spread of virus were associated with less frequent emotional reactions. Lack of access to personal protective equipment and exposure to infected pupils, parents or colleagues were associated with more frequent emotional reactions. CONCLUSION: Similar to other groups of frontline employees, teachers experience negative emotional reactions to the COVID-19 pandemic. Gaining knowledge about teachers' worries and fears during pandemics is an important first step enabling leaders and occupational health professionals to address these.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Emotions , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , School Teachers/psychology , Adult , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Cross-Sectional Studies , Denmark/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Management/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace
10.
Contemp Clin Trials ; 104: 106368, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1155430

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 pandemic caused several alarming challenges for clinical trials. On-site source data verification (SDV) in the multicenter clinical trial became difficult due to travel ban and social distancing. For multicenter clinical trials, centralized data monitoring is an efficient and cost-effective method of data monitoring. Centralized data monitoring reduces the risk of COVID-19 infections and provides additional capabilities compared to on-site monitoring. The key steps for on-site monitoring include identifying key risk factors and thresholds for the risk factors, developing a monitoring plan, following up the risk factors, and providing a management plan to mitigate the risk. METHODS: For analysis purposes, we simulated data similar to our clinical trial data. We classified the data monitoring process into two groups, such as the Supervised analysis process, to follow each patient remotely by creating a dashboard and an Unsupervised analysis process to identify data discrepancy, data error, or data fraud. We conducted several risk-based statistical analysis techniques to avoid on-site source data verification to reduce time and cost, followed up with each patient remotely to maintain social distancing, and created a centralized data monitoring dashboard to ensure patient safety and maintain the data quality. CONCLUSION: Data monitoring in clinical trials is a mandatory process. A risk-based centralized data review process is cost-effective and helpful to ignore on-site data monitoring at the time of the pandemic. We summarized how different statistical methods could be implemented and explained in SAS to identify various data error or fabrication issues in multicenter clinical trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Data Accuracy , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Research Design/trends , Risk Management , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Change Management , Clinical Trials Data Monitoring Committees/organization & administration , Clinical Trials as Topic/economics , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Clinical Trials as Topic/organization & administration , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Humans , Risk Adjustment/methods , Risk Adjustment/trends , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Management/methods , Risk Management/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Travel-Related Illness
11.
Can J Cardiol ; 37(5): 722-732, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1144548

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 and our public health responses to the pandemic may have far-reaching implications for cardiovascular (CV) risk, affecting the general population and not only survivors of COVID-19. In this narrative review, we discuss how the pandemic may affect general CV risk for years to come and explore the mitigating potential of telehealth interventions. From a health care perspective, the shift away from in-person office visits may have led many to defer routine risk- factor management and may have had unforeseen effects on continuity of care and adherence. Fear of COVID-19 has led some patients to forego care for acute CV events. Curtailment of routine outpatient laboratory testing has likely delayed intensification of risk-factor-modifying medical therapy, and drug shortages and misinformation may have negative impacts on adherence to antihypertensive, glucose-lowering, and lipid-lowering agents. From a societal perspective, the unprecedented curtailment of social and economic activities has led to loss of income, unemployment, social isolation, decreased physical activity, and increased frequency of depression and anxiety, all of which are known to be associated with worse CV risk-factor control and outcomes. We must embrace and evaluate measures to mitigate these potential harms to avoid an epidemic of CV morbidity and mortality in the coming years that could dwarf the initial health effects of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Public Health , Risk Management/methods , Telemedicine , Comorbidity , Humans
12.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 23, 2021 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119610

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Rwanda has made significant advancements in medical and economic development over the last 20 years and has emerged as a leader in healthcare in the East African region. The COVID-19 pandemic, which reached Rwanda in March 2020, presented new and unique challenges for infectious disease control. The objective of this paper is to characterize Rwanda's domestic response to the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic and highlight effective strategies so that other countries, including high and middle-income countries, can learn from its innovative initiatives. Methods: Government publications describing Rwanda's healthcare capacity were first consulted to obtain the country's baseline context. Next, official government and healthcare system communications, including case counts, prevention and screening protocols, treatment facility practices, and behavioral guidelines for the public, were read thoroughly to understand the course of the pandemic in Rwanda and the specific measures in the response. Results: As of 31 December 2020, Rwanda has recorded 8,383 cumulative COVID-19 cases, 6,542 recoveries, and 92 deaths since the first case on 14 March 2020. The Ministry of Health, Rwanda Biomedical Centre, and the Epidemic and Surveillance Response division have collaborated on preparative measures since the pandemic began in January 2020. The formation of a Joint Task Force in early March led to the Coronavirus National Preparedness and Response Plan, an extensive six-month plan that established a national incident management system and detailed four phases of a comprehensive national response. Notable strategies have included disseminating public information through drones, robots for screening and inpatient care, and official communications through social media platforms to combat misinformation and mobilize a cohesive response from the population. Conclusion: Rwanda's government and healthcare system has responded to the COVID-19 pandemic with innovative interventions to prevent and contain the virus. Importantly, the response has utilized adaptive and innovative technology and robust risk communication and community engagement to deliver an effective response to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Delivery of Health Care , Government Regulation , Risk Management , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Change Management , Communicable Disease Control/legislation & jurisprudence , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Communication , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Risk Management/methods , Risk Management/organization & administration , Rwanda/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Int J Risk Saf Med ; 32(2): 77-86, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081481

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The disease caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has rapidly spread escalating the situation to an international pandemic. The absence of a vaccine or an efficient treatment with enough scientific evidence against the virus has generated a healthcare crisis of great magnitude. The precautionary principle justifies the selection of the recommended medicines, whose demand has increased dramatically. METHODS: we carried out an analysis of the healthcare risk management and the main measures taken by the state healthcare authorities to a possible shortage of medicines in the most affected countries of the European Union: Spain, France, Italy and Germany. RESULTS: the healthcare risk management in the European Union countries is carried out based on the precautionary principle, as we do not have enough scientific evidence to recommend a specific treatment against the new virus. Some measures aimed to guarantee the access to medicines for the population has been adopted in the most affected countries by the novel coronavirus. CONCLUSIONS: in Spain, Italy and Germany, some rules based on the precautionary principle were pronounced in order to guarantee the supply of medicines, while in France, besides that, the competences of pharmacists in pharmacy offices have been extended to guarantee the access to medicines for the population.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/supply & distribution , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Health Services Accessibility , Risk Management , Strategic Stockpile/organization & administration , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , European Union , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Quality Improvement/organization & administration , Quality Indicators, Health Care/organization & administration , Quality Indicators, Health Care/standards , Risk Management/methods , Risk Management/standards , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 14(5): 652-657, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065714

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: More than 80% of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases are mild or moderate. In this study, a risk model was developed for predicting rehabilitation duration (the time from hospital admission to discharge) of the mild-moderate COVID-19 cases and was used to conduct refined risk management for different risk populations. METHODS: A total of 90 consecutive patients with mild-moderate COVID-19 were enrolled. Large-scale datasets were extracted from clinical practices. Through the multivariable linear regression analysis, the model was based on significant risk factors and was developed for predicting the rehabilitation duration of mild-moderate cases of COVID-19. To assess the local epidemic situation, risk management was conducted by weighing the risk of populations at different risk. RESULTS: Ten risk factors from 44 high-dimensional clinical datasets were significantly correlated to rehabilitation duration (P < 0.05). Among these factors, 5 risk predictors were incorporated into a risk model. Individual rehabilitation durations were effectively calculated. Weighing the local epidemic situation, threshold probability was classified for low risk, intermediate risk, and high risk. Using this classification, risk management was based on a treatment flowchart tailored for clinical decision-making. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed novel model is a useful tool for individualized risk management of mild-moderate COVID-19 cases, and it may readily facilitate dynamic clinical decision-making for different risk populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Rehabilitation/methods , Risk Management/methods , Time Factors , Adult , China , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors
15.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0244706, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067401

ABSTRACT

Without vaccines and treatments, societies must rely on non-pharmaceutical intervention strategies to control the spread of emerging diseases such as COVID-19. Though complete lockdown is epidemiologically effective, because it eliminates infectious contacts, it comes with significant costs. Several recent studies have suggested that a plausible compromise strategy for minimizing epidemic risk is periodic closure, in which populations oscillate between wide-spread social restrictions and relaxation. However, no underlying theory has been proposed to predict and explain optimal closure periods as a function of epidemiological and social parameters. In this work we develop such an analytical theory for SEIR-like model diseases, showing how characteristic closure periods emerge that minimize the total outbreak, and increase predictably with the reproductive number and incubation periods of a disease- as long as both are within predictable limits. Using our approach we demonstrate a sweet-spot effect in which optimal periodic closure is maximally effective for diseases with similar incubation and recovery periods. Our results compare well to numerical simulations, including in COVID-19 models where infectivity and recovery show significant variation.


Subject(s)
Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Quarantine/methods , Risk Management/methods , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Diseases/psychology , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Epidemics/prevention & control , Epidemics/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Models, Theoretical , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
16.
J Healthc Risk Manag ; 40(4): 30-37, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1012192

ABSTRACT

On March 11, 2020, the novel coronavirus disease, COVID-19, was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO).1 The pandemic evolved rapidly, forcing providers to face previously unconsidered health care delivery scenarios. Medical and dental professionals sought guidance. This article presents an overview of the questions, concerns, and requests physicians and dentists shared with patient safety risk management consultants (PSRMs) at a large medical professional liability company. During the first 5 months of the pandemic, PSRMs handled more than 1200 calls related to COVID-19. Analysis of call data provides insight into front line provider concerns as the pandemic evolved.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Safety/statistics & numerical data , Risk Management/methods , Risk Management/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(21)2020 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983332

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: The emergency linked to the spread of COVID-19 in Italy has led to inevitable consequences on the penitentiary system. The risks of this emergency in prisons is mainly related to the problem of persistent overcrowding that makes social distancing difficult and the isolation of any contagion hard to arrange. The Department of Protection for Adults and Minors of the ASL Salerno Criminal Area has taken steps in order to perform screening operations and minimize the risks for prisoners and operators. (2) Methods: We conducted a two-phase observational study. In the first phase, we offered and then executed serum COVID-19 screening to all the convicted inmates. For those who had a doubtful or positive result, a swab was executed in the shortest time possible. In the second phase, a pharyngeal swab was offered and executed to all the police officers, the penitentiary administrative staff and the medical personnel working in the prison. (3) Results: In the first phase, we executed 485 COVID-19 blood tests on prisoners, 3 (0.61%) of which were positive. The three positive inmates underwent nasopharyngeal swabbing, which ultimately were negative. After that, we executed 276 nasopharyngeal swabs on the prison personnel, penitentiary administrative staff and medical personnel-all were negative. (4) Conclusion: All tests (blood tests and swabs) that were carried out on the prisoners and on the staff were negative for COVID-19. We believe that all prisons in Italy and in the world should take action to ensure preventive and control measures in order to safeguard the health of the prison population and of all the people who work there.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Nasopharynx/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Prisoners , Risk Management/methods , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Italy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Prisons , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Toxicol Ind Health ; 36(9): 736-742, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-947904

ABSTRACT

Risk mitigation of COVID-19 in the indoor environment requires an articulated strategy for creating a bridge between science and the business community that focuses on knitting together four core capabilities-environmental microbiology, transmission science, building science, and social science-advancing scientific knowledge. The purpose of this article is to share insights from the CLEAN 2020 Summit, which assembled leaders from business, policy, standards development, science, and engineering working to mitigate risk of transmission in the built environment. The Summit worked to assess current challenges and pain points felt by industries from around the globe as well as innovative solutions applied to meet these challenges. Although SARS-CoV-2 and the COVID-19 diseases are unique, the foundation of knowledge to assess and mitigate the risk of viral transmission in the built environment is robust. There are opportunities to improve science and engineering technology solutions, processes, and procedures to better meet the dynamic needs of the evolving pandemic.


Subject(s)
Built Environment , COVID-19/prevention & control , Risk Management/methods , Air Pollution, Indoor/prevention & control , Congresses as Topic , Global Health , Humans , Pandemics
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL