Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 178
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261437, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581743

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: At present, the focus of the fighting against COVID-19 in China is shifting to strictly prevent the entrance of cases from abroad and disease transmission. Therefore, it is extremely urgent to better understand the clinical features of imported cases from overseas countries, which is conductive to formulate the corresponding countermeasures. This study aimed to describe the clinical features of COVID-19 cases imported from Russia through the Suifenhe port, in order to identify baseline and clinical data associated with disease progression and present corresponding countermeasures. METHODS: All COVID-19 cases imported from Russia through the Suifenhe port were included in this retrospective study. According to the "Diagnosis and Treatment Protocol for Novel Coronavirus Pneumonia (seventh edition)", imported COVID-19 cases were divided into asymptomatic infection, mild, moderate, severe, and critical groups. Baseline and clinical data, including age, gender, comorbidities, disease severity, symptoms at onset, body temperature, white blood cell (WBC) count, lymphocyte (LYMPH) count, lymphocyte percentage (LYM%), C-reactive protein (CRP), oxygenation index (OI), and the use therapeutic modalities were obtained on admission, and then compared between groups. RESULTS: A total of 375 COVID-19 cases imported from Russia through Suifenhe port were included, of whom the asymptomatic infection, mild, moderate, severe, and critical groups accounted for 4.0%, 13.9%, 75.5%, 5.3%, and 1.3%, respectively. The majority of the imported COVID-19 cases were men (61.9%) with a median age of 38.72 years who had no comorbidity (87.7%). Nearly one-third of them (33.1%) were asymptomatic at onset, and common initial symptoms included fever (36.5%), cough (36.0%), pharyngeal discomfort (12.3%), expectoration (8.0%), and chest tightness (5.3%). In total, 180 (48%) and 4 (1.1%) enrolled imported cases received nasal tube oxygen inhalation therapy and high-flow oxygen absorption, respectively; the remaining patients did not undergo oxygen therapy. The values of age, body temperature, WBC, LYMPH, LYM%, CRP, and OI were 38.72 ± 10.50, 35.10 ± 7.92, 5.59 ± 1.97, 1.67 ± 0.68, 31.05 ± 10.22, 8.00 ± 14.75, and 389.03 ± 74.07, respectively. Gender, age, LYMPH, LYM%, symptoms at onset, cough, fever, other rare symptoms, and oxygen therapy showed significant differences between groups (P = 0.036, < 0.001, < 0.001, < 0.001, < 0.001, < 0.001, < 0.001, = 0.045, < 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with domestic confirmed patients, COVID-19 patients who arrived at China from Russia through the Suifenhe port had significantly different clinical features, and the differences in gender, age, LYMPH, LYM%, symptoms at onset, cough, fever, other rare symptoms, and oxygen therapy between groups were statistically significant. Therefore, detailed and comprehensive countermeasures were developed to manage and prevent another outbreak based on these clinical features.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Cough/virology , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Russia , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
2.
Psychiatr Danub ; 33(3): 386-392, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527115

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The study aimed to identify the patterns of adaptive and behavioral strategies in different population groups, also to evaluate their association with the infection prevention strategies and the distress during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The data were obtained from the on-line survey of 1958 respondents (mean age 31±12 years) from March 30, 2020 to April 5, 2020. 578 respondents reported a history of affective disorders; 884 respondents - a history of somatic disease. The level of anxiety distress was evaluated with the Psychological Stress Measure (PSM-25). The analysis of variance was used for statistics. p<0.05 was considered significant. The effect sizes (ES) were evaluated according to Cohen's d and Cramer's V criteria. RESULTS: The average PSM-25 score corresponded to moderate stress intensity. An increased level of psychological stress was associated with the young age of the respondents, the history of affective disorders and somatic diseases, the compliance with self-isolation, the practice of social distancing, and the use of sanitizer. Concerns about the availability of protective equipment were specifically associated with the self-isolation compliance (ES=0.1); the combination of concerns about the contagiousness of the virus (ES=0.12) and the inaccessibility of daily medications (ES=0.11) - with the principles of social distance. Moreover, the concerns about the lack of specific treatment, the danger to one's own life, the contagiousness of the virus, and the lack of protective equipment were associated with the protective behavior resulting in increased hand hygiene. The history of affective disorders was rarely associated with wearing masks and gloves, but more often - with the use of self-isolation strategies. CONCLUSIONS: The psychological reactions of the population during the COVID-19 pandemic are specifically associated with adaptive behavior in the process of anti-epidemic measures. Respondents with affective disorders experienced specific patterns of anxiety about coronavirus infection in combination with high rates of psychological stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Russia , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
3.
J Hematol Oncol ; 14(1): 192, 2021 11 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515448

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To our knowledge, there is no clinical data pertaining to COVID-19 outcomes and safety of COVID-19 vaccination in Russian patients with genitourinary (GU) malignancies. Aim of our analysis was to describe the characteristics of the COVID-19 infection course as well as preliminary safety and efficacy of Gam-COVID-Vac vaccine in patients with active GU malignancies. METHODS: Patients were retrospectively identified at nine cancer centers in different regions. Patients were included if COVID-19 was diagnosed by a polymerase chain reaction. Data from additional patients with GU cancers who had no positive SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR test before vaccination and who received two doses of Gam-COVID-Vac (Sputnik V) between 11 February and 31 August 2021 were collected for safety assessment. Anonymized data were collected through an online registry covering demographics, treatments, and outcomes. RESULTS: The Gam-COVID-Vac vaccine was well tolerated; no grade 3-5 toxicities were reported in 112 vaccinated metastatic GU cancer patients. The most common grade 1 adverse events (81%) were injection site reactions (76%), flu-like illness (68%), and asthenia (49%). Five patients experienced grade 2 chills (4.5%) and 3 patients had grade 2 fever (2.7%). With median follow-up of 6.2 months, two COVID-19 cases were confirmed by RT-PCR test in the vaccine group (of 112 participants; 1.8%). Eighty-eight patients with COVID-19 disease were included in the analysis. The average age as of the study enrollment was 66 (range 39-81) and the majority of patients were male with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Thirty-six patients (41%) had evidence of metastatic disease, of these 22 patients were receiving systemic therapy. More than half of patients required hospitalization. Fifty-four patients (61%) experienced complications. Sixteen patients who developed COVID-19 pneumonia required mechanical ventilator support. Sixteen patients (18%) died in a median of 23.5 days after the date of COVID-19 diagnosis was established. The 3-month survival rate was 82%. Clinical and/or radiographic progression of cancer during COVID-19 infection or the subsequent 3 months was observed in 10 patients (11.4%). CONCLUSION: Patients with GU malignancies are at increased risk of mortality from COVID-19 infection when compared to the general population. Vaccination could be safe in GU cancer patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: retrospectively registered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , Urogenital Neoplasms/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Russia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Treatment Outcome , Urogenital Neoplasms/epidemiology
5.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 285: 259-264, 2021 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502267

ABSTRACT

Due to the specific circumstances related to the COVID-19 pandemic, many countries have enforced emergency measures such as self-isolation and restriction of movement and assembly, which are also directly affecting the functioning of their respective public health and judicial systems. The goal of this study is to identify the efficiency of the criminal sanctions in Russia that were introduced in the beginning of COVID-19 outbreak using machine learning methods. We have developed a regression model for the fine handed out, using random forest regression and XGBoost regression, and calculated the features importance parameters. We have developed classification models for the remission of the penalty and for setting a sentence using a gradient boosting classifier.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Machine Learning , Pandemics , Crime , Humans , Russia/epidemiology
6.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 560, 2021 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502000

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to obtain feedback from medical students in Russia regarding their e-learning experience during COVID-19 Pandemic. METHODS: Thirteen thousand forty students from 46 Medical Schools in Russia completed an original evaluation form validated by 6 experts. Criterion and construct validity were determined in a pilot study (n = 46). The study design was based on the use of Google Forms. Participants used the Visual Analog Scale from 1 to 10 to assess the level of knowledge acquired. RESULTS: 95.31% of medical schools in Russia switched to e-learning during the Pandemic. 39.8% of the students stated that the time to prepare for the class has doubled. For 19.9% of them, it increased by one third, while 26.6% did not report any changes. 38,4% of the participants are satisfied with particular elements of e-learning, 27.5% like such a format, 22.9% do not like it, and 11.2% could not answer the question. The average scores for the knowledge assessment were 5.9 for the humanities, 6.1 for fundamental science, and 6.0 for clinical training. CONCLUSIONS: The most important findings are increased self-instruction time, insufficient knowledge gained and territorial and socio-economic inequalities within the country. Meanwhile, most students favor distance learning or its particular elements. Consequently, medical education leaders in Russia should consider the implementation of blended training in medicine taking into account specific regional factors, ensuring its effectiveness at all stages.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical/methods , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Russia
7.
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult ; 98(5): 66-73, 2021.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1498076

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the normative and regulatory support of the state policy of development of health resort business in Russia and organizational and methodological aspects of its implementation, including those in emergency and coronavirus pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The following current methods of community hygienic and medical-organizational research were applied: analytical, statistical, best practice study, monographic, etc. Data from state and departmental official sources, statistical books, scientific publications, and other sources were studied. RESULTS: The main normative, regulatory, organizational and methodological aspects of the strategy implementation, developed in accordance with the order of the Government of the Russian Federation «On approval of the development strategy of the health-resort complex of the Russian Federation¼ dated 26.11.18 №2581-p were analyzed. Some discrepancies in the state and departmental statistics of health-resort organizations were found. The nomenclature of the health-resort area was reviewed, and the used term «health-resort treatment¼ was criticized, which does not correspond to the parts of this type of daily practice medical care, unlike the concepts «health-resort care¼ or «health-resort business¼. The article presents the author's vision of the issue of normative and organizational support of health-resort organizations in an emergency such as COVID-19 pandemic since 2020. CONCLUSIONS: It is shown that the national and local experience of coronavirus infection control contributed to the development of a considerable number of federal regulatory documents in a short time frame. The publication describes an analysis and systematic review of the most important documents, including those related to the spa resorts. Addressing the demanding challenges of further development of the country's health-resort complex largely relies on the state of its facilities and resources. However, its objective analysis is hindered by the identified significant discrepancies in the state and departmental statistic data concerning the number of functioning health-resort organizations and its change over time. As opposed to the concept of «health-resort treatment¼, the term «health-resort care¼ most accurately describes its complexity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Policy , Russia , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 29(5): 1066-1070, 2021 Sep.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478960

ABSTRACT

The article considers the problem of access to stomatological care, in particular to prosthetic dentistry, for people with limited health capacities in conditions of the COVID-19 pandemic. The range of factors impeding to get quality dental services in state stomatological polyclinics and at home was established by empirical study organized in two Subjects of the Russian Federation located in the Central Federal Okrug.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Oral Medicine , Humans , Pandemics , Russia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 29(5): 1060-1065, 2021 Sep.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478959

ABSTRACT

The article demonstrates that the restrictions introduced during the coronavirus pandemic affected the dynamics of mutual settlements between the territorial funds of the mandatory medical insurance (MMI, TFMMI). According to the results of the first nine months of 2020, medical institutions of a number of subjects were not able to earn even a half of the amount of sum that was presented for payment in 2019 on medical care support of patients from other regions. It was established that besides such relevant features of the Russian health care system as large territory, fragmentation of population, necessity to maintain a number of state medical institutions, there is also a number of factors that during the pandemic were most aggravated in those "weak" places in the MMI system that have been stagnating for a long time. Among them, insufficiently large listing of medical services covered by MMI, inability to provide medical services to all those in need due to shortage of equipment, working areas, qualified care, etc. It is noted that among the general trends of MMI, the Russian medical insurance system (not only that it is not a classical one), especially during the pandemic, is broken out of social insurance: two funds, structures, costs of informatization, etc. However, in Russia, even in such conditions, health care is funded through the MMI system up to 50%. The pandemic demonstrated that no private sector, no paid services, no commercial insurance companies can cover the whole spectrum of health care complicities during the pandemic crisis. Namely, the MMI system bore the brunt of the survival of medicine during the pandemic. It is concluded that namely the need in medical institutions with sufficient reserve of bed fund with MMI services can input into development of necessary stable basis for survival in difficult conditions of pandemic crisis. The proposal of the Audit Chamber of the Russian Federation of further reforming of the mandatory medical insurance system is considered reasonable and logical especially in difficult situation of struggle against COVID-19. The article also presents data concerning the state of MMI in 2020, at the height of the pandemic crisis in the regions of the Russian Federation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Insurance , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Insurance, Health , Russia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 29(5): 1047-1056, 2021 Sep.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478957

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of the new corona-virus infection COVID-19 will be over only when population immunity will be developed. This condition can be achieved by both vaccination and surviving disease in natural way. The WHO recommends the first mode for achieving population immunity, since immune response to vaccine is similar to that one developed while surviving natural infection, but with minimal risks to health and life. The article presents the results of sociological survey organized with purpose of studying the attitude of Russians to vaccination against COVID-19 infection. The results of the survey demonstrated that at present, 22% of respondents are ready to be vaccinated i.e. they responded positively to the corresponding question. The following main factors determining population attitude to vaccination were identified. First, there is statistically significant correlation between vaccination readiness and education level: respondents with higher level of education are more likely to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Secondly, in general, the population is quite positive about the response of the National health care to the corona-virus pandemic. However, the percentage of population that is positive about vaccination can be higher if it would be possible to apply foreign-made vaccines in Russia. Thirdly, still there is large percentage of population believing that vaccination with medications that have not passed long-term clinical trials can result in health negative consequences. Fourthly, the majority of respondents experienced various manifestations of the pandemic on themselves: either they have been ill themselves, or their relatives and friends were ill or died and almost all of them somehow limited their common mobility.The survey results did not established statistically significant differences in distribution of responses among males and females. We assume that in order to develop positive attitude of population to vaccination, and specifically to Russian-made vaccines, more extensive information campaign is needed to be implemented. Also, significant increase of percentage of vaccinated population can be achieved if clearly defined requirements for availability of COVID-19 vaccination would be adopted on the international level. Actually, this is key condition for restoring international mobility and removing restrictions in national economies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Demography , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Russia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
11.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 29(5): 1040-1046, 2021 Sep.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478956

ABSTRACT

The article presents the results of restudy of the Russian health care information field, carried out during the second wave of COVID-19 in the mass media database "Medialogia" and in the search engine "Yandex" from October 1, 2020 to January 31, 2021. The comparative analysis of the results of the study with previous measurements taken from December 1, 2019 to May 15, 2020 was implemented. The results of the study are a portion of panel study of the Russian health care system image and can be used hereinafter by interested structures with the view of its adjustment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care , Health Facilities , Humans , Russia , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Int J Infect Dis ; 104: 510-525, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454176

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) are substantial public health threats in the region of Central Asia and the Caucasus, where the prevalence of these infections is currently rising. METHODS: A systematic review of MEDLINE, Embase and PsycINFO was conducted with no publication date or language restrictions through October 2019. Additional data were also harvested from national surveillance reports, references found in discovered sources, and other "grey" literature. It included studies conducted on high-risk populations (people who inject drugs (PWID), female sex workers (FSW), men who have sex with men (MSM), prisoners, and migrants) in Central Asia: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan; and the Caucasus: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Northern Caucasus region of the Russian Federation. RESULTS: Wide ranges were noted for HIV prevalence: PWID 0-30.1%, MSM 0-25.1%, prisoners 0-22.8%, FSW 0-10.0%, and migrants 0.06-1.5%, with the highest prevalence of these high-risk groups reported in Kazakhstan (for PWID), Georgia (for MSM and prisoners) and Uzbekistan (for migrants). HCV prevalence also had a wide range: PWID 0.3-92.1%, MSM 0-18.9%, prisoners 23.8-49.7%, FSW 3.3-17.8%, and migrants 0.5-26.5%, with the highest prevalence reported in Georgia (92.1%), Kyrgyzstan (49.7%), and migrants from Tajikistan and Uzbekistan (26.5%). Similarly, HBV prevalence had a wide range: PWID 2.8-79.7%, MSM 0-22.2%, prisoners 2.7-6.2%, FSW 18.4% (one study), and migrants 0.3-15.7%. CONCLUSION: In Central Asia and the Caucasus, prevalence of HIV, HCV and HBV remains exceedingly high among selected populations, notably PWID and MSM.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections/epidemiology , Hepatitis B/epidemiology , Hepatitis C/epidemiology , Asia, Central/epidemiology , Female , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Prevalence , Prisoners , Risk Factors , Russia/epidemiology , Sex Workers , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Substance-Related Disorders/complications , Transcaucasia/epidemiology
13.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258132, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448580

ABSTRACT

This confirmatory research investigates the influence of risk framing of COVID-19 on support for restrictive government policy based on two web survey experiments in Russia. Using 2x2 factorial design, we estimated two main effects-factors of risk severity (low vs. high) and object at risk (individual losses vs. losses to others). First, focusing on higher risks had a positive effect on support for the government's restrictive policy. Second, focusing on the losses for others did not produce stronger support for the restrictive policy compared to focusing on personal losses. However, we found a positive moderation effect of such prosocial values as universalism and benevolence. We found that those with prosocial values had a stronger positive effect in the "losses for others" condition and were more willing to support government restrictive policy when others were included. The effects found in our experimental study reveal both positive and negative aspects in risk communication during the pandemic, which may have a great and long-term impact on trust, attitudes, and behavior.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Health Policy , Social Support , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Government , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk , Russia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
14.
J Med Virol ; 93(10): 5846-5852, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432417

ABSTRACT

Geographical variation in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS--CoV--2) spread requires seroprevalence studies based on local tests, but robust validation is needed. We summarize an evaluation of antibody tests used in a serological study of SARS--CoV--2 in Saint Petersburg, Russia. We validated three different antibody assays: chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA) Abbott Architect SARS--CoV--2 immunoglobulin G (IgG), enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) CoronaPass total antibodies test, and ELISA SARS--CoV--2--IgG--EIA--BEST. Clinical sensitivity was estimated with the SARS--CoV--2 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test as the gold standard using manufacturer recommended cutoff. Specificity was estimated using pre-pandemic sera samples. The median time between positive PCR test results and antibody tests was 21 weeks. Measures of concordance were calculated against the microneutralization test (MNA).Sensitivity was equal to 91.1% (95% confidence intervbal [CI]: 78.8-97.5), 90% (95% CI: 76.4-96.4), and 63.1% (95% CI [50.2-74.7]) for ELISA Coronapass, ELISA Vector-Best, and CMIA Abbott, respectively. Specificity was equal to 100% for all the tests. Comparison of receiver operating characteristics has shown lower AUC for CMIA Abbott. The cut-off SC/O ratio of 0.28 for CMIA Abbott resulted in a sensitivity of 80% at the same level of specificity. Less than 33% of the participants with positive antibody test results had neutralizing antibodies in titers 1:80 and above. Antibody assays results and MNA correlated moderately. This study encourages the use of local antibody tests and sets the reference for seroprevalence correction. Available tests' sensitivity allows detecting antibodies within the majority of PCR- positive individuals. The Abbott assay sensitivity can be improved by incorporating a new cut-off. Manufacturers' test characteristics may introduce bias into the study results.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Serological Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Humans , Immunoassay , Russia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sensitivity and Specificity , Seroepidemiologic Studies
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(18)2021 09 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430872

ABSTRACT

Loneliness has been considered a major challenge since long before the pandemic. Changes caused by the COVID-19 pandemic included modifications in social communications and activities. Thus, it was expected that loneliness would increase during the pandemic. The first studies of loneliness during the pandemic revealed inconsistent results. We hypothesized that physical isolation led to changes in the quality of relationships; thus, loneliness trends could be different from those predicted. For our study we used methods to measure loneliness: the Social and Emotional Loneliness Scale (SELSA-S) for Adults and Older Adults; the Multidimensional Inventory of Loneliness Experience; and demographic data. Participants were middle-aged and older middle-aged adults (n = 457) aged 35-59 (M = 45.5, SD = 6.88, 35.4% males). Participants came from two studies: Study 1 consisted of 280 participants aged 35-59 (M = 44.8; SD = 6.93; 29.6% males), the study was conducted before the pandemic in late 2019; participants in Study 2 were adults (n = 177) aged 35-59 (M = 46.5; SD = 6.68; 44.6% males), data were collected in the fall of 2020. The results did not confirm increase in loneliness; moreover, participants reported lower scores of loneliness in some domains. Regression analyses showed that general experience of loneliness was predicted by different loneliness characteristics in pre-pandemic and pandemic age groups. We found some similar mechanisms that were activated within different situations. Our results confirmed the complex nature of loneliness, they argue that pandemic effects were not limited to increase in loneliness and that the mechanism of loneliness can adjust to environmental factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , Female , Humans , Loneliness , Male , Middle Aged , Russia , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Clin Exp Allergy ; 51(9): 1107-1120, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398367

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The long-term sequalae of COVID-19 remain poorly characterized. We assessed persistent symptoms in previously hospitalized patients with COVID-19 and assessed potential risk factors. METHODS: Data were collected from patients discharged from 4 hospitals in Moscow, Russia between 8 April and 10 July 2020. Participants were interviewed via telephone using an ISARIC Long-term Follow-up Study questionnaire. RESULTS: 2,649 of 4755 (56%) discharged patients were successfully evaluated, at median 218 (IQR 200, 236) days post-discharge. COVID-19 diagnosis was clinical in 1291 and molecular in 1358. Most cases were mild, but 902 (34%) required supplemental oxygen and 68 (2.6%) needed ventilatory support. Median age was 56 years (IQR 46, 66) and 1,353 (51.1%) were women. Persistent symptoms were reported by 1247 (47.1%) participants, with fatigue (21.2%), shortness of breath (14.5%) and forgetfulness (9.1%) the most common symptoms and chronic fatigue (25%) and respiratory (17.2%) the most common symptom categories. Female sex was associated with any persistent symptom category OR 1.83 (95% CI 1.55 to 2.17) with association being strongest for dermatological (3.26, 2.36 to 4.57) symptoms. Asthma and chronic pulmonary disease were not associated with persistent symptoms overall, but asthma was associated with neurological (1.95, 1.25 to 2.98) and mood and behavioural changes (2.02, 1.24 to 3.18), and chronic pulmonary disease was associated with chronic fatigue (1.68, 1.21 to 2.32). CONCLUSIONS: Almost half of adults admitted to hospital due to COVID-19 reported persistent symptoms 6 to 8 months after discharge. Fatigue and respiratory symptoms were most common, and female sex was associated with persistent symptoms.


Subject(s)
Aftercare , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Russia/epidemiology
18.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 29(4): 837-843, 2021 Jul.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395748

ABSTRACT

The article considers, on the basis of results of sociological research, consequences of pandemic impact on social health of citizens of the Eurasian Economic Union states. The comparative analysis was applied to two groups of labor migrants from the EAEU states in Moscow and Russian citizens of the same age. The measures taken by the EАEU to maintain population social health in conditions of COVID-19 pandemic are considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Moscow , Pandemics , Russia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 29(4): 831-836, 2021 Jul.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395747

ABSTRACT

The article describes, on the basis of the results of content analysis of posts and comments in social networks, the actual situation with coronavirus infection including its overcoming, security maintaining, possibility of risks and threats occurrence and acceptance/refusal of vaccination as well. The desk research technique was applied to analyze documents and publications of the WHO, live data from national resource www.стопкоронавирус.рф, statistical information, results of sociological surveys of leading sociological companies.It is demonstrated that how the situation concerning coronavirus and vaccination issues in various Russian regions changed, including causes of different dispositions of residents. Three stable social groups were identified, provisionally designated as optimists, moderate and pessimists. The classification is based on differences in assessment of the epidemiological situation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Russia/epidemiology
20.
Sovrem Tekhnologii Med ; 13(4): 16-24, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395480

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study is to assess the gender-related specifics of the COVID-19 course in patients under 55 years of age. Materials and Methods: This pilot single-center continuous retrospective non-randomized study was carried out in the repurposed infectious diseases hospital of the Privolzhsky Research Medical University (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia). The study inclusion criterion was the age of patients (up to 55 years) and confirmed coronavirus infection. In the groups based on gender differences (25 men, average age 44.0±7.8 years and 32 women, average age 41.9±9.1 years), we monitored complications of COVID-19 such as the transfer of patients to the ICU and the volume of lung damage (determined with CT scans). Results: The course of COVID-19 in male patients younger than 55 was aggravated by concomitant diseases (γ=0.36; p=0.043), among which IHD (γ=1.00; p=0.003) and liver disease (γ=0.58; p=0.007) dominated. Frequency analysis confirmed the high prevalence of coronary artery disease in men (p=0.044). Significant differences between the gender-related groups were noted in the volume of lung lesions: at admission (p=0.050), during hospital treatment (p=0.019), and at discharge (p=0.044). Using the logistic regression method, a relationship was found between the transfer of male patients to ICU and the Krebs index [y= -2.033 + 1.154 male gender + 1.539 Krebs index (χ2=5.68; p=0.059)] and comorbidity [y= -2.836 + 1.081 male gender + 2.052 comorbidity (χ2=7.03; p=0.030)]. The influence of the Krebs index and the male gender on the excess volume of lung lesions was shown [y= -1.962 + 0.575 male gender + 1.915 Krebs index (χ2=7.78; p=0.021)]. Conclusion: In individuals under the age of 55 diagnosed with COVID-19, gender is of significant importance: in men, there is a more pronounced lesion of the lung parenchyma and a more significant change in laboratory parameters. Risk factors for a severe course of COVID-19 in men are coronary artery disease and hepatobiliary disorder. Calculating the Krebs index can be used to assess the risk of disease progression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Characteristics , Adult , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Coronary Artery Disease/mortality , Coronary Artery Disease/therapy , Coronary Artery Disease/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Russia/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...