Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 78
Filter
1.
Viruses ; 14(4)2022 Mar 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1818212

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) have caused several global outbreaks with relatively high mortality rates, including Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS)-CoV, which emerged in 2012, and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-CoV-1, which appeared in 2002. The recent emergence of SARS-CoV-2 highlights the need for immediate and greater understanding of the immune evasion mechanisms used by CoVs. Interferon (IFN)-α is the body's natural antiviral agent, but its Janus kinase/signal transducer and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) signalling pathway is often antagonized by viruses, thereby preventing the upregulation of essential IFN stimulated genes (ISGs). Therapeutic IFN-α has disappointingly weak clinical responses in MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-1 infected patients, indicating that these CoVs inhibit the IFN-α JAK/STAT pathway. Here we show that in lung alveolar A549 epithelial cells expression of MERS-CoV-nsp2 and SARS-CoV-1-nsp14, but not MERS-CoV-nsp5, increased basal levels of total and phosphorylated STAT1 & STAT2 protein, but reduced IFN-α-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1-3 and induction of MxA. While MERS-CoV-nsp2 and SARS-CoV-1-nsp14 similarly increased basal levels of STAT1 and STAT2 in bronchial BEAS-2B epithelial cells, unlike in A549 cells, they did not enhance basal pSTAT1 nor pSTAT2. However, both viral proteins reduced IFN-α-mediated induction of pSTAT1-3 and ISGs (MxA, ISG15 and PKR) in BEAS-2B cells. Furthermore, even though IFN-α-mediated induction of pSTAT1-3 was not affected by MERS-CoV-nsp5 expression in BEAS-2B cells, downstream ISG induction was reduced, revealing that MERS-CoV-nsp5 may use an alternative mechanism to reduce antiviral ISG induction in this cell line. Indeed, we subsequently discovered that all three viral proteins inhibited STAT1 nuclear translocation in BEAS-2B cells, unveiling another layer of inhibition by which these viral proteins suppress responses to Type 1 IFNs. While these observations highlight cell line-specific differences in the immune evasion effects of MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-1 proteins, they also demonstrate the broad spectrum of immune evasion strategies these deadly coronaviruses use to stunt antiviral responses to Type IFN.


Subject(s)
Interferon-alpha , Janus Kinases , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , SARS Virus , STAT Transcription Factors , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Interferon-alpha/metabolism , Janus Kinases/metabolism , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/metabolism , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , STAT Transcription Factors/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Viral Proteins/metabolism
2.
J Biol Chem ; 298(4): 101814, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788109

ABSTRACT

Within the last 2 decades, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses 1 and 2 (SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2) have caused two major outbreaks; yet, for reasons not fully understood, the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 has been significantly more widespread than the 2003 SARS epidemic caused by SARS-CoV-1, despite striking similarities between these two viruses. The SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins, both of which bind to host cell angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, have been implied to be a potential source of their differential transmissibility. However, the mechanistic details of prefusion spike protein binding to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 remain elusive at the molecular level. Here, we performed an extensive set of equilibrium and nonequilibrium microsecond-level all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 prefusion spike proteins to determine their differential dynamic behavior. Our results indicate that the active form of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein is more stable than that of SARS-CoV-1 and the energy barrier associated with the activation is higher in SARS-CoV-2. These results suggest that not only the receptor-binding domain but also other domains such as the N-terminal domain could play a crucial role in the differential binding behavior of SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins.


Subject(s)
SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , Protein Domains , SARS Virus/chemistry , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
3.
Cells ; 11(8)2022 Apr 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785539

ABSTRACT

The receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (RBDCoV2) has a higher binding affinity to the human receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) than the SARS-CoV RBD (RBDCoV). Here, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, binding free energy (BFE) calculations, and interface residue contact network (IRCN) analysis to explore the mechanistic origin of different ACE2-binding affinities of the two RBDs. The results demonstrate that, when compared to the RBDCoV2-ACE2 complex, RBDCoV-ACE2 features enhanced dynamicsand inter-protein positional movements and increased conformational entropy and conformational diversity. Although the inter-protein electrostatic attractive interactions are the primary determinant for the high ACE2-binding affinities of both RBDs, the significantly enhanced electrostatic attractive interactions between ACE2 and RBDCoV2 determine the higher ACE2-binding affinity of RBDCoV2 than of RBDCoV. Comprehensive comparative analyses of the residue BFE components and IRCNs between the two complexes reveal that it is the residue changes at the RBD interface that lead to the overall stronger inter-protein electrostatic attractive force in RBDCoV2-ACE2, which not only tightens the interface packing and suppresses the dynamics of RBDCoV2-ACE2, but also enhances the ACE2-binding affinity of RBDCoV2. Since the RBD residue changes involving gain/loss of the positively/negatively charged residues can greatly enhance the binding affinity, special attention should be paid to the SARS-CoV-2 variants carrying such mutations, particularly those near or at the binding interfaces with the potential to form hydrogen bonds and/or salt bridges with ACE2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , SARS Virus , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
4.
J Virol ; 96(8): e0016922, 2022 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765080

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-1) and SARS-CoV-2 are highly pathogenic to humans and have caused pandemics in 2003 and 2019, respectively. Genetically diverse SARS-related coronaviruses (SARSr-CoVs) have been detected or isolated from bats, and some of these viruses have been demonstrated to utilize human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as a receptor and to have the potential to spill over to humans. A pan-sarbecovirus vaccine that provides protection against SARSr-CoV infection is urgently needed. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine against recombinant SARSr-CoVs carrying two different spike proteins (named rWIV1 and rRsSHC014S, respectively). Although serum neutralizing assays showed limited cross-reactivity between the three viruses, the inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine provided full protection against SARS-CoV-2 and rWIV1 and partial protection against rRsSHC014S infection in human ACE2 transgenic mice. Passive transfer of SARS-CoV-2-vaccinated mouse sera provided low protection for rWIV1 but not for rRsSHC014S infection in human ACE2 mice. A specific cellular immune response induced by WIV1 membrane protein peptides was detected in the vaccinated animals, which may explain the cross-protection of the inactivated vaccine. This study shows the possibility of developing a pan-sarbecovirus vaccine against SARSr-CoVs for future preparedness. IMPORTANCE The genetic diversity of SARSr-CoVs in wildlife and their potential risk of cross-species infection highlight the necessity of developing wide-spectrum vaccines against infection of various SARSr-CoVs. In this study, we tested the protective efficacy of the SARS-CoV-2 inactivated vaccine (IAV) against two SARSr-CoVs with different spike proteins in human ACE2 transgenic mice. We demonstrate that the SARS-CoV-2 IAV provides full protection against rWIV1 and partial protection against rRsSHC014S. The T-cell response stimulated by the M protein may account for the cross protection against heterogeneous SARSr-CoVs. Our findings suggest the feasibility of the development of pan-sarbecovirus vaccines, which can be a strategy of preparedness for future outbreaks caused by novel SARSr-CoVs from wildlife.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus Infections , Cross Protection , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Vaccines, Inactivated , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Chiroptera , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Protection/immunology , Humans , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Viral Zoonoses/prevention & control
5.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun ; 606: 23-28, 2022 05 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739556

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a newly emerging infectious disease currently spreading across the world. The spike (S) protein plays a key role in the receptor recognition and cell membrane fusion, making it an important target for developing vaccines, therapeutic antibodies and diagnosis. In this study, we constructed a baculovirus surface display system that efficiently presents both SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 S proteins (including ectodomain, S1 subunit and receptor-binding-domain, RBD) on the surface of recombinant baculoviruses, utilizing transmembrane anchors from gp64 (signal peptide) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). These recombinant baculoviruses were capable of transducing engineered HEK 293T cells overexpressing ACE2 receptors with significantly higher transduction efficiencies, indicating that S proteins displayed on baculovirus surface have antigenicity and can recognize and bind ACE2 receptors. Additionally, the transduction of SARS-CoV-2 S proteins can be inhibited by an antibody against the SARS-CoV-2 RBD. These results demonstrate that this baculovirus surface display system is a promising tool for developing antibodies, vaccines and recombinant protein production.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS Virus , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Baculoviridae/genetics , Baculoviridae/metabolism , Humans , Protein Binding , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry
6.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 39(6): 1021-1026, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718753

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, the infection of the new coronavirus (COVID-19) caused an outbreak of new coronavirus pneumonia in Wuhan, China, and caused great public concern. Both COVID-19 and SARS-CoV belong to the coronavirus family and both invade target cells through ACE2. An in-depth understanding of ACE2 and a series of physiological and physiological changes caused by the virus invading the human body may help to discover and explain the corresponding clinical phenomena and then deal with them timely. In addition, ACE2 is a potential therapeutic target. This article will summarize the role of ACE2 in multiple organ damage caused by COVID-19 and SARS-CoV, targeted blocking drugs against ACE2, and drugs that inhibit inflammation in order to provide the basis for subsequent related research, diagnosis and treatment, and drug development.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral , Pneumonia , SARS Virus/metabolism , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Pneumonia/etiology , Pneumonia/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/drug therapy
7.
FASEB J ; 36(3): e22234, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702985

ABSTRACT

The transmembrane protease angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a protective regulator within the renin angiotensin system and additionally represents the cellular receptor for SARS-CoV. The release of soluble ACE2 (sACE2) from the cell surface is hence believed to be a crucial part of its (patho)physiological functions, as both, ACE2 protease activity and SARS-CoV binding ability, are transferred from the cell membrane to body fluids. Yet, the molecular sources of sACE2 are still not completely investigated. In this study, we show different sources and prerequisites for the release of sACE2 from the cell membrane. By using inhibitors as well as CRISPR/Cas9-derived cells, we demonstrated that, in addition to the metalloprotease ADAM17, also ADAM10 is an important novel shedding protease of ACE2. Moreover, we observed that ACE2 can also be released in extracellular vesicles. The degree of either ADAM10- or ADAM17-mediated ACE2 shedding is dependent on stimulatory conditions and on the expression level of the pro-inflammatory ADAM17 regulator iRhom2. Finally, by using structural analysis and in vitro verification, we determined for the first time that the susceptibility to ADAM10- and ADAM17-mediated shedding is mediated by the collectrin-like part of ACE2. Overall, our findings give novel insights into sACE2 release by several independent molecular mechanisms.


Subject(s)
ADAM10 Protein/metabolism , ADAM17 Protein/metabolism , Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Membrane Glycoproteins/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , SARS Virus/metabolism , ADAM10 Protein/genetics , ADAM17 Protein/genetics , Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats , Extracellular Vesicles/genetics , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism , Membrane Glycoproteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Nature ; 603(7903): 913-918, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671589

ABSTRACT

Two different sarbecoviruses have caused major human outbreaks in the past two decades1,2. Both of these sarbecoviruses, SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2, engage ACE2 through the spike receptor-binding domain2-6. However, binding to ACE2 orthologues of humans, bats and other species has been observed only sporadically among the broader diversity of bat sarbecoviruses7-11. Here we use high-throughput assays12 to trace the evolutionary history of ACE2 binding across a diverse range of sarbecoviruses and ACE2 orthologues. We find that ACE2 binding is an ancestral trait of sarbecovirus receptor-binding domains that has subsequently been lost in some clades. Furthermore, we reveal that bat sarbecoviruses from outside Asia can bind to ACE2. Moreover, ACE2 binding is highly evolvable-for many sarbecovirus receptor-binding domains, there are single amino-acid mutations that enable binding to new ACE2 orthologues. However, the effects of individual mutations can differ considerably between viruses, as shown by the N501Y mutation, which enhances the human ACE2-binding affinity of several SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern12 but substantially decreases it for SARS-CoV-1. Our results point to the deep ancestral origin and evolutionary plasticity of ACE2 binding, broadening the range of sarbecoviruses that should be considered to have spillover potential.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Evolution, Molecular , SARS Virus , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Binding Sites , COVID-19/virology , Chiroptera/virology , Humans , Protein Binding , SARS Virus/classification , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
9.
J Biol Chem ; 297(6): 101399, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509947

ABSTRACT

The nonstructural protein 1 (nsp1) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is a critical viral protein that suppresses host gene expression by blocking the assembly of the ribosome on host mRNAs. To understand the mechanism of inhibition of host gene expression, we sought to identify cellular proteins that interact with nsp1. Using proximity-dependent biotinylation followed by proteomic analyses of biotinylated proteins, here we captured multiple dynamic interactions of nsp1 with host cell proteins. In addition to ribosomal proteins, we identified several pre-mRNA processing proteins that interact with nsp1, including splicing factors and transcription termination proteins, as well as exosome, and stress granule (SG)-associated proteins. We found that the interactions with transcription termination factors are primarily governed by the C-terminal region of nsp1 and are disrupted by the mutation of amino acids K164 and H165 that are essential for its host shutoff function. We further show that nsp1 interacts with Ras GTPase-activating protein SH3 domain-binding protein 1 (G3BP1) and colocalizes with G3BP1 in SGs under sodium arsenite-induced stress. Finally, we observe that the presence of nsp1 disrupts the maturation of SGs over a long period. Isolation of SG core at different times shows a gradual loss of G3BP1 in the presence of nsp1.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Biotinylation , COVID-19/virology , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Proteomics , Ribosomal Proteins/metabolism , SARS Virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , /metabolism
10.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 22042, 2021 11 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510622

ABSTRACT

The mutation of SARS-CoV-2 influences viral function as residue replacements affect both physiochemical properties and folding conformations. Although a large amount of data on SARS-CoV-2 is available, the investigation of how viral functions change in response to mutations is hampered by a lack of effective structural analysis. Here, we exploit the advances of protein structure fingerprint technology to study the folding conformational changes induced by mutations. With integration of both protein sequences and folding conformations, the structures are aligned for SARS-CoV to SARS-CoV-2, including Alpha variant (lineage B.1.1.7) and Delta variant (lineage B.1.617.2). The results showed that the virus evolution with change in mutational positions and physicochemical properties increased the affinity between spike protein and ACE2, which plays a critical role in coronavirus entry into human cells. Additionally, these structural variations impact vaccine effectiveness and drug function over the course of SARS-CoV-2 evolution. The analysis of structural variations revealed how the coronavirus has gradually evolved in both structure and function and how the SARS-CoV-2 variants have contributed to more severe acute disease worldwide.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Evolution, Molecular , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Amino Acid Sequence , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Models, Molecular , Protein Conformation , Protein Folding , Protein Interaction Maps , Protein Multimerization , SARS Virus/chemistry , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Sequence Alignment , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
11.
Mol Biol Evol ; 38(2): 702-715, 2021 01 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387955

ABSTRACT

Despite SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 being equipped with highly similar protein arsenals, the corresponding zoonoses have spread among humans at extremely different rates. The specific characteristics of these viruses that led to such distinct outcomes remain unclear. Here, we apply proteome-wide comparative structural analysis aiming to identify the unique molecular elements in the SARS-CoV-2 proteome that may explain the differing consequences. By combining protein modeling and molecular dynamics simulations, we suggest nonconservative substitutions in functional regions of the spike glycoprotein (S), nsp1, and nsp3 that are contributing to differences in virulence. Particularly, we explain why the substitutions at the receptor-binding domain of S affect the structure-dynamics behavior in complexes with putative host receptors. Conservation of functional protein regions within the two taxa is also noteworthy. We suggest that the highly conserved main protease, nsp5, of SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 is part of their mechanism of circumventing the host interferon antiviral response. Overall, most substitutions occur on the protein surfaces and may be modulating their antigenic properties and interactions with other macromolecules. Our results imply that the striking difference in the pervasiveness of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV among humans seems to significantly derive from molecular features that modulate the efficiency of viral particles in entering the host cells and blocking the host immune response.


Subject(s)
Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Proteomics , SARS Virus/chemistry , SARS Virus/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Animals , Humans , Protein Domains , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Species Specificity , Viral Proteins/metabolism
12.
J Mol Biol ; 433(10): 166946, 2021 05 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386061

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses are a major infectious disease threat, and include the zoonotic-origin human pathogens SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV, and MERS-CoV (SARS-2, SARS-1, and MERS). Entry of coronaviruses into host cells is mediated by the spike (S) protein. In our previous ESR studies, the local membrane ordering effect of the fusion peptide (FP) of various viral glycoproteins including the S of SARS-1 and MERS has been consistently observed. We previously determined that the sequence immediately downstream from the S2' cleavage site is the bona fide SARS-1 FP. In this study, we used sequence alignment to identify the SARS-2 FP, and studied its membrane ordering effect. Although there are only three residue differences, SARS-2 FP induces even greater membrane ordering than SARS-1 FP, possibly due to its greater hydrophobicity. This may be a reason that SARS-2 is better able to infect host cells. In addition, the membrane binding enthalpy for SARS-2 is greater. Both the membrane ordering of SARS-2 and SARS-1 FPs are dependent on Ca2+, but that of SARS-2 shows a greater response to the presence of Ca2+. Both FPs bind two Ca2+ ions as does SARS-1 FP, but the two Ca2+ binding sites of SARS-2 exhibit greater cooperativity. This Ca2+ dependence by the SARS-2 FP is very ion-specific. These results show that Ca2+ is an important regulator that interacts with the SARS-2 FP and thus plays a significant role in SARS-2 viral entry. This could lead to therapeutic solutions that either target the FP-calcium interaction or block the Ca2+ channel.


Subject(s)
Calcium/metabolism , Cell Membrane/metabolism , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Fusion Proteins/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Binding Sites , Calcium/pharmacology , Calorimetry , Cell Membrane/drug effects , Cell Membrane/virology , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions , SARS Virus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Thermodynamics , Viral Fusion Proteins/chemistry , Viral Fusion Proteins/genetics , Virus Internalization/drug effects
14.
Virol Sin ; 36(6): 1484-1491, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359969

ABSTRACT

The sudden emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has caused global panic in 2003, and the risk of SARS-CoV outbreak still exists. However, no specific antiviral drug or vaccine is available; thus, the development of therapeutic antibodies against SARS-CoV is needed. In this study, a nanobody phage-displayed library was constructed from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of alpacas immunized with the recombinant receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV. Four positive clones were selected after four rounds of bio-panning and subjected to recombinant expression in E. coli. Further biological identification demonstrated that one of the nanobodies, S14, showed high affinity to SARS-CoV RBD and potent neutralization activity at the picomole level against SARS-CoV pseudovirus. A competitive inhibition assay showed that S14 blocked the binding of SARS-CoV RBD to either soluble or cell-expressed angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). In summary, we developed a novel nanobody targeting SARS-CoV RBD, which might be useful for the development of therapeutics against SARS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS Virus , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Escherichia coli/metabolism , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Protein Binding , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
17.
IUBMB Life ; 73(8): 1005-1015, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291220

ABSTRACT

The kidney is one of the main targets attacked by viruses in patients with a coronavirus infection. Until now, SARS-CoV-2 has been identified as the seventh member of the coronavirus family capable of infecting humans. In the past two decades, humankind has experienced outbreaks triggered by two other extremely infective members of the coronavirus family; the MERS-CoV and the SARS-CoV. According to several investigations, SARS-CoV causes proteinuria and renal impairment or failure. The SARS-CoV was identified in the distal convoluted tubules of the kidney of infected patients. Also, renal dysfunction was observed in numerous cases of MERS-CoV infection. And recently, during the 2019-nCoV pandemic, it was found that the novel coronavirus not only induces acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but also can induce damages in various organs including the liver, heart, and kidney. The kidney tissue and its cells are targeted massively by the coronaviruses due to the abundant presence of ACE2 and Dpp4 receptors on kidney cells. These receptors are characterized as the main route of coronavirus entry to the victim cells. Renal failure due to massive viral invasion can lead to undesirable complications and enhanced mortality rate, thus more attention should be paid to the pathology of coronaviruses in the kidney. Here, we have provided the most recent knowledge on the coronaviruses (SARS, MERS, and COVID19) pathology and the mechanisms of their impact on the kidney tissue and functions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , SARS Virus/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/mortality , Viral Tropism/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/genetics , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Kidney/metabolism , Kidney/pathology , Kidney/virology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/metabolism , Protein Binding , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/genetics , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Survival Analysis
18.
Cells ; 10(7)2021 06 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288809

ABSTRACT

Betacoronaviruses, responsible for the "Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome" (SARS) and the "Middle East Respiratory Syndrome" (MERS), use the spikes protruding from the virion envelope to attach and subsequently infect the host cells. The coronavirus spike (S) proteins contain receptor binding domains (RBD), allowing the specific recognition of either the dipeptidyl peptidase CD23 (MERS-CoV) or the angiotensin-converting enzyme ACE2 (SARS-Cov, SARS-CoV-2) host cell receptors. The heavily glycosylated S protein includes both complex and high-mannose type N-glycans that are well exposed at the surface of the spikes. A detailed analysis of the carbohydrate-binding specificity of mannose-binding lectins from plants, algae, fungi, and bacteria, revealed that, depending on their origin, they preferentially recognize either complex type N-glycans, or high-mannose type N-glycans. Since both complex and high-mannose glycans substantially decorate the S proteins, mannose-specific lectins are potentially useful glycan probes for targeting the SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2 virions. Mannose-binding legume lectins, like pea lectin, and monocot mannose-binding lectins, like snowdrop lectin or the algal lectin griffithsin, which specifically recognize complex N-glycans and high-mannose glycans, respectively, are particularly adapted for targeting coronaviruses. The biomedical prospects of targeting coronaviruses with mannose-specific lectins are wide-ranging including detection, immobilization, prevention, and control of coronavirus infection.


Subject(s)
Lectins/pharmacology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/metabolism , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cyanobacteria/chemistry , Drug Delivery Systems/methods , Fungi/chemistry , Humans , Lectins/isolation & purification , Lectins/therapeutic use , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Plants/chemistry , Protein Binding , SARS Virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Species Specificity , Virus Internalization/drug effects
19.
Phys Chem Chem Phys ; 23(25): 13926-13933, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275962

ABSTRACT

The global outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Bat virus RaTG13 and SARS-CoV are also members of the coronavirus family and SARS-CoV caused a world-wide pandemic in 2003. SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV and RaTG13 bind to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) through their receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the spike protein. SARS-CoV-2 binds ACE2 with a higher binding affinity than SARS-CoV and RaTG13. Here we performed molecular dynamics simulation of these binding complexes and calculated their binding free energies using a computational alanine scanning method. Our MD simulation and hotspot residue analysis showed that the lower binding affinity of SARS-CoV to ACE2 vs. SARS-CoV-2 to ACE2 can be explained by different hotspot interactions in these two systems. We also found that the lower binding affinity of RaTG13 to ACE2 is mainly due to a mutated residue (D501) which resulted in a less favorable complex formation for binding. We also calculated an important mutation of N501Y in SARS-CoV-2 using both alanine scanning calculation and a thermodynamic integration (TI) method. Both calculations confirmed a significant increase of the binding affinity of the N501Y mutant to ACE2 and explained its molecular mechanism. The present work provides an important theoretical basis for understanding the molecular mechanism in coronavirus spike protein binding to human ACE2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Chiroptera/virology , Coronavirus/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Animals , Binding Sites , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Mutation , Protein Binding , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Sequence Alignment , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Thermodynamics
20.
Cell Rep Med ; 2(6): 100313, 2021 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240648

ABSTRACT

The continual emergence of novel coronaviruses (CoV), such as severe acute respiratory syndrome-(SARS)-CoV-2, highlights the critical need for broadly reactive therapeutics and vaccines against this family of viruses. From a recovered SARS-CoV donor sample, we identify and characterize a panel of six monoclonal antibodies that cross-react with CoV spike (S) proteins from the highly pathogenic SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, and demonstrate a spectrum of reactivity against other CoVs. Epitope mapping reveals that these antibodies recognize multiple epitopes on SARS-CoV-2 S, including the receptor-binding domain, the N-terminal domain, and the S2 subunit. Functional characterization demonstrates that the antibodies mediate phagocytosis-and in some cases trogocytosis-but not neutralization in vitro. When tested in vivo in murine models, two of the antibodies demonstrate a reduction in hemorrhagic pathology in the lungs. The identification of cross-reactive epitopes recognized by functional antibodies expands the repertoire of targets for pan-coronavirus vaccine design strategies.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Epitopes/immunology , Immunoglobulin Fc Fragments/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antigen-Antibody Reactions , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Cross Reactions/immunology , Epitope Mapping , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin Fc Fragments/immunology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Phagocytosis , Protein Subunits/immunology , SARS Virus/immunology , SARS Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL