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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(1)2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613825

ABSTRACT

(1R,5S)-1-Hydroxy-3,6-dioxa-bicyclo[3.2.1]octan-2-one, available by an efficient catalytic pyrolysis of cellulose, has been applied as a chiral building block in the synthesis of seven new nucleoside analogues, with structural modifications on the nucleobase moiety and on the carboxyl- derived unit. The inverted configuration by Mitsunobu reaction used in their synthesis was verified by 2D-NOESY correlations, supported by the optimized structure employing the DFT methods. An in silico screening of these compounds as inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase has been carried out in comparison with both remdesivir, a mono-phosphoramidate prodrug recently approved for COVID-19 treatment, and its ribonucleoside metabolite GS-441524. Drug-likeness prediction and data by docking calculation indicated compound 6 [=(3S,5S)-methyl 5-(hydroxymethyl)-3-(6-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-9H-purin-9-yl)tetrahydrofuran-3-carboxylate] as the best candidate. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation showed a stable interaction of structure 6 in RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) complex and a lower average atomic fluctuation than GS-441524, suggesting a well accommodation in the RdRp binding pocket.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Cellulose/chemistry , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Nucleosides/chemical synthesis , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine/chemistry , Adenosine/pharmacokinetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacokinetics , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Computational Biology , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Nucleosides/chemistry , Nucleosides/pharmacokinetics , Pyrolysis , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
2.
SAR QSAR Environ Res ; 32(11): 863-888, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606722

ABSTRACT

The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV-2) was introduced as an epidemic in 2019 and had millions of deaths worldwide. Given the importance of this disease, the recommendation and design of new active compounds are crucial. 3-chymotrypsin-like protease (3 CLpro) inhibitors have been identified as potent compounds for treating SARS-CoV-2 disease. So, the design of new 3 CLpro inhibitors was proposed using a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study. In this context, a powerful adaptive least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (ALASSO) penalized variable selection method with inherent advantages coupled with a nonlinear artificial neural network (ANN) modelling method were used to provide a QSAR model with high interpretability and predictability. After evaluating the accuracy and validity of the developed ALASSO-ANN model, new compounds were proposed using effective descriptors, and the biological activity of the new compounds was predicted. Ligand-receptor (LR) interactions were also performed to confirm the interaction strength of the compounds using molecular docking (MD) study. The pharmacokinetics properties and calculated Lipinski's rule of five were applied to all proposed compounds. Due to the ease of synthesis of these suggested new compounds, it is expected that they have acceptable pharmacological properties.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Inhibitory Concentration 50 , Molecular Docking Simulation , Neural Networks, Computer , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacokinetics , Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology
3.
J Med Chem ; 65(1): 876-884, 2022 01 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606194

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, a global health threat, was caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The SARS-CoV-2 papain-like cysteine protease (PLpro) was recognized as a promising drug target because of multiple functions in virus maturation and antiviral immune responses. Inhibitor GRL0617 occupied the interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) C-terminus-binding pocket and showed an effective antiviral inhibition. Here, we described a novel peptide-drug conjugate (PDC), in which GRL0617 was linked to a sulfonium-tethered peptide derived from PLpro-specific substrate LRGG. The EM-C and EC-M PDCs showed a promising in vitro IC50 of 7.40 ± 0.37 and 8.63 ± 0.55 µM, respectively. EC-M could covalently label PLpro active site C111 and display anti-ISGylation activities in cellular assays. The results represent the first attempt to design PDCs composed of stabilized peptide inhibitors and GRL0617 to inhibit PLpro. These novel PDCs provide promising opportunities for antiviral drug design.


Subject(s)
Aniline Compounds/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Benzamides/chemistry , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Drug Design , Naphthalenes/chemistry , Peptides/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Aniline Compounds/metabolism , Aniline Compounds/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Benzamides/metabolism , Benzamides/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Cell Survival/drug effects , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , Cytokines/chemistry , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Humans , Inhibitory Concentration 50 , Naphthalenes/metabolism , Naphthalenes/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Ubiquitins/chemistry
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(1)2021 Dec 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580698

ABSTRACT

In this review, we collected 1765 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) M-pro inhibitors from the bibliography and other sources, such as the COVID Moonshot project and the ChEMBL database. This set of inhibitors includes only those compounds whose inhibitory capacity, mainly expressed as the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value, against M-pro from SARS-CoV-2 has been determined. Several covalent warheads are used to treat covalent and non-covalent inhibitors separately. Chemical space, the variation of the IC50 inhibitory activity when measured by different methods or laboratories, and the influence of 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT) are discussed. When available, we have collected the values of inhibition of viral replication measured with a cellular antiviral assay and expressed as half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values, and their possible relationship to inhibitory potency against M-pro is analyzed. Finally, the most potent covalent and non-covalent inhibitors that simultaneously inhibit the SARS-CoV-2 M-pro and the virus replication in vitro are discussed.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Enzyme Assays/methods , Inhibitory Concentration 50 , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Virus Replication/drug effects
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(1)2021 Dec 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580696

ABSTRACT

The inhibition of key enzymes that may contain the viral replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have assumed central importance in drug discovery projects. Nonstructural proteins (nsps) are essential for RNA capping and coronavirus replication since it protects the virus from host innate immune restriction. In particular, nonstructural protein 16 (nsp16) in complex with nsp10 is a Cap-0 binding enzyme. The heterodimer formed by nsp16-nsp10 methylates the 5'-end of virally encoded mRNAs to mimic cellular mRNAs and thus it is one of the enzymes that is a potential target for antiviral therapy. In this study, we have evaluated the mechanism of the 2'-O methylation of the viral mRNA cap using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. It was found that the calculated free energy barriers obtained at M062X/6-31+G(d,p) is in agreement with experimental observations. Overall, we provide a detailed molecular analysis of the catalytic mechanism involving the 2'-O methylation of the viral mRNA cap and, as expected, the results demonstrate that the TS stabilization is critical for the catalysis.


Subject(s)
Methyltransferases/metabolism , RNA Caps/chemistry , RNA Caps/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/metabolism , Biocatalysis , Biomechanical Phenomena , Methylation , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Quantum Theory , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/chemistry
6.
Molecules ; 27(1)2021 Dec 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580564

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused millions of fatalities since 2019. Despite the availability of vaccines for this disease, new strains are causing rapid ailment and are a continuous threat to vaccine efficacy. Here, molecular docking and simulations identify strong inhibitors of the allosteric site of the SARS-CoV-2 virus RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). More than one hundred different flavonoids were docked with the SARS-CoV-2 RdRp allosteric site through computational screening. The three top hits were Naringoside, Myricetin and Aureusidin 4,6-diglucoside. Simulation analyses confirmed that they are in constant contact during the simulation time course and have strong association with the enzyme's allosteric site. Absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET) data provided medicinal information of these top three hits. They had good human intestinal absorption (HIA) concentrations and were non-toxic. Due to high mutation rates in the active sites of the viral enzyme, these new allosteric site inhibitors offer opportunities to drug SARS-CoV-2 RdRp. These results provide new information for the design of novel allosteric inhibitors against SARS-CoV-2 RdRp.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Computational Biology/methods , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Flavonoids/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Allosteric Site , COVID-19/virology , Catalytic Domain , Drug Design , Humans , Intestinal Absorption , Molecular Docking Simulation
7.
Gastroenterology ; 160(3): 925-928.e4, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575253
8.
Molecules ; 26(24)2021 Dec 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555013

ABSTRACT

An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the antiviral nature of polyphenols, and many polyphenols have been proposed to inhibit SARS-CoV or SARS-CoV-2. Our previous study revealed the inhibitory mechanisms of polyphenols against DNA polymerase α and HIV reverse transcriptase to show that polyphenols can block DNA elongation by competing with the incoming NTPs. Here we applied computational approaches to examine if some polyphenols can also inhibit RNA polymerase (RdRp) in SARS-CoV-2, and we identified some better candidates than remdesivir, the FDA-approved drug against RdRp, in terms of estimated binding affinities. The proposed compounds will be further examined to develop new treatments for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Polyphenols/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Anthocyanins/chemistry , Anthocyanins/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/isolation & purification , COVID-19/drug therapy , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Molecular Structure , Polyphenols/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology
9.
Curr Pharm Biotechnol ; 22(15): 2054-2070, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551391

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In December 2019, an outbreak of a pneumonia-like illness, Corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19), originating from Wuhan, China, was linked to novel coronavirus, now termed SARS-CoV-2. Unfortunately, no effective drugs or vaccines have been reported yet. The main protease (MPRO) remains the most validated pharmacological target for the design and discovery of inhibitors. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to find a prospective natural scaffold as an inhibitor for MPRO main protease in SARS-CoV-2 and compare it with repurposed antiviral drugs lopinavir and nelfinavir. METHODS: Natural compound libraries were screened for potential scaffold against MPRO main protease. Molecular dynamics simulation, MM-GBSA and principal component analyses of enzyme- ligand complexes were carried out with the top-ranking hits and compared with the repurposed antiviral drugs lopinavir and nelfinavir. RESULTS: The structure-based virtual screening indicated phenylbenzopyrone of flavonoids as one of the top-ranking scaffolds that have the potential to inhibit the main protease with the Oglycosidic form, performing better than the corresponding aglyconic form. Simulation studies indicated that glycosidic form of flavonoid is a more suitable inhibitor with compounds rutin, procyanidin B6, baicalin and galloylquercetin, demonstrating high affinity and stability, and rutin, emerging as one of the best candidate compounds. Interestingly, rutin was reported to have inhibitory activity against similar protease (3Cprotease of enterovirus A71) and implicated in lung fibrosis. CONCLUSION: The present study on flavonoids, possessing a potential scaffold for inhibiting main protease activity for all betacoronavirus is an attempt to provide new and safe drug leads within a reasonably short period.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Flavonoids , Protease Inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Flavonoids/pharmacology , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Prospective Studies , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/drug effects
10.
Pharmacol Res ; 172: 105820, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1531713

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which enter the host cells through the interaction between its receptor binding domain (RBD) of spike glycoprotein with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor on the plasma membrane of host cell. Neutralizing antibodies and peptide binders of RBD can block viral infection, however, the concern of accessibility and affordability of viral infection inhibitors has been raised. Here, we report the identification of natural compounds as potential SARS-CoV-2 entry inhibitors using the molecular docking-based virtual screening coupled with bilayer interferometry (BLI). From a library of 1871 natural compounds, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), 20(R)-ginsenoside Rg3 (RRg3), 20(S)-ginsenoside Rg3 (SRg3), isobavachalcone (Ibvc), isochlorogenic A (IscA) and bakuchiol (Bkc) effectively inhibited pseudovirus entry at concentrations up to 100 µM. Among these compounds, four compounds, EGCG, Ibvc, salvianolic acid A (SalA), and isoliensinine (Isl), were effective in inhibiting SARS-CoV-2-induced cytopathic effect and plaque formation in Vero E6 cells. The EGCG was further validated with no observable animal toxicity and certain antiviral effect against SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus mutants (D614G, N501Y, N439K & Y453F). Interestingly, EGCG, Bkc and Ibvc bind to ACE2 receptor in BLI assay, suggesting a dual binding to RBD and ACE2. Current findings shed some insight into identifications and validations of SARS-CoV-2 entry inhibitors from natural compounds.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Biological Products/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Binding, Competitive , Biological Products/pharmacology , Catechin/analogs & derivatives , Catechin/pharmacology , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Cell Membrane/ultrastructure , Chalcones/pharmacology , Chlorogenic Acid/analogs & derivatives , Chlorogenic Acid/pharmacology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Ginsenosides/pharmacology , Humans , Interferometry , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Phenols/pharmacology , Protein Binding
11.
Viruses ; 13(8)2021 08 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524167

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 continues to spread despite the global efforts taken to control it. The 3C-like protease (3CLpro), the major protease of SARS-CoV-2, is one of the most interesting targets for antiviral drug development because it is highly conserved among SARS-CoVs and plays an important role in viral replication. Herein, we developed high throughput screening for SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro inhibitor based on AlphaScreen. We screened 91 natural product compounds and found that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), an FDA-approved drug, inhibited 3CLpro activity. The 3CLpro inhibitory effect of ATRA was confirmed in vitro by both immunoblotting and AlphaScreen with a 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) of 24.7 ± 1.65 µM. ATRA inhibited the replication of SARS-CoV-2 in VeroE6/TMPRSS2 and Calu-3 cells, with IC50 = 2.69 ± 0.09 µM in the former and 0.82 ± 0.01 µM in the latter. Further, we showed the anti-SARS-CoV-2 effect of ATRA on the currently circulating variants of concern (VOC); alpha, beta, gamma, and delta. These results suggest that ATRA may be considered as a potential therapeutic agent against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Tretinoin/pharmacology , Animals , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , DEAD Box Protein 58/metabolism , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Humans , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
12.
Acta Crystallogr D Struct Biol ; 77(Pt 11): 1357-1364, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494172

ABSTRACT

Ensemble refinement, the application of molecular dynamics to crystallographic refinement, explicitly models the disorder inherent in macromolecular structures. These ensemble models have been shown to produce more accurate structures than traditional single-model structures. However, suboptimal sampling of the molecular-dynamics simulation and modelling of crystallographic disorder has limited the utility of the method, and can lead to unphysical and strained models. Here, two improvements to the ensemble refinement method implemented within Phenix are presented: DEN restraints, which guide the local sampling of conformations and allow a more robust exploration of local conformational landscapes, and ECHT disorder models, which allow the selection of more physically meaningful and effective disorder models for parameterizing the continuous disorder components within a crystal. These improvements lead to more consistent and physically interpretable simulations of macromolecules in crystals, and allow structural heterogeneity and disorder to be systematically explored on different scales. The new approach is demonstrated on several case studies and the SARS-CoV-2 main protease, and demonstrates how the choice of disorder model affects the type of disorder that is sampled by the restrained molecular-dynamics simulation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Crystallography, X-Ray , Humans
13.
J Am Chem Soc ; 143(45): 18827-18831, 2021 11 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483090

ABSTRACT

Despite the importance of rapid and accurate detection of SARS-CoV-2 in controlling the COVID-19 pandemic, current diagnostic methods are static and unable to distinguish between viable/nonviable virus or directly reflect viral replication activity. Real-time imaging of protease activity specific to SARS-CoV-2 can overcome these issues but remains lacking. Herein, we report a near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) activatable molecular probe (SARS-CyCD) for detection of SARS-CoV-2 protease in living mice. The probe comprises a hemicyanine fluorophore caged with a protease peptide substrate and a cyclodextrin unit, which function as an NIRF signaling moiety and a renal-clearable enabler, respectively. The peptide substrate of SARS-CyCD can be specifically cleaved by SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro), resulting in NIRF signal activation and liberation of the renal-clearable fluorescent fragment (CyCD). Such a design not only allows sensitive detection of Mpro in the lungs of living mice after intratracheal administration but also permits optical urinalysis of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Thus, this study presents an in vivo sensor that holds potential in preclinical high-throughput drug screening and clinical diagnostics for respiratory viral infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Kidney/metabolism , Molecular Probes/metabolism , Optical Imaging/methods , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Fluorescent Dyes/analysis , Fluorescent Dyes/metabolism , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Mice , Molecular Probes/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared , Urinalysis , Viral Matrix Proteins/metabolism
14.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 6055, 2021 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475294

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus has become a global pandemic. 3CL protease is a virally encoded protein that is essential across a broad spectrum of coronaviruses with no close human analogs. PF-00835231, a 3CL protease inhibitor, has exhibited potent in vitro antiviral activity against SARS-CoV-2 as a single agent. Here we report, the design and characterization of a phosphate prodrug PF-07304814 to enable the delivery and projected sustained systemic exposure in human of PF-00835231 to inhibit coronavirus family 3CL protease activity with selectivity over human host protease targets. Furthermore, we show that PF-00835231 has additive/synergistic activity in combination with remdesivir. We present the ADME, safety, in vitro, and in vivo antiviral activity data that supports the clinical evaluation of PF-07304814 as a potential COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Indoles/administration & dosage , Leucine/administration & dosage , Pyrrolidinones/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacokinetics , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacokinetics , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 229E, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus 229E, Human/enzymology , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/adverse effects , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/pharmacokinetics , Disease Models, Animal , Drug Design , Drug Synergism , Drug Therapy, Combination , HeLa Cells , Humans , Indoles/adverse effects , Indoles/pharmacokinetics , Infusions, Intravenous , Leucine/adverse effects , Leucine/pharmacokinetics , Mice , Pyrrolidinones/adverse effects , Pyrrolidinones/pharmacokinetics , SARS Virus/drug effects , SARS Virus/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Vero Cells
15.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 187: 976-987, 2021 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474606

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus 3C-like protease (3CLpro) is a crucial target for treating coronavirus diseases including COVID-19. Our preliminary screening showed that Ampelopsis grossedentata extract (AGE) displayed potent SARS-CoV-2-3CLpro inhibitory activity, but the key constituents with SARS-CoV-2-3CLpro inhibitory effect and their mechanisms were unrevealed. Herein, a practical strategy via integrating bioactivity-guided fractionation and purification, mass spectrometry-based peptide profiling and time-dependent biochemical assay, was applied to identify the crucial constituents in AGE and to uncover their inhibitory mechanisms. The results demonstrated that the flavonoid-rich fractions (10-17.5 min) displayed strong SARS-CoV-2-3CLpro inhibitory activities, while the constituents in these fractions were isolated and their SARS-CoV-2-3CLpro inhibitory activities were investigated. Among all isolated flavonoids, dihydromyricetin, isodihydromyricetin and myricetin strongly inhibited SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro in a time-dependent manner. Further investigations demonstrated that myricetin could covalently bind on SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro at Cys300 and Cys44, while dihydromyricetin and isodihydromyricetin covalently bound at Cys300. Covalent docking coupling with molecular dynamics simulations showed the detailed interactions between the orthoquinone form of myricetin and two covalent binding sites (surrounding Cys300 and Cys44) of SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro. Collectively, the flavonoids in AGE strongly and time-dependently inhibit SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro, while the newly identified SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro inhibitors in AGE offer promising lead compounds for developing novel antiviral agents.


Subject(s)
3C Viral Proteases/chemistry , 3C Viral Proteases/metabolism , Ampelopsis/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Flavonoids/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites/drug effects , Cysteine/metabolism , Flavonoids/chemistry , Flavonols/chemistry , Flavonols/pharmacology , Mass Spectrometry , Models, Molecular , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protein Binding/drug effects , Protein Conformation/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
16.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470936

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus is highly contagious to humans and has caused a pandemic of global proportions. Despite worldwide research efforts, efficient targeted therapies against the virus are still lacking. With the ready availability of the macromolecular structures of coronavirus and its known variants, the search for anti-SARS-CoV-2 therapeutics through in silico analysis has become a highly promising field of research. In this study, we investigate the inhibiting potentialities of triazole-based compounds against the SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro). The SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro) is known to play a prominent role in the processing of polyproteins that are translated from the viral RNA. Compounds were pre-screened from 171 candidates (collected from the DrugBank database). The results showed that four candidates (Bemcentinib, Bisoctrizole, PYIITM, and NIPFC) had high binding affinity values and had the potential to interrupt the main protease (Mpro) activities of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The pharmacokinetic parameters of these candidates were assessed and through molecular dynamic (MD) simulation their stability, interaction, and conformation were analyzed. In summary, this study identified the most suitable compounds for targeting Mpro, and we recommend using these compounds as potential drug molecules against SARS-CoV-2 after follow up studies.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Triazoles/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Benzocycloheptenes/chemistry , Benzocycloheptenes/metabolism , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Databases, Chemical , Half-Life , Humans , Ligands , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protease Inhibitors/metabolism , Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Protein Binding , Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Triazoles/metabolism , Triazoles/therapeutic use
17.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470891

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, represents a new pathogen from the family of Coronaviridae that caused a global pandemic of COVID-19 disease. In the absence of effective antiviral drugs, research of novel therapeutic targets such as SARS-CoV-2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) becomes essential. This viral protein is without a human counterpart and thus represents a unique prospective drug target. However, in vitro biological evaluation testing on RdRp remains difficult and is not widely available. Therefore, we prepared a database of commercial small-molecule compounds and performed an in silico high-throughput virtual screening on the active site of the SARS-CoV-2 RdRp using ensemble docking. We identified a novel thioether-amide or guanidine-linker class of potential RdRp inhibitors and calculated favorable binding free energies of representative hits by molecular dynamics simulations coupled with Linear Interaction Energy calculations. This innovative procedure maximized the respective phase-space sampling and yielded non-covalent inhibitors representing small optimizable molecules that are synthetically readily accessible, commercially available as well as suitable for further biological evaluation and mode of action studies.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Amides/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Catalytic Domain , Databases, Chemical , Drug Design , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Guanidine/chemistry , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Structure-Activity Relationship , Sulfides/chemistry , Thermodynamics , Viral Proteins/metabolism
18.
Curr Top Med Chem ; 21(16): 1429-1438, 2021 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468281

ABSTRACT

As a part of the efforts to quickly develop pharmaceutical treatments for COVID-19 through repurposing existing drugs, some researchers around the world have combined the recently released crystal structure of SARS-CoV-2 Mpro in complex with a covalently bonded inhibitor with virtual screening procedures employing molecular docking approaches. In this context, protease inhibitors (PIs) clinically available and currently used to treat infectious diseases, particularly viral ones, are relevant sources of promising drug candidates to inhibit the SARS-CoV-2 Mpro, a key viral enzyme involved in crucial events during its life cycle. In the present perspective, we summarized the published studies showing the promising use of HIV and HCV PIs as potential repurposing drugs against the SARS-CoV-2 Mpro.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus M Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Drug Repositioning , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus M Proteins/chemistry , Coronavirus M Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus M Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Kinetics , Models, Molecular , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Thermodynamics
19.
Antiviral Res ; 195: 105183, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458592

ABSTRACT

The likelihood of continued circulation of COVID-19 and its variants, and novel coronaviruses due to future zoonotic transmissions, combined with the current paucity of coronavirus antivirals, emphasize the need for improved screening in developing effective antivirals for the treatment of infection by SARS-CoV-2 (CoV2) and other coronaviruses. Here we report the development of a live-cell based assay for evaluating the intracellular function of the critical, highly-conserved CoV2 target, the Main 3C-like protease (Mpro). This assay is based on expression of native wild-type mature CoV2 Mpro, the function of which is quantitatively evaluated in living cells through cleavage of a biosensor leading to loss of fluorescence. Evaluation does not require cell harvesting, allowing for multiple measurements from the same cells facilitating quantification of Mpro inhibition, as well as recovery of function upon removal of inhibitory drugs. The pan-coronavirus Mpro inhibitor, GC376, was utilized in this assay and effective inhibition of intracellular CoV2 Mpro was found to be consistent with levels required to inhibit CoV2 infection of human lung cells. We demonstrate that GC376 is an effective inhibitor of intracellular CoV2 Mpro at low micromolar levels, while other predicted Mpro inhibitors, bepridil and alverine, are not. Results indicate this system can provide a highly effective high-throughput coronavirus Mpro screening system.


Subject(s)
Biosensing Techniques , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Pyrrolidines/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Sulfonic Acids/pharmacology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Fluorescence , HEK293 Cells , Humans
20.
Elife ; 102021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456505

ABSTRACT

The absence of 'shovel-ready' anti-coronavirus drugs during vaccine development has exceedingly worsened the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Furthermore, new vaccine-resistant variants and coronavirus outbreaks may occur in the near future, and we must be ready to face this possibility. However, efficient antiviral drugs are still lacking to this day, due to our poor understanding of the mode of incorporation and mechanism of action of nucleotides analogs that target the coronavirus polymerase to impair its essential activity. Here, we characterize the impact of remdesivir (RDV, the only FDA-approved anti-coronavirus drug) and other nucleotide analogs (NAs) on RNA synthesis by the coronavirus polymerase using a high-throughput, single-molecule, magnetic-tweezers platform. We reveal that the location of the modification in the ribose or in the base dictates the catalytic pathway(s) used for its incorporation. We show that RDV incorporation does not terminate viral RNA synthesis, but leads the polymerase into backtrack as far as 30 nt, which may appear as termination in traditional ensemble assays. SARS-CoV-2 is able to evade the endogenously synthesized product of the viperin antiviral protein, ddhCTP, though the polymerase incorporates this NA well. This experimental paradigm is essential to the discovery and development of therapeutics targeting viral polymerases.


To multiply and spread from cell to cell, the virus responsible for COVID-19 (also known as SARS-CoV-2) must first replicate its genetic information. This process involves a 'polymerase' protein complex making a faithful copy by assembling a precise sequence of building blocks, or nucleotides. The only drug approved against SARS-CoV-2 by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), remdesivir, consists of a nucleotide analog, a molecule whose structure is similar to the actual building blocks needed for replication. If the polymerase recognizes and integrates these analogs into the growing genetic sequence, the replication mechanism is disrupted, and the virus cannot multiply. Most approaches to study this process seem to indicate that remdesivir works by stopping the polymerase and terminating replication altogether. Yet, exactly how remdesivir and other analogs impair the synthesis of new copies of the virus remains uncertain. To explore this question, Seifert, Bera et al. employed an approach called magnetic tweezers which uses a magnetic field to manipulate micro-particles with great precision. Unlike other methods, this technique allows analogs to be integrated under conditions similar to those found in cells, and to be examined at the level of a single molecule. The results show that contrary to previous assumptions, remdesivir does not terminate replication; instead, it causes the polymerase to pause and backtrack (which may appear as termination in other techniques). The same approach was then applied to other nucleotide analogs, some of which were also found to target the SARS-CoV-2 polymerase. However, these analogs are incorporated differently to remdesivir and with less efficiency. They also obstruct the polymerase in distinct ways. Taken together, the results by Seifert, Bera et al. suggest that magnetic tweezers can be a powerful approach to reveal how analogs interfere with replication. This information could be used to improve currently available analogs as well as develop new antiviral drugs that are more effective against SARS-CoV-2. This knowledge will be key at a time when treatments against COVID-19 are still lacking, and may be needed to protect against new variants and future outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Nucleotides/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacology , Cell Line , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , Humans , Models, Theoretical , Nucleotides/metabolism , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Stochastic Processes , Virus Replication/drug effects
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