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1.
J Korean Med Sci ; 37(21): e167, 2022 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875390

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It has been known that the fear of contagion during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) creates time delays with subsequent impact on mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, difference of time delay and clinical outcome in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or non-STEMI between the COVID-19 pandemic and pre-pandemic era has not been fully investigated yet in Korea. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on time delays and clinical outcome in patients with STEMI or non-STEMI compared to the same period years prior. METHODS: A total of 598 patients with STEMI (n = 195) or non-STEMI (n = 403) who underwent coronary angiography during the COVID-19 pandemic (February 1 to April 30, 2020) and pre-pandemic era (February 1 to April 30, 2017, 2018, and 2019) were analyzed in this study. Main outcomes were the incidence of time delay, cardiac arrest, and in-hospital death. RESULTS: There was 13.5% reduction in the number of patients hospitalized with AMI during the pandemic compared to pre-pandemic era. In patients with STEMI, door to balloon time tended to be longer during the pandemic compared to pre-pandemic era (55.7 ± 12.6 minutes vs. 60.8 ± 13.0 minutes, P = 0.08). There were no significant differences in cardiac arrest (15.6% vs. 10.4%, P = 0.397) and in-hospital mortality (15.6% vs. 10.4%, P = 0.397) between pre-pandemic and the pandemic era. In patients with non-STEMI, symptom to door time was significantly longer (310.0 ± 346.2 minutes vs. 511.5 ± 635.7 minutes, P = 0.038) and the incidence of cardiac arrest (0.9% vs. 3.5%, P = 0.017) and in-hospital mortality (0.3% vs. 2.3%, P = 0.045) was significantly greater during the pandemic compared to pre-pandemic era. Among medications, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin type 2 receptor blockers (ACE-I/ARBs) were underused in STEMI (64.6% vs. 45.8%, P = 0.021) and non-STEMI (67.8% vs. 57.0%, P = 0.061) during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been a considerable reduction in hospital admissions for AMI, time delay, and underuse of ACE-I/ARBs for the management of AMI, and this might be closely associated with the excess death in Korea.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Arrest , Myocardial Infarction , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Pandemics , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology
2.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 79(22): 2236-2244, 2022 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1859822

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We previously reported high in-hospital mortality for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients with COVID-19 treated in the early phase of the pandemic. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to describe trends of COVID-19 patients with STEMI during the course of the pandemic. METHODS: The NACMI (North American COVID-19 STEMI) registry is a prospective, investigator-initiated, multicenter, observational registry of hospitalized STEMI patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 infection in North America. We compared trends in clinical characteristics, management, and outcomes of patients treated in the first year of the pandemic (January 2020 to December 2020) vs those treated in the second year (January 2021 to December 2021). RESULTS: A total of 586 COVID-19-positive patients with STEMI were included in the present analysis; 227 treated in Y2020 and 359 treated in Y2021. Patients' characteristics changed over time. Relative to Y2020, the proportion of Caucasian patients was higher (58% vs 39%; P < 0.001), patients presented more frequently with typical ischemic symptoms (59% vs 51%; P = 0.04), and patients were less likely to have shock pre-PCI (13% vs 18%; P = 0.07) or pulmonary manifestations (33% vs. 47%; P = 0.001) in Y2021. In-hospital mortality decreased from 33% (Y2020) to 23% (Y2021) (P = 0.008). In Y2021, none of the 22 vaccinated patients expired in hospital, whereas in-hospital death was recorded in 37 (22%) unvaccinated patients (P = 0.009). CONCLUSIONS: Significant changes have occurred in the clinical characteristics and outcomes of STEMI patients with COVID-19 infection during the course of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Prospective Studies , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy
4.
Can J Cardiol ; 38(6): 783-791, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1828080

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are concerns of delays in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) care during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is unclear whether the care and outcomes of STEMI patients differ between COVID-19 waves and compared with historical periods. METHODS: Consecutive patients in the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority STEMI database were included to compare care during 3 distinct waves of the COVID-19 pandemic (9 months; March 2020 to January 2021) with an historical non-COVID-19 cohort. We compared STEMI incidence, baseline characteristics, and outcomes between groups. We also examined time from first medical contact (FMC) to reperfusion, symptom to FMC, and FMC to STEMI diagnosis, as well as predictors of delays. RESULTS: The incidence of STEMI was similar during COVID-19 (n = 305; mean 0.93/day) and before COVID-19 (n = 949; 0.97/day; P = 0.80). The COVID-19 cohort showed significant delay in FMC-to-reperfusion (median 116 min vs 102 min; P < 0.001) and FMC-to-STEMI diagnosis (median 17 mins vs 11 min; P < 0.001). Delays in FMC-to-device times worsened across the 3 COVID-19 waves (FMC-to-device time ≤ 90 min in wave 1: 32.9%; in wave 2: 25.6%; in wave 3: 16.3%; P = 0.045 [47.5% before COVID-19; P < 0.001]). There were no significant predictors of delay were unique to the COVID-19 cohort. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates delays in reperfusion during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with the historical control, with delays increasing during subsequent waves within the pandemic. It is critical to further understand these care gaps to improve STEMI care for future waves of the current and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Time Factors
5.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord ; 22(1): 194, 2022 04 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1817181

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 affects healthcare resource allocation, which could lead to treatment delay and poor outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We assessed the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on AMI outcomes. METHODS: We compared outcomes of patients admitted for acute ST-elevation MI (STEMI) and non-STEMI (NSTEMI) during a non-COVID-19 pandemic period (January-February 2019; Group 1, n = 254) and a COVID-19 pandemic period (January-February 2020; Group 2, n = 124). RESULTS: For STEMI patients, the median of first medical contact (FMC) time, door-to-balloon time, and total myocardial ischemia time were significantly longer in Group 2 patients (all p < 0.05). Primary percutaneous intervention was performed significantly more often in Group 1 patients than in Group 2 patients, whereas thrombolytic therapy was used significantly more often in Group 2 patients than in Group 1 patients (all p < 0.05). However, the rates of and all-cause 30-day mortality and major adverse cardiac event (MACE) were not significantly different in the two periods (all p > 0.05). For NSTEMI patients, Group 2 patients had a higher rate of conservative therapy, a lower rate of reperfusion therapy, and longer FMC times (all p < 0.05). All-cause 30-day mortality and MACE were only higher in NSTEMI patients during the COVID-19 pandemic period (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 pandemic causes treatment delay in AMI patients and potentially leads to poor clinical outcome in NSTEMI patients. Thrombolytic therapy should be initiated without delay for STEMI when coronary intervention is not readily available; for NSTEMI patients, outcomes of invasive reperfusion were better than medical treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Pandemics , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
6.
Am J Emerg Med ; 57: 91-97, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814024

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus of 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in a global pandemic; COVID-19 has resulted in significant challenges in the delivery of healthcare, including emergency management of multiple diagnoses, such as stroke and ST-segment myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study was to identify the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on emergency department care of stroke and STEMI patients. In this study a review of the available literature was performed using pre-defined search terms, inclusion criteria, and exclusion criteria. Our analysis, using a narrative review format, indicates that there was not a significant change in time required for key interventions for stroke and STEMI emergent management, including imaging (door-to-CT), tPA administration (door-to-needle), angiographic reperfusion (door-to-puncture), and percutaneous coronary intervention (door-to-balloon). Potential future areas of investigation include how emergency department (ED) stroke and STEMI care has adapted in response to different COVID-19 variants and stages of the pandemic, as well as identifying strategies used by EDs that were successful in providing effective emergency care in the face of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Stroke , COVID-19/therapy , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/therapy
7.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 11(9): e024451, 2022 May 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807755

ABSTRACT

Background Early reports from the COVID-19 pandemic identified coronary thrombosis leading to ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) as a complication of COVID-19 infection. However, the epidemiology of STEMI in patients with COVID-19 is not well characterized. We sought to determine the incidence, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and outcomes in STEMI patients hospitalized for COVID-19. Methods and Results Patients with data on presentation ECG and in-hospital myocardial infarction were identified from January 14, 2020 to November 30, 2020, from 105 sites participating in the American Heart Association COVID-19 Cardiovascular Disease Registry. Patient characteristics, resource use, and clinical outcomes were summarized and compared based on the presence or absence of STEMI. Among 15 621 COVID-19 hospitalizations, 54 (0.35%) patients experienced in-hospital STEMI. Among patients with STEMI, the majority (n=40, 74%) underwent transthoracic echocardiography, but only half (n=27, 50%) underwent coronary angiography. Half of all patients with COVID-19 and STEMI (n=27, 50%) did not undergo any form of primary reperfusion therapy. Rates of all-cause shock (47% versus 14%), cardiac arrest (22% versus 4.8%), new heart failure (17% versus 1.4%), and need for new renal replacement therapy (11% versus 4.3%) were multifold higher in patients with STEMI compared with those without STEMI (P<0.050 for all). Rates of in-hospital death were 41% in patients with STEMI, compared with 16% in those without STEMI (P<0.001). Conclusions STEMI in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 is rare but associated with poor in-hospital outcomes. Rates of coronary angiography and primary reperfusion were low in this population of patients with STEMI and COVID-19. Adaptations of systems of care to ensure timely contemporary treatment for this population are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Myocardial Infarction , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , American Heart Association , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Pandemics , Registries , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , United States/epidemiology
9.
Kardiol Pol ; 80(3): 266-277, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1766359

ABSTRACT

ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is one of the cardiac emergencies whose management has been most challenged by the COVID-19 pandemic. Patients presenting with the "lethal combo" of STEMI and concomitant SARS-CoV-2 infection have faced dramatic issues related to the need for self-isolation, systemic inflammation with multi-organ disease and difficulties to obtain timely diagnosis and treatment. The interplay between these and other factors has partly neutralized the major advances in STEMI care achieved in the last decades, significantly impairing prognosis in these patients. In the present review article, we will provide an overview on mechanisms of myocardial injury, specific clinical and angiographic characteristics and contemporary management in different settings of STEMI patients with COVID-19, alongside the inherent implications in terms of in-hospital mortality and short-term clinical outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy
12.
Am J Cardiol ; 169: 18-23, 2022 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635346

ABSTRACT

Fewer ST-elevation myocardial infarctions (STEMIs) presentations and increased delays in care occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic in urban areas. Whether these associations occurred in a more rural population has not been previously reported. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on time-to-presentation for STEMI in rural locations. Patients presenting to a large STEMI network spanning 27 facilities and 13 predominantly rural counties between January 1, 2016 and April 30, 2020 were included. Presentation delays, defined as time from symptom onset to arrival at the first medical facility, classified as ≥12 and ≥24 hours from symptom onset were compared among patients in the pre-COVID-19 and the early COVID-19 eras. To account for patient-level differences, 2:1 propensity score matching was performed using binary logistic regression. Among 1,286 patients with STEMI, 1,245 patients presented in the pre-COVID-19 era and 41 presented during the early COVID-19 era. Presentation delays ≥12 hours (19.5% vs 4.0%) and ≥24 hours (14.6% and 0.2%) were more common in COVID-19 than pre-COVID-19 cohorts (p <0.001 for both), despite a low COVID-19 prevalence. Similar results were seen in propensity-matched comparisons (≥12 hours: 19.5% vs 2.4%, p = 0.002; ≥24 hours 14.6% vs 0.0%, p = 0.001). In a predominantly rural STEMI population, delays in seeking medical care after symptom onset were markedly more frequent during the COVID-19 era, despite low COVID-19 prevalence. Considering delays in reperfusion have multiple adverse downstream consequences, these findings may have important implications in rural communities during future pandemic resurgences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , Prevalence , Rural Population , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology
13.
Tex Heart Inst J ; 48(5)2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1579718

ABSTRACT

Atypical presentations of ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have been reported in patients who have COVID-19. We have seen this occurrence in our center in Bronx, New York, where multitudes of patients sought treatment for the coronavirus. We studied the prevalence of atypical STEMI findings among patients with COVID-19 who presented during the first 2 months of the pandemic. Consistent with previous reports, 4 of our 10 patients with COVID-19 and STEMI had no identifiable culprit coronary lesion; rather, they often had diffuse ST-segment elevations on surface electrocardiograms along with higher levels of D-dimer and inflammatory markers. In contrast, 32 of 33 patients without COVID-19 (97%) had a culprit lesion. The patients with COVID-19 and a culprit lesion more often needed thrombectomy catheterization and administration of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors. Our study confirms that patients with COVID-19 often have atypical STEMI presentations, including the frequent absence of a culprit coronary lesion. Our findings can help clinicians prepare for these atypical clinical presentations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Humans , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy
15.
Intern Med ; 60(23): 3693-3700, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547078

ABSTRACT

Objective The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a significant impact on global healthcare systems. Some studies have reported the negative impact of COVID-19 on ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients; however, the impact in Japan remains unclear. This study investigated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on STEMI patients admitted to an academic tertiary-care center in Tokyo, Japan. Methods In this retrospective, observational, cohort study, we included 398 consecutive patients who were admitted to our institute from January 1, 2018, to March 10, 2021, and compared the incidence of hospitalization, clinical characteristics, time course, management, and outcomes before and after March 11, 2020, the date when the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic. Results There was a 10.7% reduction in hospitalization of STEMI patients during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with that in the previous year (117 vs. 131 cases). During the COVID-19 pandemic, the incidence of late presentation was significantly higher (26.5% vs. 12.1%, p<0.001), and the onset-to-door [241 (IQR: 70-926) vs. 128 (IQR: 66-493) minutes, p=0.028] and door-to-balloon [72 (IQR: 61-128) vs. 60 (IQR: 43-90) min, p<0.001] times were significantly longer than in the previous year. Furthermore, the in-hospital mortality was higher, but the difference was not significant (9.4% vs. 5.0%, p=0.098). Conclusion The COVID-19 pandemic significantly impacted STEMI patients in Tokyo and resulted in a slight decrease in hospitalization, a significant increase in late presentation and treatment delays, and a slight but nonsignificant increase in mortality. In the COVID-19 era, the acute management system for STEMI in Japan must be reviewed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Cohort Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Tokyo/epidemiology
16.
Int Heart J ; 62(6): 1230-1234, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542216

ABSTRACT

During the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) should be treated as possibly infected individuals. Therefore, more time is considered necessary to conduct primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In this study, we sought to evaluate the impact of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic on primary PCI for STEMI. Between March 2019 and March 2021, 259 patients with STEMI underwent primary PCI. Patients were divided into 2 groups: the pre-pandemic group (March 2019-February 2020) and the pandemic group (March 2020-February 2021). The patient demographics, reperfusion time including onset-to-door time, door-to-balloon time (DTBT), computed tomography (CT), peak creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), and 30-day mortality rate were investigated. The mean age of the patients was 70.4 ± 12.9 years, and 71.6% were male. There were 117 patients before the pandemic and 142 during the pandemic. The median DTBT was 29 (21.25-41.25) minutes before the pandemic and 48 minutes (31-73 minutes) during the pandemic (P < 0.001). The median door-to-catheter-laboratory time was 13.5 (10-18.75) minutes before the pandemic and 29.5 (18-47.25) minutes during the pandemic (P < 0.001). CT evaluation was performed before PCI in 39 (33.3%) patients and 63 (44.4%) patients (P = 0.08); their peak CPK levels were 1480 (358-2737.5) IU and 1363 (621-2722.75) IU (P = 0.56), and the 30-day mortality rates were 4.3% and 2.1% (P = 0.48), respectively. The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic changed the diagnostic procedure in the emergency department and affected the DTBT in patients with STEMI. Nonetheless, no adverse effects on the 30-day mortality rate were observed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Creatine Kinase/blood , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/statistics & numerical data , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Health Impact Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/mortality , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/mortality , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/virology , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment/trends
17.
Am J Emerg Med ; 53: 68-72, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530556

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Strict control measures under the COVID epidemic have brought an inevitable impact on ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)'s emergency treatment. We investigated the impact of the COVID on the treatment of patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. METHODS: In this single center cohort study, we selected a time frame of 6 month after declaration of COVID-19 infection (Jan 24-July 24, 2020); a group of STEMI patients in the same period of 2019 was used as control. Finally, a total of 246 STEMI patients, who were underwent primary PCI, were enrolled into the study (136 non COVID-19 outbreak periods and 110 COVID-19 outbreak periods). The impact of COVID on the time of symptom onset to the first medical contact (symptom-to-FMC) and door to balloon (D-to-B) was investigated. Moreover, the primary outcome was in-hospital major adverse cardiac events (MACE), defined as a composite of cardiac death, heart failure and malignant arrhythmia. RESULTS: Compared with the same period in 2019, there was a 19% decrease in the total number of STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI at the peak of the pandemic in 2020. The delay in symptom-to-FMC was significantly longer in COVID Outbreak period (180 [68.75, 342] vs 120 [60,240] min, P = 0.003), and the D-to-B times increased significantly (148 [115-190] vs 84 [70-120] min, P < 0.001). However, among patients with STEMI, MACE was similar in both time periods (18.3% vs 25.7%, p = 0.168). On multivariable analysis, COVID was not independently associated with MACE; the history of diabetes, left main disease and age>65 years were the strongest predictors of MACE in the overall population. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID pandemic was not independently associated with MACE; suggesting that active primary PCI treatment preserved high-quality standards even when challenged by a severe epidemic. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: https://ClinicalTrials.gov Unique identifier: NCT04427735.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/statistics & numerical data , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Aged , Beijing/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/transmission , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/trends , Retrospective Studies , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment/standards , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Treatment Outcome
19.
Int J Cardiol ; 347: 89-96, 2022 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504814

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Discrepant data were reported about hospital admissions for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) during COVID-19 pandemic. We reviewed studies reporting STEMI hospitalizations during COVID-19 pandemic, investigating whether differences in COVID-19 epidemiology or public health-related factors could explain discrepant findings in different countries. METHODS: Search through MedLine, Embase, Scopus, Web-of-Science, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, of studies comparing STEMI admissions during COVID-19 pandemic with a reference period, without language restrictions, as registered in PROSPERO International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines were followed. Data independently extracted by multiple investigators were pooled using a random-effects model. Health-related metrics were from publicly-available sources. RESULTS: We included 79 articles (111,557 STEMI cases, from 57 countries). During peak COVID-19 pandemic, overall incidence rate-ratio (IRR) of STEMI hospitalizations over reference period decreased (0.80; 95% CI 0.76-0.84; p < 0.05). Although wide variations and significant heterogeneity were detected among studies (I2 = 89%; p < 0.0001), no significant differences were observed by report methodology (survey vs registry), or observation/reference period. However, large differences emerged at country level not explained by COVID-related epidemiological data, nor by public health strategies. Instead, IRRs for STEMI admissions were inversely related to hospital bed availability in each country (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: During COVID-19 pandemic hospitalization for STEMI significantly decreased, although to a smaller extent than initially reported. Large variability emerged across countries, unrelated to COVID-related epidemiology or social containment measures. Disparities in healthcare organization likely contributed, indicating that proper organization of emergency medicine should be preserved during pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Hospitalization , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology
20.
Curr Probl Cardiol ; 47(3): 101032, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491924

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular injury with SARS-CoV-2 infection is well known. Several studies have outlined baseline characteristics in patients presenting with STEMI and SARS-CoV-2. Paucity in data exists in selective coronary involvement in patients with STEMI and SARS-CoV-2 during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A systematic search and meta-analysis of studies meeting the inclusion and exclusion criteria obtained from MEDLINE, Scopus, and Cochrane databases was performed utilizing PRISMA criteria. The main outcome was likelihood of coronary artery involvement among patients with STEMI and SARS-CoV-2 versus without SARS-CoV-2. The primary adverse outcome measured was in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: The final analysis included 5 observational studies with a total of 2,266 patients. There was no statistical significance in LM (OR 1.40; 95% CI: 0.68, 2.90), LAD (OR 1.09; 95% CI 0.83, 1.43), LCX (OR 1.17; 95% CI: 0.75, 1.85), or RCA (OR 0.59; 95% CI: 0.30, 1.17) disease among the 2 groups. LAD disease was the most prevalent coronary involvement among patients with STEMI and SARS-CoV-2 (49.6%). Higher in-hospital mortality was observed in the STEMI and SARS-CoV-2 group (OR 5.24; 95% CI: 3.63, 7.56). CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis demonstrated no statistical significance in selective coronary involvement in patients with STEMI and SARS-CoV-2 during the COVID-19 pandemic. The higher mortality among patients with SARS-CoV-2 and STEMI has been noted in prior studies with concerns being late presentation due to fear of infection, delayed care time, and poor resource allocation. Focus should be placed on identifying and managing comorbidities to reduce mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Coronary Vessels , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology
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