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1.
Int Heart J ; 63(2): 226-234, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770813

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic occurred in several countries, making the conventional medical system difficult to maintain. Recent recommendations aim to prevent nosocomial infections and infections among health care workers. Therefore, establishing a cardiovascular medical system under an emergency for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is desired. This study aimed to determine the relationship between prognosis and door-to-balloon time (DBT) shortening based on the severity on arrival.This retrospective, multi-center, observational study included 1,127 consecutive patients with STEMI. These patients were transported by emergency medical services and underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients were stratified according to the Killip classification: Killip 1 (n = 738) and Killip ≥ 2 (n = 389) groups.Patients in the Killip ≥ 2 group were older, with more females, and more severity on arrival than those in the Killip 1 group. The 30-day mortality rate in the Killip 1 and Killip ≥ 2 groups was 2.2% and 18.0%, respectively. The Killip ≥ 2 group had a significant difference in the 30-day mortality between patients with DBT ≤ 90 minutes and those with DBT > 90 minutes; however, this did not occur in the Killip 1 group. Furthermore, multivariate analysis revealed that DBT ≤ 90 minutes was not a significant predictive factor in the Killip 1 group; however, it was an independent predictive factor in the Killip ≥ 2 group.DBT shortening affected the 30-day mortality in STEMI patients with Killip ≥ 2, although not those with Killip 1.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Female , Humans , Retrospective Studies , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Time Factors
2.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(12)2021 Dec 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561838

ABSTRACT

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, several cases have reported extensive multivessel coronary thrombosis as a cardiovascular manifestation of SARS-CoV-2 infection. This case describes a patient who developed non-ST elevation myocardial infarction during hospitalization for acute hypoxic respiratory failure due to COVID-19. We review the immediate and delayed revascularisation strategies of culprit and non-culprit lesions in the setting of high intracoronary thrombus burden induced by SARS-CoV-2. Successful percutaneous intervention and stenting of a culprit lesion and resolution of an intracoronary thrombus using a delayed strategy of lesion passivation with adjuvant pharmacotherapy are demonstrated on index and follow-up angiography.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronary Thrombosis , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Coronary Angiography , Coronary Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Coronary Thrombosis/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnostic imaging , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Treatment Outcome
3.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 78(25): 2550-2560, 2021 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549859

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Regional heart attack services have improved clinical outcomes following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) by facilitating early reperfusion by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Early discharge after primary PCI is welcomed by patients and increases efficiency of health care. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess the safety and feasibility of a novel early hospital discharge pathway for low-risk STEMI patients. METHODS: Between March 2020 and June 2021, 600 patients who were deemed at low risk for early major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) were selected for inclusion in the pathway and were successfully discharged in <48 hours. Patients were reviewed by a structured telephone follow-up at 48 hours after discharge by a cardiac rehabilitation nurse and underwent a virtual follow-up at 2, 6, and 8 weeks and at 3 months. RESULTS: The median length of hospital stay was 24.6 hours (interquartile range [IQR]: 22.7-30.0 hours) (prepathway median: 65.9 hours [IQR: 48.1-120.2 hours]). After discharge, all patients were contacted, with none lost to follow-up. During median follow-up of 271 days (IQR: 88-318 days), there were 2 deaths (0.33%), both caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (>30 days after discharge), with 0% cardiovascular mortality and MACE rates of 1.2%. This finding compared favorably with a historical group of 700 patients meeting pathway criteria who remained in the hospital for >48 hours (>48-hour control group) (mortality, 0.7%; MACE, 1.9%) both in unadjusted and propensity-matched analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Selected low-risk patients can be discharged safely following successful primary PCI by using a pathway that is supported by a structured, multidisciplinary virtual follow-up schedule.


Subject(s)
Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Patient Discharge , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/statistics & numerical data , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Critical Pathways , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies
4.
JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc ; 59(242): 1048-1051, 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547958

ABSTRACT

Silent myocardial infarction or unrecognized myocardial infarction has increased prevalence in elderly population with increased cardiovascular risk factors. However, its prevalence in COVID-19 patients is not well-known. A 77-year-old Caucasian male with COVID-19 pneumonia, presented with silent ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, diabetic ketoacidosis and multiorgan failure. He underwent cardiac catheterization and drug eluting stent placement in the ostial right coronary artery with safety protocol. He was discharged to extended-care-facility in stable condition. This is a first case report of silent ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in a patient presenting with COVID-19. In patients with COVID-19, acute myocardial infarction should be ruled out even when asymptomatic, especially in older patients. Prompt intervention using safety protocol is life-saving.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug-Eluting Stents , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Aged , Humans , Male , Myocardial Infarction/complications , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/complications , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Treatment Outcome
5.
Int Heart J ; 62(6): 1230-1234, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542216

ABSTRACT

During the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) should be treated as possibly infected individuals. Therefore, more time is considered necessary to conduct primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In this study, we sought to evaluate the impact of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic on primary PCI for STEMI. Between March 2019 and March 2021, 259 patients with STEMI underwent primary PCI. Patients were divided into 2 groups: the pre-pandemic group (March 2019-February 2020) and the pandemic group (March 2020-February 2021). The patient demographics, reperfusion time including onset-to-door time, door-to-balloon time (DTBT), computed tomography (CT), peak creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), and 30-day mortality rate were investigated. The mean age of the patients was 70.4 ± 12.9 years, and 71.6% were male. There were 117 patients before the pandemic and 142 during the pandemic. The median DTBT was 29 (21.25-41.25) minutes before the pandemic and 48 minutes (31-73 minutes) during the pandemic (P < 0.001). The median door-to-catheter-laboratory time was 13.5 (10-18.75) minutes before the pandemic and 29.5 (18-47.25) minutes during the pandemic (P < 0.001). CT evaluation was performed before PCI in 39 (33.3%) patients and 63 (44.4%) patients (P = 0.08); their peak CPK levels were 1480 (358-2737.5) IU and 1363 (621-2722.75) IU (P = 0.56), and the 30-day mortality rates were 4.3% and 2.1% (P = 0.48), respectively. The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic changed the diagnostic procedure in the emergency department and affected the DTBT in patients with STEMI. Nonetheless, no adverse effects on the 30-day mortality rate were observed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Creatine Kinase/blood , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/statistics & numerical data , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Health Impact Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/mortality , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/mortality , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/virology , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment/trends
6.
Tex Heart Inst J ; 48(4)2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527036

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, social distancing guidelines have negatively affected the care-seeking behavior of patients with chronic medical conditions, including those with cardiovascular disease. We report the case of a 60-year-old man with vague gastrointestinal symptoms who waited more than 1 week to seek treatment for fear of COVID-19 infection. On presentation at another hospital, he was found to have had an anterior myocardial infarction, and he underwent percutaneous coronary intervention to stent an occluded proximal left anterior descending coronary artery. Subsequently, the patient experienced refractory cardiogenic shock and, during his transfer to our hospital, refractory ventricular tachycardia, which ultimately proved fatal.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Fear , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery
7.
Int J Cardiol ; 345: 14-19, 2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474608

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Mechanical complications (MC) (i.e., free wall rupture (FWR), papillary muscle rupture (PMR) and ventricular septal rupture (VSR)) are rare complications of ST- elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI). Incidence of MC according to pre-hospital delay remains unknown. We aimed to determine the rates of MC according to pre-hospital delay. METHODS: Analysis was conducted on the MODIF registry data. Patients were allocated to four groups according to pre-hospital delay: 0 to 12 h, 12 to 24 h, 24 to 36 h and 36 to 48 h. RESULTS: 6185 patients with complete data were analyzed. Mean age was 64.1 years old and 75.7% of patients were males. Eighty-three patients (1.34%) presented with MC: 44 (0.71%) experienced a FWR, 17 (0.27%) a PMR, and 22 (0.36%) a VSR. Global rates of MC were 0.82%, 1.43%, 1.24% and 5.07% in the four groups of pre-hospital delays - 0 to 12 h, 12 to 24 h, 24 to 36 h and 36 to 48 h - respectively (p < 0.001). In-hospital mortality rates were high: 44.2%, 47.1% and 54.6% for FWR, PMR and VSR, respectively. In multivariate analysis, factors independently related to the occurrence of MC were older age, female sex, simultaneous COVID-19 infection, absence of dyslipidemia, initial TIMI flow 0 or 1 in the culprit artery, 36 to 48 h-pre-hospital delay and absence of revascularization by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent implantation. CONCLUSION: The probability of MC in STEMI increases with pre-hospital delay. Mechanical complications of STEMI remain associated with a very poor prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Aged , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Treatment Outcome
8.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0241149, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388891

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Early reports described decreased admissions for acute cardiovascular events during the SarsCoV-2 pandemic. We aimed to explore whether the lockdown enforced during the SARSCoV-2 pandemic in Israel impacted the characteristics of presentation, reperfusion times, and early outcomes of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients. METHODS: A multicenter prospective cohort comprising all STEMI patients treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention admitted to four high-volume cardiac centers in Israel during lockdown (20/3/2020-30/4/2020). STEMI patients treated during the same period in 2019 served as controls. RESULTS: The study comprised 243 patients, 107 during the lockdown period of 2020 and 136 during the same period in 2019, with no difference in demographics and clinical characteristics. Patients admitted in 2020 had higher admission and peak troponin levels, had a 2.4 fold greater likelihood of Door-to-balloon times> 90 min (95%CI: 1.2-4.9, p = 0.01) and 3.3 fold greater likelihood of pain-to-balloon times> 12 hours (OR 3.3, 95%CI: 1.3-8.1, p<0.01). They experienced higher rates hemodynamic instability (25.2% vs 14.7%, p = 0.04), longer hospital stay (median, IQR [4, 3-6 Vs 5, 4-6, p = 0.03]), and fewer early (<72 hours) discharge (12.4% Vs 32.4%, p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The lockdown imposed during the SARSCoV-2 pandemic was associated with a significant lag in the time to reperfusion of STEMI patients. Measures to improves this metric should be implemented during future lockdowns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Admission/standards , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Prospective Studies , Registries/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
9.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 53(2): 335-345, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1375670

ABSTRACT

The pandemic has led to adverse short-term outcomes for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). It is unknown if this translates to poorer long-term outcomes. In Singapore, the escalation of the outbreak response on February 7, 2020 demanded adaptation of STEMI care to stringent infection control measures. A total of 321 patients presenting with STEMI and undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention at a tertiary hospital were enrolled and followed up over 1-year. They were allocated into three groups based on admission date-(1) Before outbreak response (BOR): December 1, 2019-February 6, 2020, (2) During outbreak response (DOR): February 7-March 31, 2020, and (3) control group: November 1-December 31, 2018. The incidence of cardiac-related mortality, cardiac-related readmissions, and recurrent coronary events were examined. Although in-hospital outcomes were worse in BOR and DOR groups compared to the control group, there were no differences in the 1-year cardiac-related mortality (BOR 8.7%, DOR 7.1%, control 4.8%, p = 0.563), cardiac-related readmissions (BOR 15.1%, DOR 11.6%, control 12.0%, p = 0.693), and recurrent coronary events (BOR 3.2%, DOR 1.8%, control 1.2%, p = 0.596). There were higher rates of additional PCI during the index admission in DOR, compared to BOR and control groups (p = 0.027). While patients admitted for STEMI during the pandemic may have poorer in-hospital outcomes, their long-term outcomes remain comparable to the pre-pandemic era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Recurrence , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Singapore/epidemiology , Tertiary Care Centers , Treatment Outcome
10.
Tex Heart Inst J ; 48(3)2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355273

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandmic, more patients are presenting with complications late after acute myocardial infarction. We report the case of a 71-year-old man who delayed seeking medical care for 2 weeks, despite progressive shortness of breath, cough, and tactile fever, for fear of contracting COVID-19 in the hospital. Clinical and echocardiographic evaluation revealed a ventricular septal rupture secondary to acute myocardial infarction. The patient underwent urgent cardiac catheterization, followed by successful saphenous vein grafting to the left anterior descending coronary artery and open surgical repair of the ventricular septal rupture with a bovine pericardial patch. This case highlights a potential long-lasting negative effect that the COVID-19 pandemic will have on the care-seeking behavior and health of patients with acute cardiovascular disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Catheterization/methods , Coronary Artery Bypass/methods , Fear , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Ventricular Septal Rupture , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Coronary Angiography/methods , Echocardiography/methods , Electrocardiography/methods , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/complications , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/physiopathology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Treatment Outcome , Ventricular Septal Rupture/diagnosis , Ventricular Septal Rupture/etiology , Ventricular Septal Rupture/physiopathology , Ventricular Septal Rupture/surgery
11.
Atherosclerosis ; 332: 48-54, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1321994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: SARS-Cov-2 predisposes patients to thrombotic complications, due to excessive inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet activation, and coagulation/fibrinolysis disturbances. The aim of the present study was to evaluate clinical characteristics and prognostic impact of SARS-CoV-2 positivity among STEMI patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). METHODS: We selected SARS-CoV-2 positive patients included in the ISACS-STEMI COVID-19, a retrospective multicenter European registry including 6609 STEMI patients treated with PPCI from March 1st until April 30th, in 2019 and 2020. As a reference group, we randomly sampled 5 SARS-Cov-2 negative patients per each SARS-CoV-2 positive patient, individually matched for age, sex, and hospital/geographic area. Study endpoints were in-hospital mortality, definite stent thrombosis, heart failure. RESULTS: Our population is represented by 62 positive SARS-CoV-2 positive patients who were compared with a matched population of 310 STEMI patients. No significant difference was observed in baseline characteristics or the modality of access to the PCI center. In the SARS-CoV-2 positive patients, the culprit lesion was more often located in the RCA (p < 0.001). Despite similar pre and postprocedural TIMI flow, we observed a trend in higher use of GP IIb-IIIa inhibitors and a significantly higher use of thrombectomy in the SARS-CoV-2 positive patients. SARS-CoV-2 positivity was associated with a remarkably higher in hospital mortality (29% vs 5.5%, p < 0.001), definite in-stent thrombosis (8.1% vs 1.6%, p = 0.004) and heart failure (22.6% vs 10.6%, p = 0.001) that was confirmed after adjustment for confounding factors. CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that among STEMI patients, SARS-CoV-2 positivity is associated with larger thrombus burden, a remarkably higher mortality but also higher rates of in-stent thrombosis and heart failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Registries , Reperfusion , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Treatment Outcome
12.
J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep ; 9: 23247096211031135, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309898

ABSTRACT

Amid the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, there is an unprecedented increase in public avoidance of hospitals predominantly driven by fear of contracting the virus. Recent publications highlight a re-emergence of rare post-myocardial infarction complications. While mechanical complications are infrequent in the era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention, they are associated with high mortality rates. The concurrent occurrence of mechanical complications such as left ventricular aneurysm and ventricular septal rupture is an extremely rare entity. We hereby delineate a unique case of a 53-year-old Caucasian male who underwent successful concomitant closure of a ventricular septal rupture, left ventricular aneurysmectomy, and 3-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting. Due to a delayed initial presentation owing to the patient's fear of contracting COVID-19, the surgery was carried out 3 months after the myocardial infarction. His postoperative evaluation confirmed normal contractility of the left ventricle and complete closure of the ventricular septal rupture. Six months postoperatively, the patient continues to do well. We also present a literature review of the mechanical complications following delayed presentation of myocardial infarction amid the COVID-19 pandemic. This article illustrates that clinicians should remain cognizant of these extremely rare but potentially lethal collateral effects during the ongoing global public-health challenge. Furthermore, it highlights a significant concern regarding the delay in first medical contact due to the reluctance of patients to visit the hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Heart Aneurysm/surgery , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Time-to-Treatment , Ventricular Septal Rupture/surgery , COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Coronary Artery Bypass , Heart Aneurysm/complications , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/complications , Treatment Outcome , Ventricular Septal Rupture/complications
13.
Heart Surg Forum ; 24(3): E564-E574, 2021 06 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282335

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Our aim of this study was to evaluate the cardiac symptoms, coronary angiographic results, and clinical outcomes of patients with confirmed COVID-19 and ST-segment elevation with myocardial infarction (STEMI) or myocardial ischemia. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-seven patients, who already were confirmed with COVID-19 using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), were admitted to our hospital due to chest pain with STEMI. The median patient age was 66 years (range: 27-84 years). Female/male ratio was 22/15. We performed a second RT-PCR test in all patients. We investigated myocardial enzymes (creatine kinase myocardial band (CK-MB), cardiac troponin-I (c-TnI), and C-reactive protein (CRP), and liver enzymes (alanine amino transferase (ALT) and aspartate amino transferase (AST) also were measured. Blood d-dimer, thromboplastin time (PT), partial thromboplastin time (PTT), and fibrinogen were investigated. Transcutaneous oxygen saturation was monitored for each patient in the emergency department (ED). To evaluate myocardial wall abnormalities, transthoracic echocardiography was performed. RESULTS: Coronary artery disorders requiring revascularization were detected in 25 patients (67.5%). There was no evidence of coronary artery disease in the remaining 12 patients. Out of 25, nine coronary artery disease patients had a history of coronary intervention (24.3%). All patients had high levels of myocardial enzyme release. Percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) were performed in patients with culprit lesion(s). Success rate of PCI was 87.5% (N = 21). The median number of stent use was 2.9±0.7 (range: 1-4). Because PCI failed in four patients, we suggested elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery after medical treatment. Six patients required re-intervention owing to early stent thrombosis (30%). Seven patients died after PCI (33.3%). For patients with negative or positive RT-PCR test results, we performed thoracic computed tomography (CT), which is a sensitive diagnostic method for COVID-19. Interlobular septal and pleural thickening with patchy bronchiectasis in the bilateral or unilaterally lower and/or middle lobe(s) were the main pathologies in 24 patients. D-dimer, fibrinogen, and CRP levels were high in 11 PCI patients with bilaterally pulmonary involvement by COVID-19 (52.3%), while fibrin degradation products did not significantly change. For three patients with normal coronary arteries with a transient hypokinesia or hypokinesia as result of myocarditis, we decided to perform atypical Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. We medically treated using inodilator (levosimendan), diuretic, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers. To prevent the risk of thromboembolism, we also administered a heparin drip. The myocardial contractility of the apex did improve, and patients were discharged from the hospital, with the exception of one young female patient. She is following in the ICU with stabil hemodynamics. CONCLUSION: Chest pain with STEMI can develop in patients with confirmed COVID-19. Nearly one-third of patients had COVID-19 with chest pain and concomitant STEMI and normal coronary angiography (32.4%). Urgent PCI may be performed in hemodynamically unstable patients with high mortality. Complications, including sudden cardiac arrest, severe ventricular arrhythmia, and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, related to COVID-19 patients with normal coronary arteries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Coronary Artery Bypass , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation Tests , Coronary Angiography , Echocardiography , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnostic imaging , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/etiology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
15.
Am J Cardiol ; 151: 10-14, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201694

ABSTRACT

Impact of COVID-19 pandemic and pandemic-related social restrictions on clinical course of patients treated for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is unclear. In the present study presentation and outcome of patients with STEMI in the year 2020 were compared with the years before in a German registry that includes all patients hospitalized for acute STEMI in a region with approximately 1 million inhabitants. In the year 2020 726 patients with STEMI were registered compared with 10.226 patients in the years 2006 to 2019 (730 ± 57 patients per year). No significant differences were observed between the groups regarding age, gender and medical history of patients. However, in the year 2020 a significantly higher rate of patients admitted with cardiogenic shock (21.9% vs 14.2%, p <0.01) and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) (14.3% vs 11.1%, p <0.01) was observed. The rate of patients with subacute myocardial infarction (14.3% vs 11.6%, p <0.05) was elevated in 2020. Hospital mortality increased by 52% from the years 2006 to 2019 (8.4%) to the year 2020 (12.8%, p <0.01). Only 4 patients (0.6%) with STEMI in the year 2020 had SARS-CoV-2 infection, none of those died in-hospital. In conclusion, in the year 2020 a highly significant increase of STEMI-patients admitted to hospital with advanced infarction and poor prognosis was observed. As the structure of the emergency network to treat patients with STEMI was unchanged during the study period, the most obvious reason for these changes was COVID-19 pandemic-related lockdown and the fear of many people to contact medical staff during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Registries , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Comorbidity , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology
17.
EuroIntervention ; 16(17): 1426-1433, 2021 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194745

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The aim of this study was to assess clinical and prognosis differences in patients with COVID-19 and STEMI. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using a nationwide registry of consecutive patients managed within 42 specific STEMI care networks, we compared patient and procedure characteristics and in-hospital outcomes in two different cohorts, according to whether or not they had COVID-19. Among 1,010 consecutive STEMI patients, 91 were identified as having COVID-19 (9.0%). With the exception of smoking status (more frequent in non-COVID-19 patients) and previous coronary artery disease (more frequent in COVID-19 patients), clinical characteristics were similar between the groups, but COVID-19 patients had more heart failure on arrival (31.9% vs 18.4%, p=0.002). Mechanical thrombectomy (44% vs 33.5%, p=0.046) and GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor administration (20.9% vs 11.2%, p=0.007) were more frequent in COVID-19 patients, who had an increased in-hospital mortality (23.1% vs 5.7%, p<0.0001), that remained consistent after adjustment for age, sex, Killip class and ischaemic time (OR 4.85, 95% CI: 2.04-11.51; p<0.001). COVID-19 patients had an increase of stent thrombosis (3.3% vs 0.8%, p=0.020) and cardiogenic shock development after PCI (9.9% vs 3.8%, p=0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Our study revealed a significant increase in in-hospital mortality, stent thrombosis and cardiogenic shock development after PCI in patients with STEMI and COVID-19 in comparison with contemporaneous non-COVID-19 STEMI patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals , Humans , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Treatment Outcome
18.
Cardiovasc Interv Ther ; 37(2): 264-268, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188201

ABSTRACT

Healthcare systems worldwide have been overburdened by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. Accordingly, hospitals have had to implement strategies to profoundly reorganize activities, which have affected procedures such as primary percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs). This study aimed to describe changes in PCI practices during the health emergency at the national level. The Japanese Association of Cardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics performed provided serial surveys of institutions throughout Japan during the pandemic. The data obtained on December, 2020 and February 2021 (during the 2nd wave of pandemic) were compared with the data obtained on August 2020 (1st wave). Primary PCI for STEMI was performed as usual in 99.1%, 98.7%, and 97.5% of institutions in mid-August, mid-December, 2020 and mid-February, 2021, respectively. The COVID-19 screening tests rates in patients were significantly higher during the third wave than during the second wave (54.0% in mid-August, 2020 and 64.6% in mid-February, 2021, P = 0.002). In addition, hospitals reported that personal protective equipment was more available over time (66.4% in mid-August, 2020 and 83.8% in mid-February, 2021, P < 0.001). In conclusion, most institutions surveyed in Japan continued to perform primary PCI as usual for STEMI patients during the second and third waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, the COVID-19 screening tests were more frequently performed over time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery
20.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(3)2021 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146028

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has varied cardiovascular manifestations including microvascular and macrovascular thrombi leading to multiorgan system injury and failure. This case describes a patient presenting with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure from COVID-19 who abruptly developed a large thrombus in the right coronary artery leading to myocardial infarction. This case report reviews the ECG, heart catheterisation images prepercutaneous and postpercutaneous coronary intervention, critical care management and outcome in the context of the height of the COVID-19 pandemic in the Virginia area. A brief review of relevant literature regarding cardiovascular complications of COVID-19 is also provided. Unfortunately, the patient ultimately passed after 2 weeks of inability to wean off the ventilator.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Coronary Thrombosis/etiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/etiology , Angiography , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cardiac Catheterization , Coronary Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Coronary Thrombosis/surgery , Diagnosis, Differential , Drug-Eluting Stents , Electrocardiography , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Radiography , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnostic imaging , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Thrombectomy
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