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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1979234

ABSTRACT

The patient safety climate is a key element of quality in healthcare. It should be a priority in the healthcare systems of all countries in the world. The goal of patient safety programs is to prevent errors and reduce the potential harm to patients when using healthcare services. A safety climate is also necessary to ensure a safe working environment for healthcare professionals. The attitudes of healthcare workers toward patient safety in various aspects of work, organization and functioning of the ward are important elements of the organization's safety culture. The aim of this study was to determine the perception of the patient safety climate by healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study was conducted in five European countries. The Safety Attitude Questionnaire (SAQ) short version was used for the study. A total of 1061 healthcare workers: physicians, nurses and paramedics, participated in this study. RESULTS: All groups received the highest mean results on the stress recognition subscale (SR): nurses 98.77, paramedics 96.39 and physician 98.28. Nurses and physicians evaluated work conditions (WC) to be the lowest (47.19 and 44.99), while paramedics evaluated perceptions of management (PM) as the worst (46.44). Paramedics achieved statistically significantly lower scores compared to nurses and physicians in job satisfaction (JS), stress recognition (SR) and perception of management (PM) (p < 0.0001). Paramedics compared to nurses and physicians rank better in working conditions (WC) in relation to patient safety (16.21%). Most often, persons of lower seniority scored higher in all subscales (p = 0.001). In Poland, Spain, France, Turkey, and Greece, healthcare workers scored highest in stress recognition (SR). In Poland, Spain, France, and Turkey, they assessed working conditions (WC) as the worst, while in Greece, the perception of management (PM) had the lowest result. CONCLUSION: Participant perceptions about the patient safety climate were not at a particularly satisfactory level, and there is still a need for the development of patient safety culture in healthcare in Europe. Overall, positive working conditions, good management and effective teamwork can contribute to improving employees' attitudes toward patient safety. This study was carried out during the COVID-19 pandemic and should be repeated after its completion, and comparative studies will allow for a more precise determination of the safety climate in the assessment of employees.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Patient Safety , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Organizational Culture , Pandemics , Perception , Safety Management , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
BMJ Open Qual ; 11(3)2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1932768

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Developing a safety culture in hospitals improves patient safety-related initiatives. Limited recent knowledge about patient safety culture (PSC) exists in the healthcare context. AIMS: This study assessed nurses' reporting on the predictors and outcomes of PSC and the differences between the patient safety grades and the number of events reported across the components of PSC. METHODS: A cross-sectional comparative research design was conducted. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (https://www.strobe-statement.org/index.php?id=available-checklists) guided the study. The researcher recruited a convenience sample of 300 registered nurses using the hospital survey on patient safety culture, with a response rate of 75%. RESULTS: Nurses reported PSC to be 'moderate'. Areas of strength in PSC were non-punitive responses to errors and teamwork within units. Areas that needed improvements were the supervisor's/manager's expectations and actions in promoting safety and communication openness. Some significant correlations were reported among PSC components. Significant differences in means were observed for patient safety grades in six out of the ten PSC components and one outcome item. Organisational learning/continuous improvement, hospital handoffs and transitions, years of experience in the current hospital, the supervisor's/manager's expectations and actions in promoting safety and gender predicted PSC. Of the outcomes, around half of the sample reported a 'very good' patient safety grade, and 'no events' or 'one to two events' only were reported, and nurses 'agreed' on the majority of items, which indicates a positive perception about the overall PSC in the hospitals. In addition, nurses 'most of the time' reported the events when they occurred. PSC components correlated significantly and moderately with PSC outcomes. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: PSC was moderate with an overall positive nurses' perceptions. PSC's strengths should be maintained, and areas of improvement should be prioritised and immediately tackled. Assessing PSC is the first step in improving hospitals' overall performance and quality of services, and improving patient safety practices is essential to improving PSC and clinical outcomes.


Subject(s)
Organizational Culture , Patient Safety , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Safety Management , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 10(6): e38614, 2022 06 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1917125

ABSTRACT

Face masks are an important way to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the prolonged pandemic has revealed confounding problems with the current face masks, including not only the spread of the disease but also concurrent psychological, social, and economic complications. As face masks have been worn for a long time, people have been interested in expanding the purpose of masks from protection to comfort and health, leading to the release of various "smart" mask products around the world. To envision how the smart masks will be extended, this paper reviewed 25 smart masks (12 from commercial products and 13 from academic prototypes) that emerged after the pandemic. While most smart masks presented in the market focus on resolving problems with user breathing discomfort, which arise from prolonged use, academic prototypes were designed for not only sensing COVID-19 but also general health monitoring aspects. Further, we investigated several specific sensors that can be incorporated into the mask for expanding biophysical features. On a larger scale, we discussed the architecture and possible applications with the help of connected smart masks. Namely, beyond a personal sensing application, a group or community sensing application may share an aggregate version of information with the broader population. In addition, this kind of collaborative sensing will also address the challenges of individual sensing, such as reliability and coverage. Lastly, we identified possible service application fields and further considerations for actual use. Along with daily-life health monitoring, smart masks may function as a general respiratory health tool for sports training, in an emergency room or ambulatory setting, as protection for industry workers and firefighters, and for soldier safety and survivability. For further considerations, we investigated design aspects in terms of sensor reliability and reproducibility, ergonomic design for user acceptance, and privacy-aware data-handling. Overall, we aim to explore new possibilities by examining the latest research, sensor technologies, and application platform perspectives for smart masks as one of the promising wearable devices. By integrating biomarkers of respiration symptoms, a smart mask can be a truly cutting-edge device that expands further knowledge on health monitoring to reach the next level of wearables.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Wearable Electronic Devices , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety Management
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 508, 2022 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1910310

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has made it more difficult to maintain high quality in medical education. As online formats are often considered unsuitable, interactive workshops and seminars have particularly often been postponed or cancelled. To meet the challenge, we converted an existing interactive undergraduate elective on safety culture into an online event. In this article, we describe the conceptualization and evaluation of the elective. METHODS: The learning objectives of the safety culture elective remained unchanged, but the teaching methods were thoroughly revised and adapted to suit an online setting. The online elective was offered as a synchronous two-day course in winter semester 2020/21 during the "second wave" of the COVID-19 pandemic in Germany. At the end of each day, participating students evaluated the elective by completing an online survey. Items were rated on a six-point Likert scale. We used SPSS for data analysis. RESULTS: Twenty medical undergraduates completed the elective and rated it extremely positively (1.1 ± 0.2). Students regard safety culture as very important and felt the learning objectives had been achieved. Moreover, they were very satisfied with the design and content of the elective, and especially with interactive elements like role-play. Around 55% of participants would recommend continuing to offer the online elective after the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: It makes sense to offer undergraduate medical students online elective courses on safety culture, especially during a pandemic. The elective described here can serve as a best practice example of how to teach safety culture to undergraduates, especially when physical presence is unfeasible. Electives requiring a high degree of interaction can also function well online.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , Learning , Pandemics/prevention & control , Safety Management
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(11)2022 06 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1892879

ABSTRACT

Workplace safety is critical for advancing patient safety and eliminating harm to both the healthcare workforce and patients. The purpose of this study was to develop and test survey items that can be used in conjunction with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Surveys on Patient Safety Culture™ (SOPS®) Hospital Survey to assess how the organizational culture in hospitals supports workplace safety for providers and staff. After conducting a literature review and background interviews with workplace safety experts, we identified key areas of workplace safety culture (workplace hazards, moving/transferring/lifting patients, workplace aggression, supervisor/management support for workplace safety, workplace safety reporting, and work stress/burnout) and drafted survey items to assess these areas. Survey items were cognitively tested and pilot tested with the SOPS Hospital Survey 2.0 among providers and staff in 28 U.S. hospitals. We conducted psychometric analysis on data from 6684 respondents. Confirmatory factor analysis results (item factor loadings and model fit indices), internal consistency reliability, and site-level reliability were acceptable for the 16 survey items grouped into 6 composite measures. Most composite measures were significantly correlated with each other and with the overall rating on workplace safety, demonstrating conceptual convergence among survey measures. Hospitals and researchers can use the Workplace Safety Supplemental items to assess the dimensions of organizational culture that support provider and staff safety and to identify both strengths and areas for improvement.


Subject(s)
Patient Safety , Workplace , Hospitals , Humans , Organizational Culture , Pilot Projects , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , Safety Management , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 03 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1847310

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The rapid spread of COVID-19 has generated anxiety and concerns among the whole population, by also affecting people's working life quality. Although several studies underlined the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in the healthcare sector, very few studies investigated the consequences in the occupational sectors with low risk of contagion. METHOD: 220 full-time in-presence workers of the manufacturing sector agreed to participate in a study of cross-sectional design during September and October 2020. Data were collected by means of a self-reported questionnaire conceived to investigate the constructs of the COVID-19 concerns, both the personal contribution and the supervisor support to workplace safety, the organizational commitment to safety, and finally, the level of workers' exhaustion. RESULTS: This study highlights that COVID-19 concerns represent a significant source of stress since it is significantly associated to higher levels of exhaustion among workers. Furthermore, the findings show the relevance of resources related to employee's personal contribution to safety management as well as the role of climate variables. CONCLUSIONS: These results promote knowledge on the role of COVID-19 concerns in affecting psychological wellbeing at work, as well as the impact of both individual and job-related resources that may prevent exhaustion at work. Finally, the present findings also have implications for organizations and the maintenance of their commitment to safety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Safety Management
7.
rev. cuid. (Bucaramanga. 2010) ; 12(2): 1-17, mayo 1, 2021.
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1811617

ABSTRACT

Introdução: A pandemia de Covid-19 trouxe muitos desafios para a assistência oncológica, gerando novos desenhos operacionais nas esferas da gestão e da assistência. Objetivo: Descrever experiências de implantação de processos administrativos e assistenciais de instituições prestadoras de atendimento oncológico durante a pandemia da Covid-19. Método: Relato de caso, descritivo, qualitativo. As experiências contidas nos relatos compreendem o período de 05 de março a 31 de janeiro de 2021. Os relatos são provenientes de instituições distintas do município de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brasil. Resultados: Os 3 relatos descrevem ações como: triagem dos pacientes para a incorporação de estratégias de telemedicina e tele-enfermagem; preparação de ambientes livres de Covid-19 para a segurança de profissionais e pacientes; reforço às ações educativas na geração de conhecimentos e adoção de comportamentos seguros para equipes de saúde e pacientes, entre outras. Discussão: Os relatos descreveram como eixo comum a implementação de ações para viabilizar a segurança dos pacientes, dos profissionais e do meio ambiente, bem como a continuidade da assistência oncológica. A literatura científica e as recomendações dos conselhos, sociedades e organizações foram subsidiárias das medidas instituídas. Conclusão: O ineditismo da situação de isolamento social devido ao risco da disseminação da COVID-19 demonstrou-se um campo fecundo para a incorporação de novas estratégias de gestão e assistência em Oncologia. Perdas e danos certamente ocorrerão no processo de assistência oncológica na vigência desta pandemia. Neste contexto, o mapeamento da queda de diagnósticos de câncer bem como das interrupções de tratamento é fundamental para mitigação de suas consequências.


Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought many challenges to oncology care, leading to the implementation of new operational models in health management and care. Objective: To describe the experiences related to the implementation of health management and care models in cancer treatment centers during the COVID-19 outbreak. Materials and Methods: A qualitative descriptive case report was conducted including experiences from March 5 to January 31, 2021. Reports were provided by different cancer treatment centers in São Paulo, Brazil. Results: Actions such as identification of patients eligible for telemedicine and telenursing strategies, preparation of COVID-19-free environments for healthcare professionals and patients, and support for educational actions to increase knowledge and adoption of safety behavior for healthcare professionals and patients were observed in the three reports. Discussion: A common element described in the reports is the implementation of actions to improve the safety of healthcare professionals, patients and the environment, as well as the continuity of cancer care. Scientific literature and recommendations of advisory boards, associations and organizations were supplementary to the measures applied. Conclusions: Social distancing due to the risk of COVID-19 spread proved to a successful field for the introduction of new health management and care in cancer treatment. Although there will certainly be loss and damage to cancer treatment processes during this pandemic, mapping the drop in cancer diagnosis, as well as treatment interruptions, is essential to mitigate any consequences.


Introducción: La pandemia de Covid-19 trajo muchos desafíos para la atención oncológica, generando nuevos diseños operativos en las esferas de gestión y atención. Objetivo: Describir las experiencias de implementación de procesos administrativos y de atención de instituciones proveedoras de atención oncológica durante la pandemia de Covid-19. Métodos: Reporte de caso, descriptivo, cualitativo. Las experiencias del reporte cubren el período del 5 de marzo al 31 de enero de 2021. Los informes provienen de diferentes instituciones en el municipio de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brasil. Resultados: Los 3 reportes describen acciones tales como: detección de pacientes para las estrategias de telemedicina y tele enfermería; preparación de entornos libres de Covid-19 para la seguridad de profesionales y pacientes; refuerzo de acciones educativas para generación de conocimiento y adopción de comportamientos seguros para profesionales y pacientes, entre otros. Discusión: Los reportes describen como eje común la implementación de acciones para la seguridad de los pacientes, los profesionales y el medio ambiente, así como la continuidad de la atención oncológica. La literatura científica, las recomendaciones de consejos, sociedades y organizaciones fueron subsidiarias de las medidas instituidas. Conclusión: La novedad del confinamiento social debido al riesgo de propagación de COVID-19 demostró ser un campo fructífero para la incorporación de nuevas estrategias de gestión y asistencia oncológica. Ciertamente, habrá pérdidas y daños en el proceso de atención oncológica durante esta pandemia. En este contexto, el mapeo de la caída del diagnóstico de cáncer, así como de las interrupciones del tratamiento, es esencial para mitigar sus consecuencias.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Safety Management , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Ambulatory Care , Medical Oncology
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809854

ABSTRACT

The occupational health of immigrant workers in the United States is a major concern. This analysis describes two domains, organization of work and work safety culture, important to the occupational health of Latinx women in farmworker families. Sixty-seven Latinx women in North Carolina farmworker families completed a baseline and five follow-up questionnaires in 2019 through 2021. Fifty-nine of the women were employed in the year prior to the Follow-Up 5 Questionnaire. These women experienced an abysmal organization of work and work safety culture. They experienced significant job churn, with most changing employment several times during the 18-month period. Most of their jobs were seasonal, paid less than $10.00 per hour, piece-rate, and almost all without benefits. The women's jobs had little skill variety (mean 1.5) or decision latitude (mean 1.1), but had high psychological demands (mean 2.0). Work safety climate was very low (mean 13.7), with 76.3% of women noting that their supervisors were "only interested in doing the job fast and cheaply" rather than safely. Women employed as farmworkers versus those in other jobs had few differences. Further research and intervention are needed on the organization of work and work safety culture of Latinx women manual workers.


Subject(s)
Occupational Injuries , Transients and Migrants , Agriculture , Farmers , Female , Hispanic or Latino , Humans , North Carolina , Safety Management
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785624

ABSTRACT

The risks faced by the mining industry have always been prominent for every walk of life in China. As the direct cause of accidents, individual unsafe behaviors are closely related to their risk perception. So, it is important to explore the factors affecting miners' risk perception and analyze the influencing mechanisms between these factors and risk perception. The questionnaire survey method was used to collect the data of risk perception from nearly 400 respondents working in metal mines in China. Exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were used to analyze and process collected data. The impact of four factors affecting miners' risk perception was verified, namely: organizational safety atmosphere, organizational trust, knowledge level, and risk communication. Then, regression analysis, Pearson correlation analysis, and structural equation model analysis were used to examine the effect of the four influencing factors on miners' risk perception. The four influencing factors all have a positive impact on miners' risk perception; knowledge level has the largest explained variation of miners' risk perception, followed by risk communication. Organizational trust and organizational safety atmosphere have an indirect and positive impact on miners' risk perception intermediated by knowledge level and risk communication. The results offer four important aspects of mine safety management to help miners establish quick and accurate risk perception, thereby reducing unsafe behaviors and avoiding accidents.


Subject(s)
Miners , China , Humans , Mining , Perception , Safety Management
11.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(5): 1105-1114, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784698

ABSTRACT

AIM: To analyse the impact of COVID-19 on professional nursing practice environments and patient safety culture. BACKGROUND: The relationship between work environments and patient safety has been internationally recognized. In 2020, the pandemic imposed enormous challenges, yet the impact on these variables remains unknown. METHOD: This is a quantitative observational study, conducted in a Portuguese hospital, with 403 registered nurses. A self-completion questionnaire was used. RESULTS: The impact on the Structure and Outcome components of nursing professional practice environments was positive. Although the Process component remained favourable to quality of care, a negative trend was confirmed in almost all dimensions. The results regarding safety culture showed weaknesses; 'teamwork within units' was the only dimension that maintained a positive culture. CONCLUSION: Positive responses regarding patient safety were significantly associated with the quality of the nursing professional practice environment. The need to invest in all dimensions of safety culture emerges to promote positive professional environments. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Improving professional nursing practice environments can be achieved through managers' investment in the participation and involvement of nurses in the policies and functioning of institutions, as well as promoting an open, fair and participatory safety culture that encourages reporting events and provides adequate support for professionals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Patient Safety , Safety Management , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace
12.
Front Public Health ; 10: 840281, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776046

ABSTRACT

The main purpose of this research was to investigate the mediating role of safety communication (SCO) in the relationship between safety culture (SC) and safety performance (SP) amongst employees in the petrochemical industry. Safety communication methods not only enhance working conditions but also have a positive impact on employee's behaviors and attitudes toward safety leading toward reduced incidents in the workplace environment. A stratified sampling method was followed to collect data in the petrochemical industry in Malaysia. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was utilized to analyze the hypothesized model, using data from 320 participants. The findings reveal that safety communication partially mediates the association between safety culture and safety performance. Further, safety culture was found to have a significant and positive effect on safety performance. This -study makes a significant theoretical contribution by providing empirical evidence on the direct and indirect relationship between safety culture and safety performance in the petrochemical industry.


Subject(s)
Communication , Safety Management , Workplace , Humans , Industry
13.
Front Public Health ; 9: 732707, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775867

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although surgery is essential in healthcare, a significant number of patients suffer unfair harm while undergoing surgery. Many of these originate from failures in non-technical aspects, especially communication among operators. A surgical safety checklist is a simple tool that helps to reduce surgical adverse events, but even if it is fast to fill out, its compilation is often neglected by the healthcare workers because of unprepared cultural background. The present study aims to value the efficacy of a free intervention, such as a short training about risk management and safety checklist, to improve checklist adherence. METHODS: In March 2019, the medical and nursing staff of the General Surgical Unit attended a two-lesson theoretical training concerning surgical safety and risk management tools such as the surgical safety checklist. The authors compared the completeness of the surgical checklists after and before the training, considering the same period (2 months) for both groups. RESULT: The surgical safety checklists were present in 198 cases (70.97%) before the intervention and 231 cases (96.25%) after that. After the training, the compilation adherence increased for every different type of healthcare worker of the unit (surgeons, nurses, anesthetists, and scrab nurses). Furthermore, a longer hospitalization was associated with a higher surgical checklist adherence by the operators. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that a free and simple intervention, such as a two-lesson training, significantly stimulated the correct use of the surgical safety checklist. Moreover, the checklist adherence increased even for the operators who did not attend the training, maybe because of the positive influence of the colleagues' positive behaviors. As the results were promising with only two theoretical lessons, much more can be done to build a new safety culture in healthcare.


Subject(s)
Checklist , Health Personnel , Humans , Patient Safety , Safety Management
15.
Soc Sci Med ; 301: 114951, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763982

ABSTRACT

U.S. media has extensively covered racial disparities in COVID-19 infections and deaths, which may ironically reduce public concern about COVID-19. In two preregistered studies (conducted in the fall of 2020), we examined whether perceptions of COVID-19 racial disparities predict White U.S. residents' attitudes toward COVID-19. Utilizing a correlational design (N = 498), we found that those who perceived COVID-19 racial disparities to be greater reported reduced fear of COVID-19, which predicted reduced support for COVID-19 safety precautions. In Study 2, we manipulated exposure to information about COVID-19 racial disparities (N = 1,505). Reading about the persistent inequalities that produced COVID-19 racial disparities reduced fear of COVID-19, empathy for those vulnerable to COVID-19, and support for safety precautions. These findings suggest that publicizing racial health disparities has the potential to create a vicious cycle wherein raising awareness reduces support for the very policies that could protect public health and reduce disparities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Attitude , Humans , Racial Groups , Safety Management , United States/epidemiology
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708393

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has put inordinate pressure on frontline healthcare workers (HCWs) and hospitals. HCWs are under chronic emotional stress, affected by burnout, moral distress and interpersonal issues with peers or supervisors during the pandemic. All of these can lead to lower levels of patient safety. The goal of this study was to examine patient safety culture values in a COVID-19 frontline hospital. Patient safety represents action, while patient safety culture represents the beliefs, values and norms of an organization that support and promote patient safety. Patient safety culture is a prerequisite for patient safety. A cross-sectional study on healthcare workers (228, response rate of 81.43%) at a COVID-19 frontline hospital was conducted using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HOSPSC), which had PSC dimensions, single question dimensions and comments. Our research revealed that, during the COVID-19 pandemic, a number of patient safety issues have been identified: low communication openness and current punitive response to errors, which might have incapacitated HCWs in the reporting of adverse events. Although participants expressed high supervisor/management expectations, actual support from the supervisor/management tier was low. Poor teamwork across units was identified as another issue, as well as low staffing. The infrastructure was identified as a potential new PSC dimension. There was a lack of support from supervisors/managers, while HCWs need their supervisors to be available; to be visible on the front line and to create an environment of trust, psychological safety and empowerment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Patient Safety , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety Management
18.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 23(2): 241-246, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587370

ABSTRACT

Decades of concerns about the quality of care provided by nursing homes have led state and federal agencies to create layers of regulations and penalties. As such, regulatory efforts to improve nursing home care have largely focused on the identification of deficiencies and assignment of sanctions. The current regulatory strategy often places nursing home teams and government agencies at odds, hindering their ability to build a culture of safety in nursing homes that is foundational to health care quality. Imbuing safety culture into nursing homes will require nursing homes and regulatory agencies to acknowledge the high-risk nature of post-acute and long-term care settings, embrace just culture, and engage nursing home staff and stakeholders in actions that are supported by evidence-based best practices. The response to the COVID-19 pandemic prompted some of these actions, leading to changes in nursing survey and certification processes as well as deployment of strike teams to support nursing homes in crisis. These actions, coupled with investments in public health that include funds earmarked for nursing homes, could become the initial phases of an intentional renovation of the existing regulatory oversight from one that is largely punitive to one that is rooted in safety culture and proactively designed to achieve meaningful and sustained improvements in the quality of care and life for nursing home residents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Nursing Homes , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety Management
20.
Ind Health ; 59(5): 293-297, 2021 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547177

ABSTRACT

This paper reviews three viewpoints regarding the society after the COVID-19 infection on the concept of safety management. The first is the relationship between With COVID-19 and a zero risk. As a result of coexistence with COVID-19 for more than one year, the Japanese society thought that a zero risk is difficult to accomplish, and some risks will be accepted to maintain social activities. This leads a change in a way of thinking from zero risk to risk-based safety management. The second is the change in the way of working. As a result of having experienced remote work forcibly, it will become the hybrid model that incorporated remote work in a conventional method. Personnel evaluation changes from the seniority system to the job evaluation type, and each person's professional ability will be more focused on. The third is the review of the Japanese society system. In Japan, although the infection level was controlled to some extent by the groupism of the self-restraint of actions by mutual monitoring, there is a limit of managing based on groupism. Moreover, as seen in the delay of vaccine development and the medical care collapse, these problems should be improved by changing Japanese society system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Safety Management/organization & administration , Teleworking , COVID-19 Vaccines , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Drug Development , Fukushima Nuclear Accident , Humans , Japan , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
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