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2.
Ind Health ; 59(5): 293-297, 2021 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547177

ABSTRACT

This paper reviews three viewpoints regarding the society after the COVID-19 infection on the concept of safety management. The first is the relationship between With COVID-19 and a zero risk. As a result of coexistence with COVID-19 for more than one year, the Japanese society thought that a zero risk is difficult to accomplish, and some risks will be accepted to maintain social activities. This leads a change in a way of thinking from zero risk to risk-based safety management. The second is the change in the way of working. As a result of having experienced remote work forcibly, it will become the hybrid model that incorporated remote work in a conventional method. Personnel evaluation changes from the seniority system to the job evaluation type, and each person's professional ability will be more focused on. The third is the review of the Japanese society system. In Japan, although the infection level was controlled to some extent by the groupism of the self-restraint of actions by mutual monitoring, there is a limit of managing based on groupism. Moreover, as seen in the delay of vaccine development and the medical care collapse, these problems should be improved by changing Japanese society system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Safety Management/organization & administration , Teleworking , COVID-19 Vaccines , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Drug Development , Fukushima Nuclear Accident , Humans , Japan , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Am J Ind Med ; 64(11): 941-951, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1408312

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: App-based drivers face work disruptions and infection risk during a pandemic due to the nature of their work, interactions with the public, and lack of workplace protections. Limited occupational health research has focused on their experiences. METHODS: We surveyed 100 app-based drivers in Seattle, WA to assess risk perceptions, supports, and controls received from the company that employs them, sources of trust, stress, job satisfaction, COVID-19 infection status, and how the pandemic had changed their work hours. Data were summarized descriptively and with simple regression models. We complemented this with qualitative interviews to better understand controls and policies enacted during COVID-19, and barriers and facilitators to their implementation. RESULTS: Drivers expressed very high levels of concern for exposure and infection (86%-97% were "very concerned" for all scenarios). Only 31% of drivers reported receiving an appropriate mask from the company for which they drive. Stress (assessed via PSS-4) was significantly higher in drivers who reported having had COVID-19, and also significantly higher in respondents with lower reported job satisfaction. Informants frequently identified supports such as unemployment benefits and peer outreach among the driver community as ways to ensure that drivers could access available benefits during COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: App-based drivers received few protections from the company that employed them, and had high fear of exposure and infection at work. There is increased need for health-supportive policies and protections for app-based drivers. The most effective occupational and public health regulations would cover employees who may not have a traditional employer-employee relationship.


Subject(s)
Automobile Driving/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Safety Management/organization & administration , Workplace/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Occupational Diseases/virology , Occupational Health , Organizational Culture , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Transportation , Washington , Workplace/organization & administration , Young Adult
5.
Infect Dis Clin North Am ; 35(3): 697-716, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340668

ABSTRACT

The built environment has been integral to response to the global pandemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). In particular, engineering controls to mitigate risk of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 and other newly emergent respiratory pathogens in the future will be important. Anticipating emergence from this pandemic, or at least adaptation given increasing administration of effective vaccines, and the safety of patients, personnel, and others in health care facilities remain the core goals. This article summarizes known risks and highlights prevention strategies for daily care as well as response to emergent infectious diseases and this parapandemic phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Civil Defense , Health Facilities/trends , Infection Control , Safety Management/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Civil Defense/methods , Civil Defense/organization & administration , Environment, Controlled , Hospital Design and Construction/methods , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2
6.
NASN Sch Nurse ; 36(4): 188-190, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273178

ABSTRACT

Annually, the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) sets advocacy goals. The goals include legislative and policy priorities. The COVID-19 pandemic brought attention to the need to heighten advocacy efforts, specifically to provide for additional school nurses and supplies necessary to meet the challenge of safely returning students to school. While advocating at the national level, NASN also encouraged advocacy at the state and local levels. This article provides a brief summary of NASN's advocacy efforts as well as providing examples from two different state associations demonstrating the importance of collaboration in advocacy efforts in areas related to the pandemic and in general areas related to school nursing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Nurse's Role , Safety Management/organization & administration , School Health Services/organization & administration , School Nursing/legislation & jurisprudence , Societies, Nursing/legislation & jurisprudence , Humans , Leadership , Organizational Objectives , School Nursing/organization & administration , United States
7.
Eval Health Prof ; 44(3): 319-322, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1204028

ABSTRACT

Increased stressful experiences are pervasive among healthcare providers (HCPs) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Identifying resources that help mitigate stress is critical to maintaining HCPs' well-being. However, to our knowledge, no instrument has systematically examined how different levels of resources help HCPs cope with stress during COVID-19. This cross-sectional study involved 119 HCPs (64 nurses and 55 physicians) and evaluated the perceived availability, utilization, and helpfulness of a list of personal, hospital, and healthcare system resources. Participants also reported on their level of burnout, psychological distress, and intentions to quit. Results revealed that HCPs perceived the most useful personal resource to be family support; the most useful hospital resources were a safe environment, personal protective equipment, and support from colleagues; the most useful system resources were job protection, and clear communication and information about COVID. Moreover, HCPs who perceived having more available hospital resources also reported lower levels of psychological distress symptoms, burnout, and intentions to quit. Finally, although training and counseling services were perceived as useful to reduce stress, training was not perceived as widely available, and counseling services, though reported as being available, were underutilized. This instrument helps identify resources that support HCPs, providing implications for healthcare management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Health Services/organization & administration , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Environment , Family Relations/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Occupational Stress/psychology , Occupational Stress/therapy , Pandemics , Quebec , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety Management/organization & administration , Workplace/psychology
8.
Open Heart ; 8(1)2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195855

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The response to COVID-19 has required cancellation of all but the most urgent procedures; there is therefore a need for the reintroduction of a safe elective pathway. METHODS: This was a study of a pilot pathway performed at Barts Heart Centre for the admission of patients requiring elective coronary and structural procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic (April-June 2020). All patients on coronary and structural waiting lists were screened for procedural indications, urgency and adverse features for COVID-19 prognosis and discussed at dedicated multidisciplinary teams. Dedicated admission pathways involving preadmission isolation, additional consent, COVID-19 PCR testing and dedicated clean areas were used. RESULTS: 143 patients (101 coronary and 42 structural) underwent procedures (coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, transcatheter aortic valve intervention and MitralClip) during the study period. The average age was 68.2; 74% were male; and over 93% had one or more moderate COVID-19 risk factors. All patients were COVID-19 PCR negative on admission with (8.1%) COVID-19 antibody positive (swab negative). All procedures were performed successfully with low rates of procedural complications (9.8%). At 2-week follow-up, no patients had symptoms or confirmed COVID-19 infection with significant improvements in quality if life and symptoms. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that patients undergoing coronary and structural procedures can be safely admitted during the COVID-19 pandemic, with no patients contracting COVID-19 during their admission. Reassuringly, patients reflective of typical practice, that is, those at moderate or higher risk, were treated successfully. This pilot provides important information applicable to other settings, specialties and areas to reintroduce services safely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Coronary Angiography/methods , Elective Surgical Procedures , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/methods , Infection Control , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Organizational Innovation , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Risk Adjustment/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety Management/organization & administration , United Kingdom/epidemiology
9.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 39(10): 1792-1798, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177766

ABSTRACT

Motor vehicle crashes remain the leading cause of adolescent mortality and injury in the United States. For young drivers, crash risk peaks immediately after licensure and declines during the next two years, making the point of licensure an important safety intervention opportunity. Legislation in Ohio established a unique health-transportation partnership among the State of Ohio, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and Diagnostic Driving, Inc., to identify underprepared driver license applicants through a virtual driving assessment system. The system, a computer-based virtual driving test, exposes drivers to common serious crash scenarios to identify critical skill deficits and is delivered in testing centers immediately before the on-road examination. A pilot study of license applicants who completed it showed that the virtual driving assessment system accurately predicted which drivers would fail the on-road examination and provided automated feedback that informed drivers on their skill deficits. At this time, the partnership's work is informing policy changes around integrating the virtual driving assessment system into licensing and driver training with the aim of reducing crashes in the first months of independent driving. The system can be developed to identify deficits in safety-critical skills that lead to crashes in new drivers and to address challenges that the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has introduced to driver testing and training.


Subject(s)
Automobile Driving/legislation & jurisprudence , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Licensure/legislation & jurisprudence , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Safety Management/organization & administration , User-Computer Interface , Adolescent , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Motor Vehicles/statistics & numerical data , Ohio , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Philadelphia , Pilot Projects , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Transportation/methods , Young Adult
11.
New Solut ; 31(1): 16-19, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136199

ABSTRACT

As mass COVID-19 vaccination programs roll out across the country, we are potentially faced with compromising workers' health for the sake of the broader public health, as it relates to occupational exposure to contaminated needles and syringes. We have the opportunity to provide recommendations that advance protection of workers through the industrial hygiene hierarchy of controls, especially in light of the twentieth anniversary of the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act. Specifically, greater focus on institutional controls that can dictate the safety culture and climate of institutions that roll out COVID-19 vaccination programs, while maintaining careful focus on preventing sharps injuries and blood exposure. In addition, we provide suggestions for the role that engineering controls, such as devices with sharps injury prevention features play in protecting workers from exposure to bloodborne pathogens, as well as the importance of ongoing injury incident surveillance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , Needlestick Injuries/epidemiology , Needlestick Injuries/prevention & control , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Health Personnel/standards , Humans , Organizational Culture , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety Management/organization & administration , United States
12.
Int J Qual Health Care ; 33(1)2021 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127342

ABSTRACT

Several of the key organizational issues that we have had to face with the emergence of COVID-19 crisis are related to human factors/ergonomics (HFE) and the safety culture. During the crisis the main activities of the healthcare services have been profoundly affected. Patient safety and risk management units have also experienced the need to adapt rapidly. What can we do as HFE experts, now that the scenario has completely changed? We contend that: (a) we can favour and support the heuristics that are applied to manage the load of psycho-cognitive stress. (b) We can observe, collect strategies and develop analytic schemes, thereby creating a memory of the organization for improvement in the future. (c) And we can support in educating and engaging the public. This crisis has forced the community of healthcare experts to broaden their reflections: for the future to come, our communities of experts in the field of risk management HF/E, quality and safety of care and public health should play together an important role from the very beginning, from the time of peace.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Ergonomics , Infection Control/organization & administration , Safety Management/organization & administration , Hand Hygiene/standards , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Organizational Culture , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Quality Indicators, Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety Management/standards , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Ventilation/standards
13.
Soc Work Health Care ; 60(1): 8-29, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1117682

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has wrought widespread devastation upon children and families across the United States, widening existing health disparities and inequities that disproportionately affect communities of color. In health care settings specifically, social work is the key workforce tasked with responding to patient and family psychosocial needs, both of which have increased substantially since the emergence of COVID-19. There is a need to understand ways in which hospital social workers' roles, responsibilities, and integration within interprofessional teams have evolved in response to these challenges. In this qualitative study, focus groups were conducted with 55 social workers employed across multiple settings in a large, urban, pediatric hospital in Spring 2020. Thematic analyses revealed salient superordinate themes related to the pandemic's impact on social work practice and social workers themselves, institutional facilitators and impediments to effective social work and interprofessional practice, and social work perspectives on future pandemic recovery efforts. Within each theme, a number of interrelated subthemes emerged elucidating nuances of telehealth adoption in the context of remote work, the salience of social determinants of health, and the critical role of social work in social justice oriented pandemic preparedness and response efforts. Implications for interprofessional practice and the profession at large are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Social Work/organization & administration , Social Workers/psychology , Focus Groups , Group Processes , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Occupational Health , Pandemics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Professional Role , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety Management/organization & administration , Social Work/standards , Socioeconomic Factors , Telemedicine/organization & administration , United States/epidemiology
14.
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med ; 29(1): 41, 2021 Feb 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105726

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak in the Netherlands, the demand for intensive care beds exceeded availability within days. Initially, patients were redistributed regionally by ground transport. When transport over longer distances became necessary, we initiated a new Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) operation. We hypothesize that the transport of contagious COVID-19 patients is feasible and safe for patients and HEMS personnel. METHODS: In this retrospective, single-centre observational study, flight and monitor data were used to calculate the exposure time of the retrieval team to COVID-19 patients. All the crew members (n = 18) were instructed on the proper use of personal protective equipment (PPE), dressing and undressing routine using buddy check supervision and cleaning procedures. All the team members were monitored for possible COVID-19 symptoms, as advised by our National Institute for Health and Environment. One month after completing the aeromedical transport all crew members were asked to donate a blood sample which was examined for the presence of IgG antibodies to SARS-CoV-2. RESULTS: From March 24 to May 25, 2020 the HEMS team transported 67 ventilated critical care COVID-19 patients. The exposure time was 7451 min (124 h and 11 min). One HEMS member reported pneumonia 6 weeks before the start of the patient transport. He tested positive for IgG SARS-CoV-2 by serology testing. We speculate that he was infected before the start of the operation; irrefutable evidence is lacking to support this claim because we did not perform serology testing before this operation started. CONCLUSION: Occupational COVID-19 exposure during helicopter transport of ventilated critical care COVID-19 patients can be performed safely when proper PPE is applied.


Subject(s)
Air Ambulances , Aircraft , COVID-19/transmission , Critical Care , Emergency Medical Services , Health Personnel , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands , Personal Protective Equipment , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety Management/organization & administration
19.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 56(12)2020 Nov 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024602

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: The aims of this systematic review were to identify additional infection control measures implemented in dental practice globally to prevent cross-infection and evaluate the psychological impacts of the pandemic among dental professionals. Materials and Methods: A sequential systematic literature search was conducted from December 2019 to 30 April 2020 through PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, Google Scholar, Embase, and Web of Science databases. The search yielded the following results: "COVID-19" (n = 12,137), "Novel corona virus" (n = 63), "COVID-19 and dentistry" (n = 46), "COVID-19 and oral health" (n = 41), "Novel Corona virus and Dentistry" (n = 0), "dental health and Novel Coronavirus" (n = 26), and "dental practice and Novel Coronavirus" (n = 6). Results: After a careful review and eliminating articles based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, the final review included 13 articles. Management of infection control is discussed extensively in the literature and remains the main theme of many Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) articles on dentistry. Telephone triage using a questionnaire, hand hygiene, personal protective equipment (PPE) for clinical and nonclinical staff, a preprocedural mouth rinse, and aerosol management have been discussed and implemented in few countries. Three studies recommended that elective treatments for patients with a temperature of >100.4 F or 38 °C should be postponed or performed in an airborne infection isolation room (AIIR) or negative-pressure room. Limiting the number of patients in the waiting area, the removal of shared objects, proper ventilation, and physical distancing were highly recommended. Psychological distress among dental professionals in relation to existing medical conditions and self-efficacy has been discussed. Conclusions: Although the COVID-19 pandemic has had a substantial impact on the dental profession worldwide, our review highlights many practice management approaches to adopt the new norm. More research highlighting evidence-based safety practices and multisectoral collaboration is required to help dental professionals make informed decisions and make the profession safe, both for the patient and dental professionals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dental Care , Infection Control , Oral Health/trends , Safety Management , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dental Care/methods , Dental Care/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety Management/methods , Safety Management/organization & administration , Safety Management/trends
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