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3.
Nature ; 609(7926): 220, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2016632
4.
CMAJ ; 192(20): E564-E565, 2020 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383764
5.
Accid Anal Prev ; 173: 106715, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1866757

ABSTRACT

With the advance of intelligent transportation system technologies, contributing factors to crashes can be obtained in real time. Analyzing these factors can be critical in improving traffic safety. Despite many crash models having been successfully developed for safety analytics, most models associate crash observations and contributing factors at the aggregate level, resulting in potential information loss. This study proposes an efficient Gaussian process modulated renewal process model for safety analytics that does not suffer from information loss due to data aggregations. The proposed model can infer crash intensities in the continuous-time dimension so that they can be better associated with contributing factors that change over time. Moreover, the model can infer non-homogeneous intensities by relaxing the independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) exponential assumption of the crash intervals. To demonstrate the validity and advantages of this proposed model, an empirical study examining the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on traffic safety at six interstate highway sections is performed. The accuracy of our proposed renewal model is verified by comparing the areas under the curve (AUC) of the inferred crash intensity function with the actual crash counts. Residual box plot shows that our proposed models have lower biases and variances compared with Poisson and Negative binomial models. Counterfactual crash intensities are then predicted conditioned on exogenous variables at the crash time. Time-varying safety impacts such as bimodal, unimodal, and parabolic patterns are observed at the selected highways. The case study shows the proposed model enables safety analytics at a granular level and provides a more detailed insight into the time-varying safety risk in a changing environment.


Subject(s)
Automobile Driving , COVID-19 , Accidents, Traffic/prevention & control , Humans , Models, Statistical , Pandemics , Safety
6.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e059312, 2022 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788967

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify and prioritise the research needed to help Nepali agencies develop an improved road safety system. DESIGN: Delphi study. SETTING: Nepal. PARTICIPANTS: Stakeholders from government institutions, academia, engineering, healthcare and civil society were interviewed to identify knowledge gaps and research questions. Participants then completed two rounds of ranking and a workshop. RESULTS: A total of 93 participants took part in interviews and two rounds of ranking. Participants were grouped with others sharing expertise relating to each of the five WHO 'pillars' of road safety: (1) road safety management; (2) safer roads; (3) safer vehicles; (4) safer road users and (5) effective postcrash response. Interviews yielded 1019 research suggestions across the five pillars. Two rounds of ranking within expert groups yielded consensus on the important questions for each pillar. A workshop involving all participants then led to the selection of 6 questions considered the most urgent: (1) How can implementing agencies be made more accountable? (2) How should different types of roads, and roads in different geographical locations, be designed to make them safer for all road users? (3) What vehicle fitness factors lead to road traffic crashes? (4) How can the driver licensing system be improved to ensure safer drivers? (5) What factors lead to public vehicle crashes and how can they be addressed? and (6) What factors affect emergency response services getting to the patient and then getting them to the right hospital in the best possible time? CONCLUSIONS: The application of the Delphi approach is useful to enable participants representing a range of institutions and expertise to contribute to the identification of road safety research priorities. Outcomes from this study provide Nepali researchers with a greater understanding of the necessary focus for future road safety research.


Subject(s)
Automobile Driving , Accidents, Traffic/prevention & control , Delphi Technique , Humans , Licensure , Nepal , Research , Safety
7.
Vox Sang ; 117(4): 488-494, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784753

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to describe motives as well as donation experiences and the intention to return for further donations of German whole blood donors who donated at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To describe motives and donor experiences, a retrospective survey was conducted among whole blood donors that had a donation appointment at the German Red Cross Blood Donation Service in the first 4 weeks of the pandemic. A donor questionnaire including 17 retrospective questions was sent to 7500 donors. Donor motivation and donor experiences were compared for different donor groups using chi-square statistics. Finally, in an ordinal logistic regression model predictors for the intention to return were identified. RESULTS: More than half of the participating donors (56.9%) wanted to contribute to the fight against the pandemic by donating blood. Most of the donors were satisfied with their last donation experience and felt safe during the blood donor appointment. However, some donors would have liked more information on how to deal with the pandemic (20.3%). Intention to return for further donations was strongly associated with overall satisfaction (OR: 1.67, CI: 1.47-1.90) and the feeling of being safe during blood donation (OR: 1.33, CI: 1.05-1.68). CONCLUSION: Donor satisfaction with the last donation was high and the vast majority of donors felt very safe. However, those donors who felt unsafe expressed a low intention to return and blood donation services should therefore carefully monitor donor satisfaction.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors/psychology , COVID-19 , Motivation , Personal Satisfaction , Safety , COVID-19/epidemiology , Germany , Humans , Intention , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Front Public Health ; 10: 841345, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776048

ABSTRACT

Background: Although positive safety leadership has attracted increasingly academic and practical attention due to its critical effects on followers' safety compliance behavior, far fewer steps have been taken to study the safety impact of laissez-faire leadership. Objective: This study examines the relationships between safety-specific leader reward and punishment omission (laissez-faire leadership) and followers' safety compliance, and the mediations of safety-specific distributive justice and role ambiguity. Methods: On a two-wave online survey of 307 workers from high-risk enterprises in China, these relationships were tested by structural equations modeling and bootstrapping procedures. Results: Findings show that safety-specific leader reward omission was negatively associated with followers' safety compliance through the mediating effects of safety-specific distributive justice and role ambiguity. Safety-specific leader punishment omission was also negatively associated with followers' safety compliance through the mediating effect of safety-specific role ambiguity, while safety-specific distributive justice was an insignificant mediator. Originality: The study addresses and closes more gaps by explaining how two contextualized laissez-faire leadership measures relate to followers' safety behaviors, following the contextualization and matching principles between predictors, mediators and criteria, and by revealing two mechanisms behind the detrimental effects of laissez-faire leadership on safety outcomes.


Subject(s)
Leadership , Punishment , Reward , Safety , China , Guideline Adherence , Humans , Social Justice
9.
Acad Pediatr ; 22(1): 17-18, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757004
10.
Pediatrics ; 149(3)2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705029

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To establish statewide consensus priorities for safer in-person school for children with medical complexity (CMC) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic using a rapid, replicable, and transparent priority-setting method. METHODS: We adapted the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative Method, which allows for crowdsourcing ideas from diverse stakeholders and engages technical experts in prioritizing these ideas using predefined scoring criteria. Crowdsourcing surveys solicited ideas from CMC families, school staff, clinicians and administrators through statewide distribution groups/listservs using the prompt: "It is safe for children with complex health issues and those around them (families, teachers, classmates, etc.) to go to school in-person during the COVID-19 pandemic if/when…" Ideas were aggregated and synthesized into a unique list of candidate priorities. Thirty-four experts then scored each candidate priority against 5 criteria (equity, impact on COVID-19, practicality, sustainability, and cost) using a 5-point Likert scale. Scores were weighted and predefined thresholds applied to identify consensus priorities. RESULTS: From May to June 2021, 460 stakeholders contributed 1166 ideas resulting in 87 candidate priorities. After applying weighted expert scores, 10 consensus CMC-specific priorities exceeded predetermined thresholds. These priorities centered on integrating COVID-19 safety and respiratory action planning into individualized education plans, educating school communities about CMC's unique COVID-19 risks, using medical equipment safely, maintaining curricular flexibility, ensuring masking and vaccination, assigning seats during transportation, and availability of testing and medical staff at school. CONCLUSIONS: Priorities for CMC, identified by statewide stakeholders, complement and extend existing recommendations. These priorities can guide implementation efforts to support safer in-person education for CMC.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Multiple Chronic Conditions , Safety , Schools , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Child Health , Consensus , Crowdsourcing , Female , Health Policy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Stakeholder Participation , Wisconsin , Young Adult
11.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 71(7): 249-254, 2022 Feb 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1689714

ABSTRACT

During September 22, 2021-February 6, 2022, approximately 82.6 million U.S. residents aged ≥18 years received a COVID-19 vaccine booster dose.* The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized a booster dose of either the same product administered for the primary series (homologous) or a booster dose that differs from the product administered for the primary series (heterologous). These booster authorizations apply to all three COVID-19 vaccines used in the United States (1-3).† The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended preferential use of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine (mRNA-1273 [Moderna] or BNT162b2 [Pfizer-BioNTech]) for a booster, even for persons who received the Ad26.COV2.S (Janssen [Johnson & Johnson]) COVID-19 vaccine for their single-dose primary series.§ To characterize the safety of COVID-19 vaccine boosters among persons aged ≥18 years during September 22, 2021-February 6, 2022, CDC reviewed adverse events and health impact assessments following receipt of a booster that were reported to v-safe, a voluntary smartphone-based safety surveillance system for adverse events after COVID-19 vaccination, and adverse events reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), a passive vaccine safety surveillance system managed by CDC and FDA. Among 721,562 v-safe registrants aged ≥18 years who reported receiving a booster, 88.8% received homologous COVID-19 mRNA vaccination. Among registrants who reported a homologous COVID-19 mRNA booster dose, systemic reactions were less frequent following the booster (58.4% [Pfizer-BioNTech] and 64.4% [Moderna], respectively) than were those following dose 2 (66.7% and 78.4%, respectively). The adjusted odds of reporting a systemic reaction were higher following a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine booster, irrespective of the vaccine received for the primary series. VAERS has received 39,286 reports of adverse events after a COVID-19 mRNA booster vaccination for adults aged ≥18 years, including 36,282 (92.4%) nonserious and 3,004 (7.6%) serious events. Vaccination providers should educate patients that local and systemic reactions are expected following a homologous COVID-19 mRNA vaccine booster; however, these reactions appear less common than those following dose 2 of an mRNA-based vaccine. CDC and FDA will continue to monitor vaccine safety and provide data to guide vaccine recommendations and protect public health.


Subject(s)
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Safety , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Immunization, Secondary/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , United States
12.
AORN J ; 115(1): 80-82, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1640653
13.
J Mater Sci Mater Med ; 33(1): 8, 2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1602899

ABSTRACT

The collection capacity of common nasopharyngeal swabs and irregularities of medical personnel limit the accuracy of PCR testing. This study describes a newly designed 3D-printed swab that is combined with a 3D-printed cover to prevent the extraction of undesired nasal secretions. This swab improved the accuracy of PCR test results. The results of a series of experiments showed that, because of the mucus extraction effect, 3D-printed swabs can replace ordinary cotton swabs. The crisis of the worldwide medical supply shortage can be ameliorated to a certain extent by applying 3D printing technology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/instrumentation , Specimen Handling/instrumentation , Biocompatible Materials , Biomechanical Phenomena , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Computer Simulation , Equipment Design , Finite Element Analysis , Humans , Materials Testing , Nasopharynx/virology , Printing, Three-Dimensional , Resins, Synthetic , Safety , Tensile Strength , Textiles
14.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0243263, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1576004

ABSTRACT

As mobile device location data become increasingly available, new analyses are revealing the significant changes of mobility pattern when an unplanned event happened. With different control policies from local and state government, the COVID-19 outbreak has dramatically changed mobility behavior in affected cities. This study has been investigating the impact of COVID-19 on the number of people involved in crashes accounting for the intensity of different control measures using Negative Binomial (NB) method. Based on a comprehensive dataset of people involved in crashes aggregated in New York City during January 1, 2020 to May 24, 2020, people involved in crashes with respect to travel behavior, traffic characteristics and socio-demographic characteristics are found. The results show that the average person miles traveled on the main traffic mode per person per day, percentage of work trip have positive effect on person involved in crashes. On the contrary, unemployment rate and inflation rate have negative effects on person involved in crashes. Interestingly, different level of control policies during COVID-19 outbreak are closely associated with safety awareness, driving and travel behavior, and thus has an indirect influence on the frequency of crashes. Comparing to other three control policies including emergence declare, limits on mass gatherings, and ban on all nonessential gathering, the negative relationship between stay-at-home policy implemented in New York City from March 20, 2020 and the number of people involved crashes is found in our study.


Subject(s)
Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data , Automobile Driving/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Safety/statistics & numerical data , Travel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , New York City , Public Policy , Risk-Taking
16.
Front Immunol ; 12: 791764, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556181

ABSTRACT

Despite global vaccination efforts, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continues to evolve and spread globally. Relatively high vaccination rates have been achieved in most regions of the United States and several countries worldwide. However, access to vaccines in low- and mid-income countries (LMICs) is still suboptimal. Second generation vaccines that are universally affordable and induce systemic and mucosal immunity are needed. Here we performed an extended safety and immunogenicity analysis of a second-generation SARS-CoV-2 vaccine consisting of a live Newcastle disease virus vector expressing a pre-fusion stabilized version of the spike protein (NDV-HXP-S) administered intranasally (IN), intramuscularly (IM), or IN followed by IM in Sprague Dawley rats. Local reactogenicity, systemic toxicity, and post-mortem histopathology were assessed after the vaccine administration, with no indication of severe local or systemic reactions. Immunogenicity studies showed that the three vaccination regimens tested elicited high antibody titers against the wild type SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and the NDV vector. Moreover, high antibody titers were induced against the spike of B.1.1.7 (alpha), B.1.351 (beta) and B.1.617.2 (delta) variants of concern (VOCs). Importantly, robust levels of serum antibodies with neutralizing activity against the authentic SARS-CoV-2 USA-WA1/2020 isolate were detected after the boost. Overall, our study expands the pre-clinical safety and immunogenicity characterization of NDV-HXP-S and reinforces previous findings in other animal models about its high immunogenicity. Clinical testing of this vaccination approach is ongoing in different countries including Thailand, Vietnam, Brazil and Mexico.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Newcastle disease virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Administration, Intranasal , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Injections, Intramuscular , Newcastle disease virus/immunology , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Safety , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Synthetic/genetics , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
18.
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot ; 29(2): 265-277, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545833

ABSTRACT

This study uses structured literature mapping to review worldwide trends in traffic safety following the phenomenon of the COVID-19 pandemic. Motivated by dissimilar findings globally and a lack of evidence from emerging nations which have been significantly more affected by road traffic crashes, the study examines the impact of the pandemic-induced lockdown on road traffic deaths and injuries in Tamil Nadu, India. Using a holistic approach, methods such as ARIMA, Holt-Winters, Bayesian Structural Time Series, and Generalized Additive Model are employed for counterfactual prediction, to draw a causal inference of lockdown on traffic safety. In line with global studies, a substantial reduction in traffic crashes, injuries, and fatalities during lockdowns has been found. However, the comparison of relative differences shows that the number of grievous injuries reduced more than minor injuries, crashes, or fatalities. Furthermore, these relative differences were sustained even when metrics returned to normalcy in the post-lockdown phases. Further spatial stratification at two levels (cities and districts) shows that the macroscopic state-level trends are also broadly seen in the sub-units. This validates the consistency of trends across rural-urban differences and shows that, despite variations in the degree of enforcement of the lockdown within Chennai city, contrary to expectation, increased police presence did not have a differential impact on road crashes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Wounds and Injuries , Accidents, Traffic , Bayes Theorem , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Safety
19.
Curr Med Sci ; 41(6): 1087-1095, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1540258

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is often accompanied by gastrointestinal symptoms, which are related to gut microbiota dysbiosis (GMD). Whether washed microbiota transplantation (WMT) is an effective treatment for COVID-19 patients suspected of having GMD by restoring the gut microbiota is unknown. This study is designed to explore the efficacy and safety of WMT in COVID-19 patients suspected of having GMD. METHODS: This is a randomized, multicenter, single-blind prospective study. COVID-19 patients suspected of having GMD will be randomly divided to receive routine treatment only or to receive routine treatment and WMT. The frequency of WMT will be once a day for three consecutive days. Laboratory and imaging examinations will be performed at admission, 1 and 2 weeks after treatment, and on the day of discharge. Then a telephone follow-up will be conducted at 1st week, 2nd week, and 6th month after discharge. The clinical efficacy and safety of WMT in COVD-19 patients suspected of having GMD and the effects of WMT on the organ function, homeostasis, inflammatory response, intestinal mucosal barrier function, and immunity of the patients will be evaluated. RESULTS: By following the proposed protocol, WMT is expected to be efficacious and safe for the treatment of COVID-19 patients suspected of having GMD, and the therapeutic effect is expected to be associated with improvement of the intestinal mucosal barrier function, inflammatory response, and immunity. CONCLUSION: The findings from this study may offer a new approach for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 patients suspected of having GMD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/therapy , Dysbiosis/microbiology , Dysbiosis/therapy , Fecal Microbiota Transplantation/methods , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , China , Clinical Protocols , Dysbiosis/etiology , Fecal Microbiota Transplantation/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Living Donors , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Safety , Single-Blind Method , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
20.
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act ; 18(1): 152, 2021 11 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538078

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although it is globally known that Japan has high prevalence of active school travel among children, there are few international studies on Japanese children's school travel. Moreover, only few studies have focused on the differences in their mode of travel between to-school and from-school. This study examined the associations of neighborhood built, safety, and social environments with walking to/from school among elementary school-aged children in Chiba, Japan. METHODS: We conducted an online survey with 1545 parents of children aged 6-12 years residing in Chiba between 25 and 27 November 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. A neighborhood was defined as the area of a postcode provided by the participants. Each neighborhood environment was assessed based on the built environment (new town designation, walkability, distance to school, population density), social environment (neighborhood cohesion and connection), and safety (CCTVs, a road section for walking alone, safety volunteers). Neighborhood walkability was measured using subscales of the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (youth and abbreviated versions) including crime safety and traffic safety. Parents' perceived influence of COVID-19 on school commuting and after-school activities were also included in the model as covariates. Walking to and from school were separately analyzed using multinomial logistic regressions, where new towns and walkability were computed separately as explanatory variables. RESULTS: Four fifths of children walked to and from school daily. Walking to school was positively associated with crime safety, neighborhood connections, and schools sited in new towns. Walking from school had positive associations with traffic safety, neighborhood cohesion, and CCTVs, but negative associations with safety volunteers and after-school activities. The presence of a section for walking alone and perceived influence of COVID-19 had negative associations with walking to and from school. CONCLUSIONS: Recent social changes such as declining birthrate, decline in public elementary schools, and increasing after-school activities may change parental attitudes toward children's walking to/from school, and subsequently, their mode of school travel over time. To maintain the high prevalence of walking to/from school in Japan, multidisciplinary approaches involving different stakeholders from education, public health, and urban planning are required to overcome sectionalism and support this behavior in the long term.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Environment Design , Humans , Japan , Pandemics , Parents , Residence Characteristics , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety , Schools , Social Environment , Transportation , Walking
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