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1.
J Nutr Health Aging ; 25(9): 1064-1069, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410085

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To develop and cross-validate self-administered Rapid Geriatric Assessment (SA-RGA) app against administered Rapid Geriatric Assessment (A-RGA) to identify seniors with geriatric syndromes such as frailty, sarcopenia, and anorexia of ageing who may benefit from targeted intervention. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Primary Care and Community. PARTICIPANTS: A-RGA and SA-RGA app were administered to older adults ≥ 60 years old from December 2020 to April 2021. MEASUREMENTS: The RGA app screens for frailty (FRAIL), sarcopenia (SARC-F), anorexia of aging (SNAQ) and cognition (Rapid Cognitive Screen) with assisted management pathway. Patient Health Questionnaire 9 is administered for those who score positive for fatigue. The diagnostic performance of SA-RGA was compared against A-RGA as a reference by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) and positive likelihood ratio (+LR). RESULTS: 123 participants with a mean age of 71 ± 5.9 years completed both the SA-RGA and A-RGA. Questions on fatigue, 5 or more illnesses, loss of weight and falls in the past year performed better with high sensitivity, specificity, NPV and +LR than self-functional assessment where SA-RGA participants reported lower prevalence on the FRAIL scale aerobic and resistance components, and higher prevalence on the SARC-F strength and rising from a chair components. CONCLUSION: The SA-RGA app performed well in certain domains such as assessment for weight loss, falls, number of chronic illness and fatigue. Self-functional assessment can be improved further by removing ambiguity in wordings such as "some" or "a lot" and replacing it with functional difficulty scale. SA-RGA has the potential to be incorporated in the eHEALTH platforms worldwide for early identifications of older adults at risk and to reduce health inequalities, at the same time building community resilience in the era of Covid-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Applications , Sarcopenia , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Geriatric Assessment , Humans , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Sarcopenia/diagnosis , Sarcopenia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102235, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330757

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Post Covid-19 syndrome (PCS) is a major cause of morbidity. In this article we intend to review the association and consequences of PCS and diabetes. METHODS: We reviewed all studies on "Long Covid", "Post COVID-19 Syndrome" and diabetes in PubMed and Google Scholar. RESULTS: The symptoms of PCS can be due to organ dysfunction, effects of hospitalisation and drugs, or unrelated to these. Type 2 diabetes mellitus has a bidirectional relationship with COVID-19. Presence of diabetes also influences PCS via various pathophysiological mechanisms. COVID-19 can add to or exacerbate tachycardia, sarcopenia (and muscle fatigue), and microvascular dysfunction (and organ damage) in patients with diabetes. CONCLUSION: PCS in patients with diabetes could be detrimental in multiple ways. Strict control of diabetes and other comorbidities, supervised rehabilitation and physical exercise, and optimal nutrition could help in reducing and managing PCS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Fatigue/diagnosis , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sarcopenia/diagnosis , Sarcopenia/epidemiology , Sarcopenia/etiology , Sarcopenia/therapy , Tachycardia/diagnosis , Tachycardia/epidemiology , Tachycardia/etiology , Tachycardia/therapy
3.
BMC Geriatr ; 21(1): 355, 2021 06 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266472

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the outbreak of COVID-19, it has been documented that old age and underlying illnesses are associated with poor prognosis among COVID-19 patients. However, it is unknown whether sarcopenia, a common geriatric syndrome, is associated with poor prognosis among older COVID-19 patients. The aim of our prospective cohort study is to investigate the association between sarcopenia risk and severe disease among COVID-19 patients aged ≥60 years. METHOD: A prospective cohort study of 114 hospitalized older patients (≥60 years) with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia between 7 February, 2020 and 6 April, 2020. Epidemiological, socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory data on admission and outcome data were extracted from electronic medical records. All patients were assessed for sarcopenia on admission using the SARC-F scale and the outcome was the development of the severe disease within 60 days. We used the Cox proportional hazards model to identify the association between sarcopenia and progression of disease defined as severe cases in a total of 2908 person-days. RESULT: Of 114 patients (mean age 69.52 ± 7.25 years, 50% woman), 38 (33%) had a high risk of sarcopenia while 76 (67%) did not. We found that 43 (38%) patients progressed to severe cases. COVID-19 patients with higher risk sarcopenia were more likely to develop severe disease than those without (68% versus 22%, p < 0.001). After adjustment for demographic and clinical factors, higher risk sarcopenia was associated with a higher hazard of severe condition [hazard ratio = 2.87 (95% CI, 1.33-6.16)]. CONCLUSION: We found that COVID-19 patients with higher sarcopenia risk were more likely to develop severe condition. A clinician-friendly assessment of sarcopenia could help in early warning of older patients at high-risk with severe COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sarcopenia , Aged , Female , Geriatric Assessment , Humans , Proportional Hazards Models , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sarcopenia/diagnosis , Sarcopenia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(5): 413-418, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169716

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Sarcopenia has been related to negative outcomes in different clinical scenarios from critical illness to chronic conditions. The aim of this study was to verify whether there was an association between low skeletal muscle index and in-hospital mortality, intensive care unit admission, and invasive mechanical ventilation need in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. DESIGN: This was a retrospective cohort study of a referral center for COVID-19. We included all consecutive patients admitted to the hospital between February 26 and May 15, 2020, with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19. Skeletal muscle index was assessed from a transverse computed tomography image at the level of twelfth thoracic vertebra with National Institutes of Health ImageJ software, and statistical analysis was performed to find an association between skeletal muscle index and in-hospital mortality, need of invasive mechanical ventilation, and intensive care unit admission. RESULTS: We included 519 patients, the median age was 51 (42-61) yrs, and 115 patients (22%) had low skeletal muscle index. On multivariable analysis, skeletal muscle index was not associated with mortality, intensive care unit admission, or invasive mechanical ventilation need nor in a subanalysis of patients 65 yrs or older. CONCLUSIONS: Skeletal muscle index determined by computed tomography at the level of twelfth thoracic vertebra was not associated with negative outcomes in hospitalized patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Sarcopenia/complications , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Critical Care , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Muscle, Skeletal , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sarcopenia/diagnosis , Sarcopenia/mortality , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
5.
Geriatr Gerontol Int ; 20(6): 547-558, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-998919

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has casted a huge impact on global public health and the economy. In this challenging situation, older people are vulnerable to the infection and the secondary effects of the pandemic and need special attention. To evaluate the impacts of COVID-19 on older people, it is important to balance the successful pandemic control and active management of secondary consequences. These considerations are particularly salient in the Asian context, with its diversity among countries in terms of sociocultural heritage, healthcare setup and availability of resources. Thus, the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia summarized the considerations of Asian countries focusing on responses and difficulties in each country, impacts of health inequity related to the COVID-19 pandemic and proposed recommendations for older people, which are germane to the Asian context. More innovative services should be developed to address the increasing demands for new approaches to deliver healthcare in these difficult times and to establish resilient healthcare systems for older people. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2020; 9999: n/a-n/a.


Subject(s)
Aging/ethnology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Geriatric Assessment/methods , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Sarcopenia/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging/physiology , Asia/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Prevalence , Public Health , Risk Assessment , Sarcopenia/diagnosis
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