Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 14 de 14
Filter
1.
J Nutr Health Aging ; 25(9): 1064-1069, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410085

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To develop and cross-validate self-administered Rapid Geriatric Assessment (SA-RGA) app against administered Rapid Geriatric Assessment (A-RGA) to identify seniors with geriatric syndromes such as frailty, sarcopenia, and anorexia of ageing who may benefit from targeted intervention. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Primary Care and Community. PARTICIPANTS: A-RGA and SA-RGA app were administered to older adults ≥ 60 years old from December 2020 to April 2021. MEASUREMENTS: The RGA app screens for frailty (FRAIL), sarcopenia (SARC-F), anorexia of aging (SNAQ) and cognition (Rapid Cognitive Screen) with assisted management pathway. Patient Health Questionnaire 9 is administered for those who score positive for fatigue. The diagnostic performance of SA-RGA was compared against A-RGA as a reference by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) and positive likelihood ratio (+LR). RESULTS: 123 participants with a mean age of 71 ± 5.9 years completed both the SA-RGA and A-RGA. Questions on fatigue, 5 or more illnesses, loss of weight and falls in the past year performed better with high sensitivity, specificity, NPV and +LR than self-functional assessment where SA-RGA participants reported lower prevalence on the FRAIL scale aerobic and resistance components, and higher prevalence on the SARC-F strength and rising from a chair components. CONCLUSION: The SA-RGA app performed well in certain domains such as assessment for weight loss, falls, number of chronic illness and fatigue. Self-functional assessment can be improved further by removing ambiguity in wordings such as "some" or "a lot" and replacing it with functional difficulty scale. SA-RGA has the potential to be incorporated in the eHEALTH platforms worldwide for early identifications of older adults at risk and to reduce health inequalities, at the same time building community resilience in the era of Covid-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Applications , Sarcopenia , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Geriatric Assessment , Humans , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Sarcopenia/diagnosis , Sarcopenia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Proc Nutr Soc ; 80(3): 279-282, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356524

ABSTRACT

Micronutrient malnutrition, the deficiency of vitamins or minerals, impacts on physical and mental health, in clinical and general populations, across the life course. In older western populations the high prevalence and impact of micronutrient malnutrition is less well recognised. Low- and middle-income countries are experiencing the 'double burden of disease' where malnutrition coexists alongside the non-communicable diseases of aging, obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Held in December 2020, the Winter Conference of the Nutrition Society was designed to cover new areas of research and concern in micronutrient malnutrition across the life course. Common themes arising from the conference were: 1) The continuing high prevalence of micronutrient malnutrition across the life-course, in diverse populations, in high, middle and low-income countries. 2) That multiple deficiencies of micronutrients frequently exist. 3) The primary cause of deficiency is poor quality diets, of low diversity, low in micronutrient dense foods. 4) Clinical conditions, medications for common non-communicable diseases, and environmental conditions, interact with and exacerbate the effects of poor diet quality. 5) Understanding of the mechanistic effects of micronutrients is still emerging. 6) Micronutrients are necessary for maintaining immune function, which has importance for the COVID-19 epidemic. 7) Better biomarkers are needed detect and understand the effects of deficiency. 7) Dietary recommendations need to be updated regularly. Further research is needed in all these areas. Comprehensive public health and government approaches to ensure access and affordability of good quality foods to populations of all ages, particularly during the ongoing COVID-19 epidemic, are crucial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Frailty , Malnutrition , Sarcopenia , Aged , Humans , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Micronutrients , SARS-CoV-2 , Sarcopenia/epidemiology
4.
Nutrients ; 13(8)2021 Jul 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335158

ABSTRACT

The paper presents the designs and methods of a cross-sectional study of two groups of randomly selected Polish inhabitants aged 19-64, and 65 and over, carried out as part of the National Health Program. The aim of the study was to illustrate the current health situation of the respondents in terms of nutrition and physical activity level. The quantitative and qualitative methods were used. The Computer Assisted Personal Interview technique was used. The dietary research was carried out through repeated interviews about the frequency of food consumption, and about what food had been consumed in the previous 24 h. In addition to the questionnaire studies, anthropometric data, blood pressure and the level of physical activity were measured. During the COVID-19 pandemic, some methods were modified according to hygiene rules. The Computer Assisted Telephone Interview technique was used to collect the data, and the anthropometric data were obtained via measurements made by the respondents themselves based on detailed instructions. The results will be used to present representative data for the Polish population, describing a wide range of eating behaviours and other lifestyle elements, food and nutrition knowledge, dietary supplement use, the occurrence of diet-related diseases, nutritional status and, in the seniors group, the risk of sarcopenia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Nutritional Status , Obesity/epidemiology , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet/methods , Feeding Behavior , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Life Style , Male , Middle Aged , Poland/epidemiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sarcopenia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
5.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102235, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330757

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Post Covid-19 syndrome (PCS) is a major cause of morbidity. In this article we intend to review the association and consequences of PCS and diabetes. METHODS: We reviewed all studies on "Long Covid", "Post COVID-19 Syndrome" and diabetes in PubMed and Google Scholar. RESULTS: The symptoms of PCS can be due to organ dysfunction, effects of hospitalisation and drugs, or unrelated to these. Type 2 diabetes mellitus has a bidirectional relationship with COVID-19. Presence of diabetes also influences PCS via various pathophysiological mechanisms. COVID-19 can add to or exacerbate tachycardia, sarcopenia (and muscle fatigue), and microvascular dysfunction (and organ damage) in patients with diabetes. CONCLUSION: PCS in patients with diabetes could be detrimental in multiple ways. Strict control of diabetes and other comorbidities, supervised rehabilitation and physical exercise, and optimal nutrition could help in reducing and managing PCS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Fatigue/diagnosis , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sarcopenia/diagnosis , Sarcopenia/epidemiology , Sarcopenia/etiology , Sarcopenia/therapy , Tachycardia/diagnosis , Tachycardia/epidemiology , Tachycardia/etiology , Tachycardia/therapy
7.
BMC Geriatr ; 21(1): 355, 2021 06 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266472

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the outbreak of COVID-19, it has been documented that old age and underlying illnesses are associated with poor prognosis among COVID-19 patients. However, it is unknown whether sarcopenia, a common geriatric syndrome, is associated with poor prognosis among older COVID-19 patients. The aim of our prospective cohort study is to investigate the association between sarcopenia risk and severe disease among COVID-19 patients aged ≥60 years. METHOD: A prospective cohort study of 114 hospitalized older patients (≥60 years) with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia between 7 February, 2020 and 6 April, 2020. Epidemiological, socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory data on admission and outcome data were extracted from electronic medical records. All patients were assessed for sarcopenia on admission using the SARC-F scale and the outcome was the development of the severe disease within 60 days. We used the Cox proportional hazards model to identify the association between sarcopenia and progression of disease defined as severe cases in a total of 2908 person-days. RESULT: Of 114 patients (mean age 69.52 ± 7.25 years, 50% woman), 38 (33%) had a high risk of sarcopenia while 76 (67%) did not. We found that 43 (38%) patients progressed to severe cases. COVID-19 patients with higher risk sarcopenia were more likely to develop severe disease than those without (68% versus 22%, p < 0.001). After adjustment for demographic and clinical factors, higher risk sarcopenia was associated with a higher hazard of severe condition [hazard ratio = 2.87 (95% CI, 1.33-6.16)]. CONCLUSION: We found that COVID-19 patients with higher sarcopenia risk were more likely to develop severe condition. A clinician-friendly assessment of sarcopenia could help in early warning of older patients at high-risk with severe COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sarcopenia , Aged , Female , Geriatric Assessment , Humans , Proportional Hazards Models , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sarcopenia/diagnosis , Sarcopenia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Nutrients ; 13(4)2021 Apr 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1187013

ABSTRACT

The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (COVID-19) has hit older adults harder due to a combination of age-related immunological and metabolic alterations. The aim of this review was to analyze the COVID-19 literature with respect to nutritional status and nutrition management in older adults. No studies only on people aged 65+ years were found, and documentation on those 80+ was rare. Age was found to be strongly associated with worse outcomes, and with poor nutritional status. Prevalence of malnutrition was high among severely and critically ill patients. The studies found a need for nutrition screening and management, and for nutrition support as part of follow-up after a hospital stay. Most tested screening tools showed high sensitivity in identifying nutritional risk, but none were recognized as best for screening older adults with COVID-19. For diagnosing malnutrition, the Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition (GLIM) criteria are recommended but were not used in the studies found. Documentation of olfactory and gustatory dysfunction in relation to nutritional status is missing in older adults. Other COVID-19-associated factors with a possible impact on nutritional status are poor appetite and gastrointestinal symptoms. Vitamin D is the nutrient that has attracted the most interest. However, evidence for supplementation of COVID-19 patients is still limited and inconclusive.


Subject(s)
Aging , COVID-19/epidemiology , Nutrition Assessment , Nutrition Therapy/methods , Nutritional Status , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Agnosia/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/epidemiology , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Olfaction Disorders/epidemiology , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sarcopenia/epidemiology , Vitamin D/therapeutic use
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(8)2021 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1186956

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic restrictions on the change in muscle mass in older patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), who were not infected with COVID-19. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, data were obtained from outpatients who underwent bioelectrical impedance analysis at least twice before April 2020 and at least once thereafter. Skeletal muscle mass index (SMI, kg/m2) was calculated as appendicular muscle mass (kg) divided by height squared (m2). Change in SMI (kg/m2/year) was calculated as (follow-up SMI-baseline SMI/follow-up period). The differences between the changes in SMI before and after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic were evaluated using paired t test. Results: This study recruited 56 patients, with a mean (SD) age of 75.2 (7.1) years. SMI changed from 6.7 (0.9) to 6.8 (0.9) kg/m2 before the COVID-19 pandemic, whereas SMI changed from 6.8 (0.9) to 6.6 (0.9) kg/m2 after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. SMI decreased after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic compared with before the pandemic (-0.117 (0.240) vs. 0.005 (0.289) kg/m2/year, p = 0.049). This decrease was observed in men (-0.159 (0.257) vs. 0.031 (0.325) kg/m2/year, p = 0.038), patients with poor glycemic control (-0.170 (0.264) vs. 0.031 (0.285) kg/m2/year, p = 0.042), and those with a long diabetes duration (-0.153 (0.229) vs. 0.082 (0.291) kg/m2, p = 0.049). Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic restrictions caused muscle mass loss in older patents with T2D. Actions, including recommendation of exercise and adequate diet intake, are needed to prevent loss of muscle mass.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Sarcopenia , Aged , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/pathology , Humans , Male , Muscle, Skeletal , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sarcopenia/epidemiology
10.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci ; 76(8): e110-e116, 2021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1155779

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of sarcopenia on clinical outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is not clearly determined yet. We aimed to investigate the association between baseline sarcopenia and clinical outcomes in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: All hospitalized adult patients with COVID-19 who had baseline chest computed tomography (CT) scans at a Korean university hospital from February 2020 to May 2020 were included. The main outcome was time from hospital admission to discharge. Death was considered as a competing risk for discharge. Baseline skeletal muscle cross-sectional area at the level of the 12th thoracic vertebra was measured from chest CT scans. The lowest quartile of skeletal muscle index (skeletal muscle cross-sectional area divided by height-squared) was defined as sarcopenia. RESULTS: Of 121 patients (median age, 62 years; 44 men; 29 sarcopenic), 7 patients died and 86 patients were discharged during the 60-day follow-up. Patients with sarcopenia showed a longer time to discharge (median, 55 vs 28 days; p < .001) and a higher incidence of death (17.2% vs 2.2%; p = .004) than those without sarcopenia. Baseline sarcopenia was an independent predictor of delayed hospital discharge (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.47; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.23-0.96), but was not independently associated with mortality in patients with COVID-19 (aHR, 3.80; 95% CI, 0.48-30.26). The association between baseline sarcopenia and delayed hospital discharge was consistent in subgroups stratified by age, sex, comorbidities, and severity of COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Baseline sarcopenia was independently associated with a prolonged hospital stay in patients with COVID-19. Sarcopenia could be a prognostic marker in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Prognosis , Sarcopenia , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Muscle, Skeletal/physiology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sarcopenia/complications , Sarcopenia/epidemiology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
12.
Geriatr Gerontol Int ; 20(6): 547-558, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-998919

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has casted a huge impact on global public health and the economy. In this challenging situation, older people are vulnerable to the infection and the secondary effects of the pandemic and need special attention. To evaluate the impacts of COVID-19 on older people, it is important to balance the successful pandemic control and active management of secondary consequences. These considerations are particularly salient in the Asian context, with its diversity among countries in terms of sociocultural heritage, healthcare setup and availability of resources. Thus, the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia summarized the considerations of Asian countries focusing on responses and difficulties in each country, impacts of health inequity related to the COVID-19 pandemic and proposed recommendations for older people, which are germane to the Asian context. More innovative services should be developed to address the increasing demands for new approaches to deliver healthcare in these difficult times and to establish resilient healthcare systems for older people. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2020; 9999: n/a-n/a.


Subject(s)
Aging/ethnology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Geriatric Assessment/methods , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Sarcopenia/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging/physiology , Asia/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Prevalence , Public Health , Risk Assessment , Sarcopenia/diagnosis
13.
Nutr Hosp ; 34(3): 622-630, 2020 Jul 13.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-663764

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The current COVID-19 pandemic mainly affects older people, those with obesity or other coexisting chronic diseases such as type-2 diabetes and high blood pressure. It has been observed that about 20 % of patients will require hospitalization, and some of them will need the support of invasive mechanical ventilation in intensive care units. Nutritional status appears to be a relevant factor influencing the clinical outcome of critically ill patients with COVID-19. Several international guidelines have provided recommendations to ensure energy and protein intake in people with COVID-19, with safety measures to reduce the risk of infection in healthcare personnel. The purpose of this review is to analyze the main recommendations related to adequate nutritional management for critically ill patients with COVID-19 in order to improve their prognosis and clinical outcomes.


La pandemia actual por COVID-19 afecta principalmente a personas mayores, con obesidad o con otras enfermedades crónicas coexistentes como diabetes de tipo 2 e hipertensión arterial. Se ha observado que alrededor del 20 % de los pacientes requerirán hospitalización y algunos de ellos necesitarán soporte de ventilación mecánica invasiva en unidades de cuidados intensivos. El estado nutricional parece ser un factor relevante que influye en el resultado clínico de los pacientes con COVID-19 críticamente enfermos. Diversas guías internacionales han publicado recomendaciones para asegurar la ingesta energética y proteica de las personas con COVID-19, junto con medidas de seguridad para disminuir el riesgo de infección por parte del personal de salud. El propósito de esta revisión es analizar las principales recomendaciones relacionadas con el adecuado manejo nutricional del paciente hospitalizado críticamente enfermo con COVID-19 con la finalidad de mejorar el pronóstico y los resultados clínicos.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diet therapy , Critical Care/methods , Critical Illness , Malnutrition/diet therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diet therapy , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Dietary Proteins/administration & dosage , Enteral Nutrition/adverse effects , Enteral Nutrition/methods , Gastrointestinal Diseases/complications , Humans , Inflammation/epidemiology , Inflammation/physiopathology , Malnutrition/diagnosis , Malnutrition/etiology , Malnutrition/prevention & control , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Micronutrients/administration & dosage , Nutrition Assessment , Nutritional Requirements , Nutritional Support , Obesity/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Refeeding Syndrome/prevention & control , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Sarcopenia/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...