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3.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6660-6670, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544317

ABSTRACT

With the wide spread of Coronavirus, most people who infected with the COVID-19, will recover without requiring special treatment. Whereas, elders and those with underlying medical problems are more likely to have serious illnesses, even be threatened with death. Many more disciplines try to find solutions and drive master plan to this global trouble. Consequently, by taking one particular population, Hungary, this study aims to explore a pattern of COVID-19 victims, who suffered from some underlying conditions. Age, gender, and underlying medical problems form the structure of the clustering. K-Means and two step clustering methods were applied for age-based and age-independent analysis. Grouping of the deaths in the form of two different scenarios may highlight some concepts of this deadly disease for public health professionals. Our result for clustering can forecast similar cases which are assigned to any cluster that it will be a serious cautious for the population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Asthma/complications , COVID-19/etiology , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Hungary/epidemiology , Lung Diseases/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Obesity/complications , Risk Factors , Schizophrenia/complications , Sex Factors , Young Adult
4.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 16524, 2021 08 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360205

ABSTRACT

The aims of the current study were to identify factors associated with sleep disturbance and Coronavirus disease-19 related psychological distress (CPD), and to develop a conceptual model to verify the mediating effect of CPD on the association between social impact and sleep disturbance. This study recruited patients with schizophrenia. Factors associated with the level of sleep disturbance and CPD were identified using univariate linear regression, and further selected into a stepwise multivariate linear regression model. Using structural equation modeling, a mediation model was developed to test the mediating effect of CPD on the association between social impact and sleep disturbance. After estimating with the stepwise and bootstrap regression, higher levels of CPD were associated with higher levels of social anxiety and subjects without a regular diet. Sleep disturbance was associated with a higher level of social anxiety, a history of psychological trauma, chronic disease, and those who did not smoke. The final model confirmed the mediating effects of CPD; whereas, the direct effect from social impact to sleep disturbance did not reach statistical significance. The current study manifests the crucial role of CPD on the association between social impact and sleep disturbance, and timely intervention for CPD is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Psychological Distress , Schizophrenia/complications , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Social Change , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Schizophrenic Psychology , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Taiwan/epidemiology
6.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6660-6670, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330342

ABSTRACT

With the wide spread of Coronavirus, most people who infected with the COVID-19, will recover without requiring special treatment. Whereas, elders and those with underlying medical problems are more likely to have serious illnesses, even be threatened with death. Many more disciplines try to find solutions and drive master plan to this global trouble. Consequently, by taking one particular population, Hungary, this study aims to explore a pattern of COVID-19 victims, who suffered from some underlying conditions. Age, gender, and underlying medical problems form the structure of the clustering. K-Means and two step clustering methods were applied for age-based and age-independent analysis. Grouping of the deaths in the form of two different scenarios may highlight some concepts of this deadly disease for public health professionals. Our result for clustering can forecast similar cases which are assigned to any cluster that it will be a serious cautious for the population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Asthma/complications , COVID-19/etiology , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Hungary/epidemiology , Lung Diseases/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Obesity/complications , Risk Factors , Schizophrenia/complications , Sex Factors , Young Adult
7.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(10): e14528, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285029

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Increased coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) incidence and mortality in hospitalised patients with psychiatric and neurologic disorders have been reported. METHODS: The clinical records of 198 patients with psychiatric and neurological disorders hospitalised in the Dr Rafael Serrano Psychiatric Hospital in Puebla during the peak of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Mexico were analysed for psychiatric or neurologic diagnosis, gender, age, medical diagnosis, and COVID-19 prevalence. For patients with COVID-19, the effects of gender, and medical diagnosis were explored. RESULTS: There was an increased COVID-19 prevalence in the studied population (43.94%), compared with the national Mexican (~0.21% to 0.63%) and worldwide average in the general population (~0.13% to 4.28%). However, the mortality rate (5.75%) was lower than that reported in Mexico (11.28%-13.55%), which was higher than the worldwide average (2.95%-4.98%). We detected increased COVID-19 prevalence in patients with comorbidities (odds ratios [OR] 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2-1, P = .0447). Moreover, patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders have a decreased predisposition to COVID-19 (OR 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2-0.8; P = .0250), as opposed to patients with intellectual disability that are predisposed to COVID-19 (OR 2.2, 95% CI: 0.2-0.8; P = .0434), in comparison with the rest of the hospital population. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of COVID-19 in hospitalised patients with psychiatric disorders is increased compared with that of the general population; however, a lower mortality rate was detected. Also, an increased risk of COVID-19 was detected in patients with comorbidities. Interestingly, the observed variation in COVID-19 prevalence in patients with schizophrenia and intellectual disability was not associated with age or other specific medical diagnoses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nervous System Diseases , Schizophrenia , Hospitalization , Humans , Mexico/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Schizophrenia/complications , Schizophrenia/epidemiology
10.
J ECT ; 37(3): 209-210, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1205901

ABSTRACT

CONCLUSIONS: Although ECT is a safe procedure, caution should be exercised in the context of COVID-19, as it is now clear that patients who recovered from COVID-19 might have an undetected venous thromboembolism that can cause untoward outcomes. ETHICAL CONSIDERATION: A written consent was obtained from the sister to the deceased patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Death, Sudden/etiology , Electroconvulsive Therapy/adverse effects , Adult , Autopsy , Fatal Outcome , Female , Humans , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Schizophrenia/complications , Schizophrenia/therapy
11.
Nutrients ; 13(4)2021 Mar 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159895

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In older people with psychoneurological diseases, COVID-19 infection may be associated with a risk of developing or exacerbating dysphagia. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between eating/swallowing function and COVID-19 infection. METHODS: Subjects were 44 inpatients with confirmed COVID-19 infection being treated for schizophrenia in a psychiatric ward. Eating function was assessed using the Food Intake Level Scale (FILS) before and after infection. We also evaluated age, comorbidities, COVID-19 hospital stay, obesity index, weight loss rate, and chlorpromazine equivalent. RESULTS: Subjects had a mean age of 68.86 years. Pre-infection, 20 subjects had a FILS score of 7-9 (presence of eating/swallowing disorder) and 24 subjects had a score of 10 (normal). Eating function after infection resolution showed decreasing FILS score compared to that before infection in 14 subjects (74.14 years). Six subjects (79.3 years) transitioned from oral feeding to parenteral feeding. A ≥ 10% weight loss during infection treatment was significantly associated with decreased eating function and a transition to parenteral feeding. Chlorpromazine equivalents, comorbidities, and number of days of hospitalization showed no associations with decreased eating function. CONCLUSIONS: Preventing malnutrition during treatment for COVID-19 infection is important for improving post-infection life prognosis and maintaining quality of life (QOL).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Deglutition Disorders/etiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/etiology , Schizophrenia/complications , Weight Loss , Aged , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/psychology , Deglutition Disorders/physiopathology , Deglutition Disorders/psychology , Eating/physiology , Eating/psychology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/physiopathology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nutritional Status , Schizophrenia/virology
12.
Braz. j. med. biol. res ; 54(3): e10426, 2021. graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1067469

ABSTRACT

The prognosis of COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) is usually poor when it occurs in aged adults or in patients with chronic diseases, which brought a great challenge to clinical practice. Furthermore, widespread depression, anxiety, and panic related to SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2) infection affected treatment compliance and recovery. Here we report the successful treatment of a 57-year-old male with severe COVID-19, schizophrenia, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. The patient's negative emotions (such as tension, panic, and anxiety), particularly his aggression and paranoia, seriously hindered treatment, leading to a deteriorating condition. Psychological counseling and supportive psychotherapy were given but the effect was weak. To improve adherence, risperidone and quetiapine fumarate were replaced by olanzapine for anti-schizophrenic treatment to reduce insomnia and anxiety side effects, associated with sedative-hypnotic drugs as well as psychological counseling. The treatment compliance of the patient improved significantly. The patient's serum alanine aminotransferase increased abnormally in the late stage of hospitalization, suggesting potential liver damage after complex medication strategies. We also monitored the changes of lymphocyte subsets and retrospectively analyzed the virus-specific antibody response. The results suggested that dynamic monitoring of lymphocyte subsets and virus-specific antibody response could facilitate disease progression evaluation and timely treatment plan adjustments. An effective psychotropic drug intervention associated with psychological counselling and psychotherapy are essential for the successful adherence, treatment, and rehabilitation of psychiatric disorders in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Schizophrenia/complications , Schizophrenia/drug therapy , COVID-19 , Chronic Disease , Retrospective Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Int J Psychiatry Med ; 56(4): 255-265, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058157

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is still a lot unknown about the novel Coronavirus Disease 19 (COVID-19) and its effects in humans. This pandemic has posed several challenging clinical situations to healthcare providers. OBJECTIVE: We hope to highlight the distinctive challenges that COVID-19 presents in patients with serious mental illness and what steps primary medical teams can take to co-manage these patients with the psychiatry consultants. METHODS: We present a retrospective chart review of four patients who were on psychotropic polypharmacy and admitted to our hospital from the same long-term psychiatric facility with COVID-19 delirium and other associated medical complications. RESULTS: We illustrate how the primary medical teams and psychiatrists collaborated in clinical diagnosis, treatment, and management. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with serious mental illness and COVID-19 infection require active collaboration between primary medical teams and psychiatrists for diagnostic clarification, reduction of psychotropic polypharmacy to avoid adverse effects and drug-drug interactions, prevention of psychiatric decompensation, and active management of agitation while balancing staff and patient safety concerns.


Subject(s)
Bipolar Disorder/complications , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/psychology , Delirium/complications , Psychotic Disorders/complications , Schizophrenia/complications , Bipolar Disorder/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Delirium/drug therapy , Drug Interactions , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Polypharmacy , Psychotic Disorders/drug therapy , Psychotropic Drugs/therapeutic use , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Schizophrenia/drug therapy
14.
Transl Psychiatry ; 10(1): 411, 2020 11 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-943885

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been classified as a pandemic, and mental hospitals located in epidemic centers have been affected. Social isolation is an important and irreplaceable measure to control the spread of the epidemic. In this study, schizophrenic patients who were subjected to social isolation after close contact with COVID-19 patients were used as participants to explore the impact of social isolation on common inflammatory indicators and psychological characteristics. A total of 30 patients with schizophrenia were recruited from Wuhan Mental Health Center. In addition, 30 ordinary schizophrenic patients were matched with the isolation group and were recruited from another branch of Wuhan Mental Health Center as controls. We compared the differences in common inflammatory indicators and psychological characteristics between the isolated group and the control group, and longitudinal comparison of the differences in the above indicators before and after isolation among the isolation group. The Chinese Perceived Stress Scale (CPSS) score, Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) score and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) score of the isolation group were significantly higher than those of the control group (p = 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, respectively). The C-reactive protein (CRP) level, CPSS score, HAMA score and Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) score of the isolation group were significantly higher after isolation (p = 0.01, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, respectively). Inpatients of schizophrenia suffered from social isolation due to COVID-19 have a severe psychological burden. Social isolation caused patients to develop a weak inflammatory state and led to worse anxiety and sleep quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Inpatients/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Schizophrenic Psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Case-Control Studies , China , Female , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Schizophrenia/complications , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Int J Soc Psychiatry ; 66(8): 763-769, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-670627

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Childhood trauma (CT) has been shown to affect the etiology and clinical features of schizophrenia. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the effects of CT on the age of onset (AoO) and clinical features of the disease by considering factors such as family history, head trauma, birth trauma, alcohol and substance abuse that may affect AoO of the disease. METHODS: The sample comprising 200 patients admitted to the outpatient and inpatient care at the Izmir Katip Çelebi University, Atatürk Education and Research Hospital psychiatry clinic, were included in the study. Socio-demographic information form, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form (CTQ-SF) and subscale of Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) were applied. RESULTS: All types of trauma, except physical abuse, were found related to the disease onset age earlier. It was also detected that the factors of head trauma, birth complication, presence of an individual diagnosed with schizophrenia in the family and migration history were not related to AoO of the disease. On the other hand, it was found that physical, emotional and sexual abuses lead to more positive psychotic symptoms, and all types of CT increase the severity of disease and the risk of suicide. CONCLUSION: This study draws attention to the etiological importance of CT in schizophrenia as an environmental factor by showing that it affects AoO of the disease along with symptomatology. Future studies should focus on the pathogenesis of CT in schizophrenia and the interaction between CT and biological and genetic predisposition.


Subject(s)
Child Abuse/psychology , Schizophrenia/diagnosis , Suicide/psychology , Adult , Adult Survivors of Child Abuse/psychology , Age of Onset , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Psychotic Disorders , Schizophrenia/complications , Schizophrenia/epidemiology , Schizophrenic Psychology
20.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(6)2020 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-599774
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