Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 19 de 19
Filter
1.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260396, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546954

ABSTRACT

School closures due to the COVID-19 global pandemic are likely to have a range of negative consequences spanning the domains of child development, education and health, in addition to the widening of inequalities and inequities. Research is required to improve understanding of the impact of school closures on the education, health and wellbeing of pupils and school staff, the challenges posed during face-to-face reopening and importantly to identify how the impacts of these challenges can be addressed going forward to inform emerging policy and practice. This qualitative study aimed to reflect on the perspectives and experiences of primary school staff (pupils aged 3-11) in Wales regarding school closures and the initial face-to-face reopening of schools and to identify recommendations for the future. A total of 208 school staff completed a national online survey through the HAPPEN primary school network, consisting of questions about school closures (March to June 2020), the phased face-to-face reopening of schools (June to July 2020) and a return to face-to-face education. Thematic analysis of survey responses highlighted that primary school staff perceive that gaps in learning, health and wellbeing have increased and inequalities have widened during school closures. Findings from this study identified five recommendations; (i) prioritise the health and wellbeing of pupils and staff; (ii) focus on enabling parental engagement and support; (iii) improve digital competence amongst pupils, teachers and parents; (iv) consider opportunities for smaller class sizes and additional staffing; and (v) improve the mechanism of communication between schools and families, and between government and schools.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , School Teachers/psychology , Schools , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control/trends , Communication , Education, Distance , Forecasting , Humans , Qualitative Research , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Wales
2.
Sch Psychol ; 36(5): 367-376, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442726

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to explore how returning to teaching during the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic impacted teachers' stress and anxiety. Specifically, the study investigated how teachers' anxiety changed during the first month of school. Additionally, the study explored the association of teachers' stress and anxiety and predictor variables for changes in teacher anxiety while teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic. The present study included 329 elementary teachers from across the United States who completed a survey during the first week of October 2020. The results found that most teachers saw no change or an increase in anxiety during the first month. Significant predictors of increased teacher anxiety included stress and communication within the school, with virtual instruction teachers having the most increase in anxiety. In comparison, the no change in anxiety group included significant predictors of stress, virtual instruction, and communication within the school. The present study provides applicable information to schools and districts as there is limited empirical research on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on teachers. Teachers are working as frontline workers during the pandemic; thus, schools and districts need to monitor teacher stress and anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic and provide the necessary support. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , School Teachers/psychology , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Schools/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
3.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(35): 1214-1219, 2021 Sep 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412877

ABSTRACT

On May 25, 2021, the Marin County Department of Public Health (MCPH) was notified by an elementary school that on May 23, an unvaccinated teacher had reported receiving a positive test result for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The teacher reported becoming symptomatic on May 19, but continued to work for 2 days before receiving a test on May 21. On occasion during this time, the teacher read aloud unmasked to the class despite school requirements to mask while indoors. Beginning May 23, additional cases of COVID-19 were reported among other staff members, students, parents, and siblings connected to the school. To characterize the outbreak, on May 26, MCPH initiated case investigation and contact tracing that included whole genome sequencing (WGS) of available specimens. A total of 27 cases were identified, including that of the teacher. During May 23-26, among the teacher's 24 students, 22 students, all ineligible for vaccination because of age, received testing for SARS-CoV-2; 12 received positive test results. The attack rate in the two rows seated closest to the teacher's desk was 80% (eight of 10) and was 28% (four of 14) in the three back rows (Fisher's exact test; p = 0.036). During May 24-June 1, six of 18 students in a separate grade at the school, all also too young for vaccination, received positive SARS-CoV-2 test results. Eight additional cases were also identified, all in parents and siblings of students in these two grades. Among these additional cases, three were in persons fully vaccinated in accordance with CDC recommendations (1). Among the 27 total cases, 22 (81%) persons reported symptoms; the most frequently reported symptoms were fever (41%), cough (33%), headache (26%), and sore throat (26%). WGS of all 18 available specimens identified the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant. Vaccines are effective against the Delta variant (2), but risk of transmission remains elevated among unvaccinated persons in schools without strict adherence to prevention strategies. In addition to vaccination for eligible persons, strict adherence to nonpharmaceutical prevention strategies, including masking, routine testing, facility ventilation, and staying home when symptomatic, are important to ensure safe in-person learning in schools (3).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Disease Outbreaks , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Schools , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , California/epidemiology , Child , Contact Tracing , Humans , Masks/statistics & numerical data , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data
4.
BMJ ; 374: n2060, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394084

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the risk of hospital admission with covid-19 and severe covid-19 among teachers and their household members, overall and compared with healthcare workers and adults of working age in the general population. DESIGN: Population based nested case-control study. SETTING: Scotland, March 2020 to July 2021, during defined periods of school closures and full openings in response to covid-19. PARTICIPANTS: All cases of covid-19 in adults aged 21 to 65 (n=132 420) and a random sample of controls matched on age, sex, and general practice (n=1 306 566). Adults were identified as actively teaching in a Scottish school by the General Teaching Council for Scotland, and their household members were identified through the unique property reference number. The comparator groups were adults identified as healthcare workers in Scotland, their household members, and the remaining general population of working age. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was hospital admission with covid-19, defined as having a positive test result for SARS-CoV-2 during hospital admission, being admitted to hospital within 28 days of a positive test result, or receiving a diagnosis of covid-19 on discharge from hospital. Severe covid-19 was defined as being admitted to intensive care or dying within 28 days of a positive test result or assigned covid-19 as a cause of death. RESULTS: Most teachers were young (mean age 42), were women (80%), and had no comorbidities (84%). The risk (cumulative incidence) of hospital admission with covid-19 was <1% for all adults of working age in the general population. Over the study period, in conditional logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, general practice, race/ethnicity, deprivation, number of comorbidities, and number of adults in the household, teachers showed a lower risk of hospital admission with covid-19 (rate ratio 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.64 to 0.92) and of severe covid-19 (0.56, 0.33 to 0.97) than the general population. In the first period when schools in Scotland reopened, in autumn 2020, the rate ratio for hospital admission in teachers was 1.20 (0.89 to 1.61) and for severe covid-19 was 0.45 (0.13 to 1.55). The corresponding findings for household members of teachers were 0.91 (0.67 to 1.23) and 0.73 (0.37 to 1.44), and for patient facing healthcare workers were 2.08 (1.73 to 2.50) and 2.26 (1.43 to 3.59). Similar risks were seen for teachers in the second period, when schools reopened in summer 2021. These values were higher than those seen in spring/summer 2020, when schools were mostly closed. CONCLUSION: Compared with adults of working age who are otherwise similar, teachers and their household members were not found to be at increased risk of hospital admission with covid-19 and were found to be at lower risk of severe covid-19. These findings should reassure those who are engaged in face-to-face teaching.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Case-Control Studies , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Datasets as Topic , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Scotland/epidemiology , Young Adult
5.
Nutrients ; 13(8)2021 Aug 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348679

ABSTRACT

The school closures, precipitated by the COVID-19 pandemic, required teachers to convert their entire classroom curricula to online formats, taught from home. This shift to a more sedentary teaching environment, coupled with the stresses related to the pandemic, may correlate with weight gain. In total, 52% of study participants reported weight gain, with a higher prevalence observed among kindergarten and elementary school teachers when compared to high school teachers (p < 0.05). Deviations in physical activity, emotional eating, and dietary patterns were assessed among 129 teachers (using the Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire, the Dutch Eating Behavioral Questionnaire, and a short-form Food Frequency Questionnaire, respectively) to uncover possible associations with the observed weight gain. Increases in sedentariness (p < 0.005), emotional eating (p < 0.001), the consumption of potatoes, fries, breads, cheese, cake (p < 0.05), chips, candy, ice-cream, and soft drinks (p < 0.005) were all positively correlated with weight gain. Decreases in exercise frequency (p < 0.001), and the consumption of fruits (p < 0.05) and beans (p < 0.005), were also positively correlated with weight gain. Weight gain, observed among teachers during school closures, was associated with changes in diet, emotional eating and physical activity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Schools/statistics & numerical data , Weight Gain , Adult , Body Weight , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emotions , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Female , Humans , Life Style , Male , Middle Aged , New York/epidemiology , Pandemics , Quarantine/psychology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sedentary Behavior , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
6.
J Sch Health ; 91(7): 541-549, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242178

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, students and teachers have transitioned to online learning. The transition required changes in teaching practices to accommodate for an online learning environment. However, there are no studies characterizing physical educators' and school health experts' perspectives on physical education via distance learning or identifying best practices and their implications for student health. METHODS: Using purposive and snowball sampling, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 19 physical education teachers and school health experts across 21 California school districts on best practices for physical education via distance learning. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. RESULTS: Four major themes emerged: (1) participants felt high quality physical education via distance learning was both critical and possible; (2) strategies for creating a successful distance learning environment included personalization, creativity, and inclusiveness; (3) resources necessary for success included professional development, administrative support, and equipment; and (4) lessons for the long-term. CONCLUSIONS: Participants identified effective strategies, challenges, and recommendations for the future. Participants felt optimistic about their ability to provide quality physical education via distance learning, given the necessary supports, and perceived that they played a critical role in supporting student health during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/trends , Health Education/trends , Physical Education and Training/trends , COVID-19/psychology , Curriculum , Exercise , Humans , Male , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Students/statistics & numerical data , United States
7.
Pediatrics ; 147(5)2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1124573

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic led many jurisdictions to close in-person school instruction. METHODS: We collected data about COVID-19 cases associated with New York City (NYC) public schools from polymerase chain reaction testing performed in each school on a sample of asymptomatic students and staff and from routine reporting. We compared prevalence from testing done in schools to community prevalence estimates from statistical models. We compared cumulative incidence for school-associated cases to all cases reported to the city. School-based contacts were monitored to estimate the secondary attack rate and possible direction of transmission. RESULTS: To assess prevalence, we analyzed data from 234 132 persons tested for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection in 1594 NYC public schools during October 9 to December 18, 2020; 986 (0.4%) tested positive. COVID-19 prevalence in schools was similar to or less than estimates of prevalence in the community for all weeks. To assess cumulative incidence, we analyzed data for 2231 COVID-19 cases that occurred in students and staff compared with the 86 576 persons in NYC diagnosed with COVID-19 during the same period; the overall incidence was lower for persons in public schools compared with the general community. Of 36 423 school-based close contacts, 191 (0.5%) subsequently tested positive for COVID-19; the likely index case was an adult for 78.0% of secondary cases. CONCLUSIONS: We found that in-person learning in NYC public schools was not associated with increased prevalence or incidence overall of COVID-19 infection compared with the general community.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Students/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Incidence , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Prevalence , Schools/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
8.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(8): 289-292, 2021 02 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102703

ABSTRACT

In-person learning benefits children and communities (1). Understanding the context in which transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), occurs in schools is critical to improving the safety of in-person learning. During December 1, 2020-January 22, 2021, Cobb and Douglas Public Health (CDPH), the Georgia Department of Public Health (GDPH), and CDC investigated SARS-CoV-2 transmission in eight public elementary schools in a single school district. COVID-19 cases* among educators and students were either self-reported or identified by local public health officials. Close contacts (contacts)† of persons with a COVID-19 case received testing. Among contacts who received positive test results, public health investigators assessed epidemiologic links, probable transmission directionality, and the likelihood of in-school transmission.§ Nine clusters of three or more epidemiologically linked COVID-19 cases were identified involving 13 educators and 32 students at six of the eight elementary schools. Two clusters involved probable educator-to-educator transmission that was followed by educator-to-student transmission and resulted in approximately one half (15 of 31) of school-associated cases. Sixty-nine household members of persons with school-associated cases were tested, and 18 (26%) received positive results. All nine transmission clusters involved less than ideal physical distancing, and five involved inadequate mask use by students. Educators were central to in-school transmission networks. Multifaceted mitigation measures in schools, including promotion of COVID-19 precautions outside of school, minimizing in-person adult interactions at school, and ensuring universal and correct mask use and physical distancing among educators and students when in-person interaction is unavoidable, are important in preventing in-school transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Although not required for reopening schools, COVID-19 vaccination should be considered as an additional mitigation measure to be added when available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Students/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cluster Analysis , Georgia/epidemiology , Humans , Schools
9.
Ann Ig ; 33(6): 527-532, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1076849

ABSTRACT

Background: In the COVID-19 era, we designed the webinar "COVID-19: instructions for use" with the aim of providing clear and actionable information to school staff about the characteristics of the disease, the preventive measures to adopt and the path for early detection and control of COVID-19 in primary schools of Modena province. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional survey using a 7-item closed-ended satisfaction questionnaire self-administered to webinar participants among school staff of the Modena Municipality and neighbouring. Results: A total of 103 out of 152 (68%) participants delivered the questionnaires. The participating staff came from 29 schools. Most of respondents (83.5%) were primary school teachers following by kindergarten teachers and educators. The overall webinar assessment index was "very good" for 51% of attendees and "good" for the remaining. Nevertheless, 25.2% highlighted the need to have more time dedicated to the discussion. Conclusions: Our project promotes a virtuous circle between school-family and community; so that the benefits can be sustained and enhanced. This may improve the effectiveness of the preventive measures in terms of transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and other virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Educational Personnel/education , Schools , Webcasts as Topic/organization & administration , Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Schools/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Teacher Training
11.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(4): 136-140, 2021 Jan 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052555

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has disrupted in-person learning in the United States, with approximately one half of all students receiving online-only instruction since March 2020.* Discontinuation of in-person schooling can result in many hardships (1) and disproportionately affects families of lower socioeconomic status (2). Current evidence suggests that transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in kindergarten through grade 12 (K-12) schools might not significantly contribute to COVID-19 spread nationwide (3). During August 31-November 29, 2020, COVID-19 cases, spread, and compliance with mask use were investigated among 4,876 students and 654 staff members who participated in in-person learning in 17 K-12 schools in rural Wisconsin. School-attributable COVID-19 case rates were compared with rates in the surrounding community. School administration and public health officials provided information on COVID-19 cases within schools. During the study period, widespread community transmission was observed, with 7%-40% of COVID-19 tests having positive results. Masking was required for all students and staff members at all schools, and rate of reported student mask-wearing was high (>92%). COVID-19 case rates among students and staff members were lower (191 cases among 5,530 persons, or 3,453 cases per 100,000) than were those in the county overall (5,466 per 100,000). Among the 191 cases identified in students and staff members, one in 20 cases among students was linked to in-school transmission; no infections among staff members were found to have been acquired at school. These findings suggest that, with proper mitigation strategies, K-12 schools might be capable of opening for in-person learning with minimal in-school transmission of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Schools/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , Cooperative Behavior , Humans , Masks/statistics & numerical data , Public Health/legislation & jurisprudence , Rural Population/statistics & numerical data , School Teachers/psychology , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Students/psychology , Students/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Wisconsin/epidemiology
14.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 11: 2150132720967503, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983351

ABSTRACT

Teachers are vulnerable non-essential workers that continue to have significant misgivings about in-person school reopening. Dialogue around pandemic management has relatively neglected these concerns so far. This perspective offers a broad framework for risk assessment related to COVID-19 and in-person instruction. The accumulated general body of knowledge related to COVID-19 is particularized to the special dynamics of education. We highlight the impact of historic investments and underinvestment in education on the viability of adapting best practices to mitigate risk. Gaps in public health planning to supply educators with needed personal protective equipment and vaccination are explored. The challenges for low-income and minority-predominant districts receive special attention. We place these problems within the broader context of socioeconomic disparities and the societal consequences of the pandemic. The local level of community transmission, resources, and circumstances should dictate reopening dates. Without effective infection control, teachers are justified to fear infection. The transparency and scientific rigor that would allow teachers to assess their personal health risk and characterize the process for decision-making has been largely absent.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , School Teachers/psychology , Schools/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Fear , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Risk Assessment , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
15.
Euro Surveill ; 25(49)2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-970966

ABSTRACT

We report epidemiological investigations of transmission of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in 41 classes of 36 schools in Reggio Emilia province, northern Italy, from their reopening on 1 September to 15 October 2020. The overall secondary case attack rate was 3.2%, reaching 6.6% in middle and high schools. More timely isolation and testing of classmates could be effective in reducing virus transmission in this setting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/statistics & numerical data , Masks , Physical Distancing , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Schools, Nursery , Schools , Students/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Mortality , Organizational Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
16.
Am J Ind Med ; 64(1): 39-47, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-932412

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The disease burden of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is not uniform across occupations. Although healthcare workers are well-known to be at increased risk, data for other occupations are lacking. In lieu of this, models have been used to forecast occupational risk using various predictors, but no model heretofore has used data from actual case numbers. This study assesses the differential risk of COVID-19 by occupation using predictors from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) database and correlating them with case counts published by the Washington State Department of Health to identify workers in individual occupations at highest risk of COVID-19 infection. METHODS: The O*NET database was screened for potential predictors of differential COVID-19 risk by occupation. Case counts delineated by occupational group were obtained from public sources. Prevalence by occupation was estimated and correlated with O*NET data to build a regression model to predict individual occupations at greatest risk. RESULTS: Two variables correlate with case prevalence: disease exposure (r = 0.66; p = 0.001) and physical proximity (r = 0.64; p = 0.002), and predict 47.5% of prevalence variance (p = 0.003) on multiple linear regression analysis. The highest risk occupations are in healthcare, particularly dental, but many nonhealthcare occupations are also vulnerable. CONCLUSIONS: Models can be used to identify workers vulnerable to COVID-19, but predictions are tempered by methodological limitations. Comprehensive data across many states must be collected to adequately guide implementation of occupation-specific interventions in the battle against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Aviation , Barbering , Firefighters/statistics & numerical data , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Law Enforcement , Mortuary Practice , Occupational Health , Prevalence , Risk Factors , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Time Factors , Transportation , Washington/epidemiology , Workplace
17.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 39(11): 2002-2009, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-781677

ABSTRACT

Across the United States, school districts are grappling with questions of whether and how to reopen and keep open elementary and secondary schools in the 2020-21 academic year. Using household data from before the pandemic (2014-17), we examined how often people who have health conditions placing them at risk for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were connected to schools, either as employees or by living in the same households as school employees or school-age children. Between 42.0 percent and 51.4 percent of all school employees met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) definition of having or potentially having increased risk for severe COVID-19. Among all adults with CDC-defined risk factors for severe COVID-19, between 33.9 million and 44.2 million had direct or within-household connections to schools.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Family Characteristics , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Schools , Adolescent , Adult , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Child , Child, Preschool , Chronic Disease/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
19.
J Affect Disord ; 277: 153-158, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-712244

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of anxiety and explore its factors during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic among the teachers in China. METHODS: We involved 88611 teachers (response rate: 94.75%) from three cities of Henan Province, China, during February 4, 2020 and February 12, 2020. Anxiety was assessed by using Generalized Anxiety Disorder tool (GAD-7). Odds ratios (OR) with 95% Confidence intervals (CI) for potential factors of anxiety were estimated using multiple logistic regression models. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of anxiety was 13.67%. The prevalence was higher for women than men (13.89% vs. 12.93%). The highest prevalence of anxiety was 14.06% (SE 2.51%) with age of 60 to 100 years in men, and 14.70% (SE 0.56%) with age of 50 to 60 years in women. Participants located in country-level city school had the lowest prevalence of anxiety across all age categories (12.01% for age of 18-30 years; 12.50% for age of 30-40 years; 12.13% for age of 40-50 years; 9.52% for age of 60-100 years). After adjusting for potential confounders, age, sex, education status, type of teachers, school location, information source, worried level, fear level, and behavior status were found to be associated with anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: This large-scale study assessed the prevalence of anxiety in teachers, as well as its potential influence of factors, which is useful for international and national decision-makers.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Patient Health Questionnaire , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , School Teachers/psychology , Sex Factors , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL