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1.
N Engl J Med ; 386(14): 1363-1371, 2022 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1778680

ABSTRACT

The 2020 U.S. Census data show a rapidly diversifying U.S. population. We sought to evaluate whether clinical faculty and leadership representation at academic medical schools reflects the diversifying population over time. Using data from the Association of American Medical Colleges for the period of 1977 through 2019, we found notable progress in female representation among clinical faculty, with smaller gains among department chairs and medical school deans. Racial and ethnic groups that are underrepresented in medicine are designated as such because their presence within the medical profession is disproportionate to the U.S. Census data. Even with accounting for this underrepresentation, clinical faculty and leadership positions show even starker disparities. Thoughtful policy implementation could help address this persistent underrepresentation among medical school faculty and leadership positions.


Subject(s)
Faculty, Medical , Cultural Diversity , Female , Humans , Leadership , Schools, Medical , United States
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 218, 2022 Mar 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770524

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic required a transformation of medical education in Egypt. Public health measures necessitated a rapid shift from traditional face to face lectures to largely online platforms following campus closures. The aim of this study is to characterize medical student use and perception of online medical education in Egypt as well as exploring the efficacy of different e-learning modalities. Additionally, many barriers and opportunities as perceived by students are reviewed to inform future educational improvements. METHODS: A 29-item online survey was created on google forms and distributed by social media to medical students across 26 Egyptian medical schools. The survey was administered from August 20th, 2021, to September 5th, 2021. The survey consisted of a mixture of questions style. The medical students were asked about their experiences with online medical education during the COVID-19 pandemic as well as medical students' anxiety, perceived academic performance, and obstacles related to online education. RESULTS: Of the 4935 responses collected, 43.4% (n = 2140) of respondents were women; 56.6% (n = 2795) were men. Medical students from private medical schools were 13.0% (n = 644), whereas 87.0% (n = 4291) were from public medical schools. 54.6% of students reported that online education is not as effective as face-to-face education. There was a significant rise in hours spent by medical students on online medical education compared to before COVID-19 pandemic. More than half of students (63%) agreed that online recorded video tutorials (e.g., YouTube) were the most effective form of online medical education. CONCLUSION: The shift to online education has significantly impacted medical students in Egypt. Medical students reported various limitations and challenges of online medical education, which must be addressed considering the potential benefits of online platforms over traditional face to face learning. The results of this nationwide study provide a framework for potential areas to implement change to improve the accessibility and structure of online medical education in Egypt.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Egypt/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Schools, Medical
3.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258660, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702809

ABSTRACT

Due to COVID-19 precautions, the Vanderbilt University summer biomedical undergraduate research program, the Vanderbilt Summer Science Academy (VSSA), rapidly transitioned from offering an in-person training program to a virtual seminar format. Our program typically supports undergraduate development through research and/or clinical experience, meeting with individuals pursuing postgraduate training, and providing career development advice. Evidence supports the idea that summer programs transform undergraduates by clarifying their interest in research and encouraging those who haven't previously considered graduate studies. We were interested in exploring whether a virtual, synchronous program would increase participants' scientific identity and clarify postgraduate career planning. Rather than create a virtual research exposure, our 5-week "Virtual VSSA" program aimed to simulate the casual connections that would naturally be made with post-undergraduate trainees during a traditional summer program. In seminars, presenters discussed 1) their academic journey, explaining their motivations, goals, and reasons for pursuing a career in science as well as 2) a professional story that illustrated their training. Seminars included Vanderbilt University and Medical School faculty, M.D., MD/Ph.D., as well as Ph.D. students from diverse scientific and personal backgrounds. In addition, weekly informational sessions provided an overview of the nature of each degree program along with admissions advice. Through pre-and post-program surveys, we found that students who registered for this experience already strongly identified with the STEMM community (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Medicine). However, participation in the Virtual VSSA increased their sense of belonging. We also uncovered a gap in participants' understanding of postgraduate pathways prior to participation and found that our program significantly increased their self-reported understanding of postgraduate programs. It also increased their understanding of why someone would pursue a Ph.D. or Ph.D./MD versus M.D. These changes did not uniformly impact participants' planned career paths. Overall, by providing personal, tangible stories of M.D., MD/Ph.D., and Ph.D. training, the Virtual VSSA program offered seminars that positively impacted students' sense of belonging with and connection to the STEMM disciplines.


Subject(s)
Engineering/education , Mathematics/education , Technology/education , Academies and Institutes , Biomedical Research/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Career Choice , Faculty/education , Humans , Knowledge , Mentors/education , Minority Groups/education , Schools, Medical , Students , Universities
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 103, 2022 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690921

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anatomy education in US medical schools has seen numerous changes since the call for medical education reform in 2010. The purpose of this study was to survey US medical schools to assess recent trends in anatomy education, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on anatomy teaching, and future directions of medical school anatomy curricula. METHODS: We sent a 29-item survey to anatomy course directors of 145 AAMC-associated allopathic medical schools inquiring about their schools' anatomy curricula. The survey contained objective discrete questions concerning the curricula changes preceding COVID-19 and those directly related to COVID-19. We also asked subjective and open-ended questions about the impact of COVID-19 and future directions of anatomy education. RESULTS: A total of 117/143 course directors (82%) completed the survey. Most schools (60%) reported a major change to their anatomy course within the past five years, including a decrease in total course time (20%), integration of anatomy into other courses (19%), and implementation of a "flipped classroom" (15%) teaching style. Due to COVID-19, there was a decrease in the fraction of course time dedicated to "hands-on" learning (p < 0.01) and teaching of clinical correlates (p = 0.02) and radiology (p < 0.01). Most course directors (79%) reported that COVID-19 had a negative impact on quality of learning due to decreased interactive or in-person (62%) learning and lack of dissection (44%). Incorporation of virtual-reality applications or 3D anatomy software (23%) and a decrease in cadaver dissection (13%) were the most common future anticipated changes. CONCLUSION: The constraints conferred by COVID-19 highlight the importance of maximizing interactive learning in the discipline of anatomy. In an era of social distancing and decreased emphasis on conventional anatomy dissection, adaptations of new technologies and teaching modalities may allow for traditional educational rigor to be sustained.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Education, Medical , Anatomy/education , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Medical
5.
J Grad Med Educ ; 14(1): 108-111, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1689928

ABSTRACT

Background: The 2020-2021 residency application cycle was altered to reduce COVID-19 transmission, with moves to all virtual interviews and no away rotations for medical students. These changes may have affected how students ranked residency programs, such as choosing programs near their medical schools. Objective: To determine if a larger percentage of medical students matched to residency programs in the same state as their medical schools in 2021 vs 2018-2020. Methods: We searched the webpages or emailed student affairs deans of the 155 Liaison Committee on Medical Education accredited MD programs to attain medical school match lists. Differences in the percentage of students matching to residency programs in the same US state as their medical schools in 2021 vs 2018-2020 were compared using chi-square tests. Results: We recorded 36 021 of 79 406 (45%) National Resident Matching Program, 759 of 1720 (44%) ophthalmology, and 586 urology MD residency matches between 2018 and 2021. The percentage of students matching to residency programs in the same state as their medical schools was 35.9% in 2021 versus 34.3% in 2018-2020 (P=.005). Students were more likely to match to programs in the same state as their medical schools in 2021 if they attended a public medical school (40.3% vs 38.5%, P=.009) or applied into specialties where ≥50% of students traditionally perform away rotations (32.2% vs 30.2%, P=.031). Conclusions: There was a small difference in the percentage of medical students matching to residency programs in the same state as their medical schools in 2021 vs 2018-2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Medical
9.
BMJ ; 376: o131, 2022 01 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631764
10.
Clin Teach ; 19(2): 86-91, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621963

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Covid-19 pandemic forced undergraduate medical students and staff to adapt and adjust to new strategies for conducting research. The aim of this study was to investigate its impact on student research opportunities across Irish and UK medical schools and how these programmes have responded, both in terms of innovation and practical solutions. METHODS: A 17-item online mixed methods survey was distributed to academic staff across 31 Irish and UK medical schools. Participants were asked about (a) the effect of the pandemic on undergraduate research teaching and project opportunities, (b) measures taken to mitigate pandemic effects on these curricular elements. Descriptive analysis was used to summarise quantitative data, and free-text responses were thematically grouped. FINDINGS: We received a 66.74% (n = 21) response rate to our survey. Over 75% of respondents stated that the availability of clinical research, lab-based research, summer research programmes and QI/clinical audit projects was negatively impacted by Covid-19. Mitigation strategies included adaptation and adjustment in design of research projects; migration to online content delivery and collaborative platforms; virtualisation of research dissemination opportunities; increased workload for staff involved in delivery of research programmes; flexibility around assessment of research-based assignments; and importance of open communication. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Covid-19 has affected traditional clinical research opportunities for medical students, particularly patient-facing projects, as well as laboratory-based research options. Mitigation strategies included the introduction of time- and cost-efficient virtual data collection methods. Some of these innovations have potential for ongoing and future development, but others are short-term responsive solutions that may prove less sustainable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Schools, Medical , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Acad Med ; 97(4): 484-486, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621685

ABSTRACT

The great health paradox is that the least expensive and most effective public health measures available for addressing the COVID-19 pandemic-and other society-wide health challenges-have long been ignored and rejected in the United States in favor of more expensive and personalized care. The U.S. medical system is being overwhelmed in part because of this paradox. The authors argue that the country has invested excessively in acute care medical technology while investing insufficiently in its public health infrastructure. In this Invited Commentary, the authors recommend 5 steps that academic medicine should take to increase emphasis on and understanding of public health interventions to address society's health problems: (1) incorporate problem-based learning experiences in the medical school curriculum and community-based clinical rotations in public health departments, (2) better integrate schools of public health and schools of medicine, (3) encourage physicians to pursue public health careers, (4) educate the public about strategies for decreasing chronic illnesses, and (5) increase collaboration with colleagues around the world to identify and track outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Public Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Schools, Medical , United States
12.
J Laryngol Otol ; 136(1): 24-28, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616898

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to report the changes made to ENT placements across the UK in response to the pandemic and their impact on student experience. METHODS: A questionnaire eliciting how ENT placements were provided before and after coronavirus disease 2019 was disseminated amongst Student and Foundation Doctors in Otolaryngology representatives. RESULTS: Thirty-eight respondents from 27 medical schools across the UK completed the survey (response rate of 90 per cent). Twenty-nine of the 38 respondents (76 per cent) reported a change in ENT placements in response to the pandemic. Six of the 38 students (16 per cent) remained satisfied with their ENT placements, as compared to 12 students prior to the pandemic (32 per cent). CONCLUSION: There is considerable variability in how medical schools responded to the pandemic. Most medical schools placed students into smaller groups, with less direct contact in the hospital. These changes resulted in lower student satisfaction. The increased emphasis on e-learning underscores the need for high quality e-learning materials to promote learning throughout the pandemic and in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Otolaryngology/education , Schools, Medical , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
13.
Mil Med ; 187(1-2): 9-11, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604410

ABSTRACT

In response to the COVID pandemic, Uniformed Services University (USU) suspended clerkships. As the nation's military medical school, USU had to keep students safe while still preparing them to be military physicians. In this commentary, we, a group of USU students, explore what this experience taught us about military medicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Military Medicine , Military Personnel , Students, Medical , Humans , Military Medicine/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Medical
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592746

ABSTRACT

Medical humanity is an essential element of medical education, and the respective courses are introduced to the curricula of medical schools worldwide. However, significant differences in this type of medical education were identified in Italy, Spain, and the UK. In Poland, this issue was not yet analyzed. The classes offered on a compulsory and not elective basis secure the uniform skills of future physicians. Therefore, we were prompted to ask a question: do Polish medical students receive equal compulsory education in medical humanities? To answer that question, we performed a content analysis of mandatory classes' frequency, types, and content on medical humanization and communication in Polish medical schools. The study used publicly available information provided on the home pages of the universities to perform content and comparative analyses. Of 22 identified universities, 15 had publicly listed teaching programs, and nine had freely available syllabi. The names and types of courses varied from school to school. The number of hours the courses offered throughout medical education ranged from 15 to 216. In some medical schools, the classes were scheduled during the early, pre-clinical part of the study, whereas in other schools they were offered each year. The content of the courses always covered the topics of physician-patient communication but rarely offered protocols, such as the Calgary Cambridge guide. We conclude that the medical humanities represented by medical humanization and communication courses are included in the publicly available compulsory curriculum of most Polish medical schools. However, to secure equal education of future Polish physicians, there is a need to unify the medical humanities program.


Subject(s)
Humanities , Schools, Medical , Communication , Curriculum , Humans , Poland
15.
BMJ Open ; 11(12): e047354, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583120

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To compare in UK medical students the predictive validity of attained A-level grades and teacher-predicted A levels for undergraduate and postgraduate outcomes. Teacher-predicted A-level grades are a plausible proxy for the teacher-estimated grades that replaced UK examinations in 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The study also models the likely future consequences for UK medical schools of replacing public A-level examination grades with teacher-predicted grades. DESIGN: Longitudinal observational study using UK Medical Education Database data. SETTING: UK medical education and training. PARTICIPANTS: Dataset 1: 81 202 medical school applicants in 2010-2018 with predicted and attained A-level grades. Dataset 2: 22 150 18-year-old medical school applicants in 2010-2014 with predicted and attained A-level grades, of whom 12 600 had medical school assessment outcomes and 1340 had postgraduate outcomes available. OUTCOME MEASURES: Undergraduate and postgraduate medical examination results in relation to attained and teacher-predicted A-level results. RESULTS: Dataset 1: teacher-predicted grades were accurate for 48.8% of A levels, overpredicted in 44.7% of cases and underpredicted in 6.5% of cases. Dataset 2: undergraduate and postgraduate outcomes correlated significantly better with attained than with teacher-predicted A-level grades. Modelling suggests that using teacher-estimated grades instead of attained grades will mean that 2020 entrants are more likely to underattain compared with previous years, 13% more gaining the equivalent of the lowest performance decile and 16% fewer reaching the equivalent of the current top decile, with knock-on effects for postgraduate training. CONCLUSIONS: The replacement of attained A-level examination grades with teacher-estimated grades as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic may result in 2020 medical school entrants having somewhat lower academic performance compared with previous years. Medical schools may need to consider additional teaching for entrants who are struggling or who might need extra support for missed aspects of A-level teaching.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , School Admission Criteria , Schools, Medical , United Kingdom
16.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1905918, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1576028

ABSTRACT

In the USA, numerous summer programs are available for undergraduate students that seek to increase the number of individuals from groups underrepresented in medicine (URM) that matriculate to medical school. These programs have typically been conducted at research-focused institutions, involving hands-on-research and various enrichment experiences. For 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the suspension of on-campus student activities at American universities, necessitating a switch to a virtual format for these URM-focused programs. Outcomes, however, from these programs conducted virtually, necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic, have not been reported. The Penn Access Summer Scholars (PASS) program at the Perelman School of Medicine (PSOM) targets URM undergraduates, providing two consecutive summers of mentored research and enrichment experiences, with the goal of enabling participants' matriculation to PSOM. PASS has been an 8 week on-campus experience, but during summer 2020, virtual programming of 6 weeks was provided due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants in the 2020 virtual offering of PASS completed pre- and post-program surveys that included 5-point Likert-style and open-ended questions to determine the impact of the programing on self-assessments of research skills, familiarity with the physician identity, and preparedness to be a PSOM student. Post-program, participants also assessed program administration and content. With respect to program objectives, participants reported significant increases in their self-reported confidence in conducting research, understanding of physician identity, and sense of preparedness for medical school. The educational value of the program content, their level of engagement in the program and the overall quality of the program were rated as excellent or outstanding by large majorities of respondents. Content analyses of participant comments were consistent with these quantitative results. Therefore, a premedical summer enrichment program targeting URM undergraduates can be successfully conducted virtually to achieve program objectives and may increase the availability to these initiatives.


Subject(s)
Mentors , Minority Groups , Research/education , Students, Premedical , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pennsylvania , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Medical , Self Report , Universities
17.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1876316, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575921

ABSTRACT

Changes in medical student learning preferences help drive innovation in teaching and require schools and commercial resources to quickly adapt. However, few studies have detailed the relationship of learner preferences to the environment and teaching modalities used in the pre-clerkship years, nor do they incorporate third-party resources. Our study attempts to analyze learner preferences by comparing the use of traditional and third-party resources. In 2017-18, a survey was distributed to medical students and residents at two accredited medical schools. Participants noted preferred styles of learning regarding lecture duration, timing, location, format, third-party resources, learner types and USMLE Step 1 scores. The 'Learning Environment, Learning Processes, and Learning Outcomes' (LEPO) framework [5] was used to examine learner preferences, with responses compared using the Mann-Whitney U and two proportion z-tests. A total of 329 respondents completed the survey: 62.7% medical students and 37.3% residents. The majority of participants identified their learning style by Kolb [6] as converging (33.0%) or accommodating (39.2%). Students preferred lectures 30-40 minutes long (43.3%), during morning hours (54.2%), in their own homes (52.0%), via online lectures with simultaneous drawings (56.0%), and classroom/podcast lectures with PowerPoint® presentations (54.3%). Overall, students rated third-party resource characteristics higher than traditional curricula, including effectiveness of teachers, length, quality, time of day, and venue (p < 0.001), but also preferred small group formats. Students reported animated videos (46.6%) and simultaneous drawings (46.5%) as the most effective means of retaining information. Understanding changing learner preferences is important in creating optimal curricula for today's students. Using the LEPO framework, this study identifies critical preferences in successfully teaching medical students, inclusive of commercial and traditional resources. These results can also help guide changes in pedagogy necessary due to the more recent COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Choice Behavior , Electronics , Learning , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Medical , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
18.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248627, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575736

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There has been a rapid increase in the number of cases of COVID-19 in Latin America, Africa, Asia and many countries that have an insufficient number of physicians and other health care personnel, and the need for the inclusion of medical students on health teams is a very important issue. It has been recommended that medical students work as volunteers, undergo appropriate training, not undertake any activity beyond their level of competence, and receive continuous supervision and adequate personal protective equipment. However, the motivation of medical students must be evaluated to make volunteering a more evidence-based initiative. The aim of our study was to evaluate the motivation of medical students to be part of health teams to aid in the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We developed a questionnaire specifically to evaluate medical students' perceptions about participating in the care of patients with suspected infection with coronavirus during the COVID-19 pandemic. The questionnaire had two parts: a) one part with questions on individual characteristics, year in medical school and geographic location of the medical school and b) a second part with twenty-eight statements assessed on a 5-point Likert scale (totally agree, agree, neither agree nor disagree, disagree and totally disagree). To develop the questionnaire, we performed consensus meetings with a group of faculty and medical students. The questionnaire was sent to student organizations of 257 medical schools in Brazil and answered by 10,433 students. We used multinomial logistic regression models to analyze the data. Statements associated with greater odds ratios for participation of medical students in the COVID-19 pandemic were related to a sense of purpose or duty ("It is the duty of the medical student to put himself or herself at the service of the population in the pandemic"), altruism ("I am willing to take risks by participating in practice in the context of the pandemic"), and perception of good performance and professional identity ("I will be a better health professional for having experienced the pandemic"). Males were more prone than females to believe that only interns should participate in the care of patients with COVID-19 (odds ratio 1.36 [coefficient interval 95%:1.24-1.49]) and that all students should participate (OR 1.68 [CI:1.4-1.91]). CONCLUSIONS: Medical students are more motivated by a sense of purpose or duty, altruism, perception of good performance and values of professionalism than by their interest in learning. These results have implications for the development of volunteering programs and the design of health force policies in the present pandemic and in future health emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Schools, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Motivation/physiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Perception/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1857322, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574791

ABSTRACT

Many challenges could occur that result in the need to handle an increase in the number of medical student clinical placements, such as curricular transformations or viral pandemics, such as COVID 19. Here, we describe four different institutions' approaches to addressing the impact of curricular transformation on clerkships using an implementation science lens. Specifically, we explore four different approaches to managing the 'bulge' as classes overlap in clerkships Curriculum leaders at four medical schools report on managing the bulge of core clinical placements resulting from reducing the duration of the foundational sciences curriculum and calendar shifts for the respective clerkship curriculum. These changes, which occurred between 2014 and 2018, led to more students being enrolled in core clinical rotations at the same time than occurred previously. Schools provided respective metrics used to evaluate the effectiveness of their bulge management technique. These data typically included number of students affected in each phase of their curricular transformation, performance on standardized examinations, and student and faculty feedback. Not all data were available from all schools, as some schools are still working through their 'bulge' or are affected by COVID-19. There is much to be learned about managing curricular transformations. Working on such endeavors in a learning collaborative such as the AMA Accelerating Change in Medical Education Initiative provided support and insights about how to survive, thrive and identifying lessons learned during curricular transformation.


Subject(s)
Clinical Clerkship , Curriculum , Schools, Medical , Students, Medical , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1891610, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574778

ABSTRACT

Multiple mini-interview (MMI) is a 'multiple sample-based' approach comprising multiple focused encounters intended to access and assess a range of attributes in order to gain more objectively multiple impressions of an applicant's interpersonal skills, thoughtfulness and general demeanour. It is designed to focus on four domains that are not considered to be comprehensive, but are considered to be vital for a successful career in the health sciences: critical thinking, ethical decision making, communication and knowledge of the healthcare system. Traditionally, the MMI is conducted face-to-face, but with COVID-19 pandemic and the implementation of social distancing measures, no onsite or campus teaching, banning of mass gatherings and cancellation of face-to-face interviews, Pengiran Anak Puteri Rashidah Sa'adatul Bolkiah Institute of Health Sciences at Universiti Brunei Darussalam explored the feasibility of conducting MMI through virtual means. This report provides an account of our experience in conducting internet-MMI for the selection of new applicants into the August 2020 cohort of the Medicine programme. We also aimed to determine whether the scores derived from internet-MMI were reliable and equivalent to the scores derived from traditional MMI.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Interviews as Topic/methods , School Admission Criteria , Schools, Medical/organization & administration , Communication , Decision Making , Ethics, Medical , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Thinking
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