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2.
Trials ; 22(1): 856, 2021 Nov 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542127

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma; SSc) is a rare autoimmune connective tissue disease. We completed an initial feasibility trial of an online self-administered version of the Scleroderma Patient-centered Intervention Network Self-Management (SPIN-SELF) Program using the cohort multiple randomized controlled trial (RCT) design. Due to low intervention offer uptake, we will conduct a new feasibility trial with progression to full-scale trial, using a two-arm parallel, partially nested RCT design. The SPIN-SELF Program has also been revised to include facilitator-led videoconference group sessions in addition to online material. We will test the group-based intervention delivery format, then evaluate the effect of the SPIN-SELF Program on disease management self-efficacy (primary) and patient activation, social appearance anxiety, and functional health outcomes (secondary). METHODS: This study is a feasibility trial with progression to full-scale RCT, pending meeting pre-defined criteria, of the SPIN-SELF Program. Participants will be recruited from the ongoing SPIN Cohort ( http://www.spinsclero.com/en/cohort ) and via social media and partner patient organizations. Eligible participants must have SSc and low to moderate disease management self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease (SEMCD) Scale score ≤ 7.0). Participants will be randomized (1:1 allocation) to the group-based SPIN-SELF Program or usual care for 3 months. The primary outcome in the full-scale trial will be disease management self-efficacy based on SEMCD Scale scores at 3 months post-randomization. Secondary outcomes include SEMCD scores 6 months post-randomization plus patient activation, social appearance anxiety, and functional health outcomes at 3 and 6 months post-randomization. We will include 40 participants to assess feasibility. At the end of the feasibility portion, stoppage criteria will be used to determine if the trial procedures or SPIN-SELF Program need important modifications, thereby requiring a re-set for the full-scale trial. Otherwise, the full-scale RCT will proceed, and outcome data from the feasibility portion will be utilized in the full-scale trial. In the full-scale RCT, 524 participants will be recruited. DISCUSSION: The SPIN-SELF Program may improve disease management self-efficacy, patient activation, social appearance anxiety, and functional health outcomes in people with SSc. SPIN works with partner patient organizations around the world to disseminate its programs free-of-charge. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04246528 . Registered on 27 January 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Scleroderma, Systemic , Self-Management , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Patient-Centered Care , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
3.
J Autoimmun ; 125: 102744, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509938

ABSTRACT

Autoimmune systemic diseases (ASD) may show impaired immunogenicity to COVID-19 vaccines. Our prospective observational multicenter study aimed to evaluate the seroconversion after the vaccination cycle and at 6-12-month follow-up, as well the safety and efficacy of vaccines in preventing COVID-19. The study included 478 unselected ASD patients (mean age 59 ± 15 years), namely 101 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 38 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 265 systemic sclerosis (SSc), 61 cryoglobulinemic vasculitis (CV), and a miscellanea of 13 systemic vasculitis. The control group included 502 individuals from the general population (mean age 59 ± 14SD years). The immunogenicity of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines (BNT162b2 and mRNA-1273) was evaluated by measuring serum IgG-neutralizing antibody (NAb) (SARS-CoV-2 IgG II Quant antibody test kit; Abbott Laboratories, Chicago, IL) on samples obtained within 3 weeks after vaccination cycle. The short-term results of our prospective study revealed significantly lower NAb levels in ASD series compared to controls [286 (53-1203) vs 825 (451-1542) BAU/mL, p < 0.0001], as well as between single ASD subgroups and controls. More interestingly, higher percentage of non-responders to vaccine was recorded in ASD patients compared to controls [13.2% (63/478), vs 2.8% (14/502); p < 0.0001]. Increased prevalence of non-response to vaccine was also observed in different ASD subgroups, in patients with ASD-related interstitial lung disease (p = 0.009), and in those treated with glucocorticoids (p = 0.002), mycophenolate-mofetil (p < 0.0001), or rituximab (p < 0.0001). Comparable percentages of vaccine-related adverse effects were recorded among responder and non-responder ASD patients. Patients with weak/absent seroconversion, believed to be immune to SARS-CoV-2 infection, are at high risk to develop COVID-19. Early determination of serum NAb after vaccination cycle may allow to identify three main groups of ASD patients: responders, subjects with suboptimal response, non-responders. Patients with suboptimal response should be prioritized for a booster-dose of vaccine, while a different type of vaccine could be administered to non-responder individuals.


Subject(s)
/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Autoimmune Diseases/blood , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , /immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Italy , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Scleroderma, Systemic/immunology , Systemic Vasculitis/immunology , Vaccination , Vaccine Potency
5.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 35(2): 123-124, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462505

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In 2019, the novel SARS-CoV-2 infection emerged, causing the disease called COVID-19, which primarily affects the respiratory tract and lung at alveolar and interstitial levels. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective disease characterized by vascular abnormalities and diffuse and progressive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Raynaud phenomenon (RP) occurs in virtually all patients affected by SSc and, in most cases, is an onset symptom of the disease; that is, RP may appear several years before overt illness. Although the exact pathophysiologic pathways leading to RP and SSc are still unknown, several infectious agents, especially viruses, have been suggested as possible triggering factors. Here, the authors describe the first case of RP secondary to SSc following SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Raynaud Disease , Scleroderma, Systemic , Humans , Raynaud Disease/diagnosis , Raynaud Disease/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Scleroderma, Systemic/complications , Scleroderma, Systemic/diagnosis , Scleroderma, Systemic/therapy , Skin
6.
Adv Rheumatol ; 61(1): 60, 2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456017

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a lack of information on the role of chronic use of hydroxychloroquine during the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak. Our aim was to compare the occurrence of COVID-19 between rheumatic disease patients on hydroxychloroquine with individuals from the same household not taking the drug during the first 8 weeks of community viral transmission in Brazil. METHODS: This baseline cross-sectional analysis is part of a 24-week observational multi-center study involving 22 Brazilian academic outpatient centers. All information regarding COVID-19 symptoms, epidemiological, clinical, and demographic data were recorded on a specific web-based platform using telephone calls from physicians and medical students. COVID-19 was defined according to the Brazilian Ministry of Health (BMH) criteria. Mann-Whitney, Chi-square and Exact Fisher tests were used for statistical analysis and two binary Final Logistic Regression Model by Wald test were developed using a backward-stepwise method for the presence of COVID-19. RESULTS: From March 29th to May 17st, 2020, a total of 10,443 participants were enrolled, including 5166 (53.9%) rheumatic disease patients, of whom 82.5% had systemic erythematosus lupus, 7.8% rheumatoid arthritis, 3.7% Sjögren's syndrome and 0.8% systemic sclerosis. In total, 1822 (19.1%) participants reported flu symptoms within the 30 days prior to enrollment, of which 3.1% fulfilled the BMH criteria, but with no significant difference between rheumatic disease patients (4.03%) and controls (3.25%). After adjustments for multiple confounders, the main risk factor significantly associated with a COVID-19 diagnosis was lung disease (OR 1.63; 95% CI 1.03-2.58); and for rheumatic disease patients were diagnosis of systemic sclerosis (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.19-6.63) and glucocorticoids above 10 mg/ day (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.31-3.19). In addition, a recent influenza vaccination had a protective effect (OR 0.674; 95% CI 0.46-0.98). CONCLUSION: Patients with rheumatic disease on hydroxychloroquine presented a similar occurrence of COVID-19 to household cohabitants, suggesting a lack of any protective role against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Trial registration Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (ReBEC; RBR - 9KTWX6).


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chi-Square Distribution , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Family Health/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Scleroderma, Systemic/drug therapy , Sjogren's Syndrome/drug therapy , Statistics, Nonparametric , Young Adult
8.
J Autoimmun ; 124: 102727, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1446793

ABSTRACT

Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease secondary to three cardinal pathological features: immune-system alterations, diffuse microangiopathy, and fibrosis involving the skin and internal organs. The etiology of SSc remains quite obscure; it may encompass multiple host genetic and environmental -infectious/chemical-factors. The present review focused on the potential role of environmental agents in the etiopathogenesis of SSc based on epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory investigations previously published in the world literature. Among infectious agents, some viruses that may persist and reactivate in infected individuals, namely human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6), and parvovirus B19 (B19V), and retroviruses have been proposed as potential causative agents of SSc. These viruses share a number of biological activities and consequent pathological alterations, such as endothelial dysfunction and/or fibroblast activation. Moreover, the acute worsening of pre-existing interstitial lung involvement observed in SSc patients with symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection might suggest a potential role of this virus in the overall disease outcome. A variety of chemical/occupational agents might be regarded as putative etiological factors of SSc. In this setting, the SSc complicating silica dust exposure represents one of the most promising models of study. Considering the complexity of SSc pathogenesis, none of suggested causative factors may explain the appearance of the whole SSc; it is likely that the disease is the result of a multifactorial and multistep pathogenetic process. A variable combination of potential etiological factors may modulate the appearance of different clinical phenotypes detectable in individual scleroderma patients. The in-deep investigations on the SSc etiopathogenesis may provide useful insights in the broad field of human diseases characterized by diffuse microangiopathy or altered fibrogenesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cytomegalovirus Infections/complications , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Parvoviridae Infections/complications , Retroviridae Infections/complications , Roseolovirus Infections/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Scleroderma, Systemic/etiology , Cytomegalovirus , Herpesvirus 6, Human , Humans , Parvovirus B19, Human , Retroviridae , Scleroderma, Systemic/virology
9.
RMD Open ; 7(2)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334591

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Non-pharmacological interventions support patients with connective tissue diseases to better cope with and self-manage their diseases. This study aimed to map existing evidence on non-pharmacological interventions in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and mixed connective tissue diseases regarding content, feasibility and potential suitability in an e-health setting. METHODS: A literature search was performed in eight different databases in July 2020. The intervention's content was extracted using the 'Better reporting of interventions: template for intervention description and replication (TIDieR) checklist and guide'. A Sankey diagram and descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data and illustrate the relationships between the interventions. RESULTS: Of 8198 identified records, 119 papers were eligible. One hundred and four of them (87.4%) were conducted between 2000 and 2020, mainly in the USA (SLE n=24 (21.2%), SSc n=16 (14.2%)), Brazil (SLE n=8 (7.1%), SSc n=5 (4.4%)) and Italy (SLE n=0 (0%), SSc n=12 (10.6%)). Fifty-two studies (SLE n=24 (21.2%), SSc n=28 (24.8%)) used multicomponent interventions. The single interventions were physical exercises (SLE n=16 (14.2%), SSc n=17 (15.0%)), coaching/counselling (SLE n=11 (18.0%), SSc n=0 (0%)) and education (SLE n=2 (1.8%), SSc n=3 (2.7%)). Primary outcomes focused on physical function (SLE n=1 (0.9%), SSc n=15 (13.3%)), mouth opening in SSc (n=4 (5.9%)) and physical capacity (SLE n=2 (1.8%), SSc n=1 (0.9%)). No interventions for mixed connective tissue disease were found. CONCLUSION: There was a great variety in the intervention's content due to differences in body structure, activity limitations and participation restrictions in SLE and SSc. These results highlight the need for personalised, multicomponent, non-pharmacological interventions, which could be delivered as e-health interventions.


Subject(s)
Connective Tissue Diseases , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Scleroderma, Systemic , Telemedicine , Connective Tissue Diseases/therapy , Humans , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/therapy , Scleroderma, Systemic/therapy
10.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 61(4): 1600-1609, 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328934

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify the main CT features that may help in distinguishing a progression of interstitial lung disease (ILD) secondary to SSc from COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: This multicentric study included 22 international readers grouped into a radiologist group (RADs) and a non-radiologist group (nRADs). A total of 99 patients, 52 with COVID-19 and 47 with SSc-ILD, were included in the study. RESULTS: Fibrosis inside focal ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in the upper lobes; fibrosis in the lower lobe GGOs; reticulations in lower lobes (especially if bilateral and symmetrical or associated with signs of fibrosis) were the CT features most frequently associated with SSc-ILD. The CT features most frequently associated with COVID- 19 pneumonia were: consolidation (CONS) in the lower lobes, CONS with peripheral (both central/peripheral or patchy distributions), anterior and posterior CONS and rounded-shaped GGOs in the lower lobes. After multivariate analysis, the presence of CONs in the lower lobes (P < 0.0001) and signs of fibrosis in GGOs in the lower lobes (P < 0.0001) remained independently associated with COVID-19 pneumonia and SSc-ILD, respectively. A predictive score was created that was positively associated with COVID-19 diagnosis (96.1% sensitivity and 83.3% specificity). CONCLUSION: CT diagnosis differentiating between COVID-19 pneumonia and SSc-ILD is possible through a combination of the proposed score and radiologic expertise. The presence of consolidation in the lower lobes may suggest COVID-19 pneumonia, while the presence of fibrosis inside GGOs may indicate SSc-ILD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Diseases, Interstitial , Scleroderma, Systemic , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 Testing , Fibrosis , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/complications , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Scleroderma, Systemic/complications , Scleroderma, Systemic/diagnostic imaging , Scleroderma, Systemic/pathology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
11.
Autoimmun Rev ; 20(10): 102899, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316386

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To review similarities between COVID-19 and systemic sclerosis (SSc) early vasculopathy to provide novel insights into both diseases. METHODS: A narrative review of the literature supplemented with expert opinion. RESULTS: There is clear evidence that the endothelium is at the centre stage in SSc and COVID-19, with endothelial cell activation/injury and dysfunction creating the crucial evolving step in the pathogenesis of both diseases. The angiotensin system has also been implicated in the early stages of both COVID-19 and SSc. Autoptic studies provide novel insights into the effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the endothelium. Normal endothelium and endothelial dysfunction in COVID-19 and SSc are discussed. It is debated whether SARS-CoV-2 infection triggers autoimmunity with production of autoantibodies which is of mechanistic interest because other viral illnesses are potentially involved in endothelial dysfunction and in SSc pathogenesis. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 is due to a direct assault of SARS-CoV-2 on the vascular system as an acute infection, whereas SSc remains a chronic/sub-acute autoimmune disease of largely unknown etiology Further study and exploration of the SARS-CoV-2 pathogenic mechanisms might provide further useful milestones in the understanding of the early SSc pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Scleroderma, Systemic , Autoantibodies , Autoimmunity , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Scleroderma, Systemic/diagnosis
12.
Front Immunol ; 12: 686699, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311375

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a respiratory tract infection caused by the new virus SARS-CoV-2. The acute phase of the infection may in certain individuals be followed by another longer phase of disease (long COVID) of unknown etiology probably associated in certain cases with autoimmune activation. It has been shown that COVID-19 can trigger autoantibody production and in genetically predisposed patients may cause the onset or exacerbation of autoimmune diseases. We are reporting a case of mild COVID-19 infection complicated by autoantibody production and cutaneous and gastrointestinal symptoms and subsequently diagnosed with systemic sclerosis (SSc). A 47-year-old man with no history of any autoimmune diseases and in good health became sick together with his family on the 12th of November with mild symptoms: tiredness, fever, cough, and sore throat. Oropharyngeal swab for SARS-CoV-2 tested positive. He was isolated at home and did not require hospitalization. Three weeks later he presented with clinical manifestation compatible with suspicion of SSc. He briefly presented with skin rush, periorbital edema and conjunctivitis, vomiting, dysphagia, burning sensation in the skin, above all in the fingertips and around the mouth, puffy fingers, Raynaud's phenomenon, pain at the fingertip of the middle finger where a depressed area was noticed without a clear ulceration. ANA showed a strongly positive nucleolar pattern. Anti-PM/Scl 75 and PM/Scl 100 resulted positive. High-resolution computed tomography (HCRT) showed early stage of interstitial lung disease (ILD). The patient was diagnosed with SSc based on the persistence of autoantibodies and the clinical and radiological pictures according to the ACR/EULAR classification (scores: puffy finger, 2; ILD, 2; Raynaud's phenomenon, 3; SSc related antibodies, 3; total 10). There are several cases described in the medical literature of possible new onset of SLE after COVID-19 infection. This is the first case that describes a possible new onset of SSc. Conclusion: SARS-CoV-2 may trigger systemic sclerosis.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/etiology , Autoimmunity , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Scleroderma, Systemic/etiology , Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Calcium Channel Blockers/therapeutic use , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/diagnostic imaging , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Proton Pump Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Raynaud Disease/diagnosis , Raynaud Disease/etiology , Scleroderma, Systemic/drug therapy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
13.
Clin Dermatol ; 39(1): 56-63, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300691

ABSTRACT

Autoimmune connective tissue diseases are a heterogeneous group of clinical entities sharing a common feature-an impairment of structural components like collagen and elastin, arising by autoimmune mechanisms. Because most patients are on a long-term immunosuppressive therapy, which renders them vulnerable to infections, a new challenge appears in front of physicians in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) era. Immune mechanisms are substantial for the control and ceasing of viral infections, and their impairment may cause serious complications; however, data from immunosuppressed transplant patients do not reveal a higher frequency or diseases' severity in those infected by COVID-19. Several immunotherapies used to treat autoimmune connective tissue diseases favorably modulate the immune response of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2)-infected patients. The present review highlights the problems of susceptibility, severity, and therapeutic options in patients with autoimmune connective tissue diseases during the COVID-19 pandemic. The relationship between autoimmune connective tissue diseases and COVID-19 infection is explained with antiviral protection genes expression, hypercytokinemia, and lymphohistiocytosis/macrophage activation mechanisms. Recommendations concerning therapy for prevention during the pandemic period or in case of concomitant COVID-19 infection are also presented. Clinical trials are ongoing regarding COVID-19 therapy blocking the cytokine response. © 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Dermatomyositis , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Scleroderma, Systemic , Vasculitis , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatomyositis/complications , Dermatomyositis/drug therapy , Dermatomyositis/immunology , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/drug therapy , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/immunology , Patient Acuity , SARS-CoV-2 , Scleroderma, Systemic/drug therapy , Scleroderma, Systemic/immunology , Thromboembolism/etiology , Vasculitis/drug therapy
20.
Sci Adv ; 7(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066781

ABSTRACT

Despite past extensive studies, the mechanisms underlying pulmonary fibrosis (PF) still remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that lungs originating from different types of patients with PF, including coronavirus disease 2019, systemic sclerosis-associated interstitial lung disease, and idiopathic PF, and from mice following bleomycin (BLM)-induced PF are characterized by the altered methyl-CpG-binding domain 2 (MBD2) expression in macrophages. Depletion of Mbd2 in macrophages protected mice against BLM-induced PF. Mbd2 deficiency significantly attenuated transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGF-ß1) production and reduced M2 macrophage accumulation in the lung following BLM induction. Mechanistically, Mbd2 selectively bound to the Ship promoter in macrophages, by which it repressed Ship expression and enhanced PI3K/Akt signaling to promote the macrophage M2 program. Therefore, intratracheal administration of liposomes loaded with Mbd2 siRNA protected mice from BLM-induced lung injuries and fibrosis. Together, our data support the possibility that MBD2 could be a viable target against PF in clinical settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Macrophages/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , Animals , Bleomycin/pharmacology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/metabolism , Fibrosis , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Liposomes/chemistry , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/metabolism , Lung Neoplasms/metabolism , Macrophages/virology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Pulmonary Fibrosis/virology , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , Scleroderma, Systemic/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism
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