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1.
Front Immunol ; 13: 884211, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834411

ABSTRACT

Stagnating COVID-19 vaccination rates and vaccine hesitancy remain a threat to public health. Improved strategies for real-time tracking and estimation of population-level behavior regarding vaccinations are needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether online search trends for COIVD-19 and influenza mirror vaccination rates. State-level weekly fraction of online searches for top vaccination-related search terms and CDC vaccination data were obtained from June 1, 2020, to May 31, 2021. Next, trends in online search and vaccination data for COVID-19 and influenza were analyzed for visual and quantitative correlation patterns using Spearman's rank correlation analysis. Online searches in the US for COVID-19 vaccinations increased 2.71-fold (95% CI: 1.98-3.45) in the 4 weeks after the FDA emergency authorization compared to the precedent 4 weeks. In March-April 2021, US online searches reached a plateau that was followed by a decline of 83.3% (95% CI: 31.2%-135.3%) until May 31, 2021. The timing of peaks in online searches varied across US states. Online searches were strongly correlated with vaccination rates (r=0.71, 95% CI: 0.45 - 0.87), preceding actual reported vaccination rates in 44 of 51 states. Online search trends preceded vaccination trends by a median of 3.0 weeks (95% CI: 2.0-4.0 weeks) across all states. For influenza vaccination searches, seasonal peaks in September-October between 2016-2020 were noted. Influenza search trends highly correlated with the timing of actual vaccinations for the 2019-2020 (r=0.82, 95% CI: 0.64 - 0.93) and 2020-2021 season (r=0.91, 95% CI: 0.78 - 0.97). Search trends and real-world vaccination rates are highly correlated. Temporal alignment and correlation levels were higher for influenza vaccinations; however, only online searches for COVID-19 vaccination preceded vaccination trends. These findings indicate that US online search data can potentially guide public health efforts, including policy changes and identifying geographical areas to expand vaccination campaigns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Search Engine , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination
2.
Front Public Health ; 10: 884324, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809633

ABSTRACT

In recent years, a series of uncertain events, including the spread of COVID-19, has affected the Chinese stock market. When people face uncertainty, they often turn to internet search engines to obtain more information to support their investment decisions. This paper uses the uncertainty index, investor sentiment reflected by search engine data, and Chinese stock return data during the pandemic to examine the relationships among the three. Using daily data from March 2, 2020, to March 2, 2021, our empirical findings reveal that stock returns during a pandemic lead to an increase in investor retrieval of search engine data and that uncertainty affects stock returns during a pandemic. However, the reverse is not true. Therefore, in the face of an uncertainty such as market volatility caused by the spread of the pandemic, the active release of favorable information by regulators can help guide investor sentiment, prevent sharp stock market volatility, and improve the effectiveness of policy governance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Investments , Search Engine , Uncertainty
4.
Clin Imaging ; 86: 83-88, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1803771

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess radiology representation, multimedia content, and multilingual content of United States lung cancer screening (LCS) program websites. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We identified the websites of US LCS programs with the Google internet search engine using the search terms lung cancer screening, low-dose CT screening, and lung screening. We used a standardized checklist to assess and collect specific content, including information regarding LCS staff composition and references to radiologists and radiology. We also tabulated types and frequencies of included multimedia and multilingual content and patient narratives. RESULTS: We analyzed 257 unique websites. Of these, only 48% (124 of 257) referred to radiologists or radiology in text, images, or videos. Radiologists were featured in images or videos on only 14% (36 of 257) of websites. Radiologists were most frequently acknowledged for their roles in reading or interpreting imaging studies (35% [90 of 574]). Regarding multimedia content, only 36% (92 of 257) of websites had 1 image, 27% (70 of 257) included 2 or more images, and 26% (68 of 257) of websites included one or more videos. Only 3% (7 of 257) of websites included information in a language other than English. Patient narratives were found on only 15% (39 of 257) of websites. CONCLUSIONS: The field of Radiology is mentioned in text, images, or videos by less than half of LCS program websites. Most websites make only minimal use of multimedia content such as images, videos, and patient narratives. Few websites provide LCS information in languages other than English, potentially limiting accessibility to diverse populations.


Subject(s)
Lung Neoplasms , Radiology , Early Detection of Cancer , Humans , Internet , Lung Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Multimedia , Search Engine , United States
5.
J Dermatolog Treat ; 33(2): 1191-1192, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1778768
6.
J Psychiatr Res ; 150: 237-245, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1768361

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We examined the associations of lockdown stringency and duration with Google searches for four mental health concepts (i.e., "Anxiety," "Depression," "Suicide," "Mental Health") in nine countries (i.e., Hungary, India, Iran, Italy, Paraguay, Serbia, South Africa, Spain, Turkey) during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We retrieved national-level data for each country from Google Trends and the Global Panel Database of Pandemic Policies. In our primary analysis, we used data from all countries to estimate a set of multilevel regression models examining associations of overall lockdown stringency and lockdown duration with relative search volumes for each mental health term. We repeated the models after replacing overall lockdown stringency with each of the lockdown stringency components. RESULTS: A negative association was found between overall lockdown stringency and "Depression." Lockdown duration and the most stringent stay-at-home requirements were negatively associated with "Anxiety." Policies that recommended or required the cancelation of public events evidenced negative associations with "Depression," whereas associations between policies that required some or all levels of schooling to close and "Depression" were positive. Policies that recommended or required workplaces to close and those that enforced quarantines on non-citizens arriving from high-risk regions or closed borders entirely were negatively associated with "Suicide." CONCLUSIONS: Lockdown duration and some lockdown policies during the COVID-19 pandemic were generally associated with significantly lower, rather than higher, Google searches for selected mental health terms. These findings could be used alongside other evidence to develop future lockdown strategies that are sensitive to mental health issues during public health crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Search Engine
7.
Brain Behav Immun ; 87: 30-32, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719334

ABSTRACT

This study hypothesized that national population health literacy might reflect on their keywords searching. We applied Google searches for "wash hands" and "face mask" during January 19 to February 18 as a surrogate of national population health literacy among 21 countries, and examine whether google searches for "wash hands" and "face masks" would protect from increased numbers of confirmed cases of among 21 countries We found the increased google searches for "wash hands" from January 19 to February 18, 2020, correlated with a lower spreading speed of COVID-19 from February 19 to March 10, 2020 among 21 countries (Pearson's correlation coefficient of -0.70, P < 0.001). The result highlights the importance of public awareness of hand washing in preventing COVID-19 disease spreading.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hand Disinfection , Information Seeking Behavior , Internet , Masks , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Search Engine , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715311

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this work was to explore and characterize the current landscape of mobile applications available to treat mood disorders such as depression, bipolar disorder, and dysthymia. METHODS: We developed a tool that makes both the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store searchable using keywords and that facilitates the extraction of basic app information of the search results. All app results were filtered using various inclusion and exclusion criteria. We characterized all resultant applications according to their technical details. Furthermore, we searched for scientific publications on each app's website and PubMed, to understand whether any of the apps were supported by any type of scientific evidence on their acceptability, validation, use, effectiveness, etc. Results: Thirty apps were identified that fit the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The literature search yielded 27 publications related to the apps. However, these did not exclusively concern mood disorders. 6 were randomized studies and the rest included a protocol, pilot-, feasibility, case-, or qualitative studies, among others. The majority of studies were conducted on relatively small scales and 9 of the 27 studies did not explicitly study the effects of mobile application use on mental wellbeing. CONCLUSION: While there exists a wealth of mobile applications aimed at the treatment of mental health disorders, including mood disorders, this study showed that only a handful of these are backed by robust scientific evidence. This result uncovers a need for further clinically oriented and systematic validation and testing of such apps.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Mental Health , Mood Disorders/therapy , Search Engine
9.
Soc Sci Med ; 297: 114820, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692873

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 vaccination was associated with a general feeling of hesitancy, and its arrival increased fear and economic anxiety. This paper investigates the impacts of Covid-19 vaccination on fear and economic anxiety using a worldwide sample of 194 countries observed from December 1st, 2020 to March 4th, 2021. The difference-in-differences investigation approach shows that with the vaccine's arrival, the Google search trends measuring fear and anxiety are increasing. The arrival of the vaccine has created a general feeling of fear, and people have a lack of confidence in the vaccine's efficiency to overcome the Covid-19 crisis. Specifically, anxiety increased when the delta variant was discovered in India. Governments' interventions must ensure that the Covid-19 vaccine does not have adverse side effects that can harm public health. We suggested that policy makers should focus on increasing the number of older adults willing to receive the vaccine. It can be effective in explaining the benefits of the vaccine, and denying false information about the vaccine and its serious side effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Aged , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fear , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Search Engine , Vaccination/adverse effects
10.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 2619, 2022 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692545

ABSTRACT

The assessment of population mental health relies on survey data from representative samples, which come with considerable costs. Drawing on research which established that absolutist words (e.g. never) are semantic markers for depression, we propose a new measure of population mental health based on the frequency of absolutist words in online search data (absolute thinking index; ATI). Our aims were to first validate the ATI, and to use it to model public mental health dynamics in France and the UK during the current COVID-19 pandemic. To do so, we extracted time series for a validated dictionary of 19 absolutist words, from which the ATI was computed (weekly averages, 2019-2020, n = 208) using Google Trends. We then tested the relationship between ATI and longitudinal survey data of population mental health in the UK (n = 36,520) and France (n = 32,000). After assessing the relationship between ATI and survey measures of depression and anxiety in both populations, and dynamic similarities between ATI and survey measures (France), we tested the ATI's construct validity by showing how it was affected by the pandemic and how it can be predicted by COVID-19-related indicators. A final step consisted in replicating ATI's construct validity tests in Japan, thereby providing evidence for the ATI's cross-cultural generalizability. ATI was linked with survey depression scores in the UK, r = 0.68, 95%CI[0.34,0.86], ß = 0.23, 95%CI[0.09,0.37] in France and displayed similar trends. We finally assessed the pandemic's impact on ATI using Bayesian structural time-series models. These revealed that the pandemic increased ATI by 3.2%, 95%CI[2.1,4.2] in France and 3.7%, 95%CI[2.9,4.4] in the UK. Mixed-effects models showed that ATI was related to COVID-19 new deaths in both countries ß = 0.14, 95%CI[0.14,0.21]. These patterns were replicated in Japan, with a pandemic impact of 4.9%, 95%CI[3.1,6.7] and an influence of COVID-19 death of ß = 0.90, 95%CI[0.36,1.44]. Our results demonstrate the validity of the ATI as a measure of population mental health (depression) in France, the UK and to some extent in Japan. We propose that researchers use it as cost-effective public mental health "thermometer" for applied and research purposes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Status Indicators , Mental Health , Search Engine , Terminology as Topic , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Europe/epidemiology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology
11.
Clin Lab ; 68(2)2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687426

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The ability to forecast changing trends of COVID-19 can help drive efforts to sustain the increasing burden on the healthcare system, specifically the clinical laboratories. We aimed to assess whether the trends of SARS-CoV-2 testing in Pakistan can be predicted using COVID-19 symptoms as search terms and analyzing the data from Google Trends. METHODS: The number of weekly SARS-CoV-2 tests performed were retrieved from online COVID-19 data resource. Google Trends data for the search terms with most common COVID-19 symptoms was analyzed for cross-correlation with the number of tests performed nationally. RESULTS: A total of 10,066,255 SARS-CoV-2 diagnostic tests were analyzed. Search terms of fever, headache, and shortness of breath displayed a statistically significant correlation with total number of tests performed with a 1-week time lag. CONCLUSIONS: Google Trends data can be used to forecast the changing trends in COVID-19 testing. This information can be used for careful planning and arrangements to meet increased diagnostic and healthcare demands in difficult times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Search Engine
12.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 2373, 2022 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684110

ABSTRACT

Prior work has shown the utility of using Internet searches to track the incidence of different respiratory illnesses. Similarly, people who suffer from COVID-19 may query for their symptoms prior to accessing the medical system (or in lieu of it). To assist in the UK government's response to the COVID-19 pandemic we analyzed searches for relevant symptoms on the Bing web search engine from users in England to identify areas of the country where unexpected rises in relevant symptom searches occurred. These were reported weekly to the UK Health Security Agency to assist in their monitoring of the pandemic. Our analysis shows that searches for "fever" and "cough" were the most correlated with future case counts during the initial stages of the pandemic, with searches preceding case counts by up to 21 days. Unexpected rises in search patterns were predictive of anomalous rises in future case counts within a week, reaching an Area Under Curve of 0.82 during the initial phase of the pandemic, and later reducing due to changes in symptom presentation. Thus, analysis of regional searches for symptoms can provide an early indicator (of more than one week) of increases in COVID-19 case counts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Hotspot , Search Engine/statistics & numerical data , Cough/epidemiology , England/epidemiology , Fever/epidemiology , Humans
13.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 75(4): 1497-1520, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1682949

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The primary aim of this study was to highlight the burden of cosmetic tourism on the Irish healthcare system during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our secondary aim was to examine the popularity of cosmetic tourism currently through Google Trends data analysis. METHODS: Data on all patients presenting to our unit with complications of cosmetic tourism were retrospectively reviewed to determine the level of care and resources used for each case. The 'Google Trends' data analysis tool was accessed and the popularity of common plastic surgery topics was analysed over the last two years. RESULTS: Eight patients were referred for treatment after experiencing complications following elective cosmetic surgery overseas. Complications included seroma1, infected collection3, wound dehiscence5 and implant extrusion.2 Length of stay ranged from 1 to 18 days with 63% of patients requiring invasive intervention. Google trends revealed that popularity for plastic surgery topics initially decreased at each lockdown date but increased to pre-pandemic interests after a short period. Related search topics for procedures including the terms, "Turkey" and "Lithuania" increasing in popularity by more than 5000%. CONCLUSIONS: This case series shows that despite the current pandemic cosmetic tourism is imposing a significant cost on healthcare resources. Analysis of Google Trends has shown that interest in these procedures is increasing despite travel restrictions and risks associated with the pandemic. The public need to be informed of the potentially negative consequences of cosmetic tourism and be discouraged from undertaking surgery overseas during the current crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medical Tourism , Surgery, Plastic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Search Engine , Tourism
14.
Neurology ; 98(12 Suppl 2): S9-S10, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1677547

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This investigation employs 2004-2020 Google Trends data to correlate concussion search popularity and high school sports participation while assessing search seasonality and factors associated with search escalation. BACKGROUND: Events linked to concussions, from news to entertainment, altered public perception of concussions and discouraged high-risk activities. Such sentiment likely promoted high school football's 2004-2018 8% decrease in participation, despite simultaneous 8% increase for sports overall. Google Trends (GT) analysis calculates distinct subjects' popularity scores (0-100) by normalizing Google search frequency with other subjects in the same topic. With 35% of patients researching their conditions using Google, tracking concussion popularity scores allows robust analysis of event-driven fluctuation, seasonal variation, and sports impact. DESIGN/METHODS: Worldwide GT analysis was conducted for the disease topic "Concussion" with the categorical filter "Health" from 2004 to 2020. This period's monthly popularity scores with annual averages and annual high school sports participation data were subsequently obtained from Google Trends and the National Federation of State High School Associations, respectively. RESULTS: Concurrence of significant score changes with CTE studies' publication, release of 2015 film Concussion, and the COVID-19 pandemic validates GT's measurement of public interest. From 2006 to 2016, Pearson's correlation coefficients demonstrated strong negative correlation between GT popularity scores for "Concussion" with total number of high school football participants overall (R2 = 0.8553) and participants per school (R2 = 0.9533). Confirming football-related seasonality, one-way ANOVA regression analysis concluded 2004-2020's mean change in month-specific popularity score is not the same (p = 3.193E-08), and months during football season had statistically significant variability (September: p = 4.389E-05) with elevated average z-scores. CONCLUSIONS: Coupled with ANOVA regression and normalized analyses, strong negative correlations between concussion popularity score and high school football participation produce quantitative measures of a long-suspected relationship. Tracking concussion popularity and seasonality with Google Trends provides insight into how, when, and why patients are educating themselves online.


Subject(s)
Athletic Injuries , Brain Concussion , Search Engine , Athletic Injuries/epidemiology , Brain Concussion/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Schools , Seasons , Youth Sports
15.
J Affect Disord ; 303: 203-205, 2022 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676787

ABSTRACT

Online searches related to suicide may sometimes be an early proxy indicator for behavioural outcomes. We used interrupted time series regression analyses to examine changes in suicide and resilience-related Google searches worldwide and in the United States during the first 12 months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Searches for the word "suicide" were unchanged worldwide (-1%; 95%CI, -12%-11%) and in the US (-7%; 95%CI, -15%-2%) with decreased searches for "suicide methods" and increased searches for "how to kill yourself" and for resilience-related terms. This study provides potential evidence that suicides may not increase worldwide during the first year of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Search Engine , United States
16.
Neurol Sci ; 43(2): 1007-1014, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669827

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the concordance between Google Maps® application (GM®) and clinical practice measurements of ambulatory function (e.g., Ambulation Score (AS) and respective Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS)) in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a cross-sectional multicenter study. AS and EDSS were calculated using GM® and routine clinical methods; the correspondence between the two methods was assessed. A multinomial logistic model is investigated which demographic (age, sex) and clinical features (e.g., disease subtype, fatigue, depression) might have influenced discrepancies between the two methods. RESULTS: Two hundred forty-three pwMS were included; discrepancies in AS and in EDDS assessments between GM® and routine clinical methods were found in 81/243 (33.3%) and 74/243 (30.4%) pwMS, respectively. Progressive phenotype (odds ratio [OR] = 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-7.11, p = 0.03), worse fatigue (OR = 1.03; 95% CI 1.01-1.06, p = 0.01), and more severe depression (OR = 1.1; 95% CI 1.04-1.17, p = 0.002) were associated with discrepancies between GM® and routine clinical scoring. CONCLUSION: GM® could easily be used in a real-life clinical setting to calculate the AS and the related EDSS scores. GM® should be considered for validation in further clinical studies.


Subject(s)
Multiple Sclerosis , Search Engine , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disability Evaluation , Fatigue/diagnosis , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/diagnosis
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662655

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The WHO has used the term "infodemic" to describe the vast amount of false and true information that was making it difficult for people to find reliable information when they needed it. The infodemic spreads faster than COVID-19 itself. The main objective of the study was to characterize and analyze content about COVID-19 returned by Google during the pandemic and compare it between countries. METHODS: The study was conducted between 30 March and 27 April 2020. The information was searched through local Google websites using the "COVID-19", "Coronavirus", "SARS-CoV-2" and "fake news" keywords. The search was conducted in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Singapore, Spain, UK and the USA. The total number of the analyzed webpages was 685. RESULTS: The most frequent types were News websites 47% (324/685) and Governmental 19% (131/685) while the least were Health portals 2% (17/685) and Scientific journals 5% (35/635), p < 0.001. United States and Australia had the highest share of Governmental websites. There was a positive correlation between the amount of preventive information and a number of SARS-CoV-2 infections in countries. The higher the number of tests performed, the higher was the amount of information about prevention available online. CONCLUSIONS: Online information is usually available on news and government websites and refers to prevention. There were differences between countries in types of information available online. The highest positioned (the first 20) websites for COVID-19, Coronavirus and SARS-CoV-2 keywords returned by Google include true information.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Internet , Italy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Search Engine , United States
19.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260931, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632675

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, US populations have experienced elevated rates of financial and psychological distress that could lead to increases in suicide rates. Rapid ongoing mental health monitoring is critical for early intervention, especially in regions most affected by the pandemic, yet traditional surveillance data are available only after long lags. Novel information on real-time population isolation and concerns stemming from the pandemic's social and economic impacts, via cellular mobility tracking and online search data, are potentially important interim surveillance resources. Using these measures, we employed transfer function model time-series analyses to estimate associations between daily mobility indicators (proportion of cellular devices completely at home and time spent at home) and Google Health Trends search volumes for terms pertaining to economic stress, mental health, and suicide during 2020 and 2021 both nationally and in New York City. During the first pandemic wave in early-spring 2020, over 50% of devices remained completely at home and searches for economic stressors exceeded 60,000 per 10 million. We found large concurrent associations across analyses between declining mobility and increasing searches for economic stressor terms (national proportion of devices at home: cross-correlation coefficient (CC) = 0.6 (p-value <0.001)). Nationally, we also found strong associations between declining mobility and increasing mental health and suicide-related searches (time at home: mood/anxiety CC = 0.53 (<0.001), social stressor CC = 0.51 (<0.001), suicide seeking CC = 0.37 (0.006)). Our findings suggest that pandemic-related isolation coincided with acute economic distress and may be a risk factor for poor mental health and suicidal behavior. These emergent relationships warrant ongoing attention and causal assessment given the potential for long-term psychological impact and suicide death. As US populations continue to face stress, Google search data can be used to identify possible warning signs from real-time changes in distributions of population thought patterns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Cell Phone/statistics & numerical data , Search Engine/statistics & numerical data , Socioeconomic Factors , Suicide/psychology , Geographic Information Systems , Humans , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , New York City , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Search Engine/trends , Stress, Psychological , Time Factors , United States
20.
Surg Radiol Anat ; 44(1): 49-53, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626305

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of the present study was to assess the online search behavior for the keyword "anatomy" worldwide and to compare the pre-pandemic and during COVID-19 pandemic scenario for the same. METHODS: Google trends tool was used for the assessment of the search behavior for the term "anatomy". The data, i.e. relative search volume (RSV) were downloaded for this term using the all categories, web search and only YouTube settings during a period from 1.1.2019 to 3.31.2021 from www.trends.google.com . The geographic trends for this search query were plotted across the world. RESULTS: Seasonal peaks were observed for the search term "anatomy" during the first 3 months of the year and in months of September, October and November in 2019. Similar seasonal peaks were observed for the year 2020 except that there was sudden decrease in RSV for term "anatomy" in the month of March. Though trend for the rest of the year was same, but there was general lower RSV in 2020. The country with highest search hit was United States followed by Canada, Ireland, Australia and Philippines. CONCLUSION: The search trend for pre-pandemic and pandemic period was similar with overall lower RSV during 2020, where it noticeably decreased during the initial phase of lockdown, i.e. in the month of March. As the whole world is still in the COVID-19 pandemic era, the future studies may report the google trends once the pandemic is over and may compare the post-pandemic trend for the same.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Search Engine , United States
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