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1.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 91(2)2021 May 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1215533

ABSTRACT

To the Editor COVID-19 (COrona VIrus Disease) patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease, multiple CV risk factors or comorbidities (i.e., arterial hypertension and diabetes) were shown to be more prone to a worse prognosis. SARS-CoV-2 is a still unknown enemy and the role of concomitant cardiovascular therapies has been controversial in the early stages, particularly with regard to Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme inhibitors...


Subject(s)
/immunology , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Hyperlipidemias/drug therapy , Hypolipidemic Agents/therapeutic use , /complications , /physiopathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Deprescriptions , Humans , Hyperlipidemias/complications , Primary Prevention , Secondary Prevention
2.
Glob Heart ; 16(1): 15, 2021 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145668

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has modified the cardiovascular care of ambulatory patients. The aim of this survey was to study changes in lifestyle habits, treatment adherence, and mental health status in patients with cardiometabolic disease, but no clinical evidence of COVID-19. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in ambulatory patients with cardiometabolic disease using paper/digital surveys. Variables investigated included socioeconomic status, physical activity, diet, tobacco use, alcohol intake, treatment discontinuation, and psychological symptoms. Results: A total of 4,216 patients (50.9% males, mean age 60.3 ± 15.3 years old) from 13 Spanish-speaking Latin American countries were enrolled. Among the study population, 46.4% of patients did not have contact with a healthcare provider, 31.5% reported access barriers to treatments and 17% discontinued some medication. Multivariate analysis showed that non-adherence to treatment was more prevalent in the secondary prevention group: peripheral vascular disease (OR 1.55, CI 1.08-2.24; p = 0.018), heart failure (OR 1.36, CI 1.05-1.75; p = 0.017), and coronary artery disease (OR 1.29 CI 1.04-1.60; p = 0.018). No physical activity was reported by 38% of patients. Only 15% of patients met minimum recommendations of physical activity (more than 150 minutes/week) and vegetable and fruit intake. Low/very low income (45.5%) was associated with a lower level of physical activity (p < 0.0001), less fruit and vegetables intake (p < 0.0001), more tobacco use (p < 0.001) and perception of depression (p < 0.001). Low educational level was also associated with the perception of depression (OR 1.46, CI 1.26-1.70; p < 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with cardiometabolic disease but without clinical evidence of COVID-19 showed significant medication non-adherence, especially in secondary prevention patients. Deterioration in lifestyle habits and appearance of depressive symptoms during the pandemic were frequent and related to socioeconomic status.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Depression/psychology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Diet , Dyslipidemias/therapy , Exercise , Treatment Adherence and Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/therapy , Cigarette Smoking/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Disease/therapy , Educational Status , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Hypertension/therapy , Latin America/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Outpatients , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/therapy , Secondary Prevention , Social Class , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 8: CD013699, 2020 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-777340

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Reducing the transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a global priority. Contact tracing identifies people who were recently in contact with an infected individual, in order to isolate them and reduce further transmission. Digital technology could be implemented to augment and accelerate manual contact tracing. Digital tools for contact tracing may be grouped into three areas: 1) outbreak response; 2) proximity tracing; and 3) symptom tracking. We conducted a rapid review on the effectiveness of digital solutions to contact tracing during infectious disease outbreaks. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits, harms, and acceptability of personal digital contact tracing solutions for identifying contacts of an identified positive case of an infectious disease. SEARCH METHODS: An information specialist searched the literature from 1 January 2000 to 5 May 2020 in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and Embase. Additionally, we screened the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster-RCTs, quasi-RCTs, cohort studies, cross-sectional studies and modelling studies, in general populations. We preferentially included studies of contact tracing during infectious disease outbreaks (including COVID-19, Ebola, tuberculosis, severe acute respiratory syndrome virus, and Middle East respiratory syndrome) as direct evidence, but considered comparative studies of contact tracing outside an outbreak as indirect evidence. The digital solutions varied but typically included software (or firmware) for users to install on their devices or to be uploaded to devices provided by governments or third parties. Control measures included traditional or manual contact tracing, self-reported diaries and surveys, interviews, other standard methods for determining close contacts, and other technologies compared to digital solutions (e.g. electronic medical records). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened records and all potentially relevant full-text publications. One review author extracted data for 50% of the included studies, another extracted data for the remaining 50%; the second review author checked all the extracted data. One review author assessed quality of included studies and a second checked the assessments. Our outcomes were identification of secondary cases and close contacts, time to complete contact tracing, acceptability and accessibility issues, privacy and safety concerns, and any other ethical issue identified. Though modelling studies will predict estimates of the effects of different contact tracing solutions on outcomes of interest, cohort studies provide empirically measured estimates of the effects of different contact tracing solutions on outcomes of interest. We used GRADE-CERQual to describe certainty of evidence from qualitative data and GRADE for modelling and cohort studies. MAIN RESULTS: We identified six cohort studies reporting quantitative data and six modelling studies reporting simulations of digital solutions for contact tracing. Two cohort studies also provided qualitative data. Three cohort studies looked at contact tracing during an outbreak, whilst three emulated an outbreak in non-outbreak settings (schools). Of the six modelling studies, four evaluated digital solutions for contact tracing in simulated COVID-19 scenarios, while two simulated close contacts in non-specific outbreak settings. Modelling studies Two modelling studies provided low-certainty evidence of a reduction in secondary cases using digital contact tracing (measured as average number of secondary cases per index case - effective reproductive number (R eff)). One study estimated an 18% reduction in R eff with digital contact tracing compared to self-isolation alone, and a 35% reduction with manual contact-tracing. Another found a reduction in R eff for digital contact tracing compared to self-isolation alone (26% reduction) and a reduction in R eff for manual contact tracing compared to self-isolation alone (53% reduction). However, the certainty of evidence was reduced by unclear specifications of their models, and assumptions about the effectiveness of manual contact tracing (assumed 95% to 100% of contacts traced), and the proportion of the population who would have the app (53%). Cohort studies Two cohort studies provided very low-certainty evidence of a benefit of digital over manual contact tracing. During an Ebola outbreak, contact tracers using an app found twice as many close contacts per case on average than those using paper forms. Similarly, after a pertussis outbreak in a US hospital, researchers found that radio-frequency identification identified 45 close contacts but searches of electronic medical records found 13. The certainty of evidence was reduced by concerns about imprecision, and serious risk of bias due to the inability of contact tracing study designs to identify the true number of close contacts. One cohort study provided very low-certainty evidence that an app could reduce the time to complete a set of close contacts. The certainty of evidence for this outcome was affected by imprecision and serious risk of bias. Contact tracing teams reported that digital data entry and management systems were faster to use than paper systems and possibly less prone to data loss. Two studies from lower- or middle-income countries, reported that contact tracing teams found digital systems simpler to use and generally preferred them over paper systems; they saved personnel time, reportedly improved accuracy with large data sets, and were easier to transport compared with paper forms. However, personnel faced increased costs and internet access problems with digital compared to paper systems. Devices in the cohort studies appeared to have privacy from contacts regarding the exposed or diagnosed users. However, there were risks of privacy breaches from snoopers if linkage attacks occurred, particularly for wearable devices. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The effectiveness of digital solutions is largely unproven as there are very few published data in real-world outbreak settings. Modelling studies provide low-certainty evidence of a reduction in secondary cases if digital contact tracing is used together with other public health measures such as self-isolation. Cohort studies provide very low-certainty evidence that digital contact tracing may produce more reliable counts of contacts and reduce time to complete contact tracing. Digital solutions may have equity implications for at-risk populations with poor internet access and poor access to digital technology. Stronger primary research on the effectiveness of contact tracing technologies is needed, including research into use of digital solutions in conjunction with manual systems, as digital solutions are unlikely to be used alone in real-world settings. Future studies should consider access to and acceptability of digital solutions, and the resultant impact on equity. Studies should also make acceptability and uptake a primary research question, as privacy concerns can prevent uptake and effectiveness of these technologies.


Subject(s)
Contact Tracing/methods , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Botswana/epidemiology , /prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Contact Tracing/instrumentation , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/epidemiology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/prevention & control , Humans , Models, Theoretical , Patient Isolation/statistics & numerical data , Privacy , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Secondary Prevention/methods , Secondary Prevention/statistics & numerical data , Sierra Leone/epidemiology , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , Tuberculosis/prevention & control , United States/epidemiology , Whooping Cough/epidemiology , Whooping Cough/prevention & control
6.
Ginekol Pol ; 91(7): 428-431, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-719820

ABSTRACT

The Polish Society of Gynecologists and Obstetricians and Polish Society of Colposcopy and Cervical Pathophysiology Interim Guidelines goal at aiding gynecologists in providing a cervical cancer prevention care during the evolving SARS-CoV-2 pan-demic. Presented guidelines were developed on a review of limited data and updated when new relevant publications were revealed. Timing for deferrals of diagnostic-therapeutic procedures were mostly covered in the guidelines. Also, a support for the existing Polish recommendations on abnormal screening results in a subject of minor and major screening abnor-malities terminology were given. The guidelines are obligatory for the specified COVID-19 pandemic period only and they might be changed depending on the new available evidence.


Subject(s)
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia , Cervix Uteri/pathology , Colposcopy , Coronavirus Infections , Early Detection of Cancer , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Betacoronavirus , Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/diagnosis , Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/pathology , Colposcopy/methods , Colposcopy/standards , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Diagnosis, Differential , Early Detection of Cancer/standards , Female , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care Management/methods , Patient Care Management/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Poland/epidemiology , Secondary Prevention/methods , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control
7.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(11): 105182, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-665905

ABSTRACT

Infection with the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes the development of the novel 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and associated clinical symptoms, which typically presents as an upper respiratory syndrome such as pneumonia. Growing evidence indicates an increased prevalence of neurological involvement (e.g., in the form of stroke) during virus infection. COVID-19 has been suggested to be more than a lung infection because it affects the vasculature of the lungs and other organs and increases the risk of thrombosis. Patients with stroke are vulnerable to secondary events as a result not only of their poor vascular condition but also of their lack of access to rehabilitation resources. Herein, we review current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of COVID-19, its possible association with neurological involvement, and current drug therapies. Suggestions are also offered regarding the potential for current neurorehabilitation therapies to be taught and practiced at home.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Physical Therapy Modalities , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Secondary Prevention , Stroke Rehabilitation , Stroke/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Quarantine , Recovery of Function , Recurrence , Risk Factors , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/physiopathology , Treatment Outcome
8.
Cytokine Growth Factor Rev ; 54: 43-50, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634065

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) first emerged in late 2019 in China. At the time of writing, its causative agent SARS-CoV-2 has spread worldwide infecting over 9 million individuals and causing more than 460,000 deaths. In the absence of vaccines, we are facing the dramatic challenge of controlling COVID-19 pandemic. Among currently available drugs, type I Interferons (IFN-I) - mainly IFN-α and ß -represent ideal candidates given their direct and immune-mediated antiviral effects and the long record of clinical use. However, the best modalities of using these cytokines in SARS-CoV-2 infected patients is a matter of debate. Here, we discuss how we can exploit the current knowledge on IFN-I system to tailor the most promising dosing, timing and route of administration of IFN-I to the disease stage, with the final aim of making these cytokines a valuable therapeutic strategy in today's fight against COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Interferon-alpha/therapeutic use , Interferon-beta/therapeutic use , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Humans , Immunotherapy/methods , Secondary Prevention/methods
10.
Nature ; 585(7824): 273-276, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-592386

ABSTRACT

Effective therapies to treat coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are urgently needed. While many investigational, approved, and repurposed drugs have been suggested as potential treatments, preclinical data from animal models can guide the search for effective treatments by ruling out those that lack efficacy in vivo. Remdesivir (GS-5734) is a nucleotide analogue prodrug with broad antiviral activity1,2 that is currently being investigated in COVID-19 clinical trials and recently received Emergency Use Authorization from the US Food and Drug Administration3,4. In animal models, remdesivir was effective against infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)2,5,6. In vitro, remdesivir inhibited replication of SARS-CoV-27,8. Here we investigate the efficacy of remdesivir in a rhesus macaque model of SARS-CoV-2 infection9. Unlike vehicle-treated animals, macaques treated with remdesivir did not show signs of respiratory disease; they also showed reduced pulmonary infiltrates on radiographs and reduced virus titres in bronchoalveolar lavages twelve hours after the first dose. Virus shedding from the upper respiratory tract was not reduced by remdesivir treatment. At necropsy, remdesivir-treated animals had lower lung viral loads and reduced lung damage. Thus, treatment with remdesivir initiated early during infection had a clinical benefit in rhesus macaques infected with SARS-CoV-2. Although the rhesus macaque model does not represent the severe disease observed in some patients with COVID-19, our data support the early initiation of remdesivir treatment in patients with COVID-19 to prevent progression to pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Macaca mulatta/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacokinetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/pharmacokinetics , Alanine/pharmacology , Alanine/therapeutic use , Animals , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , DNA Mutational Analysis , Disease Progression , Drug Resistance, Viral , Female , Lung/drug effects , Lung/pathology , Lung/physiopathology , Lung/virology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Secondary Prevention , Time Factors , Viral Load/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Virus Shedding/drug effects
11.
Psychiatry Res ; 291: 113213, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-591411

ABSTRACT

The containment measures implemented to reduce the progression of the COVID-19 pandemic can increase the risk of serious mental disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The general fear of getting infected and the importance given to personal hygiene, may have a negative impact on this clinical population. In a group of patients with OCD who had completed an evidence-based therapeutic path for OCD before the quarantine, this study evaluated the changes on OCD symptoms during the quarantine and investigated the effects of contamination symptoms and remission state before the quarantine on OCD symptom worsening during the quarantine. The Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive (Y-BOCS) Severity score, administered before the quarantine, was re-administered after six weeks since the beginning of the complete lockdown. A significant increase in obsession and compulsion severity emerged. Remission status on OCD symptoms and having contamination symptoms before the quarantine were significantly associated with more elevated OCD symptom worsening during the quarantine. To our knowledge, this is the first study which assessed OCD symptoms at the COVID-19 time. Our results support the need to improve relapse prevention during the period of social restrictions and develop alternative strategies such as online consultations and digital psychiatric management.


Subject(s)
Compulsive Behavior/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/diagnosis , Pandemics , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Secondary Prevention , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
13.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 31(7): 1398-1408, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-459123

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health care-associated infections during previous coronavirus epidemics involving severe acute respiratory syndrome and Middle East respiratory syndrome resulted from human-to-human transmission in hemodialysis (HD) facilities. The effect of a strategy of HD with cohort isolation-separate dialysis sessions for close contacts of patients with confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-on the prevention of secondary transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in HD units is unknown. METHODS: Our multicenter cohort study of an HD with cohort isolation strategy enrolled close contacts of patients with confirmed COVID-19, including patients on HD and health care workers in HD units. Close contacts had been identified by epidemiologic investigation and tested negative on an immediate screening test for SARS-CoV-2. RESULTS: As of March 14, 11 patients on HD and 7 health care workers from 11 HD centers were diagnosed as having COVID-19. The immediate screening test was performed in 306 people, and among them, 302 close contacts with negative test results were enrolled. HD with cohort isolation was performed among all close contacts for a median of 14 days in seven centers. During cohort isolation, nine patients showed symptoms but tested negative for SARS-CoV-2. Two health care workers in the HD units (0.66% of the total group) were diagnosed at the termination test for SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSIONS: The transmission of COVID-19 can be controlled without closure of HD centers by implementing preemptive activities, including early detection with rapid testing, cohort isolation, collaboration between institutions, and continuous monitoring of infection. Our strategy and experience may provide helpful guidance for circumstances involving the rapid spread of infectious diseases such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Patient Isolation/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Renal Dialysis/methods , Adult , Chi-Square Distribution , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control/organization & administration , Kidney Failure, Chronic/diagnosis , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Health , Pandemics , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Program Evaluation , Renal Dialysis/statistics & numerical data , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Secondary Prevention/organization & administration , Statistics, Nonparametric , Survival Rate
15.
Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 28(4): 228-234, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-620215

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus pandemic, referred to as COVID-19, has spread throughout the globe since its first case in China in December 2019, leaving a significant number of people infected and clinically ill. The purpose of this review is to provide the current known clinical characteristics of and management for COVID-19 as it relates to otolaryngology. RECENT FINDINGS: COVID-19 is a highly transmissible respiratory disease with common presenting symptoms of fever, cough, and fatigue. In the absence of available vaccines or antiviral therapies, symptomatic and respiratory support is the current standard of therapy. Measures to prevent further transmission have been enacted globally including social distancing and cancellation of public events. Given elevated viral load in the upper aerodigestive tract, extra precautions in patients with otolaryngology needs have been recommended for protection of both healthcare workers and patients. SUMMARY: Otolaryngologists face unique risk from COVID-19. Maintaining appropriate preventive health measures and remaining updated on institutional clinical guidelines is paramount for both caretaker safety and patient care.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Occupational Health , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , China , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Otolaryngologists/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Secondary Prevention/organization & administration
16.
Ter. psicol ; 38(1): 103-118, abr. 2020. tab, graf
Article in Spanish | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-621114

ABSTRACT

Resumen En diciembre de 2019, se informaron casos de neumonía potencialmente mortal en Wuhan, provincia de Hubei, China (COVID-19). Esta enfermedad se ha extendido rápidamente por todo el mundo con miles de casos confirmados y muertes, transformándose en pandemia y desafiado los sistemas de salud pública. No existe aún vacuna ni tratamiento científicamente probado, sin embargo, se ha identificado los comportamientos exactos que pueden evitar el contagio y propagación. El presente artículo sistematiza información disponible inicial sobre psicología y COVID-19. Se discute que gran parte del problema de la enfermedad se puede evitar cambiando los comportamientos de las personas y que la psicología puede ayudar a explicar, prevenir e intervenir para su solución. La psicología cuenta con evidencia científica disponible que explica todos estos fenómenos, evidencia que debe ser puesta en relieve por los mismos actores de las disciplinas a disposición de otras áreas del conocimiento y sobre todo para los tomadores de decisión.


Abstract In December 2019, highly lethal cases of pneumonia were reported in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China (COVID-19). This disease has spread rapidly around the world with thousands of confirmed cases and deaths, becoming a pandemic and challenging public health systems. There is no vaccine or scientifically proven treatment yet, but the exact behaviours that can prevent transmission and spread have been identified. This article systematizes initial available information on psychology and COVID-19. It is discussed that much of the problem of the disease can be avoided by changing people's behaviors and that psychology can help explain, prevent and intervene to solve it. Psychology has scientific evidence available that explains all these phenomena, evidence that should be highlighted by the same actors in the disciplines available to other areas of knowledge and especially for decision makers.


Subject(s)
Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Psychology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Primary Prevention , Behavioral Medicine , Public Health , Health Personnel/psychology , Crisis Intervention , Secondary Prevention , Tertiary Prevention , Pandemics
20.
Heart Lung Circ ; 29(7): e99-e104, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-155330

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has introduced a major disruption to the delivery of routine health care across the world. This provides challenges for the use of secondary prevention measures in patients with established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this Position Statement is to review the implications for effective delivery of secondary prevention strategies during the COVID-19 pandemic. CHALLENGES: The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced limitations for many patients to access standard health services such as visits to health care professionals, medications, imaging and blood tests as well as attendance at cardiac rehabilitation. In addition, the pandemic is having an impact on lifestyle habits and mental health. Taken together, this has the potential to adversely impact the ability of practitioners and patients to adhere to treatment guidelines for the prevention of recurrent cardiovascular events. RECOMMENDATIONS: Every effort should be made to deliver safe, ongoing access to health care professionals and the use of evidenced based therapies in individuals with CVD. An increase in use of a range of electronic health platforms has the potential to transform secondary prevention. Integrating research programs that evaluate the utility of these approaches may provide important insights into how to develop more optimal approaches to secondary prevention beyond the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Rehabilitation , Cardiology , Cardiovascular Diseases , Coronavirus Infections , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Secondary Prevention , Australia/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Cardiac Rehabilitation/trends , Cardiology/methods , Cardiology/organization & administration , Cardiology/trends , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Humans , New Zealand/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Secondary Prevention/methods , Secondary Prevention/organization & administration , Societies, Medical
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