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1.
Rev. bras. promoç. saúde (Impr.) ; 34(1): 1-11, 17/02/2021.
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2202500

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze the association between social isolation (SI), physical activity level (PAL) and sedentary behavior in the university community in pandemic times. Methods: A cross-sectional epidemiological study was carried out from May 7 to June 4, 2020, with 194 participants linked to the Federal University of Jataí Universidade Federal de Jataí ­ UFJ), in Goiás, Brazil. Data were collected using a form created on Google Forms® and sent to the email addresses of the academic community of UFJ to assess socioeconomic characteristics, lifestyle, body composition, physical activity level, and sedentary behavior, taking into account the periods prior to and during SI. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics, with p<0.05 considered significant. Results: The study participants were predominantly women (n=141; 72.6%), 18-27 years old (n=100; 71%), single(n=96; 68%), students (n=110; 78%), and had no pre-existing diseases (n=94; 67%). Increases in the body mass and body massindex (BMI) (p<0.05) were observed during SI, and physical activity downtime increased for all participants, regardless of sex(p<0.05). Conclusion: SI recommended by health managers due to the pandemic caused by COVID-19 was responsible for inducing an increase in body mass and BMI accompanied by an increase in screen time during the week, as well as a decrease in the PAL of individuals belonging to the community of university students of UFJ. Descriptors: Coronavirus Infections; Sedentary Behavior; Motor Activity.


Objetivo: Analisar a associação de isolamento social (IS), nível de atividade física (NAF) e comportamento sedentário na comunidade universitária em tempos pandêmicos. Métodos: Estudo epidemiológico transversal realizado no período de 7 de maio a 4 de junho de 2020 com 194 participantes vinculados à Universidade Federal de Jataí (UFJ), Goiás, Brasil. Para coleta de dados, foi enviado ao e-mail da comunidade acadêmica da UFJ um formulário criado no Google Forms® para avaliar as características socioeconômicas, os hábitos de vida, a composição corporal, o nível de atividade física e o comportamento sedentário, levando em consideração o período anterior e durante o IS. Os dados foram analisados por estatística descritiva e inferencial, com p<0,05. Resultados: Os participantes do estudo foram, predominantemente, mulheres (n=141; 72,6%), na faixa etária de 18-27 anos (n=100; 71%), solteiras (n=96; 68%), discentes (n=110; 78%), com ausência de doenças pré-existentes(n=94; 67%). Durante o IS ocorreu aumento da massa corporal e do índice de massa corporal (IMC) dos indivíduos (p<0,05). Além disso, o tempo de inatividade física aumentou para todos os indivíduos, independente do sexo (p<0,05). Conclusão: O IS proporcionado pelos gestores de saúde em decorrência da pandemia ocasionada pela COVID-19 foi responsável por induzir um aumento da massa corporal e do IMC, acompanhado pela elevação do tempo de tela durante a semana e a diminuição do NAF dos indivíduos pertencentes à comunidade universitária da UFJ.


Objetivo: Analizar la asociación entre el aislamiento social (AS), el nivel de actividad física (NAF) y la conducta sedentaria de la comunidad universitaria en tiempos de pandemia. Métodos: Estudio epidemiológico transversal realizado entre el 07 de mayo y el 4 de junio de 2020 con 194 participantes de la Universidad Federal de Jataí (UFJ), Goiás, Brazil. La recogida de datos se dio a través de un formulario del Google Forms® que ha sido enviado para el correo electrónico de la comunidad académica de la UFJ para la obtención de las características socioeconómicas, el estilo de vida, la composición corporal, el nivel de actividad física y la conducta sedentaria en el periodo antes y durante el AS. Se ha utilizado la estadística descriptiva e inferencial para el análisis de datos con p<0,05. Resultados: Los participantes del estudio eran predominantemente mujeres (n=141; 72.6%), entre 18 y 27 años de edad (n=100; 71%), solteras (n=96; 68%), estudiantes (n=110; 78%) sin enfermedades anteriores (n=94; 67%). Durante el AS ha sido observado el aumento en la masa corporal y en el Índice de Masa Corporal (IMC) (p<0.05) y la inactividad física ha aumentado para todos los participantes, independientemente del sexo (p<0.05). Conclusión: El AS proporcionado por los gestores de salud debido a la pandemia de la COVID-19 ha sido responsable por inducir el aumento en la masa corporal yen el IMC asociado con el aumento del tiempo de tela durante la semana así como la disminución del NAF de los individuos de la comunidad de estudiantes universitarios de la UFJ.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Sedentary Behavior , Motor Activity
2.
Pediatr Clin North Am ; 69(4): 671-693, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2182229

ABSTRACT

Children's movement behaviors (ie, sedentary behaviors, physical activity, and sleep) are related to obesity risk and may vary throughout the year. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize existing literature on the seasonal variation in physical activity and sleep in children. This study found that children's behaviors fluctuate seasonally and thus, interventions must target behaviors during the times when children's behaviors are the least healthy, specifically during the summer (when children are not in school) and winter. Finally, the paucity of data on seasonal variation in sleep indicates a need for further research in this area.


Subject(s)
Pediatric Obesity , Sedentary Behavior , Child , Exercise , Humans , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology , Pediatric Obesity/prevention & control , Seasons , Sleep
3.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2196, 2022 Nov 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139239

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the physical behaviours of office workers worldwide, but studies comparing physical behaviours between countries with similar restrictions policies are rare. This study aimed to document and compare the 24-hour time-use compositions of physical behaviours among Brazilian and Swedish office workers on working and non-working days during the pandemic. METHODS: Physical behaviours were monitored over 7 days using thigh-worn accelerometers in 73 Brazilian and 202 Swedish workers. Daily time-use compositions were exhaustively described in terms of sedentary behaviour (SED) in short (< 30 min) and long (≥30 min) bouts, light physical activity (LPA), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and time-in-bed. We examined differences between countries using MANOVA on data processed according to compositional data analysis. As Swedish workers had the possibility to do hybrid work, we conducted a set of sensitivity analyses including only data from days when Swedish workers worked from home. RESULTS: During working days, Brazilian office workers spent more time SED in short (294 min) and long (478 min) bouts and less time in LPA (156 min) and MVPA (50 min) than Swedish workers (274, 367, 256 and 85 min, respectively). Time spent in bed was similar in both groups. Similar differences between Brazilians and Swedes were observed on non-working days, while workers were, in general, less sedentary, more active and spent more time-in-bed than during working days. The MANOVA showed that Brazilians and Swedes differed significantly in behaviours during working (p <  0.001, ηp2 = 0.36) and non-working days (p <  0.001, ηp2 = 0.20). Brazilian workers spent significantly more time in SED relative to being active, less time in short relative to long bouts in SED, and more time in LPA relative to MVPA, both during workdays and non-workdays. Sensitivity analyses only on data from days when participants worked from home showed similar results. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic Brazilian office workers were more sedentary and less active than Swedish workers, both during working and non-working days. Whether this relates to the perception or interpretation of restrictions being different or to differences present even before the pandemic is not clear, and we encourage further research to resolve this important issue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sedentary Behavior , Humans , Brazil/epidemiology , Sweden/epidemiology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Sleep
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116143

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to compare well-being and physical activity (PA) before and during COVID-19 confinement in older adults with heart failure (HF), to compare well-being and PA during COVID-19 confinement in octogenarians and non-octogenarians, and to explore well-being, social support, attention to symptoms, and assistance needs during confinement in this population. METHODS: A mixed-methods design was performed. Well-being (Cantril Ladder of Life) and PA (International Physical Activity Questionnaire) were assessed. Semi-structured interviews were performed to assess the rest of the variables. RESULTS: 120 participants were evaluated (74.16 ± 12.90 years; octogenarians = 44.16%, non-octogenarians = 55.83%). Both groups showed lower well-being and performed less PA during confinement than before (p < 0.001). Octogenarians reported lower well-being (p = 0.02), higher sedentary time (p = 0.03), and lower levels of moderate PA (p = 0.04) during confinement. Most individuals in the sample considered their well-being to have decreased during confinement, 30% reported decreased social support, 50% increased their attention to symptoms, and 60% were not satisfied with the assistance received. Octogenarians were more severely impacted during confinement than non-octogenarians in terms of well-being, attention to symptoms, and assistance needs. CONCLUSIONS: Well-being and PA decreased during confinement, although octogenarians were more affected than non-octogenarians. Remote monitoring strategies are needed in elders with HF to control health outcomes in critical periods, especially in octogenarians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Humans , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Social Support , Heart Failure/therapy , Exercise , Sedentary Behavior
5.
Trials ; 23(1): 923, 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108881

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Considering the confinement recommended by the World Health Organization due to the pandemic caused by COVID-19, many community physical exercise programmes for older adults have had their activities cancelled. In this context, proposing strategies to recover the possible adverse effects of the confinement period is pertinent. The use of self-management strategies associated with regular physical activity reduces sedentary behaviour and improves physical capacity in older adults. Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe a multicomponent training programme combined with a self-management strategy protocol to mitigate the effects of interruptions in physical exercise programmes on functionality, physical capacity, mental health, body composition and quality of life in older adults. METHODS: This will be a blinded, randomized and controlled clinical trial performed in São Carlos, SP, Brazil. Eighty older adults will be divided into two groups: multicomponent training (Multi) and multicomponent training + self-management strategies (Multi+SM). The intervention will be performed over 16 weeks on three alternate days of every week, with 50-min sessions. The assessment of physical capacity will be performed before the interruption of physical exercise programmes (T0: initial assessment, March 2020), preintervention (T1: immediately after the return of the exercise programme) and postintervention (T2). The assessments of physical activity level, quality of life, mental health, functionality and body composition will be performed at T1 and T2. DISCUSSION: The results from this MC+SM protocol will allow us to contribute clinical support to evaluate the variables analysed and to guide future public health policies with the aim of minimizing the possible deleterious effects arising from the physical exercise interruption periods caused by epidemics and pandemics. TRIAL REGISTRATION: RBR-10zs97gk . Prospectively registered in Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (ReBEC) on 17 June 2021. Registry name: Use of self-management strategies combined with multicomponent training to mitigate the effects of social distancing due to COVID-19 on capacity, physical capacity, mental health and quality of life in older adults - A blind, randomized and controlled clinical trial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Self-Management , Humans , Aged , Sedentary Behavior , Quality of Life/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Self-Management/methods , Mental Health , Exercise , Exercise Therapy/methods , Body Composition , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
6.
Front Public Health ; 10: 860098, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089925

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 has influenced education systems worldwide, and significantly increased screen time for college students, posing a potential risk of myopia. In China, ninety percent of college students suffer from myopia. Excessive screen time changes college students' lifestyles, imposes potential health risks, and affects opportunities for employment. It is important to identify the potential correlation between screen time use and myopia among college students. Methods: This paper conducted a nationwide experiment using Chinese college students and set a multiple-mediator SEM model to analyze the potential correlation between screen time and myopia. The two mediators were sedentary behavior and physical activity, respectively. Results: We obtained three valuable conclusions as follows: First, there was no significant direct relationship between screen time and myopia among Chinese college students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Second, sedentary behavior and physical activity significantly predicted the increase/decrease of myopia among Chinese college students, respectively. Third, a serial multiple mediator that encompassed sedentary behavior and physical activity sequentially fully mediated the relationship between screen time and myopia. Conclusions: Although there was no directly significant relationship between screen time and myopia, screen time can indirectly influence the risk of suffering myopia by influencing sedentary behavior and physical activity. Our study demonstrates the need to prevent the potential influence of overuse of electronic devices on myopia in college students, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myopia , Humans , Screen Time , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sedentary Behavior , Myopia/epidemiology
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082274

ABSTRACT

Insufficient physical activity (PA) has been identified as a leading risk factor for premature and all-cause death, as well as non-communicable diseases. Employees, especially those with low occupational PA, are more vulnerable to physical inactivity, and studies in this population are scarce. However, employees may receive benefits for both health and work productivity from PA. Therefore, well-designed behavior change studies to promote PA in employees are urgently needed, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Literature was searched before 30 July 2022, and updated evidence was summarized. This review elaborates on the evidence related to insufficient PA and further provides an overview of theory-based interventions for promoting PA. Evidence indicates that intervention mapping (IM) was a useful tool to develop, implement, and evaluate behavior change interventions. Based on the IM framework, reviewing the theory- and evidence-based change methods and delivery modes, and further identifying the research gaps and limitations of existing interventions could provide promising suggestions and directions for development of well-founded interventions promoting PA among employees. The updated knowledge base for developing future interventions may boost efficacy and provide firm conclusions for researchers in this area.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise , Sedentary Behavior , Risk Factors
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071459

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, a few studies used accelerometers to assess physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior in the family context. This study aimed to assess children and parents' moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time, as well as their relationship in MVPA and sedentary time. Data were collected from 30 parent-child dyads during the COVID-pandemic for seven days, using a hip-worn accelerometer. Children and parents engaged in 65.6 and 34.6 min/day in MVPA and 442.2 and 427.9 min/day sedentary, respectively. There was no evidence of gender difference in MVPA and sedentary between boys and girls. Male parent spent more time in MVPA than female parents. A total of 50% of children and 53.3% of parents met the recommended PA. Children's MVPA and sedentary time were both correlated with that of their parents. Adjusted linear regression showed that only child MVPA was negatively associated with their parents' MVPA. There is evidence that multi-level interventions involving parents and children are more effective than interventions focusing on a single group. This study also provides evidence to support the link between MVPA and sedentary time between parents and children. Generalization of the findings is difficult due to the bias of self-selection sample.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sedentary Behavior , Humans , Male , Female , Child , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Exercise , Schools , Accelerometry
9.
Nutrients ; 14(19)2022 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066294

ABSTRACT

Many companies switched to working from home (WFH) after the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper aimed to examine the changes in dietary behavior, body weight, sedentary lifestyle, and stress in individuals who practice WFH. A cross-sectional, web-based questionnaire was administered between March and May 2021 and included socio-demographic characteristics, anthropometric measurements, WFH arrangement, changes in diet, sedentary lifestyle, and stress status. A total of 328 individuals (260 women, 68 men), aged 31.3 ± 8.3 years with a BMI of 24.9 ± 4.6 kg/m2, participated in the study. The questionnaire revealed that the daily working time increased with WFH. The majority of the individuals (59.1%) gained weight. The average daily sedentary time and the Perceived Stress Scale score increased significantly. The daily sedentary time and Non-Healthy Diet Index scores were higher in individuals who gained weight (p < 0.05). A multinominal regression model revealed that increased body weight was less likely in individuals with underweight and normal BMI classifications. Normal BMI, stable work shifts, and no physical activity were positive predictors for gaining weight. These results suggest that WFH may have significant negative effects on physical and mental status of individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sedentary Behavior , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Weight Gain
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065954

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 lockdowns represent natural experiments where limitations of movement impact on lifestyle behaviors. The aim of this paper was to assess how lockdowns have influenced physical activity and sedentary behaviors among French adults. METHODS: 32,409 adults from the NutriNet-Santé study filled out questionnaires in April 2020 (the first 2 weeks after the start of lockdown) and in May 2020 (2 weeks before the lockdown ended). Participants were asked about changes in physical activity level and sitting time, types of physical activity performed, and main reasons for change. RESULTS: For decreased physical activity, similar rates were found at the beginning and end of the lockdown (58 and 55%-56 and 53%, in women and men, respectively). For increased physical activity, the figures were lower (20 and 14%-23 and 18%, in women and men, respectively). The participants with a decreasing physical activity evolution were older and more likely to be living in urban areas. The main reasons for (i) decreased physical activity were limitations of movement and not liking indoor exercise, (ii) increased physical activity were to stay physically fit and healthy. Physical activity changes were inversely associated with reported depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in physical activity and sedentary behaviors are heterogenous for both genders during the lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sedentary Behavior , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise , Female , Humans , Male
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065948

ABSTRACT

In 2020, as part of the COVID-19 pandemic, governments around the world enacted a wide variety of regulations and laws to contain the incidence of infection. One of these measures was the relocation of work to the home office. The objective of this review was to analyze the influence of the home office in correlation with regulations on sedentary and activity behavior. A search was conducted on various electronic databases from November 2019 to January 2022, using the search terms physical activity (PA), COVID-19, and working from home. The primary outcomes were changes in PA and sedentary behavior (SB). Secondary outcomes included pain, mood, and parenting stress. The risk of bias was assessed using the (NHLBI) Quality Assessment Tool. For the review, 21 articles met the inclusion criteria (total n = 1268). There was a significant increase in SB (+16%) and a decrease in PA (-17%), Light PA (-26%), and moderate to vigorous PA (-20%). There was also an increase in pain and parenting stress and a decrease in well-being. Due to our significant results, programs that promote movement should be created. Future studies should explore how an increase of PA and a reduction of SB in the home office could be achieved.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sedentary Behavior , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Humans , Pain , Pandemics
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065943

ABSTRACT

Initially, we aimed to investigate the impact of a one-year worksite low-volume, high-intensity interval training (LOW-HIIT) on cardiometabolic health in 114 sedentary office workers. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, LOW-HIIT was discontinued after 6 months and participants were followed up for 6 months to analyze physical activity/exercise behavior and outcome changes during lockdown. Health examinations, including cardiopulmonary exercise testing and the assessment of cardiometabolic markers were performed baseline (T-1), after 6 months (T-2, termination of worksite LOW-HIIT) and 12 months (T-3, follow-up). Cycle ergometer LOW-HIIT (5 × 1 min at 85-95% HRmax) was performed 2×/week. For follow-up analyses, participants were classified into three groups: HIIT-group (continued home-based LOW-HIIT), EX-group (continued other home-based exercises), and NO-EX-group (discontinued LOW-HIIT/exercise). At T-2, VO2max (+1.5 mL/kg/min, p = 0.002), mean arterial blood pressure (MAB, -4 mmHg, p < 0.001), HbA1c (-0.2%, p = 0.005) and self-reported quality of life (QoL, +5 points, p < 0.001) were improved. At T-3, HIIT-group maintained VO2max and QoL and further improved MAB. EX-group maintained MAB and QoL but experienced a VO2max decrease. In NON-EX, VO2max, MAB and QoL deteriorated. We conclude that LOW-HIIT can be considered a promising option to improve cardiometabolic health in real-life conditions and to mitigate physical inactivity-related negative health impacts during lockdowns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , High-Intensity Interval Training , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quality of Life , Sedentary Behavior
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065927

ABSTRACT

Canadian 24 h movement guidelines recommend engaging in >150 min/week of moderate-vigorous-intensity physical activity and ≤8 h/day of sedentary time. Half of Canadian post-secondary students do not meet physical activity or sedentary time guidelines. This pan-Canadian study aimed to (1) identify commonly cited motivators/barriers to exercise, and (2) determine which motivators/barriers were most influential for attaining physical and sedentary activity guidelines. A total of 341 respondents (279 females, 23 ± 4 years old, 53% met activity guidelines, 49% met sedentary guidelines) completed an online survey regarding undergraduate student lifestyle behaviours. Improved physical health (74% of respondents), mental health (67%), physical appearance (60%), and athletic performance (28%) were the most common motivators to exercise. The most common barriers were school obligations (68%), time commitments (58%), job obligations (32%), and lack of available fitness classes (26%). Students citing improved athletic performance (odds ratio (OR) = 1.94, p = 0.02) were more likely to adhere to activity guidelines, while those who selected physical health (OR = 0.56, p = 0.03) and physical appearance (OR = 0.46, p = 0.001) as motivators were less likely to meet activity guidelines. Students who cited school obligations as a barrier were less likely (OR = 0.59, p = 0.03) to meet sedentary guidelines. The motivators and barriers identified provide a foundation for university-led initiatives aimed at promoting physical activity and reducing sedentary time among undergraduate students. Strategies that positively re-frame students' physical health and appearance-based motivations for exercise may be particularly useful in helping more students achieve national activity recommendations.


Subject(s)
Exercise , Sedentary Behavior , Adult , Canada , Female , Humans , Schools , Students/psychology , Young Adult
14.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 16660, 2022 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2050554

ABSTRACT

Most studies have shown a decline in the adherence to 24-Hour Movement Guidelines because of Covid-19 lockdown. However, there is little evidence regarding changes 1-year after the pandemic in these guidelines and their possible impact on academic performance. The study aims were: (1) to examine the possible changes in 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for youth (i.e., at least 60 min per day of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, ≤ 2 h per day of recreational screen time, and 9 to 11 h of sleep per day for children and 8 to 10 h for adolescents) before and after 1-year into the Covid-19 pandemic, and (2) to examine the possible changes in the relationship between 24-Hour Movement Behaviours (physical activity, screen time, and sleep duration) and academic performance before and after 1-year into the Covid-19. This is a repeated cross-sectional study in two different samples of young Spanish at different times. Firstly, a total of 844 students (13.12 ± 0.86; 42.7% girls) completed a series of valid and reliable questionnaires about physical activity levels, recreational screen time, sleep duration and academic performance before Covid-19 pandemic (March to June 2018). Secondly, a different sample of 501 students (14.39 ± 1.16; 55.3% girls) completed the same questionnaires 1-year after Covid-19 pandemic (February to March 2021). Adherence to the three 24-Hour Movement Guidelines was significantly lower 1-year after into the Covid-19 pandemic (0.2%) than before the pandemic (3.3%), while adherence to none of these three recommendations was significantly higher 1-year after the Covid-19 pandemic (66.3%) than before the pandemic (28.9%). The positive relationship between physical activity levels and academic performance was no longer significant after 1-year into Covid-19 pandemic (ß = - 0.26; p < 0.001). 1-year after Covid-19 pandemic, the relationship between recreational screen time (ß = - 0.05; p > 0.05) and sleep duration (ß = 0.05; p < 0.001) with academic performance did not change compared to pre-pandemic. The results suggest that 24-Hour Movement Behaviours have worsened among young people 1-year after Covid-19 pandemic compared to pre-pandemic period. Moreover, the physical activity benefits associated in terms of academic performance seem to have disappeared because of the Covid-19 pandemic. Therefore, there is a public health problem that requires priority and coordinated action by schools, policy makers, and researchers to mitigate the adverse effects of the pandemic on 24-Hour Movement Behaviours.


Subject(s)
Academic Performance , COVID-19 , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Sedentary Behavior , Sleep
15.
BMC Pulm Med ; 22(1): 340, 2022 Sep 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038720

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Different clinical predictors of physical activity (PA) have been described in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), but studies are lacking evaluating the potential role of muscle strength and anxiety and depression symptoms in PA limitation. Moreover, little is known about the impact of changes in PA in the course of the disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between baseline PA and a wide range of variables in IPF, to assess its longitudinal changes at 12 months and its impact on progression free-survival. METHODS: PA was assessed by accelerometer and physiological, clinical, psychological factors and health-related quality of life were evaluated in subjects with IPF at baseline and at 12 month follow-up. Predictors of PA were determined at baseline, evolution of PA parameters was described and the prognostic role of PA evolution was also established. RESULTS: Forty participants with IPF were included and 22 completed the follow-up. At baseline, subjects performed 5765 (3442) daily steps and spent 64 (44) minutes/day in moderate to vigorous PA. Multivariate regression models showed that at baseline, a lower six-minute walked distance, lower quadriceps strength (QMVC), and a higher depression score in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale were associated to lower daily step number. In addition, being in (Gender-Age-Physiology) GAP III stage, having a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 and lower QMVC or maximum inspiratory pressure were factors associated with sedentary behaviour. Adjusted for age, gender and forced vital capacity (FVC) (%pred.) a lower progression-free survival was evidenced in those subjects that decreased PA compared to those that maintained, or even increased it, at 12 months [HR 12.1 (95% CI, 1.9-78.8); p = 0.009]. CONCLUSION: Among a wide range of variables, muscle strength and depression symptoms have a predominant role in PA in IPF patients. Daily PA behaviour and its evolution should be considered in IPF clinical assessment and as a potential complementary indicator of disease prognosis.


Subject(s)
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis , Exercise , Humans , Infant , Muscle Strength , Quality of Life , Sedentary Behavior
16.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1758, 2022 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038709

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought drastic changes to the lives of the global population. The restrictions imposed by government agencies impacted the daily lives of citizens, influencing several health behaviors, such as physical activity (PA). Thus, the present study aimed to assess the prevalence of physical inactivity (PI) and its associated factors before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A population-based household seroepidemiological survey was conducted in two Brazilian municipalities located in the state of Minas Gerais, in which 1750 volunteers were interviewed between October and December 2020. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire in an electronic format. The moments considered for the PI analysis were M0 (before the pandemic), M1 (from March to July 2020), and M2 (from October to December 2020). Descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to examine the factors associated with PI before (M0) and during the pandemic (M1 and M2). RESULTS: The prevalence of PI was higher in the first months of the pandemic (M1) (67.3%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 62.4-71.9) than in the months from October to December 2020 (M2) (58.7%; 95% CI: 52.8-64.3); however, at both times (M1 and M2), PI was more prevalent than in the period before the pandemic started (M0) (39.7%; 95% CI: 35.6-43.8). Individuals who were overweight, obese, and had low educational levels were more likely to be physically inactive. At both M1 and M2, individuals who worked at a work from home were less likely to have PI. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic negatively influenced PA, substantially increasing the prevalence of PI. The determinants associated with PI were education, body mass index, and work from home.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Leisure Activities , Prevalence , Sedentary Behavior , Socioeconomic Factors , Teleworking
17.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 23(1): 860, 2022 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029705

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a complex symptom with numerous possible causes and influencing factors. Understanding how modifiable factors affect the course of CLBP is important for preventing progression. As the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the lifestyle of many people, this study paper assessed whether it also changed the influence of modifiable lifestyle factors (regular exercise and sedentary behaviour) and mental health factors (anxiety and depression) on CLBP pain intensity and disability by comparing the strength of these associations before and during the pandemic. We hypothesised that the importance of regular physical activity and good mental health for CLBP patients would increase during the pandemic. METHODS: These questions were investigated in a cross-sectional study of insurance claims data and self-reported data from various questionnaires from 3,478 participants in a German CLBP health intervention (2014-2021) by calculating pre- and intra-pandemic odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each variable of interest and outcome. Potential confounders were also considered. Pandemic status was treated as an effect modifier. Based on the date of enrolment, participants were classified as "pre-pandemic" or "pandemic". RESULTS: Regularly exercising ≥ 4 h/week significantly reduced the odds of high disability for men (OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.31 - 0.79, p = 0.003) and women (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.14 - 0.563, p = 0.002) and reduced the probability of severe pain in women (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.21 - 0.65, p < 0.001). Each one-point increase in PHQ-4 score for anxiety and depression increased the OR of high pain intensity by 1.25 points (95% CI 1.18 - 1.34, p < 0.001). A clear impact of COVID-19 lockdowns was observed. In individuals who exercised ≥ 4 h/week the OR of high disability was 0.57 (95% CI 0.36 - 0.92, p = 0.021) in the pre-pandemic group compared to 0.29 (95% CI 0.12 - 0.56, p = 0.002) in the pandemic group. The probability of high disability increased from an OR of 1.42 (95% CI 1.33 - 1.52, p < 0.001) per marginal increase in the PHQ-4 scale before the pandemic, to an OR of 1.73 (95% CI 1.58 - 1.89, p < 0.001) during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The magnitude of association of the factors that influenced high pain intensity and disability increased during the pandemic. On the one hand, the protective effect of regular exercising was greater in participants surveyed during lockdown. On the other hand, a higher risk through anxiety or depression during the lockdown was identified. An additional study with objective measures of sedentary behaviour and physical activity is needed to validate these results. More in-depth investigation of lockdown-induced associations between reduced daily physical activity, increased levels of anxiety and depression, and their effects on CLPB could also be worthwhile. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study used routinely collected data from a CLBP intervention that was previously evaluated and registered in the German Registry of Clinical Trials under DRKS00015463 (04/09/2018). The original ethics approval, informed consent and self-reported questionnaire have remained unchanged and are still valid.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Low Back Pain , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise/psychology , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Low Back Pain/therapy , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , Sedentary Behavior
18.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 10(8): e37547, 2022 08 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2022372

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A large number of wearable activity monitor models are released and used each year by consumers and researchers. As more studies are being carried out on children and adolescents in terms of sedentary behavior (SB) assessment, knowledge about accurate and precise monitoring devices becomes increasingly important. OBJECTIVE: The main aim of this systematic review was to investigate and communicate findings on the accuracy and precision of consumer-grade physical activity monitors in assessing the time spent in SB in children and adolescents. METHODS: Searches of PubMed (MEDLINE), Scopus, SPORTDiscus (full text), ProQuest, Open Access Theses and Dissertations, DART Europe E-theses Portal, and Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations electronic databases were performed. All relevant studies that compared different types of consumer-grade monitors using a comparison method in the assessment of SB, published in European languages from 2015 onward were considered for inclusion. The risk of bias was estimated using Consensus-Based Standards for the Selection of Health Status Measurement Instruments. For enabling comparisons of accuracy measures within the studied outcome domain, measurement accuracy interpretation was based on group mean or percentage error values and 90% CI. Acceptable limits were predefined as -10% to +10% error in controlled and free-living settings. For determining the number of studies with group error percentages that fall within or outside one of the sides from previously defined acceptable limits, two 1-sided tests of equivalence were carried out, and the direction of measurement error was examined. RESULTS: A total of 8 studies complied with the predefined inclusion criteria, and 3 studies provided acceptable data for quantitative analyses. In terms of the presented accuracy comparisons, 14 were subsequently identified, with 6 of these comparisons being acceptable in terms of quantitative analysis. The results of the Cochran Q test indicated that the included studies did not share a common effect size (Q5=82.86; P<.001). I2, which represents the percentage of total variation across studies due to heterogeneity, amounted to 94%. The summary effect size based on the random effects model was not statistically significant (effect size=14.36, SE 12.04, 90% CI -5.45 to 34.17; P=.23). According to the equivalence test results, consumer-grade physical activity monitors did not generate equivalent estimates of SB in relation to the comparison methods. Majority of the studies (3/7, 43%) that reported the mean absolute percentage errors have reported values of <30%. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study that has attempted to synthesize available evidence on the accuracy and precision of consumer-grade physical activity monitors in measuring SB in children and adolescents. We found very few studies on the accuracy and almost no evidence on the precision of wearable activity monitors. The presented results highlight the large heterogeneity in this area of research. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42021251922; https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?RecordID=251922.


Subject(s)
Fitness Trackers , Sedentary Behavior , Adolescent , Child , Databases, Factual , Exercise , Humans , Language
19.
PLoS One ; 17(9): e0273919, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021947

ABSTRACT

Physical activity is associated lower risk for a broad range of non-communicable diseases and early mortality, and even small changes in daily activity levels could have a profound effect on public health at the population level. The COVID-19 pandemic reshaped daily life for United States (US) adults resulting in reductions in physical activity early in the pandemic, but its longer-term effects on daily activities are unknown. To examine the longer-term impact of the pandemic on daily activity levels, we conducted a nationwide longitudinal study of 1,635 adults (20-75 years) in AmeriSpeak. Previous-day recalls of time-use, sedentary time, and physical activity were completed on randomly selected days in Fall 2019 (pre-pandemic) and Fall 2020. Overall, US adults reported less time in transportation (-0.47 hrs/d), more total discretionary time (0.40 hrs/d), but no changes in total sedentary time (0.10 hrs/d) or leisure-time physical activity (-0.06 hrs/d). Women reported significantly less total activity (-0.36 hrs/d) and participants with children < 13 yrs reported more sedentary time (0.60 to 0.82 hrs/d) and less moderate-to-vigorous intensity activity (-0.84 to -0.72 hrs/d). Adults without children reported no changes in sedentary time (0.02 hrs/d) or moderate-vigorous intensity activity (-0.06 hrs/d). Adults who started working from home reported no changes in physical activity, but they were among the most sedentary and least active population groups at both timepoints. Our findings describe the complex inter-play between competing behaviors as time-use demands have changed in response to the pandemic, particularly for adults with younger children. Many US adults are likely to continue working from home; therefore, implementation of evidence-based approaches to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary time in this growing population subgroup appears warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sedentary Behavior , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
20.
Curr Psychiatry Rep ; 24(10): 493-501, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007250

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This paper examines children's physical activity and sedentary behavior and associated psychological outcomes coincident with the COVID-19 pandemic. RECENT FINDINGS: Generally, the research has found decreased physical activity and increased sedentary behavior, both of which are associated with various psychological outcomes. The research on sedentary behavior has focused on screen time with minimal consideration of other sedentary behaviors or of specific physical activities or the context in which these behaviors occurred. Changes in children's daily routines and activities have received little attention in the mass trauma research despite the fact that disasters disrupt individual, family, and community life. Thus, the current report contributes to an understanding of the breadth of mass trauma effects, underscores the importance of physical activity and sedentary behavior and their associations with health and psychological outcomes, and is a reminder to consider children's daily lives both during times of crisis and under usual circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sedentary Behavior , Child , Child Behavior , Exercise/psychology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics
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