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1.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 1116, 2023 06 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239650

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to evaluate the association of sedentary behavior (SB) and moderate to vigorous leisure-time physical activity (MVPA) with sleep quality during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Cross-sectional, population-based study in adults, conducted from October to December 2020 in the Iron Quadrangle region, Brazil. The outcome was sleep quality, evaluated with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. SB was assessed by self-report of total sitting time, before and during the pandemic. Individuals with ≥ 9 h of total sitting time were classified as SB. In addition, the ratio of time spent in MVPA to time in SB was analyzed. A contrasted directed acyclic graph (DAG) model was constructed to adjust logistic regression models. RESULTS: A total of 1629 individuals were evaluated, the prevalence of SB before the pandemic was 11.3% (95%CI: 8.6-14.8), and during the pandemic 15.2% (95%CI: 12.1-18.9). In multivariate analysis, the chance of poor sleep quality was 77% higher in subjects with SB ≥ 9 h per day (OR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.02-2.97). Furthermore, a one-hour increase in SB during the pandemic, increased the chance of poor sleep quality by 8% (OR: 1.08; 95%CI 1.01-1.15). In the analysis of the ratio of MVPA per SB in individuals with SB ≥ 9 h, practicing 1 min of MVPA per hour of SB reduces the chance of poor sleep quality by 19% (OR: 0.84; 95%CI: 0.73-0.98). CONCLUSION: SB during the pandemic was a factor associated with poor sleep quality, and the practice of MVPA can reduce the effects of SB.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , Sedentary Behavior , Cross-Sectional Studies , Sleep Quality , Exercise
2.
Nutrients ; 15(11)2023 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239545

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have higher weight gain and psychological distress compared to those without PCOS. While COVID-19 restrictions led to population level adverse changes in lifestyle, weight gain and psychological distress, their impact on people with PCOS is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact the 2020 COVID-19 restrictions had on weight, physical activity, diet and psychological distress for Australians with PCOS. METHODS: Australian reproductive-aged women participated in an online survey with assessment of weight, physical activity, diet and psychological distress. Multivariable logistic and linear regression were used to examine associations between PCOS and residential location with health outcomes. RESULTS: On adjusted analysis, those with PCOS gained more weight (2.9%; 95% CI; 0.027-3.020; p = 0.046), were less likely to meet physical activity recommendations (OR 0.50; 95% CI; 0.32-0.79; p = 0.003) and had higher sugar-sweetened beverage intake (OR 1.74; 95% CI 1.10-2.75; p = 0.019) but no differences in psychological distress compared to women without PCOS. CONCLUSIONS: People with PCOS were more adversely affected by COVID-19 restrictions, which may worsen their clinical features and disease burden. Additional health care support may be necessary to assist people with PCOS to meet dietary and physical activity recommendations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome , Psychological Distress , Sedentary Behavior , Humans , Female , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Weight Gain , Exercise , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/epidemiology , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/psychology , Diet , Australia/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Pandemics
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(11)2023 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235964

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic led many countries to apply lockdown measures that could prevent children from achieving the physical activity, sedentary behavior, and sleep levels suggested for their psychophysical health. The current study tested changes in physical activity, sedentary behavior, and sleep length of children and the incidence of achieving the 24 h movement standards through the limitations of COVID-19. A total of 490 Arab Israeli parents were surveyed. An electronic cross-sectional survey was performed, including questions addressing engagement in physical activities, use of screens, and sleep duration. Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, time spent participating in physical activity was reduced, sedentary behavior and sleep duration were increased, and the percentage of the sample who met the physical activity and sedentary behavior suggestions lessened. The percentage of participants who attained the overall 24 h movement recommendations was very low during the pandemic; school children met the guideline recommendations for physical activity and sleep duration more than preschool children, and girls spent more time in physical activity. These findings highlight the need for strategies to enhance physical activity and decrease sedentary behavior in children to prevent long-term effects of limitations imposed by COVID-19. Efforts to perceive and encourage healthy routines in Arab Israeli children in the case of pandemic limitations are expected to serve as a precedence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Child , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep Duration , Arabs , Sedentary Behavior , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Israel/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise , Sleep
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(9)2023 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317337

ABSTRACT

The 24-Hour Movement Guidelines provide specific recommendations on movement behaviors for children and adolescents. The objective of this study was to verify the adequacy of children and adolescents to the guidelines for moderate to vigorous physical activity, recreational screen time, and sleep duration, and the overall adequacy to the guidelines, before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. A cross-sectional study was conducted with parents or guardians of children or adolescents from different regions of Brazil using a digital interview form including sociodemographic characteristics of families, moderate to vigorous physical activity, recreational screen time, and sleep duration before and during the pandemic. Statistically significant variation was observed in both groups in relation to moderate to vigorous physical activity and recreational screen time between the two periods evaluated. Overall adequacy to the guidelines before the pandemic was 19.28% for children from Group 1 (0-5 years old) and 39.50% for those from Group 2 (6 to 17 years old). During the pandemic, it corresponded to 3.58% in Group 1 and 4.94% in Group 2 (p-value between periods ≤0.001). This study showed the significant impact of pandemic restrictions on reducing overall compliance and physical activity, and increasing screen time among Brazilian children and adolescents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Child , Adolescent , Infant, Newborn , Infant , Child, Preschool , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Sleep , Sedentary Behavior
5.
Can J Public Health ; 114(2): 165-174, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313538

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To estimate health care and health-related productivity costs associated with excessive sedentary behaviour (> 8 h/day and > 9 h/day) in Canadian adults. METHODS: Three pieces of information were used to estimate costs: (1) the pooled relative risk estimates of adverse health outcomes consistently shown to be associated with excessive sedentary behaviour, gathered from meta-analyses of prospective cohort studies; (2) the prevalence of excessive sedentary behaviour in Canadian men and women, obtained using waist-worn accelerometry in a nationally representative sample of adults (Canadian Health Measures Survey 2018-2019); and (3) the direct (health care) and indirect (lost productivity due to premature mortality) costs of the adverse health outcomes, selected using the Economic Burden of Illness in Canada 2010 data. The 2010 costs were then adjusted to 2021 costs to account for inflation, population growth, and higher average earnings. A Monte Carlo simulation was conducted to account for uncertainty in the model. RESULTS: The total costs of excessive sedentary behaviour in Canada were $2.2 billion (8 h/day cut-point) and $1.8 billion (9 h/day cut-point) in 2021, representing 1.6% and 1.3% of the overall burden of illness costs, respectively. The two most expensive chronic diseases attributable to excessive sedentary behaviour were cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. A 10% decrease in excessive sedentary behaviour (from 87.7% to 77.7%) would save an estimated $219 million per year in costs. CONCLUSION: Excessive sedentary behaviour significantly contributes to the economic burden of illness in Canada. There is a need for evidence-based and cost-effective strategies that reduce excessive sedentary behaviour in the population.


RéSUMé: OBJECTIF: Estimer le coût des soins de santé et le coût de productivité lié à la santé associés au comportement sédentaire excessif (> 8 heures/jour et > 9 heures/jour) chez les Canadiennes et les Canadiens adultes. MéTHODE: Trois informations ont servi à estimer ces coûts : 1) les estimations combinées du risque relatif des résultats sanitaires indésirables uniformément associés au comportement sédentaire excessif, collectées à partir de méta-analyses d'études prospectives de cohortes; 2) la prévalence du comportement sédentaire excessif chez les Canadiennes et les Canadiens, obtenue à l'aide d'un accéléromètre porté à la taille par un échantillon représentatif national d'adultes (Enquête canadienne sur les mesures de la santé 2018-2019); et 3) les coûts directs (soins de santé) et indirects (perte de productivité due à la mortalité prématurée) des résultats sanitaires indésirables sélectionnés, d'après les données du Fardeau économique de la maladie au Canada de 2010. Les coûts de 2010 ont ensuite été ajustés aux coûts de 2021 pour tenir compte de l'inflation, de la croissance démographique et de la hausse moyenne des revenus. Nous avons effectué une simulation de Monte-Carlo pour tenir compte de l'incertitude du modèle. RéSULTATS: Les coûts totaux du comportement sédentaire excessif au Canada étaient de 2,2 milliards de dollars (point de coupure de 8 heures/jour) et de 1,8 milliard de dollars (point de coupure de 9 heures/jour) en 2021, ce qui représente 1,6 % et 1,3 % du fardeau global des coûts des maladies, respectivement. Les deux maladies chroniques les plus chères imputables au comportement sédentaire excessif étaient les maladies cardiovasculaires et le diabète de type 2. Une baisse de 10 % du comportement sédentaire excessif (de 87,7 % à 77,7 %) économiserait environ 219 millions de dollars de coûts par année. CONCLUSION: Le comportement sédentaire excessif contribue de façon significative au fardeau économique de la maladie au Canada. Il nous faut des stratégies fondées sur les preuves et efficaces par rapport au coût pour réduire le comportement sédentaire excessif dans la population.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Sedentary Behavior , Male , Adult , Humans , Female , Financial Stress , Prospective Studies , Canada/epidemiology , Health Care Costs , Cost of Illness
6.
J Phys Act Health ; 20(7): 639-647, 2023 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318988

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lockdown measures, including school closures, due to the COVID-19 pandemic have caused widespread disruption to children's lives. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of a national lockdown on children's physical activity using seasonally matched accelerometry data. METHODS: Using a pre/post observational design, 179 children aged 8 to 11 years provided physical activity data measured using hip-worn triaxial accelerometers worn for 5 consecutive days prepandemic and during the January to March 2021 lockdown. Multilevel regression analyses adjusted for covariates were used to assess the impact of lockdown on time spent in sedentary and moderate to vigorous physical activity. RESULTS: A 10.8-minute reduction in daily time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity (standard error: 2.3 min/d, P < .001) and a 33.2-minute increase in daily sedentary activity (standard error: 5.5 min/d, P < .001) were observed during lockdown. This reflected a reduction in daily moderate to vigorous physical activity for those unable to attend school (-13.1 [2.3] min/d, P < .001) during lockdown, with no significant change for those who continued to attend school (0.4 [4.0] min/d, P < .925). CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the loss of in-person schooling was the single largest impact on physical activity in this cohort of primary school children in London, Luton, and Dunstable, United Kingdom.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise , Humans , Child , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics/prevention & control , Sedentary Behavior , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Schools , Accelerometry , United Kingdom/epidemiology
7.
Pensar Prát. (Online) ; 25Fev. 2022.
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2302638

ABSTRACT

Objetivo: verificar a prevalência de fatores sociodemográficos e da prática de atividade física com sintomas sugestivos de ansiedade e depressão em adultos durante a pandemia de Covid-19 no estado do Rio de Janeiro. Métodos: estudo observacional, transversal, com 1.019 participantes adultos residentes no estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, realizado através de uma amostragem bola de neve. Resultados: sintomas de ansiedade estavam associados ao sexo feminino, em adultas jovens, com o ato de limpar/arrumar a residência e à inatividade física. Os sintomas de depressão associaram-se ao sexo feminino, à divisão da casa com outras pessoas que não eram familiares, grau de escolaridade, renda e à inatividade física. Conclusão: fatores sociodemográficos e a inatividade física estão associados com os sintomas de ansiedade e depressão durante a pandemia da COVID-19 (AU).


Objective: To analyze the prevalence of sociodemographic factors and the practice of physical activity with symptoms suggestive of anxiety and depression in adults during the Covid-19 pandemic, in the state of Rio de Janeiro. Methods: Observational, cross-sectional study with 1,019 adult participants residing in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil carried out through a snowball sampling technique. Results: Anxiety symptoms were associated with being female, being young adults, cleaning/tidying the house, and physical inactivity. Depression symptoms were associated with female gender, sharing the house with other people who were not family members, level of education, income and physical inactivity. Conclusion: Sociodemographic factors and physical inactivity are associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic (AU).


Objetivo: Analizar la asociación entre síntomas de ansiedad y depresión, durante la pandemia COVID-19, con la práctica de actividades físicas y factores sociodemográficos. Métodos: Estudio observacional, transversal con 1.019 participantes adultos residentes en el estado de Río de Janeiro, Brasil, realizado a través de un muestreo de bola de nieve. Resultados: Síntomas de ansiedad asociados con mujeres, adultos jóvenes, con el acto de limpiar / ordenar la casa e inactividad física. Los síntomas depresivos se asociaron con el género femenino, compartir la casa con otras personas que no eran familiares, nivel de educación, ingresos e inactividad física. Conclusión: Los factores sociodemográficos y la inactividad física se asocian con síntomas de ansiedad y depresión durante una pandemia de COVID-19 (AU).


Subject(s)
Humans , Anxiety , Exercise , Depression , Sedentary Behavior , COVID-19 , Sociodemographic Factors , Persons
8.
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act ; 20(1): 42, 2023 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2297041

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in marked impacts on children's physical activity, with large reductions in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) reported during lockdowns. Previous evidence showed children's activity levels were lower and sedentary time higher immediately post-COVID lockdown, while there was little change in parental physical activity. We need to know if these patterns persist. METHODS: Active-6 is a natural experiment using repeated cross-sectional data conducted in two waves. Accelerometer data were collected on 393 children aged 10-11 and their parents from 23 schools in Wave 1 (June 2021-December 2021), and 436 children and parents from 27 schools in Wave 2 (January 2022-July 2022). These were compared to a pre-COVID-19 comparator group (March 2017-May 2018) of 1,296 children and parents in the same schools. Mean minutes of accelerometer-measured MVPA and sedentary time were derived for week- and weekend-days and compared across waves via linear multilevel models. We also analysed the date of data collection as a time series, to explore temporal patterns via generalised additive mixed models. RESULTS: There was no difference in children's mean MVPA in Wave 2 (weekdays: -2.3 min; 95% CI: -5.9, 1.3 and weekends: 0.6 min; 95% CI: -3.5, 4.6) when compared to the pre-COVID-19 data. Sedentary time remained higher than pre-pandemic by 13.2 min (95% CI:5.3, 21.1) on weekdays. Differences compared to pre-COVID-19 changed over time, with children's MVPA decreasing over winter, coinciding with COVID-19 outbreaks, and only returning to pre-pandemic levels towards May/June 2022. Parents' sedentary time and weekday MVPA was similar to pre-COVID-19 levels, with MVPA higher than pre-pandemic by 7.7 min (95% CI: 1.4, 14.0) on weekends. CONCLUSION: After an initial drop, children's MVPA returned to pre-pandemic levels by July 2022, while sedentary time remained higher. Parents' MVPA remained higher, especially at weekends. The recovery in physical activity is precarious and potentially susceptible to future COVID-19 outbreaks or changes in provision, and so robust measures to protect against future disruptions are needed. Furthermore, many children are still inactive, with only 41% meeting UK physical activity guidelines, and so there is still a need to increase children's physical activity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sedentary Behavior , Humans , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Accelerometry , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise , Parents
9.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1138442, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2296356

ABSTRACT

Background: The present study aimed to (1) assess and compare sedentary time (ST) of university students before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, (2) examine risk groups with regard to ST and the "extent of change" in ST (from before to during the pandemic) in association with sociodemographic (gender, age), study-related (degree aspired to, field of study, semester), and pre-pandemic physical health-related [pre-pandemic physical activity (PA) and ST levels, pre-pandemic BMI class] variables, and (3) investigate whether the change in ST was predicted by these variables. Methods: Two online surveys were conducted among students at the University of Mainz, Germany-the first in 2019 (before the pandemic) and the second in 2020 (during the pandemic). Participants of both surveys were included in a longitudinal sample. With the longitudinal sample's data, paired t-tests, single factor, and mixed analyses of variances were used to examine group differences in ST and the "extent of change" in ST. A linear regression analysis was computed to investigate the influence of the abovementioned sociodemographic, study-related, and pre-pandemic physical health-related variables on the change in ST. Results: Of the N = 4,351 (pre-pandemic) and N = 3,066 (in-pandemic) participants of the online surveys, N = 443 entered the longitudinal sample. ST increased by 1.4 h/day to critical levels (≥8 h/day) in all subgroups analyzed-even among students who were highly physically active before the pandemic. Students with a low pre-pandemic ST had the largest increase in ST. Pre-pandemic PA level negatively predicted the change in ST. Conclusion: Even during a global pandemic lockdown, individuals who were previously more physically active and had less ST showed more health-promoting behavior in terms of ST. Therefore, it can be stated that efforts to promote PA and reduce ST are always valuable. Since ST increased and was worryingly high in all subgroups analyzed, all university students should be targeted by multidimensional approaches to tackle ST and promote their health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sedentary Behavior , Pandemics , Universities , Cross-Sectional Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Students
10.
Am J Health Behav ; 45(1): 44-61, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2286416

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We examined perceived behavior change since implementation of physical distancing restrictions and identified modifiable (self-rated health, resilience, depressive symptoms, social support and subjective wellbeing) and non-modifiable (demographics) risk/protective factors. Methods: A representative US sample (N = 362) completed an online survey about potential risk/protective factors and health behaviors prior to the pandemic and after implemented/recommended restrictions. We assessed change in perceived health behaviors prior to and following introduction of COVID-19. We conducted hierarchical linear regression to explore and identify risk/protective factors related to physical activity, diet quality, and social isolation. Results: There have been substantial decreases in physical activity and increases in sedentary behavior and social isolation, but no changes in diet quality since COVID-19. We identified modifiable and non-modifiable factors associated with each health behavior. Conclusions: Negative effects indicate the need for universal intervention to promote health behaviors. Inequalities in health behaviors among vulnerable populations may be exacerbated since COVID-19, suggesting need for targeted invention. Social support may be a mechanism to promote health behaviors. We suggest scaling out effective health behavior interventions with the same intensity in which physical distancing recommendations were implemented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Diet/statistics & numerical data , Exercise , Health Status , Humans , Male , Physical Distancing , Sedentary Behavior , Social Support , United States/epidemiology
11.
Motriz (Online) ; 28: e10220016521, 2022. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2279729

ABSTRACT

Abstract Aim: Social distancing policies to combat the pandemic of COVID-19 directly impacted the physical activity (PA) index of the population. This study aimed to analyze the factors associated with insufficient leisure-time PA and the changing behavior of residents of the city of Sao Paulo, the epicenter of the pandemic in Brazil. Methods: The questionnaire used in this research was made available online and included questions on demographics and physical activity. A total of 1.096 adult residents of Sao Paulo completed the questionnaire between July 8th and August 8th, 2020. Results: For individuals who were already physically active before the restrictions, a total of 55.8% of the sample kept insufficiently active during the quarantine. Factors such as education, working conditions, and direct relationship with Covid-19 care were associated with decreased leisure-time PA practice, impacting 57.6% of the sample, especially females. People with less formal education, those who possibly changed their routines to working from home, and those who were directly connected to Covid cases were not able to maintain a daily PA routine. Conclusion: The data presented here warn about the impacts of the pandemic on engagement in PA, suggesting the need for incentives from intersectoral public policies on sports, leisure, and health to perform these activities.


Subject(s)
Humans , Exercise , Sedentary Behavior , Physical Distancing , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can ; 42(4): 125-128, 2022 Apr.
Article in English, French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2272795

ABSTRACT

Does the timing of when children, youth and adults participate in physical activity, sedentary behaviour (e.g. screen time) and sleep matter when it comes to their overall health? This special issue of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention in Canada includes four papers that present evidence and recommendations on the timing of movement behaviours: three separate systematic reviews exploring the associations between health indicators and the timing of physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep; and a commentary that discusses the importance of this evidence in terms of practice, policy and research. This editorial sets the stage for this special issue, reflecting on the challenges posed by COVID-19-related public health restrictions on healthy movement. Perhaps now is the optimal time to reimagine how and when we engage in physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep to support our health.


RÉSUMÉ: Est-ce que l'horaire auquel les enfants, les adolescents et les adultes sont actifs, demeurent sédentaires (par exemple devant un écran) et dorment ont une influence sur leur état de santé général? Ce numéro spécial de Promotion de la santé et prévention des maladies chroniques au Canada rassemble quatre articles qui présentent des données probantes et des recommandations concernant l'horaire des comportements en matière de mouvement : trois revues systématiques portant sur les associations entre les indicateurs de l'état de santé et les horaires d'activité physique, de sédentarité et de sommeil et un commentaire sur l'importance de ces données probantes pour les pratiques, les politiques et la recherche. Cet éditorial prépare le terrain pour ce numéro spécial en décrivant les effets des restrictions de santé publique liées à la COVID-19 sur un rythme favorable à la santé. Maintenant semble un moment idéal pour réévaluer de quelle manière et selon quel horaire nous devrions être physiquement actifs, demeurer sédentaires et dormir pour favoriser notre santé.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Exercise , Health Status , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Sedentary Behavior
13.
J Phys Act Health ; 20(5): 364-373, 2023 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2284330

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Understanding patterns of physical activity and sedentary behavior is essential, but evidence from low- and middle-income countries remains limited. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behavior in the Thai population; their sociodemographic correlates; and the contribution of specific domains to total physical activity. METHODS: We analyzed data from the 2021 Health Behavior Survey, a nationally representative survey, conducted by the Thailand National Statistical Office during the COVID-19 pandemic. Physical activity and sedentary behavior were assessed using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire. "Sufficiently active" was defined according to the World Health Organization guidelines. "Highly sedentary" was defined as sitting ≥7 hours per day. The contribution of work, transport, and recreational physical activity was determined as the proportion of total physical activity. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to determine the correlates of being sufficiently active and being highly sedentary. RESULTS: Of the total study population (N = 78,717), 71.9% were sufficiently active, whereas 75.8% were highly sedentary. Females, having a labor-intensive work, and living in Bangkok had a higher likelihood of being sufficiently active. Those with higher education and income levels, and living in Bangkok and the Central region had a greater likelihood of being highly sedentary. The work domain contributed the highest proportion toward physical activity (82.1%), followed by the recreation (10.0%) and transport domains (7.9%). CONCLUSIONS: Policies should focus on promoting transport and recreational physical activity and activity that can break up sedentary behavior among adults because when countries become technologically advanced, physical activity at work declines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise , Adult , Female , Humans , Sedentary Behavior , Thailand/epidemiology , Pandemics , Southeast Asian People , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Health Surveys
14.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 357, 2023 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2288036

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Exposure to air pollution has become a serious environmental issue affecting children's health and health-related behavior in China. Previous studies have focused on the associations between air pollution and physical activity among adults; however, few have examined the relationship between air pollution and health-related behavior among children, which are particularly susceptible population subgroups. The present study aims to examine the impact of air pollution on daily physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) among children in China. METHODS: PA and SB data were collected by actiGraph accelerometers for eight consecutive days. PA and SB data from 206 children were matched to daily air pollution obtained from the Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People's Republic of China, including the average daily air quality index (AQI), PM2.5 (µg/m³), and PM10 (µg/m³). Associations were estimated using linear individual fixed-effect regressions. RESULTS: A 10-unit increase in daily AQI was associated with a reduction in daily PA by 5.94 (95% confidence interval [CI] = -8.79, -3.08) minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and 229.82 (95% CI = -345.35, -114.28) walking steps and an increase in daily SB by 15.77 (95% CI = 9.01, 22.53) minutes. A 10 µg/m³ increase in air pollution concentration in daily PM2.5 was associated with a reduction in daily PA by 7.51 (95% CI = -11.04, -3.97) minutes of MVPA, 295.69 (95% CI = -438.46, -152.92) walking steps and an increase in daily SB by 21.12 (95% CI = 12.77, 29.47) minutes. A 10 µg/m³ increase in air pollution concentration in daily PM10 was associated with a reduction in daily PA by 13.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] = -15.98, -10.37) minutes of MVPA, 518.34 (95% CI = -631.77, -404.91) walking steps and an increase in daily SB by 19.87 (95% CI = 13.10, 26.64) minutes. CONCLUSION: Air pollution may discourage physical activity and increase sedentary behavior among children. Policy interventions are needed to reduce air pollution and develop strategies to decrease risks to children's health.


Subject(s)
Air Pollutants , Air Pollution , Adult , Humans , Child , Sedentary Behavior , Exercise , Air Pollution/adverse effects , Air Pollution/analysis , Health Behavior , Particulate Matter/analysis
15.
Am J Prev Med ; 64(4): 492-502, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2287982

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Physical activity before COVID-19 infection is associated with less severe outcomes. The study determined whether a dose‒response association was observed and whether the associations were consistent across demographic subgroups and chronic conditions. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of Kaiser Permanente Southern California adult patients who had a positive COVID-19 diagnosis between January 1, 2020 and May 31, 2021 was created. The exposure was the median of at least 3 physical activity self-reports before diagnosis. Patients were categorized as follows: always inactive, all assessments at 10 minutes/week or less; mostly inactive, median of 0-60 minutes per week; some activity, median of 60-150 minutes per week; consistently active, median>150 minutes per week; and always active, all assessments>150 minutes per week. Outcomes were hospitalization, deterioration event, or death 90 days after a COVID-19 diagnosis. Data were analyzed in 2022. RESULTS: Of 194,191 adults with COVID-19 infection, 6.3% were hospitalized, 3.1% experienced a deterioration event, and 2.8% died within 90 days. Dose‒response effects were strong; for example, patients in the some activity category had higher odds of hospitalization (OR=1.43; 95% CI=1.26, 1.63), deterioration (OR=1.83; 95% CI=1.49, 2.25), and death (OR=1.92; 95% CI=1.48, 2.49) than those in the always active category. Results were generally consistent across sex, race and ethnicity, age, and BMI categories and for patients with cardiovascular disease or hypertension. CONCLUSIONS: There were protective associations of physical activity for adverse COVID-19 outcomes across demographic and clinical characteristics. Public health leaders should add physical activity to pandemic control strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise , Exercise/physiology , COVID-19/classification , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Aged , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , California , Retrospective Studies , Disease Progression , Sedentary Behavior , Time Factors , Racial Groups/statistics & numerical data , Ethnicity/statistics & numerical data , Body Mass Index , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Hypertension/epidemiology
16.
Int J Obes (Lond) ; 47(5): 375-381, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2266587

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several studies have reported that the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has increased sedentary behaviour and obesity; however, these analyses used self-reported data, and the association between sedentary behaviour and visceral fat and adipocytokines during the COVID-19 pandemic remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the association of the COVID-19 pandemic with objectively measured sedentary behaviour and these obesity-related factors. METHODS: Longitudinal analysis was conducted on 257 Japanese participants who underwent health check-ups in 2018 before and in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. For both time points, sedentary behaviour was measured using an accelerometer for at least 7 days, visceral fat area (VFA) was measured using abdominal bioelectrical impedance analysis, and blood adiponectin level was measured using latex agglutination turbidimetric immunoassay. Multiple linear regression was performed to determine the association between sedentary behaviour and these outcomes. RESULTS: Compared with data in 2018, sedentary behaviour and VFA were significantly increased (P < 0.001, P = 0.006) whereas adiponectin level was significantly decreased (P < 0.001) in 2020. Increased sedentary behaviour was significantly associated with an increase in VFA (ß = 3.85, 95% CI 1.22-6.49, P = 0.004) and a decrease in adiponectin level (ß = -0.04, 95% CI -0.06 to -0.01, P = 0.005). However, the association of sedentary behaviour with adiponectin level was not significant after considering the effects of VFA. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with objectively measured sedentary behaviour and obesity-related factors in Japanese adults. Additionally, an increase in sedentary behaviour was associated with an increase in VFA, whereas the association of sedentary behaviour with adiponectin was partly mediated by VFA. These results suggest that avoiding increasing sedentary time is important to prevent visceral adiposity thereby ameliorating adiponectin, especially during behavioural limitations such as the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Adiposity , COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Sedentary Behavior , Pandemics , Adiponectin , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/metabolism , Intra-Abdominal Fat/metabolism
17.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 572, 2023 03 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2258524

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In Saudi Arabia, stay-at-home orders to address the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic between March 15 and 23, 2020 and eased on May 28, 2020. We conducted a scoping review to systematically describe physical activity and sedentary behavior in Saudi Arabia associated with the timing of the lockdown. METHODS: We searched six databases on December 13, 2021 for articles published in English or Arabic from 2018 to the search date. Studies must have reported data from Saudi Arabia for any age and measured physical activity or sedentary behavior. RESULTS: Overall, 286 records were found; after excluding duplicates, 209 records were screened, and 19 studies were included in the review. Overall, 15 studies were cross-sectional, and 4 studies were prospective cohorts. Three studies included children and adolescents (age: 2-18 years), and 16 studies included adults (age: 15-99 years). Data collection periods were < = 5 months, with 17 studies collecting data in 2020 only, one study in 2020-2021, and one study in 2021. The median analytic sample size was 363 (interquartile range 262-640). Three studies of children/adolescents collected behaviors online at one time using parental reporting, with one also allowing self-reporting. All three studies found that physical activity was lower during and/or following the lockdown than before the lockdown. Two studies found screen time, television watching, and playing video games were higher during or following the lockdown than before the lockdown. Sixteen adult studies assessed physical activity, with 15 utilizing self-reporting and one using accelerometry. Physical activity, exercise, walking, and park visits were all lower during or following the lockdown than before the lockdown. Six adult studies assessed sedentary behavior using self-report. Sitting time (4 studies) and screen time (2 studies) were higher during or following the lockdown than before the lockdown. CONCLUSIONS: Among children, adolescents, and adults, studies consistently indicated that in the short-term, physical activity decreased and sedentary behavior increased in conjunction with the movement restrictions. Given the widespread impact of the pandemic on other health behaviors, it would be important to continue tracking behaviors post-lockdown and identify subpopulations that may not have returned to their physical activity and sedentary behavior to pre-pandemic levels to focus on intervention efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sedentary Behavior , Adult , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Child, Preschool , Young Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise
18.
Nutrients ; 15(5)2023 Feb 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2256590

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has generated substantial changes in the lives of the population, such as increased physical inactivity, which can lead to being overweight and, consequently, repercussions on glucose homeostasis. A cross-sectional study based on the adult population of Brazil was conducted by stratified, multistage probability cluster sampling (October and December 2020). Participants were classified as physically active or inactive during leisure time according to the recommendations of the World Health Organization. HbA1c levels were categorized as normal (≤6.4%) or with glycemic changes (≥6.5%). The mediating variable was being overweight (overweight and obese). Descriptive, univariate, and multivariate logistic regression analyses examined the association between physical inactivity and glycemic changes. Mediation was analyzed using the Karlson-Holm-Breen method to verify the influence of being overweight on the association. We interviewed 1685 individuals, mostly women (52.4%), 35-59 years old (45.8%), race/ethnicity brown (48.1%), and overweight (56.5%). The mean HbA1c was 5.68% (95% CI: 5.58-5.77). Mediation analysis verified that physically inactive participants during leisure time were 2.62 times more likely to have high levels of HbA1c (OR: 2.62, 95% CI: 1.29-5.33), and 26.87% of this effect was mediated by over-weight (OR: 1.30: 95% CI: 1.06-1.57). Physical inactivity at leisure increases the chances of high levels of HbA1c, and part of this association can be explained by being overweight.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Overweight , Adult , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Male , Overweight/epidemiology , Glycated Hemoglobin , Sedentary Behavior , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 03 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2259000

ABSTRACT

Because of their direct relations to the process of health and disease throughout life, physical activity and sedentary behavior emerge as priorities in the global public health agenda [...].


Subject(s)
Exercise , Life Style , Sedentary Behavior , Humans
20.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1115789, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2274557

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has had major impact on the daily lives of adolescents. This study examined whether mental health outcomes had changed over the pandemic, and if such changes were related to changes in physical activity (PA), sedentary time, sleep, screen time, and participation in organized sports. Materials and methods: In this longitudinal study, data were collected in autumn 2019 with follow-up measurements in spring 2021. In total, 558 schools were invited and 34 schools around Stockholm with a variation in socioeconomic background were included. Physical activity and sedentary time were measured for seven consecutive days by accelerometry (Actigraph). Anxiety, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), psychosomatic health, stress, sleep duration, screen time, and organized sports participation were self-reported in questionnaires. Linear models were applied to estimate associations between changes in mental health outcomes and exposures. Results: From the baseline sample of 1,139 participants, 585 (55% girls), mean (SD) age 14.9 (0.3) years, participated in the follow-up. Between 2019 and 2021, there was a decrease in HRQoL [mean difference -1.7 (-2.3, -1.2), p < 0.001], increase in psychosomatic health problems [mean difference 1.8 (1.3, 2.3), p < 0.001], and an increase in the number of participants with high stress [from 94 (28%) to 139 (42%), p < 0.001]. Weekly light PA and sleep duration decreased and weekly sedentary time and screen time increased unrelated to changes in mental health outcomes. An increase in sleep duration during weekdays was significantly related to both a decrease in anxiety (B = -0.71, CI: -1.36, -0.06) and an increase in HRQoL (B = 1.00, CI: 0.51, 1.49). Conclusion: During the COVID-19 pandemic, mental health appears to have been impaired in Swedish adolescents, but unrelated to changes in PA, sedentary time, screen time, or participation in organized sports. However, increased sleep duration on weekdays was related to less anxiety and better HRQoL. The results may help policy makers and other stakeholders comprehend the differential effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health outcomes and help guiding the planning of policy actions. Trial registration: ISRCTN15689873.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise , Health Behavior , Mental Health , Sedentary Behavior , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Sweden/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Sleep Duration , Screen Time , Sports , Education, Distance
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