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1.
Epilepsy Behav ; 126: 108470, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560506

ABSTRACT

Several studies reported acute symptomatic seizures as a possible neurological complication of COVID-19 pneumonia. Apart from metabolic imbalances, hypoxia, and fever, other ictogenic mechanisms are likely related to an immune-mediated damage. The same mechanisms are shared by other respiratory viruses. Since neurotropic properties of SARS-CoV-2 have been questioned, we investigated whether SARS-CoV-2 has a similar ictogenic potential to other respiratory non-neurotropic viruses. We conducted a retrospective study identifying 1141 patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia and 146 patients with H1N1/H3N2 pneumonia. We found a similar prevalence of seizures in the two viral pneumonia (1.05% with SARS-CoV-2 vs 2.05% with influenza; p = 0.26). We detailed clinical, electroencephalographic, and neuroradiological features of each patient, together with the hypothesized pathogenesis of seizures. Previous epilepsy or pre-existing predisposing conditions (i.e., Alzheimer's disease, stroke, cerebral neoplasia) were found in one-third of patients that experienced seizures, while two-thirds of patients had seizures without known risk factors other than pneumonia in both groups. The prevalence of pre-existing predisposing conditions and disease severity indexes was similar in SARS-CoV-2 and H1N1/H3N2 pneumonia, thus excluding they could act as potential confounders. Considering all the patients with viral pneumonia together, previous epilepsy (p < 0.001) and the need for ventilatory support (p < 0.001), but not the presence of pre-existing predisposing conditions (p = 0.290), were associated with seizure risk. Our study showed that SARS-CoV-2 and influenza viruses share a similar ictogenic potential. In both these infections, seizures are rare but serious events, and can manifest without pre-existing predisposing conditions, in particular when pneumonia is severe, thus suggesting an interplay between disease severity and host response as a major mechanism of ictogenesis, rather than a virus-specific mechanism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Pneumonia, Viral , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures
2.
Epilepsy Behav ; 126: 108489, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550147

ABSTRACT

Google Trends™ is a popular tool for analyzing healthcare-seeking patterns based on observed changes in the relative search volume (RSV) of the queries made on the Google™ search engine. Google Trends™ was increasingly utilized during the pandemic to assess the impact on mental health, risk communication, the impact of media coverage, and preparedness prediction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on help-seeking behaviors for seizures and/or epilepsy by assessing the changes in seizure-related online queries in periods before and since the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic on Google Trends™. We compared the RSV volumes in the year prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic against weekly COVID-19 positive cases for each state and US census regions Search terms were categorized according to seizure symptoms or seizure treatment. Our study showed no significant increase in the RSV for seizure and epilepsy-related searches during the COVID-19 pandemic via Google Trends™. Public health entities and medical systems may use Google Trends ™ as a way to predict national, regional, and local patient needs and drive resources to meet patient demands.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Help-Seeking Behavior , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Search Engine , Seizures
3.
S Afr Med J ; 111(11): 1050-1054, 2021 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538769

ABSTRACT

A previously healthy 10-year-old girl, living in a sheep-farming community in South Africa with exposure to dogs, presented to her local hospital with generalised tonic-clonic seizures. The initial clinical assessment and laboratory work-up were unremarkable. When she presented with further seizures 6 months later, attempts to arrange neuroimaging and specialist assessment were unsuccessful owing to restrictions on routine healthcare services during the SARS-CoV-2 nationwide lockdown. Subsequently, 11 months after her first presentation, she developed focal neurological signs suggestive of raised intracranial pressure. A brain computed tomography scan revealed a left-sided cerebral cyst and imminent tonsillar herniation. An emergency burr-hole procedure was performed to relieve the raised intracranial pressure, followed by definitive neurosurgical excision of cysts. Hydatid protoscolices and hooklets were seen on microscopy of cyst fluid, and treatment with albendazole and praziquantel was initiated. While her infection was treated successfully, long-term sequelae including permanent blindness and hemiparesis could potentially have been prevented with early neuroimaging and surgical intervention.


Subject(s)
Anticestodal Agents/administration & dosage , Brain Diseases/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Echinococcosis/diagnosis , Albendazole/administration & dosage , Brain Diseases/drug therapy , Brain Diseases/parasitology , Child , Delayed Diagnosis , Echinococcosis/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Intracranial Hypertension/parasitology , Praziquantel/administration & dosage , Seizures/parasitology , South Africa , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
4.
Childs Nerv Syst ; 37(12): 3919-3922, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525534

ABSTRACT

Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis is a clinical condition characterized by acute behavioral and mood changes, abnormal movements, autonomic instability, seizures, and encephalopathy. We describe a 7-year-old boy diagnosed with autoimmune encephalitis due to NMDAR antibody in association with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) (coronavirus disease 2019) (COVID-19), without pulmonary involvement or fever. The patient presented with acute ataxia, rapidly developed encephalopathy, and autoimmune encephalitis was suspected. Steroid treatment was withheld because of lymphopenia and intravenous immunoglobulin was started. The absence of clinical response prompted plasmapheresis and, when lymphocyte counts improved, pulse steroid treatment was applied. The latter was followed by significant improvement and the patient was discharged in a conscious and ambulatory state. Autoimmune encephalitis should be considered in the presence of neurological symptoms accompanying SARS-CoV-2 infection and steroid treatment should be preferred unless limited by contraindications.


Subject(s)
Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis , COVID-19 , Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis/complications , Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis/drug therapy , Child , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures
5.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 41(1): e1-e5, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522380

ABSTRACT

Children, although at lower risk of poor outcomes from COVID-19 relative to adults, still stand to benefit from therapeutic interventions. Understanding of COVID-19 clinical presentation and prognosis in children is essential to optimize therapeutic trials design. This perspective illustrates how to collectively accelerate pediatric COVID-19 therapeutic research and development, based on the experience of the Global Accelerator for Paediatric Formulations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Research , Seizures/drug therapy , Child , Dosage Forms , Drug Compounding , Drug Development , Humans , Needs Assessment , Pharmaceutical Preparations , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(11): 3870-3872, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470416

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: An increasing number of published reports on SARS-CoV-2 neurological manifestations have revealed a wide spectrum of symptoms, diagnostic features, and outcomes. We report a fatal case of a COVID-19-associated acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE). CASE REPORT: We report a 70-year-old man brought to the hospital after a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. He was confused and disoriented. Nasopharyngeal swab testing for SARS-CoV-2 was positive. A head computed tomography (CT) scan and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed no signs of acute pathology. After recurrent seizures, he was sedated and intubated. Throughout the days that followed he remained in a therapeutic coma. After discontinuation of sedatives, he remained unconscious. A repeated head CT scan showed signs of pontine edema, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed inhomogeneous hyperintensities with microhemorrhages and small autonecrotic cavities in both thalami, brain stem, and cerebellar peduncles. With a high suspicion of a COVID-19-associated ANE, the patient was started on high-dose glucocorticoids; however, he died the next day. The CSF tested negative for SARS-CoV-2. DISCUSSION: A variety of COVID-19 neurological manifestations have been reported to date, including various forms of encephalitis and encephalopathy. In our patient, encephalopathy with seizures was the presenting symptom of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The radiological findings on days 8 and 9 were consistent with an ANE. The precise pathogenesis of ANE remains unclear; however, an immune-mediated mechanism is suspected. Early diagnostics with prompt administration of immunomodulators may be lifesaving. Suspicion of a COVID-19-related encephalopathy/encephalitis should be raised in all patients with altered mental status, seizures, and/or coma.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases , COVID-19 , Aged , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/chemically induced
8.
Trop Biomed ; 38(3): 435-445, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1451066

ABSTRACT

Ever since the first reported case series on SARS-CoV-2-induced neurological manifestation in Wuhan, China in April 2020, various studies reporting similar as well as diverse symptoms of COVID-19 infection relating to the nervous system were published. Since then, scientists started to uncover the mechanism as well as pathophysiological impacts it has on the current understanding of the disease. SARS-CoV-2 binds to the ACE2 receptor which is present in certain parts of the body which are responsible for regulating blood pressure and inflammation in a healthy system. Presence of the receptor in the nasal and oral cavity, brain, and blood allows entry of the virus into the body and cause neurological complications. The peripheral and central nervous system could also be invaded directly in the neurogenic or hematogenous pathways, or indirectly through overstimulation of the immune system by cytokines which may lead to autoimmune diseases. Other neurological implications such as hypoxia, anosmia, dysgeusia, meningitis, encephalitis, and seizures are important symptoms presented clinically in COVID-19 patients with or without the common symptoms of the disease. Further, patients with higher severity of the SARS-CoV-2 infection are also at risk of retaining some neurological complications in the long-run. Treatment of such severe hyperinflammatory conditions will also be discussed, as well as the risks they may pose to the progression of the disease. For this review, articles pertaining information on the neurological manifestation of SARS-CoV-2 infection were gathered from PubMed and Google Scholar using the search keywords "SARS-CoV-2", "COVID-19", and "neurological dysfunction". The findings of the search were filtered, and relevant information were included.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Central Nervous System/pathology , Nervous System Diseases/virology , Peripheral Nervous System/pathology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Anosmia/virology , Central Nervous System/virology , Dysgeusia/virology , Encephalitis, Viral/virology , Humans , Meningitis, Viral/virology , Nervous System Diseases/pathology , Peripheral Nervous System/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/virology
9.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 499, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447296

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused large-scale economic and social losses and worldwide deaths. Although most COVID-19 patients have initially complained of respiratory insufficiency, the presence of neuropsychiatric manifestations is also reported frequently, ranging from headache, hyposmia/anosmia, and neuromuscular dysfunction to stroke, seizure, encephalopathy, altered mental status, and psychiatric disorders, both in the acute phase and in the long term. These neuropsychiatric complications have emerged as a potential indicator of worsened clinical outcomes and poor prognosis, thus contributing to mortality in COVID-19 patients. Their etiology remains largely unclear and probably involves multiple neuroinvasive pathways. Here, we summarize recent animal and human studies for neurotrophic properties of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) and elucidate potential neuropathogenic mechanisms involved in the viral invasion of the central nervous system as a cause for brain damage and neurological impairments. We then discuss the potential therapeutic strategy for intervening and preventing neuropsychiatric complications associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Time-series monitoring of clinical-neurochemical-radiological progress of neuropsychiatric and neuroimmune complications need implementation in individuals exposed to SARS-CoV-2. The development of a screening, intervention, and therapeutic framework to prevent and reduce neuropsychiatric sequela is urgently needed and crucial for the short- and long-term recovery of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Animals , Headache , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures
10.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 191, 2021 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413462

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Presently, it is known that, even if less frequently than in adults, children can develop a severe new coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Children with the SARS-CoV-2 infection can have neurological signs and symptoms of disease more frequently than previously thought, revealing the involvement of the central nervous system, the peripheral nervous system, or both. Aim of this manuscript is to highlight the neurologic complications associated with SARS-CoV-2 among pediatric patients with COVID-19, suggesting when to monitor carefully neurologic development. MAIN FINDINGS: Children with a severe chronic underlying disease, infants and toddlers and those who develop the so-called multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) are those with the highest incidence of neurological complications. Fortunately, in most of the cases, neurological manifestations, mainly represented by headache and anosmia, are mild and transient and do not significantly complicate the COVID-19 course. However, in some cases, very severe clinical problems associated with relevant alterations of neuroimaging, electroencephalography, nerve conduction studies and electromyography findings can develop. Generally, almost all the children with COVID-19 and neurological manifestations till now described have made a complete recovery, although in some cases this has occurred after several weeks of treatment. Moreover, COVID-19 infection during pregnancy has been found associated with an increased risk of obstetric complications that can lead to neurological acute and long-term manifestations in neonates. CONCLUSIONS: Based on data showing the neurologic impact of COVID-19 in pediatric age, we suggest monitoring neurological development a few months after healing in pediatric patients who have presented MIS-C, seizures or other neurological manifestations and in children of pregnant women with COVID-19 in order to detect overt and subtle deficits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Nervous System Diseases/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/virology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis
13.
Acta Neurol Scand ; 143(2): 206-209, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388169

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lockdown due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic became a challenge to maintain care for patients with epilepsy; we aimed to find out how the pandemic affected them. METHODS: We sent an online 22-item questionnaire to patients from our outpatient clinic, a reference centre in Spain for drug-resistant epilepsy, inquiring about the effects of lockdown, from March to May 2020. RESULTS: We sent the survey to 627 patients; 312 (58% women) sent a complete response and were included. Of all respondents, 57% took >2 antiseizure medications. One-third of respondents (29%) declared an associated cognitive or motor disability. A minority had confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2 (1.92%). Seizure frequency remained like usual in 56% of patients, while 31.2% reported an increase. Less than 10% needed emergent assistance. Almost half reported anxiety or depression, and 25% increased behavioural disorders. Mood (F: 5.40; p: 0.002) and sleep disorders (F = 2.67; p: 0.05) were associated with increase in seizure frequency. Patients were able to contact their physicians when needed and were open to a future telematic approach to follow-up visits. CONCLUSIONS: Seizure frequency and severity remained unchanged in most patients during the lockdown. Mood and sleep disorders were common and associated with seizure worsening. Patients were open to telematic care in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy/therapy , Pandemics , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Anxiety/complications , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cognition Disorders/complications , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/complications , Disabled Persons , Epilepsy/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Motor Disorders/complications , Outpatients , Seizures/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/classification , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Spain/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
14.
Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica ; 38(2): 352-357, 2021.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380145

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic currently affects millions of people including the pediatric population. The clinical manifestations in children are diverse: respiratory, gastrointestinal, hematological, neurological and systemic. In order to describe the various clinical and neurological manifestations during the evolution of the disease, we documented a series of cases of pediatric patients with COVID-19. Various mechanisms are proposed through which SARS-CoV-2 would cause neurological injury (direct injury, secondary to an immune response, among others) with variable clinical characteristics (seizures, muscle weakness, sensorial disorder). Studies on clinical characteristics and prognostic factors in children and adolescents with SARS-CoV-2 are limited, therefore, this report provides a spectrum of neurological manifestations associated with SARS-CoV-2 in pediatric population.


La pandemia por la COVID-19 afecta actualmente a millones de personas sin exceptuar la población pediátrica. Las manifestaciones clínicas en niños son variables: respiratorias, gastrointestinales, hematológicas, neurológicas y sistémicas. Con el objetivo de describir las diversas presentaciones clínicas y neurológicas durante la evolución de la enfermedad se documentó una serie de casos de pacientes pediátricos con la COVID-19. Se plantean diversos mecanismos a través de los cuales el SARS-CoV-2 causaría daño neurológico (daño directo, secundario a respuesta inmune, entre otras) con características clínicas variables (convulsiones, debilidad muscular, trastorno del sensorio). Los estudios sobre características clínicas y factores pronósticos en niños y adolescentes con SARS-CoV-2 son limitados, por lo cual el presente reporte contribuye con un espectro de manifestaciones neurológicas asociadas al SARS-CoV-2 en población pediátrica.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures
15.
Seizure ; 92: 89-93, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373266

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore the rate, characteristics, risk factors, and prognosis of children presenting with seizures as the main symptom of acute COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019). METHODS: We conducted a systematic retrospective study to identify all children who presented to the emergency departments of a tertiary academic medical center between March 1st and December 31st 2020 and had a SARS-CoV-2 infection based on RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) from nasopharyngeal swab. Clinical and demographic data were extracted from the electronic medical records and reviewed. RESULTS: Total of 175 children were diagnosed with acute SARS-CoV-2 infection in the emergency departments during the study period. Of those, 11 presented with seizures. Age ranged from six months to 17 years and 4 were girls. Five presented with status epilepticus and responded to loading doses of anti-seizure medications. Six had fever. Seven had prior history of neurological disorder. Full recovery was the rule. SIGNIFICANCE: Unlike in adults, seizures occur early and may be the main manifestation of acute COVID-19 in children. Seizures, including status epilepticus, may occur without fever even in children with no history of epilepsy and are not associated with severe disease. A high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis thus infection control measures can be taken.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Status Epilepticus , Adult , Child , Female , Humans , Infant , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/diagnosis , Seizures/drug therapy , Seizures/epidemiology
16.
Epilepsia ; 62(10): 2322-2332, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371818

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected the care of all patients around the world. The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) COVID-19 and Telemedicine Task Forces examined, through surveys to people with epilepsy (PWE), caregivers, and health care professionals, how the pandemic has affected the well-being, care, and services for PWE. The ILAE included a link on their website whereby PWE and/or their caregivers could fill out a survey (in 11 languages) about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, including access to health services and impact on mental health, including the 6-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. An anonymous link was also provided whereby health care providers could report cases of new-onset seizures or an exacerbation of seizures in the context of COVID-19. Finally, a separate questionnaire aimed at exploring the utilization of telehealth by health care professionals since the pandemic began was available on the ILAE website and also disseminated to its members. Seventeen case reports were received; data were limited and therefore no firm conclusions could be drawn. Of 590 respondents to the well-being survey (422 PWE, 166 caregivers), 22.8% PWE and 27.5% caregivers reported an increase in seizure frequency, with difficulty in accessing medication and health care professionals reported as barriers to care. Of all respondents, 57.1% PWE and 21.5% caregivers had severe psychological distress (k score >13), which was significantly higher among PWE than caregivers (p<0.01). An increase in telemedicine use during the COVID-19 pandemic was reported by health care professionals, with 40% of consultations conducted by this method. Although 74.9% of health care providers thought that this impacted positively, barriers to care were also identified. As we move forward, there is a need to ensure ongoing support and care for PWE to prevent a parallel pandemic of unmet health care needs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy/therapy , Pandemics , Caregivers , Communication , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Epilepsy/psychology , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Psychological Distress , Seizures/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
17.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(9): e340-e343, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370831

ABSTRACT

AIM: To describe a term newborn with acquired severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and multisystem involvement including seizures associated to ischemic lesions in the brain. BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is predominantly a respiratory infection, but it may affect many other systems. Most pediatric COVID-19 cases range from asymptomatic to mild-moderate disease. There are no specific clinical signs described for neonatal COVID-19 infections. In children, severe central nervous system compromise has been rarely reported. CASE DESCRIPTION: We describe a 17-day-old newborn who acquired a SARS-CoV-2 infection in a family meeting that was admitted for fever, seizures and lethargy and in whom consumption coagulopathy, ischemic lesions in the brain and cardiac involvement were documented. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 neonatal infection can be associated with multi-organic involvement. In our patient, significant central nervous system compromise associated to ischemic lesions and laboratory findings of consumption coagulopathy were found. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Although neonatal SARS-CoV-2 infections are infrequent, they can be associated with multi-organic involvement. Neonatologists and pediatricians should be aware of this unusual way of presentation of COVID-19 in newborn infants.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/virology , COVID-19/complications , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Acyclovir/therapeutic use , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Brain Ischemia/pathology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use , Fever , Frontal Lobe/blood supply , Frontal Lobe/diagnostic imaging , Frontal Lobe/pathology , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/drug therapy , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/pathology , Lethargy , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Nasopharynx/virology , Seizures
18.
Epilepsy Behav ; 123: 108255, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364517

ABSTRACT

Although psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are a common neurologic condition, there remains a paucity of literature on the COVID-19 pandemic's effect on these patients. Using a cross-sectional questionnaire study, our group examined the experience of patients with PNES at a single Comprehensive Epilepsy Center in New York City, the epicenter of the initial COVID-19 outbreak in the United States. Among our cohort of 18 subjects with PNES, 22.2% reported an improvement in seizure control during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City. Compared to the cohort of subjects with epilepsy without PNES, subjects with PNES were significantly more likely to report an improvement (p = 0.033). Our findings signal that sleep and stress may be relevant variables in both conditions that should be further investigated and potentially intervened upon. Larger dedicated studies of patients with PNES are needed to understand the impact of the pandemic's widespread societal effects on these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Electroencephalography , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Humans , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/epidemiology
19.
Continuum (Minneap Minn) ; 27(4): 1051-1065, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359094

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article describes the spectrum of neurologic complications associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, their underlying pathology and pathogenic mechanisms, gaps in knowledge, and current therapeutic strategies. RECENT FINDINGS: COVID-19 is the clinical syndrome caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. It can affect the entire neuraxis, and presentations in the acute phase are variable, although anosmia is a common manifestation. Encephalopathy is common in patients who are hospitalized and is often associated with multiorgan involvement. Immune-mediated encephalitis is probably underrecognized; however, viral encephalitis is rare. Other manifestations include stroke, seizures, myelitis, and peripheral neuropathies, including Guillain-Barré syndrome, which sometimes has atypical manifestations. Treatment is symptomatic, and immunotherapies have been used successfully in some patients. Long-term complications include dysautonomia, exercise intolerance, malaise, sleep disturbances, cognitive impairment, and mood disorders. SUMMARY: Neurologic manifestations of COVID-19 may occur in the acute setting and may be independent of respiratory manifestations. Immune-mediated syndromes and cerebrovascular complications are common. Large populations of patients are expected to have long-term neurologic complications of COVID-19, many of which may emerge only after recovery from the acute illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nervous System Diseases , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases , Stroke , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures
20.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(9): e323-e332, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358506

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, very few childhood deaths have been attributed to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We evaluated clinical, microbiologic and postmortem histopathologic findings in childhood deaths in whom severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was identified antemortem or postmortem. METHODS: Surveillance of childhood deaths was ongoing during the initial COVID-19 outbreak in South Africa from April 14, 2020, to August 31, 2020. All children hospitalized during this time had a SARS-CoV-2 test done as part of standard of care. Postmortem sampling included minimally invasive tissue sampling (MITS) of lung, liver and heart tissue; blood and lung samples for bacterial culture and molecular detection of viruses (including SARS-CoV-2) and bacteria. The cause of death attribution was undertaken by a multidisciplinary team and reported using World Health Organization framework for cause of death attribution. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 was identified on antemortem and/or postmortem sampling in 11.7% (20/171) of deceased children, including 13.2% (12/91) in whom MITS was done. Eighteen (90%) of 20 deaths with SARS-CoV-2 infection were <12 months age. COVID-19 was attributed in the causal pathway to death in 91.7% (11/12) and 87.5% (7/8) cases with and without MITS, respectively. Lung histopathologic features in COVID-19-related deaths included diffuse alveolar damage (n = 6, 54.5%), type 2 pneumocyte proliferation (n = 6, 54.5%) and hyaline membrane formation (n = 5, 36.4%). Culture-confirmed invasive bacterial disease was evident in 54.5% (6/11) of COVID-19 attributed deaths investigated with MITS. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 was in the causal pathway of 10.5% (18/171) of all childhood deaths under surveillance. The postmortem histopathologic features in fatal COVID-19 cases in children were consistent with reports on COVID-19 deaths in adults; although there was a high prevalence of invasive bacterial disease in the children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adolescent , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Gastroenteritis/complications , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Tract Diseases/complications , Seizures/complications , South Africa/epidemiology
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