Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Nutrients ; 14(2)2022 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637442

ABSTRACT

In the last two years, there has been a surge in the number of publications on the trace element selenium (Se) and selenocysteine-containing selenoproteins in human health, largely due to the pandemic and the multiple roles that this micronutrient and Se-dependent selenoproteins play in various aspects of the disease [...].


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Selenium/deficiency , Selenoprotein P/blood , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/mortality , Humans , Nutritional Status , Selenocysteine/blood , Selenocysteine/deficiency , Selenoproteins/blood , Selenoproteins/deficiency
2.
Front Immunol ; 12: 730710, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441108

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 challenges the understanding of factors affecting disease progression and severity. The identification of prognostic biomarkers and physiological processes associated with disease symptoms is relevant for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions to contribute to the control of this pandemic. To address this challenge, in this study, we used a quantitative proteomics together with multiple data analysis algorithms to characterize serum protein profiles in five cohorts from healthy to SARS-CoV-2-infected recovered (hospital discharge), nonsevere (hospitalized), and severe [at the intensive care unit (ICU)] cases with increasing systemic inflammation in comparison with healthy individuals sampled prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. The results showed significantly dysregulated proteins and associated biological processes and disorders associated to COVID-19. These results corroborated previous findings in COVID-19 studies and highlighted how the representation of dysregulated serum proteins and associated BPs increases with COVID-19 disease symptomatology from asymptomatic to severe cases. The analysis was then focused on novel disease processes and biomarkers that were correlated with disease symptomatology. To contribute to translational medicine, results corroborated the predictive value of selected immune-related biomarkers for disease recovery [Selenoprotein P (SELENOP) and Serum paraoxonase/arylesterase 1 (PON1)], severity [Carboxypeptidase B2 (CBP2)], and symptomatology [Pregnancy zone protein (PZP)] using protein-specific ELISA tests. Our results contributed to the characterization of SARS-CoV-2-host molecular interactions with potential contributions to the monitoring and control of this pandemic by using immune-related biomarkers associated with disease symptomatology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aryldialkylphosphatase/blood , Biomarkers/blood , Carboxypeptidase B2/blood , Female , Humans , Interleukin-1/blood , Interleukin-4/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pregnancy Proteins/blood , Prognosis , Proteome/analysis , Proteomics , Retrospective Studies , Selenoprotein P/blood
3.
Nutrients ; 13(6)2021 Jun 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273493

ABSTRACT

The interplay between inflammation and oxidative stress is a vicious circle, potentially resulting in organ damage. Essential micronutrients such as selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) support anti-oxidative defense systems and are commonly depleted in severe disease. This single-center retrospective study investigated micronutrient levels under Se and Zn supplementation in critically ill patients with COVID-19 induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and explored potential relationships with immunological and clinical parameters. According to intensive care unit (ICU) standard operating procedures, patients received 1.0 mg of intravenous Se daily on top of artificial nutrition, which contained various amounts of Se and Zn. Micronutrients, inflammatory cytokines, lymphocyte subsets and clinical data were extracted from the patient data management system on admission and after 10 to 14 days of treatment. Forty-six patients were screened for eligibility and 22 patients were included in the study. Twenty-one patients (95%) suffered from severe ARDS and 14 patients (64%) survived to ICU discharge. On admission, the majority of patients had low Se status biomarkers and Zn levels, along with elevated inflammatory parameters. Se supplementation significantly elevated Se (p = 0.027) and selenoprotein P levels (SELENOP; p = 0.016) to normal range. Accordingly, glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) activity increased over time (p = 0.021). Se biomarkers, most notably SELENOP, were inversely correlated with CRP (rs = -0.495), PCT (rs = -0.413), IL-6 (rs = -0.429), IL-1ß (rs = -0.440) and IL-10 (rs = -0.461). Positive associations were found for CD8+ T cells (rs = 0.636), NK cells (rs = 0.772), total IgG (rs = 0.493) and PaO2/FiO2 ratios (rs = 0.504). In addition, survivors tended to have higher Se levels after 10 to 14 days compared to non-survivors (p = 0.075). Sufficient Se and Zn levels may potentially be of clinical significance for an adequate immune response in critically ill patients with severe COVID-19 ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Critical Illness/therapy , Deficiency Diseases/drug therapy , Dietary Supplements , Micronutrients/therapeutic use , Selenium/therapeutic use , Zinc/therapeutic use , Aged , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Deficiency Diseases/complications , Humans , Immune System/drug effects , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/drug therapy , Intensive Care Units , Interleukins/blood , Male , Micronutrients/blood , Micronutrients/deficiency , Middle Aged , Oxygen/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Selenium/blood , Selenium/deficiency , Selenoprotein P/blood , Severity of Illness Index , Zinc/blood , Zinc/deficiency
4.
Nutrients ; 13(6)2021 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256620

ABSTRACT

The trace element copper (Cu) is part of our nutrition and essentially needed for several cuproenzymes that control redox status and support the immune system. In blood, the ferroxidase ceruloplasmin (CP) accounts for the majority of circulating Cu and serves as transport protein. Both Cu and CP behave as positive, whereas serum selenium (Se) and its transporter selenoprotein P (SELENOP) behave as negative acute phase reactants. In view that coronavirus disease (COVID-19) causes systemic inflammation, we hypothesized that biomarkers of Cu and Se status are regulated inversely, in relation to disease severity and mortality risk. Serum samples from COVID-19 patients were analysed for Cu by total reflection X-ray fluorescence and CP was quantified by a validated sandwich ELISA. The two Cu biomarkers correlated positively in serum from patients with COVID-19 (R = 0.42, p < 0.001). Surviving patients showed higher mean serum Cu and CP concentrations in comparison to non-survivors ([mean+/-SEM], Cu; 1475.9+/-22.7 vs. 1317.9+/-43.9 µg/L; p < 0.001, CP; 547.2.5 +/- 19.5 vs. 438.8+/-32.9 mg/L, p = 0.086). In contrast to expectations, total serum Cu and Se concentrations displayed a positive linear correlation in the patient samples analysed (R = 0.23, p = 0.003). Serum CP and SELENOP levels were not interrelated. Applying receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis, the combination of Cu and SELENOP with age outperformed other combinations of parameters for predicting risk of death, yielding an AUC of 95.0%. We conclude that the alterations in serum biomarkers of Cu and Se status in COVID-19 are not compatible with a simple acute phase response, and that serum Cu and SELENOP levels contribute to a good prediction of survival. Adjuvant supplementation in patients with diagnostically proven deficits in Cu or Se may positively influence disease course, as both increase in survivors and are of crucial importance for the immune response and antioxidative defence systems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Copper/blood , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease-Free Survival , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Selenium/blood , Selenoprotein P/blood , Survival Rate
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL