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1.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 1047, 2023 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235225

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 lockdown resulted in the closure of schools with associated problems. The aim of this study was to determine the associations between depression, fear of contracting COVID-19 infection and the use of self-care measures by college students during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study that collected data from undergraduate and postgraduate college students 18 years and older from 152 countries between June and December 2020. Study participants were recruited through crowdsourcing using various social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, WhatsApp groups and emails to participants in the collaborators' networks. The dependent variables were fear of contracting COVID-19 and depression while the independent variable was students' self-care measures. Multivariable logistic regression models were conducted to assess the associations between the dependent and independent variables. RESULTS: Of the 2840 respondents, 1305 (46.0%) had fears of contracting COVID-19 and 599 (21.1%) reported depression. The most common self-care measures were phone calls with friends/family (60.1%) and video chat (52.8%). Learning a new skill was significantly associated with higher odds of fear of contracting COVID-19 (AOR = 1.669) and lower odds of having depression (AOR = 0.684). Talking to friends/family through video chat (AOR = 0.809) was significantly associated with lower odds of feeling depressed while spending time with pets (AOR = 1.470) and taking breaks from the news/social media (AOR = 1.242) were significantly associated with higher odds of feeling depressed. Students from lower middle-income countries (AOR = 0.330) had significantly lower odds of feeling depressed than students from low-income countries. CONCLUSION: Self-care strategies involving social interactions were associated with less depression. Coping strategies with more cognitive demands may significantly reduce the risk of fear of COVID-19. Special attention needs to be given to students in low-income countries who have higher odds of depression during the pandemic than students from other countries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Self Care , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Fear , Students
2.
Cien Saude Colet ; 28(1): 291-301, 2023 Jan.
Article in Portuguese, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242424

ABSTRACT

The objective was to identify the meanings attributed to self-care and its relationship with the actions taken by female sex workers in preventing and coping with COVID-19. Qualitative study supported by the Self-Care Nursing theory. An in-depth interview was carried out with 30 female sex workers from the Alto Sertão Produtivo Baiano. The IRAMUTEQ software was used to analyze the speeches, with the Descending Hierarchical Classification dendrogram. Four classes were observed, revealing the meanings attributed to self-care: the idea that self-care promotes quality of life and well-being; money as a facilitating instrument for self-care actions, both in preventing COVID-19 and in coping with difficulties; in addition to the notion that self-care contributes to the care of those around them. It is concluded that the female sex workers demonstrated to understand the concept of self-care in association with the notion of precaution, while prevention is carried out through the recommendations made by competent bodies. Furthermore, a self-care deficit was noticed due to the conditions present in the sexual service and the difficulties imposed by the pandemic.


Objetivou-se identificar os significados atribuídos ao autocuidado e a relação deste com as ações adotadas por trabalhadoras sexuais na prevenção e enfrentamento à COVID-19. Estudo qualitativo, apoiado na teoria de Enfermagem do Autocuidado. Realizou-se entrevista em profundidade com 30 trabalhadoras sexuais, do Alto Sertão Produtivo Baiano. Utilizou-se o software IRAMUTEQ para análise dos discursos, com o dendrograma da Classificação Hierárquica Descendente. Evidenciou-se quatro classes que revelam os significados atribuídos ao autocuidado: a ideia de que o autocuidado promove obter qualidade de vida e bem-estar; o dinheiro como instrumento facilitador de ações de autocuidado, tanto na prevenção da COVID-19, quanto para enfrentamento das dificuldades; além da noção de que o autocuidado contribui para o cuidado daqueles(as) que as cercam. Conclui-se que as trabalhadoras sexuais demonstraram entender o conceito de autocuidado em associação a noção de precaução, enquanto a prevenção é feita mediante as recomendações feitas por órgãos competentes. Outrossim, percebeu-se um déficit de autocuidado pelas próprias condições presentes no serviço sexual e nas dificuldades impostas pela pandemia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sex Workers , Humans , Female , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quality of Life , Self Care
3.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0284427, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2292014

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Breast (BCa) and prostate (PCa) cancer are two of the most common but survivable cancers. One important component of survivorship that is impacted by treatment long term is diminished quality of life (QoL). Supervised exercise improves QoL and subsequent outcomes but is not accessible for all survivors. Additionally, many factors influence QoL including physical activity (PA), cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), physical function, and fatigue. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need to increase access to exercise beyond supervised exercise facilities. Home-based exercise may provide a feasible alternative for cancer survivors especially for those living in rural communities. OBJECTIVES: The primary aim is to investigate the effects of home-based exercise training (Pre-training vs. Post-training) on QoL in BCa/PCa. A secondary aim is to investigate PA, CRF, physical function, and fatigue and potential moderators (age, cancer-type, intervention duration and type). Home-based exercise trials (randomized crossover or quasi-experimental design) with adults (aged 18 years and over) breast or prostate cancer survivors (not currently undergoing chemotherapy or radiation treatment) were eligible for inclusion. DATA SOURCES: Electronic databases were searched (inception-December 2022) for studies which included adult BCa or PCa survivors (not currently on chemotherapy/radiation), at least measured QoL, and undergoing unsupervised, home-based exercise training. APPRAISAL AND SYNTHESIS METHODS: Initially, 819 studies were identified, from which 17 studies (20 effects) involving 692 participants were extracted. Effect sizes were calculated as standardized mean differences (SMD). Data were pooled using a 3-level model with restricted maximum likelihood estimation. Pooled SMD was used to assess the magnitude of effect, where <0.2, 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8 was defined as trivial, small, moderate, and large respectively. RESULTS: Home-based exercise resulted in small improvements in QoL (SMD = 0.30, 95% CI 0.01, 0.60, p = 0.042), PA (SMD = 0.49, 95% CI 0.26, 0.75, p<0.001) and CRF (SMD = 0.45, 95% CI -0.01, 0.91, p = 0.056). Physical function (SMD = 0.00, 95% CI -0.21, 0.21, p = 1.000) and fatigue (SMD = -0.61, 95%CI -1.53, 0.32, p = 0.198) did not change. CONCLUSIONS: Home-based exercise results in small improves QoL in BCa/PCa survivors, independent of cancer type, intervention duration and type, or age. Home-based exercise also improves PA and CRF enhancing survivorship. Therefore, home-based exercise is an efficacious alternative option to improve QoL for BCa and PCa survivors especially for those who live in rural communities or lack access to exercise facilities.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Cancer Survivors , Fatigue , Physical Fitness , Prostatic Neoplasms , Self Care , Adolescent , Adult , Humans , Male , Exercise/physiology , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/physiopathology , Fatigue/therapy , Prostatic Neoplasms/complications , Prostatic Neoplasms/physiopathology , Prostatic Neoplasms/therapy , Quality of Life , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/physiopathology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Female , Physical Fitness/physiology , Cardiorespiratory Fitness/physiology , Functional Status , Self Care/methods
5.
J R Coll Physicians Edinb ; 53(2): 137-143, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2297360

ABSTRACT

The human toll which has resulted from the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic is clearly recognised. No single event in recent times has had such profound effects on health services and their staff wellbeing around the world. Policy making has been led by the requirement for confinement and surveillance to limit spread of the disease, and in clinical settings the impact of the necessity for the use of personal protective measures has caused huge strains on practice clinically and professionally. In this paper we share experiences from the pandemic, explore the social and organisational factors at stake and make some suggestions for both personal wellbeing practice and a systems response to the ongoing staff wellbeing challenges of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Self Care , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction
6.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 7026, 2023 04 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300554

ABSTRACT

Older adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have unique challenges and needs. In this mixed-methods study, we explored the impact of isolation during a pandemic on diabetes management and overall quality of life in this population. Older adults (age ≥ 65 years) with T1D receiving care at a tertiary care diabetes center participated in semi-structured interviews during COVID-19 pandemic isolation between June and August 2020. A multi-disciplinary team coded transcripts and conducted thematic analysis. Thirty-four older adults (age 71 ± 5 years, 97% non-Hispanic white, diabetes duration of 38 ± 7 years, A1C of 7.4 ± 0.9% (57.3 ± 10.1 mmol/mol) were recruited. Three themes related to diabetes self-care emerged regarding impact of isolation on: (1) diabetes management and self-care behaviors (how isolation prompted changes in physical activity and dietary habits); (2) emotional stress and anxiety (related to isolation and lack of support system, economic concerns); and (3) concerns regarding the COVID-19 pandemic (impact on timely medical care and access to information). Our findings identify modifiable barriers and challenges faced by older adults with T1D during isolation. As this population has a higher risk of decline in physical and psychosocial support even during non-pandemic times, clinicians will benefit from understanding these issues to improve care of this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 , Humans , Aged , Quality of Life/psychology , Self Care , Pandemics
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2288897

ABSTRACT

As more college students are facing mental health challenges, it is imperative to explore innovative ways of improving their mental health, including developing self-care interventions that help mitigate their stressors. Based on the Response Styles Theory and self-care conceptions, this study creates the "Joy Pie" project that consists of five self-care strategies, aiming to regulate negative emotions and increase self-care efficacy. Using an experimental design and two-wave data collected from a representative sample of Beijing college students (n1 = 316, n2 = 127), this study assesses the effects of the five proposed interventions on the students' self-care efficacy and mental health management. The results show that self-care efficacy helped improve mental health through emotion regulation, which is mediated by age, gender, and family income. The promising results support the effectiveness of the "Joy Pie" interventions in strengthening self-care efficacy and improving mental health. This study offers insights into building back better mental health security among college students at this critical time when the world is recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Self Care , Students
8.
Paediatr Drugs ; 25(3): 321-341, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2288395

ABSTRACT

Pain has a multifaceted impact on individuals worldwide, affecting their physical functioning, emotional well-being, and quality of life. Children (age < 18 years) have a high prevalence of conditions associated with pain, such as toothache, headache, earache, sore throat, and respiratory tract infections, many of which may be accompanied by fever. Globally, the pharmacologic treatment of pain in pediatric patients is limited largely to nonopioid analgesics, and dosing must account for differences in age, weight, metabolism, and risk of adverse effects. This narrative review summarizes the findings of a literature search on the pediatric indications, dosing approaches, dosing guidelines, and pharmacokinetics of paracetamol and ibuprofen, which are common pain medications available globally for self-care use in children. The review also discusses the risks and benefits associated with these agents. The current roles of paracetamol and ibuprofen in the symptomatic management of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection and in the management of post-COVID-19 immunization symptoms in children are also discussed. Therefore, while a very large amount of data over several decades is available for paracetamol and ibuprofen, an urgent need exists for well-designed studies of these medications for the management of pain and fever in pediatric patients with COVID-19 to ensure optimal relief with minimal toxicity.


Subject(s)
Analgesics, Non-Narcotic , COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Adolescent , Ibuprofen/adverse effects , Acetaminophen/adverse effects , Quality of Life , Self Care , Pain/drug therapy , Fever
9.
Res Nurs Health ; 46(2): 190-202, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2285395

ABSTRACT

In patients with heart failure (HF), self-care, and caregiver contribution to self-care (i.e., the daily management of the disease by patients and caregivers) are essential for improving patient outcomes. However, patients and caregivers are often inadequate in their self-care and contribution to self-care, respectively, and struggle to perform related tasks. Face-to-face motivational interviewing (MI) effectively improves self-care and caregiver contribution to self-care, but the evidence on remote MI is scarce and inconclusive. The aims of this randomized controlled trial will be to evaluate whether remote MI performed via video call in patients with HF: (1) is effective at improving self-care maintenance in patients (primary outcome); (2) is effective for the following secondary outcomes: (a) for patients: self-care management, self-care monitoring, and self-efficacy; HF symptoms; generic and disease-specific quality of life; anxiety and depression; use of healthcare services; and mortality; and (b) for caregivers: contribution to self-care, self-efficacy, and preparedness. We will conduct a two-arm randomized controlled trial. We will enroll and randomize 432 dyads (patients and their informal caregivers) in Arm 1, in which patients and caregivers will receive MI or, in Arm 2, standard care. MI will be delivered seven times over 12 months. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline and 3 (primary outcome), 6, 9, and 12 months from enrollment. This trial will demonstrate whether an inexpensive and easily deliverable intervention can improve important HF outcomes. With the restrictions on in-person healthcare professional interventions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, it is essential to evaluate whether MI is also effective remotely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Motivational Interviewing , Humans , Caregivers , Motivational Interviewing/methods , Quality of Life , Self Care/methods , Pandemics , Heart Failure/therapy
10.
PLoS One ; 18(3): e0282853, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278548

ABSTRACT

Cervical cancer screening rates are declining in the US, with persistent disparities among vulnerable populations. Strategies to better reach under-screened communities are needed. The COVID pandemic sparked major shifts in healthcare delivery, including the accelerated development and adoption of rapid diagnostic testing, broadened access to remote care, and growing consumer demand for self-testing, which could be leveraged for cervical cancer. Rapid tests for the detection of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) have the potential to improve cervical cancer screening coverage, and if coupled with patient-collected cervicovaginal samples, create an opportunity for self-testing. The objectives of this study were: 1) to examine whether COVID influenced clinician perspectives of rapid testing as a screening modality; and 2) to assess clinician awareness, perceived benefits and limitations, and willingness to adopt point-of-care HPV testing, patient self-sampling, and rapid HPV self-testing with self-collected samples. The methodology adopted consisted of an online cross-sectional survey (n = 224) and in-depth interviews (n = 20) were conducted with clinicians who perform cervical cancer screening in Indiana, ranked in the top ten states for cervical cancer mortality and with marked disparities across socio-demographic groups. The main findings show that about half the clinicians reported that the COVID pandemic had influenced their views on rapid testing as a screening modality both positively (greater public acceptability of rapid testing and impact on patient care) and negatively (concerns regarding accuracy of rapid tests). The majority of clinicians (82%) were willing to adopt rapid HPV testing at the point-of-care, while only 48% were willing to adopt rapid HPV self-testing with self-collected samples. In-depth interviews revealed provider concerns around patients' ability to collect their own sample, report results correctly, and return to the clinic for follow-up and other preventive care. Addressing clinician concerns about self-sampling and rapid HPV testing, such as ensuring that rapid tests include sample adequacy controls, is necessary to mitigate barriers to adoption for cervical cancer screening.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Female , Humans , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/epidemiology , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control , Human Papillomavirus Viruses , Vaginal Smears/methods , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Papillomaviridae , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Specimen Handling/methods , Mass Screening/methods , Self Care , Patient Acceptance of Health Care
11.
Clin Nurs Res ; 32(3): 648-659, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2260525

ABSTRACT

Treatment adherence is a fundamental aspect of heart failure (HF) management. This study aimed to explore the experiences of facilitators and inhibitors of treatment adherence in patients with HF. This descriptive qualitative study was conducted from May 2020 to June 2021. Participants including people with HF, their family caregivers and physicians, and nurses were selected purposefully, with the aim of obtaining sufficient information power. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Two main themes "the driving forces behind treatment adherence" and "the deterrent forces behind treatment adherence" emerged from the analysis. The first theme contained the following subthemes: "supportive family," "positive personality characteristics," and "having health literacy." The second theme consisted of "negligence," "psychological problems," "cultural, social, and economic problems," "physical limitations," and "lack of self-care management knowledge." Nurses can consider facilitators and inhibitors of treatment adherence in designing educational and care programs for patients with HF.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure , Treatment Adherence and Compliance , Humans , Qualitative Research , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Heart Failure/psychology , Self Care/psychology , Caregivers
12.
Am J Manag Care ; 28(14 Suppl): S255-S267, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255278

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Approaches to treating heart failure (HF), understanding of the most timely and effective interventions, and identification of appropriate patient subpopulations must evolve. HF has emerged as a chronic condition that needs to be managed on multiple fronts. Hospital resources are more limited than ever due to various factors that directly impact staff and hospital space available to manage and treat patients with HF. As a result, there is increasing attention to the current state of this progressive disease and ways to improve patient outcomes. PURPOSE: This paper examines HF and the current and future treatment landscape, the need to reevaluate terms and definitions, and the opportunity to treat HF with the right treatment at the right time. Treatments in development and potential new investigational therapies are also discussed. CONCLUSION: To meet the current challenge, HF treatment must adapt. For other disease states, we have more personalized, nimble, and timely treatment strategies that harness windows of opportunity to help maximize outcomes and reduce overwhelming costs to the health care system. HF treatment is evolving with new guidelines and treatments that hold the promise of greater personalization through additions to existing treatments that are directed by medical guidelines, since each patient is unique and requires more than a one-size-fits-all approach. In addition, advances in remote monitoring, in-home care, and telemedicine are creating a more individualized treatment approach. Therefore, it becomes critical for all health care decision makers to be aware of the tools and resources available in treatment guidelines, individualized treatment options, telemedicine, and other ways of expanding the existing toolbox to enhance patient centricity in HF treatment.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure , Home Care Services , Telemedicine , Humans , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/therapy , Self Care , Chronic Disease
13.
Gac Sanit ; 37: 102296, 2023.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2264273

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore experiences related to health-oriented behaviours during lockdown in the Spanish resident population from a gender perspective. METHOD: Qualitative research with a critical and feminist approach. Twenty-nine semi-structured interviews (17 women and 12 men) were conducted between June and July 2020 via telephone with people who had previously answered an online survey. The interviews were transcribed and a thematic content analysis was carried out, differentiating between the experiences of women and men. The data were triangulated by the research team. RESULTS: Among women, greater diversity emerged in terms of health behaviours. Among them, the difficult experiences related to COVID-19, the complexity of living together and doing unpaid care work, as well as the importance of support networks, stood out. Among men, there were different attitudes towards sport, self-care and having time for healthy eating were positively valued, and there was a good assessment of coexistence and organisation in household chores. In both men and women, work overload and economic problems were related to emotional distress and difficulties in carrying out healthy activities. CONCLUSIONS: Health-oriented behaviours during lockdown differed according to gender. They were mostly limited to COVID-19 experiences, socio-economic conditions and burden of care. It is essential to tailor public health and primary care programmes according to people's life moments, taking into account their social context and questioning traditional gender roles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Behavior , Quarantine , Stress, Physiological , Humans , Male , Female , Spain/epidemiology , Quarantine/psychology , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Sex Factors , Qualitative Research , Telephone , Interviews as Topic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Self Care/psychology , Sports/psychology , Workload/psychology , Financial Stress/psychology , Public Health , Psychosocial Support Systems
14.
JAMA ; 328(22): 2230-2241, 2022 12 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2263015

ABSTRACT

Importance: The effectiveness of remotely delivered, self-directed, weight loss programs in routine clinical practice is largely unknown. Objective: To test whether a self-directed, remotely administered behavioral lifestyle intervention improves weight and self-reported general health status compared with usual care. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this randomized clinical trial, 511 adults with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more and less than 45 (based on electronic health record [EHR] weight and height), were enrolled from 30 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) sites between February 15, 2018, and December 18, 2018 (final follow-up February 18, 2021). Interventions: Participants were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n = 254) or the control group (n = 257). Both received usual care. Participants randomized to the intervention received Diabetes Prevention Program-based self-directed videos, handouts, and coaching messages via an online platform or US mail for 12 months. Main Outcomes and Measures: Coprimary outcomes were weight measured in primary care and recorded in the EHR and self-reported general health status using the Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) physical component score (PCS; higher scores are better [range, 0-100]) at the 12-month follow-up. The between-group minimal clinically important differences are 3 kg for weight and 5 points for the SF-12 PCS. Linear mixed models used weights and SF-12 PCS measured at either time point, with participants analyzed according to randomization assignment. Statistical significance for each coprimary outcome was based on a 2-sided α level of .025. Results: Among 511 participants randomized (mean age, 57.4 [SD, 13.9] years; 231 female [45%]), 429 (84.0%) had EHR-based weights and 410 (80.2%) had SF-12 PCS data at 12 months. The unadjusted mean weight at 12 months declined from 102.7 kg to 99.8 kg in the intervention group compared with 101.9 kg to 101.0 kg in the control group (adjusted between-group mean difference, -1.93 [97.5% CI, -3.24 to -0.61]; P = .001). At 12 months, the unadjusted mean SF-12 PCS scores declined from 44.8 to 44.3 among intervention participants compared with 44.5 to 43.2 among control participants (adjusted between-group mean difference, intervention minus control, 0.69 [97.5% CI, -1.11 to 2.49]; P = .39). Cardiovascular events represented the highest percentage of serious adverse events, accounting for 25% of events in the intervention group and 35% in the control group. Conclusions and Relevance: Among adults with obesity, a remotely delivered self-directed, behavioral lifestyle intervention, compared with usual care, resulted in statistically significantly greater weight loss at 12 months, although the difference was not clinically important. There was no significant difference in self-reported general physical health status at 12 months. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03260140.


Subject(s)
Behavior Therapy , Obesity , Weight Reduction Programs , Adult , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Behavior Therapy/methods , Health Status , Obesity/diagnosis , Obesity/therapy , Weight Loss , Weight Reduction Programs/methods , Body Weight , Telemedicine/methods , Self Care , Healthy Lifestyle , Male , Aged
15.
J Christ Nurs ; 40(2): E19-E20, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2276292

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The virtual nature of education during the COVID-19 pandemic reduced nursing students' opportunities to learn and practice skills in hands-on settings, negatively impacting their readiness for nursing practice once licensed. Also, the importance of teaching nursing students self-care strategies became evident to nurse educators.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Educational Status , Learning , Self Care
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(6)2023 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2276146

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought new challenges and work changes for formal caregivers such as personal care aides with an impact on their quality of life (QoL). This cross-sectional study aims to analyze the relationships and contribution of sociodemographic and psychological variables towards QoL including the moderating role of self-care. This study included 127 formal caregivers from Portugal who were assessed on depression, anxiety and stress (DASS-21); professional self-care (SCAP); quality of life (SF-12); COVID-19 traumatic stress (COVID-19TSC) and preventive COVID-19 infection behaviors (PCOVID-19 IBS). Professional self-care was positively associated with QoL and also moderated the relationship between distress and QoL (p < 0.001). According to results, nursing homes should provide formal caregivers, such as personal care aides, with the professional support they need in order to promote their QoL and prevent burnout.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Quality of Life/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Self Care , Pandemics/prevention & control , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology
17.
Body Image ; 45: 296-306, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2272781

ABSTRACT

Pregnancy embodiment describes the way a pregnant individual inhabits their body, including disconnection and connection, likely influencing both distress and well-being. Emerging work indicates that acceptance of pregnancy-related bodily change may support well-being, particularly when co-occurring with self-care behaviors. Yet, specific associations of pregnant embodiment and intentional, individualized self-care practices (mindful self-care; MSC) with well-being and distress remain unexamined. The present study tested independent and interactive associations between MSC and positive embodiment (body agency), and negative embodiment (body estrangement), respectively, with maternal distress and well-being in a sample of US pregnant women (N = 179; Mage = 31.3 years, aged 21-43; 85.6 % White, 4.9 % Hispanic/Latinx). Challenge and threat/harm appraisals of the COVID-19 pandemic were included in the model to represent responses to the unique sociohistorical context. Measurement-corrected path analytic models explained a substantial proportion of variation in well-being and a smaller proportion in prenatal distress. Among those with higher MSC, the association between body estrangement and prenatal distress was weaker. Results support mindful self-care as protective for pregnancy distress in the setting of body disconnection. Future individualized health promotion might consider how high-stress contexts influence application of self-care practices and impact distress and well-being during pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Self Care , COVID-19/epidemiology , Body Image/psychology , Pregnant Women
18.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 76Suppl 1(Suppl 1): e20220644, 2023.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2269632

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: to understand the self-care process of community-dwelling older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: this is an explanatory study with a qualitative approach based on the constructivist Grounded Theory, carried out with 18 community-dwelling older adults. Data collection took place through interviews and content was analyzed through initial and focused coding. RESULTS: two categories were obtained: "Building connections to support self-care practices" and "Living with the risk group stigma". From their interaction, the phenomenon "Performing self-care in old age during the COVID-19 pandemic" emerged. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: it was possible to identify how older adults' experiences curing the COVID-19 pandemic had repercussions on their self-care process, being influenced by factors such as information about the disease and the impacts of risk group stigmas.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Aged , Independent Living , Pandemics , Self Care , Data Collection
19.
J Cardiovasc Nurs ; 36(6): 609-617, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2277385

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Difficulties in coping with and self-managing heart failure (HF) are well known. The COVID-19 pandemic may further complicate self-care practices associated with HF. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to understand COVID-19's impact on HF self-care, as well as related coping adaptations that may blunt the impact of COVID-19 on HF health outcomes. METHODS: A qualitative study using phone interviews, guided by the framework of vulnerability analysis for sustainability, was used to explore HF self-care among older adults in central Texas during the late spring of 2020. Qualitative data were analyzed using directed content analysis. RESULTS: Seventeen older adults with HF participated (mean [SD] age, 68 [9.1] years; 62% female, 68% White, 40% below poverty line, 35% from rural areas). Overall, the COVID-19 pandemic had an adverse impact on the HF self-care behavior of physical activity. Themes of social isolation, financial concerns, and disruptions in access to medications and food indicated exposure, and rural residence and source of income increased sensitivity, whereas adaptations by healthcare system, health-promoting activities, socializing via technology, and spiritual connections increased resilience to the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The study's findings have implications for identifying vulnerabilities in sustaining HF self-care by older adults and empowering older adults with coping strategies to improve overall satisfaction with care and quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Aged , Female , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Care
20.
BMC Womens Health ; 23(1): 50, 2023 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2287744

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: With the increase in the prevalence of non-communicable diseases and chronic health problems along with population growth, one of the definitions that is expanding is the ability to adapt and self-manage against diseases and self-care. Although there are several studies to examine self-care in medical conditions, there are not enough concepts and data related to sexual self-care. Therefore, the present study was conducted with the aim of explaining the status of sexual self-care and its predictor factors in women of reproductive age referring to healthcare centers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This research was a cross-sectional study that was conducted on 400 women of reproductive age that referring to healthcare centers affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari in 2021. Data were collected using personal-obstetric characteristics and sexual self-care questionnaires in women of reproductive age. Pearson correlation coefficients, independent t-test, one-way analysis of variance and multiple linear regression model were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: The average total score of sexual self-care in reproductive age women participating in the research was 70.66% ± 12.52%. In addition, the prevention of women's cancers and the prevention of unintended pregnancies obtained the lowest and highest scores, respectively. Factors such as age, education, education related to medical sciences, history of HIV testing, history of HPV vaccination, source of sexual information, method of contraception and infection-related action in a person can affect the level of sexual self-care in women. Based on the final regression model, education related to medical sciences (B = 5.46, P = 0.035), family income (B = 5.58, P = 0.025), prevention method (B = 10.127, P = 0.000) and action related to infection in the person (B = 12.27, P = 0.047) were the final predictors of sexual self-care score in reproductive age women. CONCLUSION: Based on the findings of the study, development of self-care promotion programs for reproductive aged women are necessary in all areas of reproductive health, with a priority for women's cancer prevention, and focusing on promoting education and related economic assistance. The results of this study can be available to experts and policy makers to design programs to promote sexual self-care in women.


Subject(s)
Self Care , Sexual Behavior , Pregnancy , Humans , Female , Adult , Iran/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care
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