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1.
J Christ Nurs ; 38(3): E28-E31, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532593

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Nurses who provided care to patients with coronavirus (COVID-19) and supported patients in their transition from life to death in the absence of patients' families have been especially needful of spiritual self-care. A spiritual first aid kit can help nurses cope with these difficult times. Spiritual self-care is vital for all nurses to renew and preserve the psychological, spiritual, and physical self.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Nurse-Patient Relations , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Self Care/psychology , Self Efficacy , Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/nursing , Critical Care/psychology , First Aid , Humans , Spirituality
2.
Soc Work Public Health ; 36(5): 606-614, 2021 07 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294639

ABSTRACT

This study aims to determine the association between fear of COVID-19 with self-care in the elderly. This is a cross-sectional study, in which data were collected using the online survey method with three questionnaires: social demographic characteristics, fear of COVID-19, and elderly self-care. The 350 elderly people were selected by multi-stage sampling from the list of households registered in the integrated health system. According to the result, the mean (SD) age of participants was 69.91 (5.19) and two-thirds of them were married, also the majority of the participants (55%) had an education level less than a diploma. A direct and statistically significant correlation was observed between fear of COVID-19 and self-care. Linear regression analysis showed that the self-care rate decreases with increasing of the COVID-19 fear (B = -0.395, SE = 0.001, R2 = 0.154). The lowest scores were related to self-care which can be due to the restrictions applied and limited family relations during the COVID-19 epidemic. Therefore, it is recommended that purposeful training programs and appropriate psychological support interventions are developed to help overcome COVID-19 fear and help elderly people use preventative behaviors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fear , Self Care , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Self Care/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
J Foot Ankle Res ; 14(1): 46, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286830

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, populations were advised to remain at home to control viral spread. Government-mandated restrictions on free movement affected individuals' engagement with physical activity, with reported increases leading to biopsychosocial health benefits and conversely increased sedentary behaviour leading to poorer health. Good foot health is key to enabling physical activity and maximal participation in activities of occupation and daily living. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study was performed, using a web-based platform. Quantitative and qualitative data were captured through responses to closed and open survey questions. Anybody with a foot health condition was eligible to participate in the online survey. Links were sent through professional networks, support groups and charities, using a snowball strategy to maximise participation. RESULTS: Two hundred fifty-five respondents completed the survey. Most (n = 193, 75.69%) reported an ongoing foot pain or problem that had been present for 4 weeks or longer, whilst 49 respondents (19.22%) noted a new pain or problem. Pain was the most frequently reported symptom (n = 139, 54.51%), whilst change in appearance of the foot was also commonly reported (n = 122, 47.84%), often alongside the observable presence of swelling. Musculoskeletal foot symptoms were frequently reported (n = 123, 48%), and were significantly associated with reported reduced physical activity (X2 = 6.61, p = 0.010). Following qualitative analysis five themes and 11 subthemes emerged, informed by 49 independent codes. A central theme of lockdown disrupting support networks, both formal (healthcare providers) and informal (friends or family members) emerged. The 5 sub-themes were: 1. foot pain is a constant companion, 2. self-care, 3. 'cope or crumble' scenarios, 4. future intent to access healthcare and 5. reduced ability to undertake physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Pain was the most frequently reported foot problem during COVID-19 lockdown restriction. Lockdown restrictions disrupted support networks integral to maintaining foot health. Poor foot health impacted people's ability to remain physically active. Complaints previously considered relatively 'minor' such as support for skin and nail care, were found to be exacerbated by restricted support networks, leading to greater negative impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise/psychology , Foot/pathology , Musculoskeletal Pain/epidemiology , Social Isolation/psychology , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Evaluation Studies as Topic , Female , Government Regulation , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Musculoskeletal Pain/diagnosis , Patient Participation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sedentary Behavior , Self Care/psychology , Self-Help Groups/organization & administration , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Health Secur ; 19(3): 338-348, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242092

ABSTRACT

Domestic travel creates a serious risk of spreading COVID-19, including novel strains of the virus. Motivating potential travelers to take precautions is critical, especially for those at higher risk for severe illness. To provide an evidence base for communication efforts, we examined the experiences and views of travelers during the summer of 2020 through a telephone survey of 1,968 US adults, conducted in English and Spanish, July 2 through July 16, 2020. The survey found that more than one-quarter (28%) of adults had traveled domestically in the prior 30 days, most commonly for "vacation" (43%), and less than half wore masks (46%) or practiced social distancing (47%) "all of the time." Although high-risk adults were significantly less likely to travel than non-high-risk adults (23% vs 31%; P < .001), they were no more likely to take precautions. Many travelers did not wear a mask or practice social distancing because they felt such actions were unnecessary (eg, they were outside or with friends and family). Although a substantial share of travelers (43% to 53%) trusted public health agencies "a great deal" for information about reducing risks while traveling, more travelers (73%) trusted their own healthcare providers. Findings suggest that outreach may be improved by partnering with providers to emphasize the benefits of layering precautions and provide targeted education to high-risk individuals. Messages that are empathetic to the need to reduce stress and convey how precautions can protect loved ones may be particularly resonant after more than a year of pandemic-related restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Behavior , Safety Management/methods , Self Care/statistics & numerical data , Travel/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , Seasons , Self Care/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Travel/psychology
7.
Bol Med Hosp Infant Mex ; 78(1): 59-65, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119705

ABSTRACT

Communicating bad news is one of the most frequent activities in hospitals, for which some recommendations have been adapted to the needs within the coronavirus-2 disease (COVID-19) context. This document presents nine steps to deliver bad news (face to face or remotely) adapted to the COVID-19 context from two international protocols (SPIKES and GRIEV_ING). The importance of promoting physical and emotional self-care skills in health personnel is also described, as well as psychological first aid strategies to address the emotional response of the family member who receives the news. Finally, the limitations and advantages of the proposal should be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Family/psychology , Self Care/psychology , Truth Disclosure , Communication , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Humans , Internationality
8.
Curr Probl Diagn Radiol ; 49(3): 143-144, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114753
9.
Prof Case Manag ; 26(2): 51-52, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091178

ABSTRACT

The year 2020 was a time of uncertainties and unpredictability. In this issue of Professional Case Management Journal, 2 articles discuss the issues of prolonged grief, complicated grief, and self-care.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/psychology , Case Management/organization & administration , Case Managers/psychology , Grief , Self Care/psychology , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Soc Work Health Care ; 60(1): 30-48, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069151

ABSTRACT

For social work practitioners in healthcare settings, self-care can be an integral tool to assuaging stressors associated with COVID-19. However, research that examines the impact of public health crises, such as COVID-19, is nominal, at best. This exploratory study investigated the impact of COVID-19 on the self-care practices of self-identified healthcare social workers (N = 2,460) in one southeastern state. Primary data were collected via an electronic survey and assessed via a retrospective pre/post design. Analyses compared practices before and after COVID-19 was declared a pandemic. Overall, data suggest that participants experienced significant pre/post decreases in self-care practices across multiple domains. As well, findings indicate that participants who identified as married, financially stable, and working non-remotely, and in good physical/mental health engaged in significantly more self-care practices than other participants, at post. This study underscores the need to foster supportive professional cultures that include developing self-care practice skills, particularly during large-scale crisis, such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Self Care/psychology , Social Workers/psychology , Adult , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Female , Health Status , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Occupational Health , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors
11.
Support Care Cancer ; 29(7): 4075-4080, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1009141

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Cumulative knowledge indicates that cancer patients, among them breast cancer patients, are more susceptible to COVID-19 than individuals without cancer. Therefore, these patients need to take additional precautions against the COVID-19 outbreak. This study aimed to examine factors associated with precautionary behavior among Israeli breast cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 151 women with breast cancer. Participants completed measures of knowledge about COVID-19, perceived threat, sense of mastery, social support, precautionary behavior, and socio-demographic questionnaires. A multivariate regression model was calculated with precautionary behavior as the dependent variable. RESULTS: The mean of precautionary behavior score was relatively high. Participants perceived their health as relatively good, had relatively high knowledge about COVID-19, and moderate perceived threat. Sense of mastery was relatively moderate and perceived social support was relatively high. In the multivariate regression analysis, after controlling for the background variables, knowledge about COVID-19 (F(2,149) = 8.68, p < 0.001; beta = 0.36) was significantly associated with precautionary behavior. This variable explained 15.4% of the precautionary behavior variance. CONCLUSION: Findings suggest that in order to enhance precautionary behavior among women with breast cancer during a pandemic outbreak, it is recommended to pay attention their knowledge about the virus.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Behavior , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Avoidance Learning , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Health Behavior/physiology , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Quarantine/psychology , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Care/psychology , Self Care/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
12.
Health Qual Life Outcomes ; 19(1): 1, 2021 Jan 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1004336

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In a context where there is no treatment for the current COVID-19 virus, the combination of self-care behaviours together with confinement, are strategies to decrease the risk of contagion and remain healthy. However, there are no self-care measures to screen self-care activities in general population and which, could be briefly in a lockdown situation. This research aims to build and validate a psychometric tool to screen self-care activities in general population. METHODS: Firstly, an exploratory factor analysis was performed in a sample of 226 participants to discover the underlying factorial structure and to reduce the number of items in the original tool into a significant pool of items related to self-care. Later a confirmatory factor analyses were performed in a new sample of 261 participants to test for the fit and goodness of factor solutions. Internal validity, reliability, and convergent validity between its score with perceived stress and psychological well-being measures were examined on this sample. RESULTS: The exploratory analyses suggested a four-factor solution, corresponding to health consciousness, nutrition and physical activity, sleep, and intra-personal and inter-personal coping skills (14 items). Then, the four-factor structure was confirmed as the best model fit for self-care activities. The tool demonstrated good reliability, predictive validity of individuals' perception of coping with COVID-19 lockdown, and convergent validity with well-being and perceived stress. CONCLUSIONS: This screening tool could be helpful to address future evaluations and interventions to promote healthy behaviours. Likewise, this tool can be targeted to specific population self-care's needs during a scalable situation.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Self Care/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Adult , Factor Analysis, Statistical , Female , Health Status , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , Self Care/standards
13.
Res Dev Disabil ; 108: 103813, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-989157

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) represent a particularly vulnerable group to the threats posed by COVID-19. However, they have not yet been given a voice on how their living conditions have been affected by COVID-19. AIMS: This study aims to report the impact on people with IDD of COVID-19 and the response measures applied in Spain during the lockdown. METHOD: Data on 582 individuals with IDD were collected through a survey. Seven open questions were included to capture the perspectives of people with IDD on COVID-19 and its consequences. Content analysis was performed to identify themes and categories across participant responses. Chi-square tests were used to analyze the relationship between reporting a specific category and participants' characteristics. RESULTS: Supports have been conditioned by the living context. People living in specific settings had fewer natural supports, while those living with their family relied heavily on it. Participants also lacked supports considered necessary. It is worth stressing that persons with IDD have also provided support to others. CONCLUSIONS: Although people with IDD have generally received the assistance they need during the lockdown, it must be ensured that appropriate supports are provided regardless of the context in which they live.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caregivers , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Developmental Disabilities/psychology , Intellectual Disability/psychology , Residential Treatment/methods , Self Care , Social Isolation/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Developmental Disabilities/epidemiology , Family Health , Female , Humans , Intellectual Disability/epidemiology , Male , Psychosocial Support Systems , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Care/methods , Self Care/psychology , Self Concept , Spain
14.
Pflege ; 33(4): 237-245, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-982156

ABSTRACT

Health behaviours and needs of people with COPD during COVID-19 pandemic: a document analysis Abstract. Background: The government's guidelines affected people with COPD on different levels during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to belonging to a group of particularly vulnerable persons, they had to adapt their health behaviours, in particular physical activity, to recommendations provided in order to prevent negative effects on disease progression. There is little knowledge regarding how this group of patients coped with these challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: To describe the health behaviours and needs people with COPD convey during nursing phone consultations and which nursing interventions have been carried out. METHODS: A document analysis of 50 nursing phone consultations was performed. The data were summarised descriptively and analysed thematically. RESULTS: The main topics were the adaptation of physical activity, the implementation of the recommendations to the individual life situation, the detection of a COVID-19 infection and questions concerning the planning of medical appointments. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic poses additional challenges to the disease management of people with COPD. The increased need for care brought on by the pandemic was able to be met by the knowledge provided in the nursing phone consultations. What remains to be established is what role the consultations play in a sustainable change in behaviour and in dealing with negative emotions.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/therapy , Self Care/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19 , Health Behavior , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/nursing
15.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e930340, 2020 Dec 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-979224

ABSTRACT

Alterations in complex behavioral patterns during the extended period of the COVID-19 pandemic are predicted to promote a variety of psychiatric disease symptoms due to enforced social isolation and self-quarantine. Accordingly, multifaceted mental health problems will continue to increase, thereby creating a challenge for society and the health care system in general. Recent studies show that COVID-19 can directly or indirectly influence the central nervous system, potentially causing neurological pathologies such as Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Thus, chronic COVID-19-related disease processes have the potential to cause serious mental illnesses, including depression, anxiety, and sleep disorders. Importantly, mental health problems can foster systemic changes in functionally-linked neuroendocrine conditions that heighten a person's susceptibility to COVID-19 infection. These altered defense mechanisms may include compromised "self-control" and "self-care", as well as a "lack of insight" into the danger posed by the virus. These consequences may have serious social impacts on the future of COVID-19 survivors. Compounding the functionally related issues of altered mental health parameters and viral susceptibility are the potential effects of compromised immunity on the establishment of functional herd immunity. Within this context, mental health takes on added importance, particularly in terms of the need to increase support for mental health research and community-based initiatives. Thus, COVID-19 infections continue to reveal mental health targets, a process we must now be prepared to deal with.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Survivors/psychology , Alzheimer Disease/epidemiology , Alzheimer Disease/prevention & control , Alzheimer Disease/virology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/prevention & control , Depression/psychology , Disease Susceptibility/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/prevention & control , Parkinson Disease/virology , Physical Distancing , Self Care/psychology , Self-Control/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology
16.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(1): 93-98, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-959725

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Uncontrolled diabetes has emerged as one of the major risk factors for mortality in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Physical inactivity, alterations in dietary habits, and inability to seek guidance from the physician are some of the contributing factors. This study aims to assess the self-care practices and psychological distress during the pandemic among diabetic patients visiting the institute's out patient department. METHOD: A convenient sampling method was used to recruit subjects from a representative clinical sample using validated scales like the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA) and Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10). RESULT: The study enrolled a total of 108 subjects with the mean age being 56.3 years. The everyday healthy eating plan was followed by 76.85% (N = 83) subjects and daily physical activity for at least 30 min performed by 50% (54) subjects. Only 12.04% (13) subjects tested their blood sugar and 6.48% (7) respondents checked their feet daily. There was no significant difference found between the SDSCA and psychological distress based on socio-demographic variables. CONCLUSION: Participants in this study typically reported a good level of self-care behavior particularly for diet followed by exercise whereas the self-care behavior was not adequate for foot care and blood-glucose testing. People were not too anxious about COVID-19. This study highlighted the fact that people with diabetes should monitor their blood sugar levels more often along with their foot care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Psychological Distress , Self Care/methods , Adult , Aged , Blood Glucose/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/psychology , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/prevention & control , Diabetic Foot/psychology , Exercise/physiology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Self Care/psychology
18.
Complement Ther Med ; 56: 102594, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893715

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Recent research has revealed multiple potential health benefits of frequent sauna bathing. Finland is a country with extraordinary sauna culture and bathing opportunities. However, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic introduced regulations and unprecedented closures to shared sauna facilities. In this study we aimed to examine the previously unknown baseline bathing frequency and its possible change during the epidemic. DESIGN: We investigated several aspects of sauna bathing with self-reports: the frequency, its possible changes, reasons for change, and beliefs about its health effects among a representative sample of thousand Finns aged 18-75 years. This online survey was administered in May 2020. RESULTS: Before the pandemic, 59 % of our respondents had enjoyed sauna at least once a week. Since the pandemic began, up to 23 % had reduced or stopped their bathing. This was often due to restricted sauna access. However, 11 % of respondents bathed more frequently and attributed this change to seeking relaxation and passing time. These findings demonstrate a surprising flexibility in this health-promoting national pastime. Men were more active bathers than women overall and women under 35 enjoy sauna more seldom than older women. Only 7.9 % of all respondents bathed at least four times a week, exceeding a suggested threshold for maximum health benefits. CONCLUSIONS: Finnish people are active sauna bathers. The COVID-19 pandemic demonstrated that the frequency of bathing is dependent on good access to sauna facilities. This flexibility and wide access could be exploited to improve public health in the long term if more frequent bathing became a standard.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , COVID-19 , Self Care , Steam Bath , Age Factors , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Culture , Female , Finland/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , Public Opinion , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Care/psychology , Self Care/statistics & numerical data , Sex Factors , Steam Bath/methods , Steam Bath/psychology , Steam Bath/trends , Utilization Review
19.
Arch Psychiatr Nurs ; 35(2): 189-194, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-856448

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Burnout rates among nurses have detrimental impact on job satisfaction, teamwork, and patient care. This costs millions of dollars in the healthcare system and challenges nurse leaders to address in order to keep up with the healthcare demands. Furthermore, burnout is especially relevant in our current healthcare climate, as frontline nurses have increased workload and multiple psychosocial stressors during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic (Sultana, Sharma, Hossain, Bhattacharya, & Purohit, 2019). Literature also suggests that mindful self-care practices need to be reinforced in order to impact burnout long term (Chamorro-Premuzic & Lusk, 2017). Project7 Mindfulness Pledge© is an accessible and voluntary mindfulness tool that nurses can utilize in their individual practice to reduce burnout and does not require significant time commitment. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of intentional self-care practices on nurse burnout and workplace environment by measuring job satisfaction and teamwork among nurses. METHODS: Comparisons between inpatient units on data from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) with the Practice Environment Scale (PES), specifically on job enjoyment and teamwork, were done utilizing ANOVA. RESULTS: Results show that nurses in an inpatient unit that implemented Project7 has significantly higher job satisfaction as compared to units that did not implement Project7. CONCLUSIONS: This suggests that this tool provides an effective and accessible mindfulness framework managers and directors can utilize to improve job satisfaction, teamwork, and thereby reduce burnout to create healthier work environments.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Mindfulness/methods , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Self Care/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Job Satisfaction , Male , Retrospective Studies , Workplace
20.
J Adolesc Health ; 67(3): 453-455, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-654519

ABSTRACT

Young adults with chronic and complex diseases face systemic barriers, care fragmentation, and increased vulnerabilities. Novel coronavirus pandemic has proven to further complicate care coordination for young adult patients with medical and psychosocial complexities. The BRIDGES Young Adult Program at Boston Children's Hospital has 6 years of experience advocating for and empowering young adults with chronic medical conditions, and their families, through outpatient consults aimed to assist with subspecialty guidance and defragmentation of care during the time of transition from pediatric to adult care. Recently, the BRIDGES consult team developed a pandemic-responsive approach to facilitate individual emergency planning and empowerment of self-management for these high-risk patients. Through the use of a virtual platform, consults were conducted with a multidisciplinary team to support patients and families with system navigation, advance care planning, emergency preparedness, chronic care management, and coping during this time of crisis. BRIDGES aimed to equip patients and families with knowledge and resources, within a rapidly changing environment, to allow for optimal self-care and self-advocacy.


Subject(s)
Chronic Disease/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Participation/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Transitional Care/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Chronic Disease/epidemiology , Emergencies , Humans , Patient Navigation , Self Care/psychology , Young Adult
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