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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785626

ABSTRACT

This study identified the acceptance of disability's impact on self-esteem among adults with disabilities in South Korea. This is a four-year follow-up study that obtained data from the Panel Survey of Employment for Persons with Disabilities from 2017 to 2020. In total, 3329 individuals participated. Logistic regression examined the acceptance of disability's effect on self-esteem. These variables were categorized based on the acceptance of disability (high→high, low→high, high→low, and low→low) and self-esteem (low and not low). Compared to the participants with a consistently high acceptance of disability, those with constantly low acceptance were 2.35 times (95% CI 1.81-3.04) more likely to have low self-esteem. When the acceptance of disability was low→high and high→low, the low self-esteem probability was 1.23 and 1.66 times, respectively. Low self-esteem was prominent for the following: men, 50-64-year olds, married, urban, economic activists, the mid-low household income category, and those with sensory disability. Acceptance of disability can adversely affect self-esteem when it is consistently low or changes from high to low. Among socio-economic factors, there were several risk factors that could make individuals more vulnerable to low self-esteem. Therefore, it is necessary to help people accept their disabilities to maintain healthy self-esteem levels.


Subject(s)
Disabled Persons , Adult , Employment , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Republic of Korea , Self Concept
2.
Front Public Health ; 10: 868914, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785458

ABSTRACT

Background: Professional identity (PI) influences the doctor's thoughts and behaviors. Thus, PI formation (PIF) plays an important role in medical students' education. Major changes to the learning environment could impact PIF, but the influence of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on medical students' PI had confusing conclusions in previous studies. We aimed to compare PI of medical students by using the data from three waves of national cross-sectional surveys conducted in China in 2019, 2020, and 2021, and to examine factors that influence PIF. Method: We used data from the China Medical Student Survey (CMSS) which has conducted three national cross-sectional surveys. From 2019 to 2021, CMCC retrieved data on PI from a nationally representative sample of medical students from 33, 121, and 123 colleges, respectively. We analyzed the data using Chi-square test, analysis of variance, and multivariable logistic regression according to sociodemographic characteristics, pre-university experience, college characteristics, and college experience. Results: A total of 244,040 medical students in China participated in the surveys. The overall score of PI increased from 3.80 in 2019 to 3.85 in 2021. Medical students with family medical background, high intrinsic and extrinsic motivation of major selection, teachers' positive role model, and high personal comprehensive quality ranking were more likely to have higher PI (all p < 0.05). The more attention students paid to the COVID-19 pandemic, the higher PI they would have (aOR 1.93, 95% CI 1.67-2.24 for more attention; aOR 2.31, 95% CI 2.00-2.68 for the most attention). However, parents' participation on the front lines of COVID-19 pandemic negatively influenced the PI of medical students (aOR 0.72, 95% CI 0.57-0.93). Conclusions: PI of medical students increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. The impact of the pandemic on PI was complex. To improve the PI of medical students, the education sector, health sector and the society need to make concerted efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Self Concept , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Front Public Health ; 10: 702162, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775959

ABSTRACT

Background: Adolescence is often considered a period of heightened stress, and healthy active living behaviors may help those experiencing it to better cope with life stressors and increase their self-esteem. The 24-h movement guidelines for children and adolescents recommend ≥60 min per day of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, ≤ 2-h per day of recreational screen time, and 9-11-h of sleep per night for school-aged children or 8-10-h per night for adolescents. The objective of this study was to examine the association of meeting the 24-h movement guidelines with life stress and self-esteem among students in Ontario, Canada. Methods: Self-reported data on movement behaviors, life stress and self-esteem were derived from the 2019 cycle of the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey, a cross-sectional and province-wide survey of students in grades 7-12 aged 11 to 20 years (N = 6,932). Multivariable ordered logistic regression analyses were adjusted for the complex sample design of the survey and for important covariates. Results: Overall, meeting all combinations of movement behavior recommendations were associated with lower life stress and better self-esteem compared with meeting none of the recommendations, except meeting the physical activity only or screen time only recommendations that were not associated with lower life stress. Meeting all 3 recommendations was associated with lower life stress (OR: 0.40; 95 CI: 0.30-0.53) and better self-esteem (OR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.21-0.40). There was a dose-response gradient between the number of recommendations met (3 > 2 > 1) and lower life stress (p < 0.001) and higher self-esteem (p < 0.001), with meeting all 3 recommendations being the best combination. Conclusions: These findings suggest that meeting the recommendations of the 24-h movement guidelines is associated with lower life stress and better self-esteem among adolescents.


Subject(s)
Exercise , Self Concept , Stress, Psychological , Adolescent , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Ontario , Screen Time , Young Adult
4.
J Christ Nurs ; 39(2): 71, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752199
5.
Ciênc. Saúde Colet ; 25(supl.1): 2479-2486, Mar. 2020. graf
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1725052

ABSTRACT

Resumo O presente ensaio busca discutir as implicações do isolamento social devido à pandemia do COVID-19 para o uso intensivo da internet entre crianças e adolescentes e suas possíveis consequências para a prática de violências autoinflingidas. Discutimos brevemente o potencial ansiogênico e a reprodução de um "medo global" que se consolidam com a exposição maciça e sem mediação dos conteúdos consumidos, que podem aumentar as vulnerabilidades para estresse e ideações suicidas. Centramos nosso debate sobre práticas "recreativas", denominadas de "desafios" com poder autolesivo, realizados por adolescentes no site Youtube. Essa prática revelou-se crescente a partir das medidas de isolamento social. Nossa reflexão sobre esses riscos é feita a partir da perspectiva teórica da sociabilidade digital, e suas implicações nas interações de adolescentes mediadas pela internet.


Abstract This essay aimed to discuss the implications of social isolation due to the COVID-19 pandemic for the intensive use of the internet among children and adolescents and its possible consequences for the practice of self-inflicted violence. We briefly discussed the anxiogenic potential and the reproduction of a "global fear" that are consolidated with the massive and unmediated exposure of the content consumed, which can increase the vulnerabilities to stress and suicidal ideas. We centered our debate on "recreational" practices, called "challenges" with self-harm power, carried out by teenagers on the YouTube website. This practice has been shown to increase with the social isolation measures. Our reflection on these risks builds on the theoretical perspective of digital sociability, and its implications for the internet-mediated interactions of adolescents.


Subject(s)
Humans , Child , Adolescent , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Social Isolation/psychology , Self-Injurious Behavior/psychology , Internet/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Betacoronavirus , Anxiety/psychology , Self Concept , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Time Factors , Information Storage and Retrieval/statistics & numerical data , Behavior, Addictive , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Fear , Social Media/statistics & numerical data
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 01 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686744

ABSTRACT

This article is based on qualitative analysis of interviews and focus groups conducted with participants enrolled in the Senior Programme of the University of Lleida, the City Council of Lleida, and care homes, as well as professional workers in the field of gerontology and related areas. It presents the analysis of interviews focused on the participants' life trajectories, ageing, creativity, self-perception, and quality of life. The study aimed to examine how creativity influences the maintenance and improvement of a sense of wellbeing in older adults, and to reflect on how the perception of old age and of oneself changes through creative activity and active engagement across the life span. The article is framed within a new concept in sociology and the social sciences-'profiguration', which is the key element in the promotion and strengthening of intergenerational interdependence, education, wellbeing, social participation, and active ageing.


Subject(s)
Ageism , Quality of Life , Aged , Aging , Creativity , Humans , Self Concept
7.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 14(1): e1-e10, 2022 Jan 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674975

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mental health manifestations such as depression and anxiety disorders became more marked during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic as frontline healthcare workers struggled to maintain high-quality intrapartum care and essential health services. AIM: This study aimed to identify maternity healthcare providers' self-perceptions of changes in their feelings of mental well-being. SETTING: Ten midwife obstetric units and the labour wards of four district hospitals in Tshwane Health District, South Africa. METHODS: We conducted an anonymous, cross-sectional survey amongst a convenience sample of 114 maternity healthcare workers to gauge the changes in healthcare workers' experience and perceptions of well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. Four items measured the perceived changes on a scale of 0-10 for the periods before and during COVID-19, respectively, namely feelings of fear or anxiety, stress, depression and anger. RESULTS: The majority of participants were professional nurses (37%) and advanced midwives (47%). They reported a significant change in well-being from before the pandemic to during the pandemic with regard to all four items (p 0.0001). The biggest 'before-during' difference was in perceptions of fear or anxiety and the smallest difference was in perceptions of anger. A framework was constructed from the open-ended responses to explain healthcare workers' understanding and perceptions of increased negative feelings regarding their mental well-being. CONCLUSION: The observed trends in the changes in healthcare workers' self-perceptions of their mental well-being highlight the need for further planning to build resilient frontline healthcare workers and provide them with ongoing mental health support and improved communication pathways.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Concept , South Africa
8.
Am J Nurs ; 122(2): 64, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662133

ABSTRACT

A retired nurse gets up to speed, with a little help from a nursing student.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Nurses/psychology , Self Concept , Students, Nursing/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Public Health Nursing
9.
Facial Plast Surg Aesthet Med ; 24(2): 73-74, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650101

ABSTRACT

Over a year ago, the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in lockdowns and isolation, quickly shifting social interactions online. During this time, the authors cited worsening self-perception due to the altered and distorted image produced by front facing cameras, later called "Zoom Dysmorphia." A recent survey study was then conducted analyzing the mental health and self-image of people as they returned to in-person activities. Increased time spent online and use of filters, which provoked unrealistic expectations, correlated with worsening anxiety and worsening self-perception, especially in respondents under the age of 24 years. A large percentage of this cohort also planned to invest in their appearance to cope with this anxiety. After a year of being behind the screen, with the ability to enhance features with the click of a button, individuals are concerned about their appearance and their ability to return to a life in-person. Aesthetic physicians should be prepared to discuss the cosmetic concerns provoked by photo editing, filters, and videoconferencing to educate about realistic surgical goals and outcomes for patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Concept , Young Adult
10.
Acta Biomed ; 92(6): e2021303, 2022 01 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1649728

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: this editorial address the content of a recent letter about the main characteristic of Zoom dysmorphia phenomenon entitled "Zoom Dysmorphia: the rise of a new issue amidst the pandemic" that presents a compelling argument for conceptualizing this type of body dysmorphic disorder. METHODS: It is largely known that self-appraisal, self-worth, and self-esteem are essential resources for an individual in private life and social context; a misperception of one's own characteristic can influence behavior and modify some personality traits. In the present editorial it is examined the larger issue of the relationship with dysmorphic concern and appearance-focused behaviors together with the use of cosmetic interventions. RESULTS: The coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic increased popularity of videoconferencing has seen a massive shift toward virtual living where individuals found themselves staring at their own video scrutinizing their appearance and potentially developing dysmorphic concerns. CONCLUSIONS: This editorial explores the conceivable similarity between obsession problems and addictions suggesting several insights for buffering the effects of stress promoting coping and (re-) appraisal strategies (www.actabiomedica.it).


Subject(s)
Body Dysmorphic Disorders , COVID-19 , Body Dysmorphic Disorders/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Concept
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(2)2022 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1634339

ABSTRACT

(1) Owing to their resistance resources, nurses can reduce the effects of stress, increase their commitment to work and improve their functioning in the face of challenges in the workplace. The aim of this study was to determine the mediatory role of a general sense of coherence and a sense of comprehensibility, manageability and meaningfulness correlated with global self-esteem and the perceived stress intensity in a group of Polish nurses aged 45-55 years. (2) The research using the diagnostic survey method was conducted on a group of 176 nurses (M = 49.1; SD = 3.1) working in seven hospitals located in Olsztyn (Poland). The following were used for data collection: Perceived Stress Scale - PSS-10, Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale and Antonovsky's Sense of Coherence (SOC-29) Questionnaire. (3) According to 21.02% of the nurses, their stress level at the workplace was low, 44.89% reported it was medium and 34.09% reported it was high. The self-esteem of nearly half of the nurses included in the study (48.30%) was at a medium level, 31.82% felt it was high and 19.89% felt it was low. The mediation analysis showed that a general sense of coherence and a sense of comprehensibility, manageability and meaningfulness have a mediator status in a correlation between global self-esteem and stress intensity. However, their mediatory role is partial. It is desirable for safe work environment promotion programmes to reinforce nurses' personal resources, which can be helpful in coping with stressors.


Subject(s)
Sense of Coherence , Adaptation, Psychological , Humans , Middle Aged , Poland , Self Concept , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(11): 1597-1602, 2021 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572703

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 was declared a pandemic in March 2020, requiring a comprehensive response from all healthcare systems, including Mexico's. As medical residents' training did not involve epidemic response, we decided to evaluate their level of training on this subject, specifically self-perceived knowledge level and capacity to respond to epidemiological crises. METHODOLOGY: Medical residents from two hospitals belonging to PEMEX (Mexico's state-owned petroleum company) were included in a cross-sectional study. All participants answered a modified version of the survey developed by the University of Lovaina's Center for Research and Education in Emergency Care. Participants were analyzed according to their relevant "clinical" or "surgical" residency tracks. Data were analyzed using through Chi-square tests, t-tests, Mann-Whitney U tests, Kruskal-Wallis tests, and Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients with significance established at p < 0.05. RESULTS: Of a total of 94 resident participants in this study, 56.7% self-perceived themselves as being poorly prepared to confront the pandemic. Only 25.5% of the participants referred previous experience in medical responses to public health emergencies, and only 35.1% reported ever receiving education on this topic. CONCLUSIONS: Medical residents-who have been involved with caring for victims of the pandemic-are under the general perception that they are not prepared, experienced, or educated enough to respond to such a widespread massive public health emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Internship and Residency , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Concept , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital , Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260659, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551301

ABSTRACT

The rapid development of advanced technology worldwide has promoted an increase in the need for highly skilled engineers who are adept at applying job-related technologies and have engineering competency (ENcom) to gain knowledge and introduce creative solutions. However, little is known about the underlying mechanism of the associations between ICT competencies related to work (ICT-Work) and the ENcom of engineering students. This study sought to examine the role of ICT-Work on ENcom. Based on the literature, self-esteem and self-regulated learning (SRL) were identified as factors that indicate the effect of ICT-Work on ENcom, while gender was identified as a moderator that conditioned these mediated relationships. The sample consisted of 1,313 undergraduate engineering students from eleven universities in Thailand. The results of structural equation modeling (SEM) showed positive direct and indirect effects of ICT-Work on ENcom, self-esteem, and SRL and confirmed that self-esteem and SRL mediate the impact of ICT-Work on ENcom. Moreover, multigroup SEM revealed no gender differences in the factor loadings and structural path coefficients of ICT-Work on ENcom via self-esteem and SRL. To prepare students for their professional lives in the digital world, educational institutions should emphasize the importance of developing engineering students in ICT-Work and the use of advanced ICT involved in the job.


Subject(s)
Learning , Self Concept , Self Efficacy , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Engineering , Female , Humans , Male , Models, Theoretical , Sex Characteristics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Thailand , Universities , Young Adult
15.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(21): 6775-6781, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524865

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This longitudinal descriptive study aimed to evaluate cognitive skills acquisition in basic Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (bCPR) among a group of Year 5 and Year 6 primary school pupils. The study made use of online tools due to the impossibility of conventional methods during the COVID-19 lockdown. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pupils received formal training in bCPR. Training was imparted uniformly by a teacher at the school (qualified in Basic Life Support -BLS- and Advanced Life Support -ALS- training by the CPR National Plan). The skills acquired (those proposed as essential for bCPR training by the European Resuscitation Council) were evaluated fifteen weeks later. Skills acquisition was evaluated by means of an online questionnaire developed specifically for the study. RESULTS: In all the cognitive skills included in bCPR training, the acquisition level achieved was over 65%. Acquisition of knowledge of the anatomical areas at which cardiac massage must be applied and the means of emergency systems activation was high, while 25.5% of pupils knew the order in which maneuvers should be performed. Pupils' self-confidence and self-perception of their capacity to act when faced with a real CPR situation increased significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Primary school pupils learned all the cognitive skills involved in bCPR, showing high levels of skills acquisition and positive self-perception of their capacity to apply them.


Subject(s)
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/education , Students/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Female , Humans , Knowledge , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Pilot Projects , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Schools , Self Concept , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(20)2021 10 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470876

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to analyze university Health Sciences students' self-perception regarding gender stereotypes, and to explore whether there was any association between gender stereotypes and clinical/socio-demographic variables. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample of 252 university students who completed a self-administrated online questionnaire (18.3% males, 81.7% females). We evaluated the self-perception of gender stereotypes as determined using the BSRI-12 questionnaire and explored the association of this measure with the impact of perceived stress measured using a modified scale (PSS-10-C) as well as anxiety and depression according to scores on the Goldberg scale (GADS). RESULTS: According to the students' self-perception of gender stereotypes, 24.9% self-perceived themselves as feminine, 20.1% as masculine, 24.9% as androgynous, and 30% as undifferentiated. The degree determines self-identification with gender stereotypes. Nursing and Occupational Therapy are studied mostly by women, 28.4% and 45%, respectively, while Physiotherapy is studied mainly by men (71.2%). Females indicated more anxiety (75.7%) and depression (81.7%) than males (52.9% and 67.3%, respectively). In contrast, males developed more stress (88.5%) than females (74.1%). CONCLUSIONS: University degree, anxiety, depression, and stress determined self-identification with gender stereotypes. The results of this study indicate that gender roles influence the possibility of developing mental disorders and should be taken into account in future studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Concept , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Students , Universities
17.
Am J Surg ; 222(6): 1085-1092, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466001

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In the midst of a pandemic, residency interviews transitioned to a virtual format for the first time. Little is known about the effect this will have on the match process. The study aim is to evaluate resident application processes and perceived outcomes. METHODS: An electronic survey was distributed to 142 colon and rectal surgery residency applicants (95% of total). RESULTS: A total of 77 applicants responded to the survey (54% response rate). Applicants reported high levels of satisfaction with virtual interviews but less comfort. Utilizing the mute button and using notes in a different way from face-to-face interviews were significantly associated with applicant confidence that they ranked the right program highest. A majority of applicants (73%) would recommend virtual interviews next year even if COVID-19 is not a factor. CONCLUSION: While applicants appear generally satisfied with virtual interviews, they also reported less comfort. Applicant confidence was predicted by utilizing the unique technological affordances offered by the virtual platform.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Interviews as Topic/methods , School Admission Criteria , Self Concept , User-Computer Interface , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0257359, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468156

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 has dramatically changed teaching approach in dental schools due to the switch to distance learning and the lack of practice training in direct contact with patients with possible impact on clinical skills of students. The aim of the study was to assess the level of the 2020 final year dental students' self-confidence in performing different dental procedures through specially designed questionnaire and compare it to self-confidence of the 2019 final year students. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An anonymous questionnaire consisting of 40 questions regarding self-confidence level in performing 40 different dental procedures and based on five points Likert-like scale was distributed during November 2020 to final year dental students whose studies were disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in one semester. The study group comprised their answers. The comparison was done with the control group that consisted of students' answers on the same questionnaire from previous 2019 year conducted as a part of regular internal educational evaluation. RESULTS: Response rate was 74.2% in study group and 89.3% in control group. Mean level of self-confidence reported by 115 students in study group was significantly lower than that reported by 100 students in control group (3.28±1.08 vs. 3.58±0.88, respectively) and the distribution of self-confidence scores were different in observed groups. Graduates from study group felt less confident than those from control in 8 clinical skills. CONCLUSION: Abrupt changes in teaching modalities caused by COVID-19 pandemic had significant impact on final year dental students' self-confidence indicating additional educational needs in postgraduate period.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Education, Dental , Self Concept , Students, Dental , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Women Birth ; 34(2): 128-135, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454573

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Limited literature is available about women who wish to breastfeed but experience unexpected feelings of aversion in reaction to their infant suckling at the breast while breastfeeding. BACKGROUND: Breastfeeding benefits mothers, infants and society yet breastfeeding rates continue to fall below recommendations in part due to inadequate tailored support after hospital discharge. Influences on breastfeeding are complex and include many physiological, psychosocial and cultural factors. AIM: To better understand the experience of women who have feelings of aversion during breastfeeding by synthesising the existing literature. METHODS: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Maternity and Infant Care databases were searched for relevant literature published between 2000 to 2019. Using Covidence software, five qualitative research studies were identified. Studies were then analysed using meta-ethnographic qualitative synthesis. FINDINGS: Feelings of aversion during breastfeeding were described as visceral and overwhelming; leading to feelings of shame and inadequacy. This synthesis identified five findings; a central conceptual category of "it's such a strong feeling of get away from me" with four key metaphors translated from this central conceptual category: "I do it because I feel it is best for my baby", "I can't control those feelings", "I should be able to breastfeed my son and enjoy it", and "I'm glad I did it". This phenomenon may negatively affect a women's sense of self and impact on the mother-infant relationship. CONCLUSION: Some women who want to breastfeed can experience feelings of aversion while breastfeeding. The feelings of 'aversion' while breastfeeding can inhibit women from achieving their personal breastfeeding goals.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/psychology , Maternal Behavior/ethnology , Mothers/psychology , Adult , Affect , Anthropology, Cultural , Breast Feeding/ethnology , Emotions , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interviews as Topic , Maternal Behavior/psychology , Mother-Child Relations , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research , Self Concept
20.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257727, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448574

ABSTRACT

Translators face hectic daily schedules with deadlines they must duly meet. As trainees they receive tuition on how to work swiftly to meet them efficiently. But despite the prominent role of time pressure, its effects on the translation process are still scarcely researched. Studies point to the higher occurrence of errors under stringent time constraints. Most of these studies use key-logging or eye-tracking techniques to identify the problems encountered. But no attempt has yet been made to measure the physiological effects of time pressure in English-to-Spanish translation and their interplay with trainees' psychological state. The present study researches the influence of time pressure on translation by exploring trainees' physiological response (i.e., salivary cortisol) and psychological traits (i.e., self-esteem and anxiety). 33 Spanish translation trainees translated 3 English literary texts under different time pressure conditions: Text 1 (no time limit), Text 2 (10 minutes), Text 3 (5 minutes). Regression analysis results showed that higher cortisol levels during preparation predicted higher number of meaning errors in Text 1 and lower number of translated words in Text 2 and 3. Besides, higher trait anxiety emerged as predictor of lower number of translated words, but higher accuracy under extreme time constraints and in the absence of time pressure. Higher self-esteem correlated with lower levels of anxiety and lower levels of cortisol during preparation and recovery, suggesting that it may act as a protective factor against stress. And yet, the regression analysis showed that higher self-esteem predicted lower meaning and total accuracy under extreme time pressure. Besides, in our correlation analysis self-esteem was positively related to the number of translated words in Text 2 and 3. Results suggest that even if self-esteem could be a protective factor against stress, it may also have a negative effect on task performance mediated by overconfidence.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/metabolism , Hydrocortisone/analysis , Occupational Stress/psychology , Saliva/chemistry , Female , Humans , Male , Regression Analysis , Self Concept , Self Report , Time Factors , Young Adult
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