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1.
BMC Womens Health ; 22(1): 444, 2022 11 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139254

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), which causes involuntarily leakage of urine, has an impact on many women and may affect self-efficacy, which, in turn, can lead to poor health-related quality of life (QOL). This study aimed to explore the effects of sociodemographic and health information, symptom distress, self-efficacy, and positive thinking on the health-related QOL (general QOL and urinary incontinence-specific QOL) of women with SUI. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design was used. Women with SUI were recruited from the obstetrics and gynecology outpatient department and urodynamics examination room of a hospital by convenience sampling from August 2021 to March 2022. Participants were surveyed on the following questionnaires: Urogenital Distress Inventory, Geriatric Self-efficacy Index for Urinary Incontinence, Positive Thinking Scale, 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12), and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire Short Form. RESULTS: Participants (N = 135) had a mean age of 53.76 years old. The mean SF-12 physical component summary score was 48.48 (physical QOL), and the mental component summary score was 46.56 (mental QOL). The urinary incontinence-specific QOL score was 16.01. Women with greater positive thinking and higher self-efficacy for urinary incontinence had better physical and mental QOL. Women with less symptom distress of urinary incontinence and higher self-efficacy for urinary incontinence had better urinary incontinence-specific QOL. CONCLUSION: The health-related QOL of women with SUI is affected by many factors, including positive thinking, self-efficacy, and symptom distress. Healthcare professionals can provide multifaceted programs to improve the health-related QOL of women with SUI.


Subject(s)
Urinary Incontinence, Stress , Urinary Incontinence , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Aged , Middle Aged , Quality of Life , Self Efficacy , Optimism , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Inquiry ; 59: 469580221139140, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2138516

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic forced many public health professionals to take on new roles such as online teaching, communicating, and managing; serving on the frontlines of patient care; and serving as health education resource personnel. Researchers of this study posed the question: How has the pandemic impacted those who serve to help others? Seven aspects of self-efficacy in professional practice were examined via an online survey sent to health educators. Respondents were extremely confident communicating with their colleagues and supervisors (60%) and with students (51%), but only 19% were extremely confident in maintaining a work-life balance and 22% in managing personal and professional stress. Respondents reported being confident in all areas of responsibilities, overall, but they were most confident in Area 8 (ethics and professionalism) and least confident in Area 1 (assessing the needs and capacity of a community) since COVID-19. Findings imply a need for more professional development opportunities to foster professional and personal self-efficacy and to improve self-efficacy in needs assessment, leadership, and advocacy. Findings also show a need for workplace or state-based interventions to support resiliency and self-care among professionals who work to serve others.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Educators , Humans , Self Efficacy , Pandemics , Health Personnel
3.
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak ; 22(1): 53, 2022 02 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2113063

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adherence to disease-modifying therapy is important in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) to increase the positive outcomes and improve the quality of life. This study aimed to determine the effects of Continuous Care Model (CCM) using a smartphone application on adherence to treatment and self-efficacy among MS patients. METHODS: This quasi-experimental study with pre/posttest design was conducted on 72 MS patients in Shiraz, Iran from June 2020 to August 2021. The samples were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 36) and control (n = 36) groups. In the intervention group, the CCM using a smartphone application was implemented during two months. However, no intervention was performed for the control group. The data were collected using the self-report Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Adherence Questionnaire (MS-TAQ) and MS Self-Efficacy Scale (MSSS) at baseline and two and four months after the intervention. RESULTS: The results showed an improvement in adherence to treatment and self-efficacy in the intervention group compared to the control group after implementing the virtual CCM and at the two-month follow-up (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Implementing the CCM using a smartphone application resulted in improvements in the MS patients' adherence to treatment and self-efficacy. It can be concluded that providing care using an interactive multimedia application can improve the outcomes as well as patients' satisfaction, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, this approach is recommended to be used for nurses, healthcare providers, and clinicians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Efficacy , Smartphone
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 757, 2022 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108767

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Professional calling (PC) is crucial for ascertaining their professional goals and fulfilling career choices in nursing students. Thus, understanding its antecedents and helping schools improve PC among nursing students is critical. This study aims to explore whether professional identity (PI), as a crucial antecedent of PC, acts as an intermediary between career self-efficacy (CSE) and professional calling during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A sample of 565 nursing students were selected by a web-based survey through convenience sampling. The study was conducted from October to November 2020. Measures of CSE, PI, and PC were assessed during the COVID-19 pandemic. We analyzed demographic data and the correlation of the research variables. The significance of the mediation effect was assessed using a bootstrap method with SPSS. RESULTS: CSE during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak (r = 0. 359, p < 0. 01) and PI (r = 0. 670, p < 0. 01) were both relevant to PC among nursing students. In addition, CSE had a positive indirect effect on PC through PI (ß = 0. 288, p < 0. 05). CONCLUSIONS: Higher scores in CSE and a better PI were associated with PC in nursing students. Furthermore, a better CSE had an indirect effect on the PC of students through PI. The favorable evidence in our study confirms that nursing educators can adopt PI interventions to improve the sense of PC among nursing students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Self Efficacy , Pandemics , Career Choice , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110062

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has disastrous impacts that impose the cultivation of knowledge and motivation of self-protection to foster disease containment. AIM: Evaluate the effect of digital self-learned educational intervention about COVID-19 using the protection motivation theory (PMT) on non-health students' knowledge and self-protective behaviors at Saudi Electronic University (SEU). METHODS: A quasi-experimental study was accomplished at three randomly chosen branches of SEU (Riyadh, Dammam, Jeddah) using a multistage sampling technique to conveniently select 219 students. An electronic self-administered questionnaire was used, which included three scales for assessing the students' knowledge, self-protective behaviors, and the constructs of the PMT. The educational intervention was designed using four stages: need assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation. A peer-reviewed digital educational content was developed after assessing the participants' educational needs using the pretest. Then, distributed through their university emails. A weekly synchronous Zoom cloud meeting and daily key health messages were shared with them. Finally, the post-test was conducted after two months. RESULTS: The mean participants' age (SD) among the experimental group was 28.94 (6.719), and the control group was 27.80 (7.256), with a high female percentage (63.4%, 73.8%) and a previous history of direct contact with verified COVID-19 patients (78.6%, 69.2%), respectively. A significant positive mean change (p = 0.000) was detected in the total COVID-19 knowledge of the experimental group post-intervention, either when it was adjusted for the covariates effect of the control group (F1 = 630.547) or the pretest (F1 = 8.585) with a large effect size (η2 = 0.745, η2 = 0.268, respectively). The same was proved by the ANCOVA test for the total self-protective behaviors either when it adjusted for the covariates effect of the control group (F1 = 66.671, p = 0.000) or the pretest (F1 = 5.873, p = 0.020) with a large effect size (η2 = 0.236, η2 = 0.164, respectively). The ANCOVA test proved that post-intervention, all the PMT constructs (perceived threats, reward appraisal, efficacy appraisal, response cost, and protection intention) and the total PMT score were significantly improved (p = 0.000) among the experimental group either when adjusted for the covariates effect of the control group (F1 = 83.835) or the pretest (F1 = 11.658) with a large effect size (η2 = 0.280, η2 = 0.561, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The digital PMT-based self-learned educational intervention effectively boosts non-health university students' COVID-19 knowledge, protection motivation, and self-protective behaviors. Thus, PMT is highly praised as a basis for COVID-19-related educational intervention and, on similar occasions, future outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Motivation , Humans , Female , Universities , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Self Efficacy , Students , Electronics
6.
Rev Esc Enferm USP ; 56: e20220130, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089521

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the breastfeeding self-efficacy levels of mothers during the pandemic period, to compare them according to various characteristics, and to examine the relationship between the fear of COVID-19 and breastfeeding self-efficacy. METHOD: The data of this descriptive and cross-sectional were collected through a web-based survey of 392 mothers between June and August 2021. The data collection tools were the Introductory Data Form, the Breast-feeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form, and the Fear of COVID-19 Scale. RESULTS: The mean score for breastfeeding self-efficacy was found to be 56.18 ± 8.24, while the mean score for the Fear of COVID-19 scale was 21.77 ± 6.14. Having a high fear of COVID-19, breastfeeding more frequently in this period, and suspecting that they had COVID-19 affected the breastfeeding self-efficacy scores positively, whereas graduating from primary school had a negative effect on self-efficacy. CONCLUSION: The breastfeeding self-efficacy of mothers who were fearful of COVID-19, who breastfed more frequently during the pandemic, and who had a higher education level were positively affected.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Mothers , Self Efficacy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Fear
7.
Work ; 73(2): 393-404, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080079

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Implications of entrepreneurial education (EE), entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) and personality traits (PT) on the entrepreneurial intentions of the deaf is yet unknown in existing literature. OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of EE, ESE and PT on the entrepreneurial intentions among some 250 Deaf and Hard of hearing (DHH) students from two post-secondary institutions in Oyo state, Nigeria. METHODS: A descriptive research design was adopted, while a structured paper questionnaire was used for data collection. The data generated were analysed using descriptive statistics and the inferential statistics of Pearson Product Moment Correlation and hierarchical multiple regression at a 0.05 level of significance. RESULTS: The entrepreneurial intentions of DHH college students had a significant positive correlation with EE (r = 0.18, p < 0.05), agreeableness (r = 0.23, p < 0.05), and conscientiousness (r = 0.19, p < 0.05); but had a negative correlation with ESE, neuroticism and openness. Furthermore, personality traits and ESE were the highest predictors of entrepreneurial intention among DHH college students. CONCLUSIONS: Personality traits were the greatest predictor of the entrepreneurial intention of DHH college students post the COVID-19 lockdowns in Nigeria. Therefore, higher education institutions should intensify their efforts in entrepreneurial education and parents of DHH students should encourage them to seek entrepreneurial opportunities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intention , Humans , Self Efficacy , Communicable Disease Control , Students , Hearing
9.
Health Educ Res ; 37(6): 452-465, 2022 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077757

ABSTRACT

Wearing a face mask is effective in minimizing the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among unvaccinated individuals and preventing severe illness among the vaccinated. Country, state and local guidelines promote, and at times mandate, mask-wearing despite it being publicly perceived as an individual's choice. Guided by the Health Belief Model (HBM), structural equation modeling was used to analyze longitudinal data in a sample of US adults aged 18-49 years to identify constructs that contribute to face mask-wearing. Results indicated that perceived COVID-19 severity, perceived masking benefits and self-efficacy were positively associated with masking behavior, and masking barriers were negatively associated with masking behavior. Perceived susceptibility to COVID-19 and cues to action were nonsignificant correlates of masking behavior. These results' theoretical and practical implications contribute to the literature on the HBM and the COVID-19 pandemic. Future directions and limitations are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Belief Model , Self Efficacy
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065922

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between physical activity and negative emotions among college students in the post-epidemic era and determine if emotional regulation plays a mediating role between physical activity and negative emotions. METHODS: 479 college students (293 males, 186 females, M = 19.94, SD = 1.25) who were under closed campus management during the epidemic period were surveyed using the physical activity rating scale (PARS-3), the self-assessment scale for anxiety (SAS), the self-esteem scale for depression (SDS), and the emotion regulation self-efficacy scale (RES). RESULTS: (1) Physical activity, negative emotions, and emotion regulation self-efficacy among college students were significantly different by gender (p < 0.01). (2) Physical exercise was negatively correlated with anxiety and depression (r = -0.236, p < 0.01; r = -0.198, p < 0.01) and positively correlated with emotion regulation self-efficacy (r = 0.256, p < 0.01) in college students. (3) Emotion regulation self-efficacy was negatively correlated with anxiety and depression (r = -0.440, p < 0.01; r = -0.163, p < 0.01). (4) Emotion regulation self-efficacy also partially mediated the relationship between physical activity and negative emotions. CONCLUSION: (1) Physical activity in the post-epidemic era negatively predicted anxiety and depression in school-isolated college students. (2) Emotion regulation self-efficacy in the post-epidemic era partially mediates the relationship between physical activity and anxiety and depression.


Subject(s)
Emotional Regulation , Self Efficacy , Anxiety/epidemiology , Emotions , Exercise , Female , Humans , Male , Students/psychology
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055249

ABSTRACT

This study aims to understand the state of emotional exhaustion of Chinese doctors during the COVID-19 pandemic, and explore the role of sports involvement in enhancing doctors' regulatory emotional self-efficacy, reducing stress perception, and alleviating emotional exhaustion. Finally, report the existing problems and make recommendations to the government and hospitals. The researchers constructed a cross-sectional questionnaire survey to collect data. From March to April 2022, using the snowball and convenience sampling methods, a total of 413 valid questionnaires were collected from 13 hospitals in Hunan Province. AMOS 23.0 was used to construct a structural equation model (SEM) with the bootstrapping approach to verify the proposed hypotheses. Doctors with more sports involvement exhibited higher levels of regulatory emotional self-efficacy and lesser perceived stress. Doctors who exhibited higher regulatory emotional self-efficacy had lesser perceived stress. The relationship between sports involvement and emotional exhaustion was mediated by perceived stress and/or regulatory emotional self-efficacy. Therefore, the government and hospitals should strengthen the depth and intensity of implementing the "National Fitness Program" at the hospital level, instead of just holding short-term activities with a small number of participants, but to cover all medical staff with fitness opportunities.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Self Efficacy
12.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0275459, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054383

ABSTRACT

The experience of graduate degree lecturers in the natural sciences when they switched to online teaching during the Covid-19 pandemic is described. The shift to online teaching throughout the pandemic provided an opportunity to evaluate how lecturers integrate technology into their teaching and what they need to improve their remote teaching. This study used a twofold perspective of TPACK (Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge) and self-efficacy in online education. Its data were derived from pre-and post-questionnaires, comprising closed and open-ended questions, given at the start and end of the semester. We found that lecturers focused on learning and applying technological and techno-pedagogical knowledge but paid less attention to the integration of three components: technology, pedagogy, and scientific content. Although no statistically significant differences in lecturers' perceived self-efficacy was found between the start and the end of the semester, at the end of the semester we found a statistically significant correlation between the variables involved in building self-efficacy in online teaching: (1) satisfaction with online teaching and the belief that (2) technology promotes teaching, student interactions, participation, and engagement. Our results enabled us to identify the knowledge aspects that lecturers implemented initiatively and to better understand what aspects required more professional development training. In addition, the results emphasized the importance of developing the lecturers' self-efficacy for online teaching. These insights can help to improve and enhance online teaching in higher education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Learning , Pandemics , Self Efficacy
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043753

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to analyze the mediating effect of self-efficacy and coping strategy in the relationship between job stress and the psychological well-being of care workers. The subjects were 112 home-visiting care workers, and data were collected at four home-visiting nursing centers in a metropolitan city and a small and medium-sized city from July to August 2022. The collected data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation co-efficient, multiple linear regression, and Sobel test. The mean score of psychological well-being was 3.33 ± 0.46 out of a possible 5. The subject's psychological well-being was correlated with self-efficacy (r = 0.64, p < 0.001), problem-solving-focused coping (r = 0.58, p < 0.001), social-support-seeking coping (r = 0.34, p < 0.001), job stress (r = -0.31, p = 0.001), avoidance-focused coping (r = -0.37, p < 0.001). Self-efficacy (Z = -4.92, p < 0.001), problem-solving-focused coping (Z = -2.56, p = 0.010), and avoidance-focused coping (Z = -3.07, p = 0.002) had a mediating effect in the relationship between job stress and psychological well-being of the subjects during the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on these results, the psychological well-being nursing intervention program for home-visiting care workers need to include job stress, problem-solving-focused coping, and avoidance-focused coping.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Adaptation, Psychological , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , Self Efficacy , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043752

ABSTRACT

Global COVID-19 lockdown measures have led to an apparent decrease in physical activity. This study aimed to explore the explanatory function of self-control's mediating role between self-efficacy and physical activity among college students. The analysis used the data of 1627 university students (aged 19.41 ± 0.66, range 17-28, 40.5% males) at Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Self-efficacy, self-control, and physical activity were tested, respectively, by the general self-efficacy scale, the new brief self-control scale, and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) scale, which were analyzed by SPSS software. Correlation analysis showed that self-efficacy, self-control, and physical activity were related in pairs. Comparing the two dimensions of self-control, we found that self-discipline mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and PA, and impulse control did not mediate the relationship. Regarding the gender difference according to multi-group analysis, findings showed that females need higher self-discipline from the path of self-efficacy to physical activity improvement than males.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Self-Control , China , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise , Female , Humans , Male , Self Efficacy , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043741

ABSTRACT

We aimed to identify factors influencing the preventive behavior of COVID-19 among nursing students. A survey was conducted through an online questionnaire in December 2021 for students in the department of nursing at a university located in C city. An online questionnaire was distributed to 189 nursing students who voluntarily agreed to participate in the study, and data from 179 of them were used for the final analysis. The research tools used were COVID-19 stress scale for Korean people, COVID-19 risk-perception scale, self-efficacy scale, and COVID-19 prevention behavior scale. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, t-test, analysis of variance, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis test, as well as Spearman correlation coefficient and multiple linear regression with SPSS 23.0 program. Factors significantly influencing the preventive behavior of COVID-19 were self-efficacy (ß = 0.53, p < 0.001) and COVID-19 stress (ß = 0.25, p = 0.001). The explanatory power of related variables was 45.0%. We found that self-efficacy and COVID-19 stress had a significant effect on the preventive behavior of nursing students. Therefore, to promote the preventive behavior of COVID-19, it is necessary to improve the self-efficacy of nursing students and manage COVID-19 stress well.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Self Efficacy , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1): 731, 2022 09 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038663

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current study investigated the relationship between behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) knowledge and positive aspects of caregiving (PAC), in addition, how caregiving attitude and self-efficacy mediate or moderate this relationship. METHODS: Two hundred twenty-nine formal caregivers (51males and 178females) who has worked in nursing homes for more than a month were recruited.With a cross-sectional, face-to-face survey, structural questionnaires were implemented to evaluate formal caregiver's BPSD knowledge, attitude, self-efficacy and PAC.A 13-item self-developed questionnaire was used to assess caregiver's BPSD knowledge about disease characteristics, care and risks, and treatment needs. Dementia attitude, self-efficacy and positive aspects of caregiving were measured by dementia attitude scale, the General self-efficacy scale, and Chinese version of positive aspects of caregiving respectively. Model 5 in the PROCESS micro was employed in order to verify the mediating effect of attitude and the moderating effect of self-efficacy on the relationship between BPSD knowledge and PAC. RESULTS: The results showed that greater BPSD knowledge was associated with increased PAC, and this relationship was fully mediated by increased friendly attitude toward people with dementia. Moreover, direct effect was moderated by self-efficacy, and that only among those with high self-efficacy, the direct effect of BPSD knowledge was found on promoting PAC. CONCLUSIONS: By elucidating the knowledge-attitude-practice pathway in handling patient's BPSD, the current study extends existing literature and provides insights for developing psychoeducation programs among formal caregivers.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Dementia , Caregivers/psychology , Cost of Illness , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dementia/diagnosis , Dementia/therapy , Humans , Self Efficacy
17.
J Transcult Nurs ; 33(5): 642-651, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029637

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Since nurses and nursing students interact with culturally diverse clients in health care settings, training programs are required to improve cultural competence and self-efficacy among them. This study aimed to investigate the effect of an online cultural care training program on cultural competence and self-efficacy among postgraduate nursing students. METHODS: The present interventional study used random sampling to allocate 80 postgraduate nursing students into the intervention and control groups. Cultural care training program was held for the intervention group. RESULTS: No significant difference in cultural competence and self-efficacy scores was found between the intervention and control groups in the pretest. However, the intervention group scored higher in terms of cultural competence and self-efficacy after the intervention. DISCUSSION: Given cultural diversity and prevalence of medical tourism, nursing instructors need to pay special attention to cultural care education at all academic levels.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Transcultural Nursing , Cultural Competency , Cultural Diversity , Culturally Competent Care , Humans , Self Efficacy , Transcultural Nursing/education
18.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 63: 103371, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2000638

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of online communication skills training conducted for first-year nursing students on effective communication and self-efficacy and self-regulated learning skills. BACKGROUND: Communication skills are an important part of nursing care. METHODS: This research was designed as a pre-test-post-test randomized controlled experimental study. The study population comprised first-year undergraduate nursing students of a state university in Turkey. A total of 60 students included in the study were divided into the two following groups: experimental (n = 30) and control (n = 30) groups. The research data were collected between 1 December 2020 and 1 March 2021. Pre-test and post-test forms were simultaneously provided to the groups. Post-tests were repeated 1 month after the pre-test was completed. A 2-day (a total of 12 h) communication skills training was conducted online for the students in the experimental group after the pre-test forms were filled. Information form, Effective Communication Skills Scale (ECSS), General Self-efficacy Scale (GSE) and Self-regulated Learning Skills Scale (SRLSS) were used to collect the data. RESULTS: The effective communication and SRLSS mean scores of the nursing students were high and the GSE scores were below average. On comparing the groups, the post-test mean scores of the communication skills and GSE were found to decrease in both the groups compared with the pre-test ones. This decrease was significant only in the "ego-enhancing language" subdimension of ECSS (p < 0.05). The post-test mean scores of the SRLSS increased in both the groups, but this increase was not significant (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Although the SRLSS scores of the students increased in the post-test, the study results show that communication skills training did not have a significant effect on effective communication and self-efficacy and self-regulated learning skills. The results of this study are important in terms of guiding research and trainings that examine the effects of communication skills.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Communication , Humans , Learning , Self Efficacy
19.
Health Qual Life Outcomes ; 20(1): 123, 2022 Aug 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2002189

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Increased knowledge about factors that can impact changes in adolescents' health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is needed. The present study aimed to investigate possible HRQOL changes in adolescents at 14 and 16 years, and assess the impact of sociodemographic factors, gender, pain, self-esteem, self-efficacy, loneliness, and stress on HRQOL changes over time. Further, to assess HRQOL stratified by gender. METHODS: A longitudinal study involving 211 adolescents was conducted. Sociodemographic variables, pain, self-esteem, self-efficacy, loneliness, and stress were all assessed with well-validated instruments. KIDSCREEN-27 was used to measure HRQOL. Data were analyzed using independent t-tests, paired samples t-tests, and linear mixed models for repeated measures. RESULTS: When all variables were added to the linear mixed models, stress, loneliness, and pain were significantly, independently associated with a reduction in HRQOL change scores for four of the five KIDSCREEN subscales. Time was significantly associated with a reduction in physical and psychological well-being. Self-efficacy and self-esteem were significantly associated with an increase in HRQOL change scores for four and two subscales, respectively. Male gender was significantly negatively associated with changes in social support and peers compared to female gender. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrated a significant decline in adolescents' HRQOL regarding physical and psychological well-being for the age range 14-16 years. Furthermore, we found that stress, loneliness, and pain have a significant negative impact on HRQOL changes, whereas self-esteem and self-efficacy have a significant positive impact. Our results highlight the importance of increased understanding regarding factors associated with changes in adolescents' HRQOL to enable accurate and strategic interventions.


Subject(s)
Quality of Life , Adolescent , Female , Humans , Loneliness , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Pain , Quality of Life/psychology , Self Concept , Self Efficacy , Sex Factors , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Soc Sci Med ; 310: 115276, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1996560

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to investigate the potential protective role of baseline resources and capabilities for experiencing challenges to emotional well-being and perceived access to and quality of diabetes care during the COVID-19 pandemic in a Danish type 2 diabetes population (N = 1608). We investigated how differences in self-efficacy, well-being capability, socioeconomic status, health status, and perceptions of diabetes care measured before the COVID-19 pandemic were related to experiences of well-being and diabetes management challenges during the pandemic. The study is based on a survey conducted shortly before the pandemic (autumn 2019) and a follow-up survey during the pandemic (autumn 2020), which included questions about impacts of the pandemic. We used this longitudinal data to quantitatively investigate in regression analyses how self-reported baseline indicators of chronic care access and quality (PACIC), self-efficacy (GSE), health (EQ VAS), and well-being capability (ICECAP-A), and registry-based socioeconomic indicators were associated with the probability of reporting negative impacts on emotional wellbeing and diabetes management. Results showed that respondents with higher baseline general self-efficacy and higher well-being capability scores, who more often considered care well-organised and were in better health before the pandemic, were less likely to report pandemic-related negative impacts on emotional well-being. Considering diabetes care well organised before the pandemic was associated with a lower probability of adverse impacts on diabetes care. The results thus broadly confirmed that several indicators of higher levels of baseline resources and capabilities were associated with a lower probability of reporting negative impacts of the pandemic. However, some variation in predictors was observed for general well-being outcomes, compared to diabetes-care specific challenges, and findings on socioeconomic status as indicated by education were mixed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/psychology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Self Efficacy
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