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2.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(3)2022 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765786

ABSTRACT

Sepsis is an emergent infectious disease and a leading cause of death despite immediate intervention. While Delta neutrophil index (DNI) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) are known as a prodiagnostic marker of sepsis, the preclinical evidence of the best marker of sepsis is unclear. For this, using a well-designed cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis mouse model, we comparatively measured the level and cost-effectiveness of sepsis biomarkers such as DNI, myeloperoxidase (MPO), procalcitonin (PCT), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). First, we found that the optimal time point for early detection is at 6 h, 24 h post-CLP. Strikingly, the peak level and fold change of DNI was revealed at 24 h, further showing the best fold change as compared with other biomarker levels. Given the fold change at 6, 24 h, PCT was next to DNI. Third, a cost-effectiveness survey showed that DNI was the best, with PCT next. Further, DNI level was moderate positively associated with PCT (ρ = 0.697, p = 0.012) and TNF-α (ρ = 0.599, p = 0.040). Collectively, these data indicate that DNI in CLP-induced sepsis mice is as effective as the existent inflammatory biomarkers such as MPO, PCT and TNF-α to predict the prognosis of sepsis. This might have clinically important implications that DNI is cost effective, thus quickly and rationally applying to diverse types of imminent sepsis regardless of species. This might be the first report on the validity of DNI in preclinical CLP-induced murine sepsis.


Subject(s)
Neutrophils , Sepsis , Animals , Biomarkers , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Mice , Punctures/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/diagnosis
3.
J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio) ; 32(2): 223-228, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759260

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic utility of quick Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) for prediction of in-hospital mortality and length of hospitalization in dogs with pyometra. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study from February 2013 to April 2019 SETTING: Tertiary referral hospital ANIMALS: Fifty-two dogs referred with confirmed diagnosis of pyometra INTERVENTIONS: None MEASUREMENTS AND PRINCIPAL OUTCOMES: Sixty-five percent of dogs survived to discharge. A cut-off score of ≥2 for qSOFA was associated with in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 6.51 [95% CI: 1.35 - 31.3]) P = 0.019. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve for a qSOFA score ≥ 2 for mortality was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.59-0.85), with a sensitivity of 77.8% and a specificity of 66.7%. The mean ± SD number of organs with dysfunction was significantly higher in dogs with a qSOFA score ≥2 1.76 ± 0.83 compared to dogs with a qSOFA score < 2 1.08 ± 1.09, P = 0.015. The presence of a qSOFA score ≥ 2 was associated with a longer time of hospitalization in survivors with a median (interquartile range) length of stay in qSOFA < 2 (48 [33]) hours versus qSOFA score ≥ 2 (78 [52]) hours, P = 0.027. CONCLUSIONS: In dogs with pyometra, the qSOFA score was associated with mortality and length of hospitalization. This score might be useful to improve the risk stratification in dogs with pyometra. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the predictive capacity of qSOFA in other septic patient populations.


Subject(s)
Dog Diseases , Pyometra , Sepsis , Animals , Dog Diseases/diagnosis , Dogs , Hospitalization , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prognosis , Pyometra/complications , Pyometra/veterinary , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/veterinary
4.
In Vivo ; 36(2): 954-960, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732570

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Multiple reports from all over the world link COVID-19 with endothelial/coagulation disorders as well as a dysregulated immune response. This study tested the hypothesis that immunostimulation will be greater in COVID-19 patients than in patients with H1N1 infection or bacterial sepsis. Also, whether an increase in immune stimulation will be accompanied by a more severely affected endothelium/coagulation system was examined. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-three septic patients, admitted in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), were enrolled (9 with SARS-CoV-2, 5 with H1N1 pneumonia, 9 with bacterial sepsis). Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity along with certain endothelial/coagulation factors were assessed on admission (time point 1) and at either improvement or deterioration (time point 2). RESULTS: MPO levels were significantly higher in COVID-19 patients compared to both other groups. Furthermore, in patients with COVID-19, vWF levels did not differ significantly, fVIII levels were lower while ADAMTS-13 activity was higher compared to patients with H1N1 pneumonia and bacterial sepsis (a trend in the latter). CONCLUSION: Increased immunostimulation was noted in COVID-19 patients compared to other septic patients; however, this was not accompanied by greater disturbance of the clotting system and/or more severe endothelial injury.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders , COVID-19 , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Sepsis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Immunization , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/complications
5.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(SI-1): 3301-3311, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726157

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a major alteration in the medical literature including the sepsis discussion. From the outset of the pandemic, various reports have indicated that although there are some unique features pertinent to COVID-19, many of its acute manifestations are similar to sepsis caused by other pathogens. As a consequence, the old definitions now require consideration of this new etiologic agent, namely SARS-CoV-2. Although the pathogenesis of COVID-19 has not been fully explained, the data obtained so far in hospitalized patients has revealed that serum cytokine and chemokine levels are high in severe COVID-19 patients, similar to those found with sepsis. COVID-19 may involve multiple organ systems. In addition to the lungs, the virus has been isolated from blood, urine, faeces, liver, and gallbladder. Results from autopsy series in COVID-19 patients have demonstrated a wide range of findings, including vascular involvement, congestion, consolidation, and hemorrhage as well as diffuse alveolar damage in lung tissue consistent with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The presence of viral cytopathic-like changes, infiltration of inflammatory cells (mononuclear cells and macrophages), and viral particles in histopathological samples are considered a consequence of both direct viral infection and immune hyperactivation. Thromboembolism and hyper-coagulopathy are other components in the pathogenesis of severe COVID-19. Although the pathogenesis of hypercoagulability is not fully understood, it has been pointed out that all three components of Virchow's triad (endothelial injury, stasis, and hypercoagulable state) play a major role in contributing to clot formation in severe COVID-19 infection. In severe COVID-19 cases, laboratory parameters such as hematological findings, coagulation tests, liver function tests, D-dimer, ferritin, and acute phase reactants such as CRP show marked alterations, which are suggestive of a cytokine storm. Another key element of COVID-19 pathogenesis in severe cases is its similarity or association with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). SARS-CoV-2 induced cytokine storm has significant clinical and laboratory findings overlapping with HLH. Viral sepsis has some similarities but also some differences when compared to bacterial sepsis. In bacterial sepsis, systemic inflammation affecting multiple organs is more dominant than in COVID-19 sepsis. While bacterial sepsis causes an early and sudden onset clinical deterioration, viral diseases may exhibit a relatively late onset and chronic course. Consideration of severe COVID-19 disease as a sepsis syndrome has relevance and may assist in terms of determining treatments that will modulate the immune response, limit intrinsic damage to tissue and organs, and potentially improve outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Inflammation , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic , Sepsis/complications , Chemokines/blood , Cytokines/blood , Humans , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/immunology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/blood
6.
Anaesthesist ; 70(8): 662-670, 2021 Aug.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575534

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the context of sepsis and septic shock, coagulopathy often occurs due to the close relationship between coagulation and inflammation. Sepsis-induced coagulopathy (SIC) is the most severe and potentially fatal form. Anticoagulants used in prophylactic or therapeutic doses are discussed to potentially exert beneficial effects in patients with sepsis and/or SIC; however, due to the lack of evidence recent guidelines are limited to recommendations for drug prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism (VTE), while treatment of SIC has not been addressed. METHODS: In order to determine the status quo of VTE prophylaxis as well as treatment of SIC in German intensive care units (ICU), we conducted a Germany-wide online survey among heads of ICUs from October 2019 to May 2020. In April 2020, the survey was supplemented by an additional block of questions on VTE prophylaxis and SIC treatment in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. RESULTS: A total of 67 senior doctors took part in the survey. The majority (n = 50; 74.6%) of the responses were from ICU under the direction of an anesthesiologist and/or a department of anesthesiology. Most of the participants worked either at a university hospital (n = 31; 47.8%) or an academic teaching hospital (n = 27; 40.3%). The survey results show a pronounced heterogeneity in clinical practice with respect to the prophylaxis of VTE as well as SIC treatment. In an exemplary case of pneumogenic sepsis, low molecular weight heparins (LMWH) were by far the most frequently mentioned group of medications (n = 51; 76.1% of the responding ITS). In the majority of cases (n = 43; 64.2%), anti-FXa activity is not monitored with the use of LMWH in prophylaxis doses. Unfractionated heparin (UFH) was listed as a strategy for VTE prophylaxis in 37.3% of the responses (n = 25). In an exemplary case of abdominal sepsis 54.5% of the participants (n = 36; multiple answers possible) stated the use of UFH or LMWH and UFH with dosage controlled by PTT is used on two participating ICUs. The anti-FXa activity under prophylactic anticoagulation with LMWH is monitored in 7 participating clinics (10.6%) in abdominal sepsis. Systematic screening for sepsis-associated coagulation disorders does not take place in most hospitals and patterns in the use of anticoagulants show significant variability between ICUs. In the case of COVID-19 patients, it is particularly noticeable that in three quarters of the participating ICUs the practice of drug-based VTE prophylaxis and SIC treatment does not differ from that of non-COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: The heterogeneity of answers collected in the survey suggests that a systematic approach to this topic via clinical trials is urgently needed to underline individualized patient care with the necessary evidence.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants , Blood Coagulation Disorders , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Sepsis , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19 , Germany , Heparin/therapeutic use , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Sepsis/complications
7.
Microvasc Res ; 140: 104303, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1568955

ABSTRACT

Systemic inflammatory response, as observed in sepsis and severe COVID-19, may lead to endothelial damage. Therefore, we aim to compare the extent of endothelial injury and its relationship to inflammation in both diseases. We included patients diagnosed with sepsis (SEPSIS group, n = 21), mild COVID-19 (MILD group, n = 31), and severe COVID-19 (SEVERE group, n = 24). Clinical and routine laboratory data were obtained, circulating cytokines (INF-γ, TNF-α, and IL-10) and endothelial injury markers (E-Selectin, Tissue Factor (TF) and von Willebrand factor (vWF)) were measured. Compared to the SEPSIS group, patients with severe COVID-19 present similar clinical and laboratory data, except for lower circulating IL-10 and E-Selectin levels. Compared to the MILD group, patients in the SEVERE group showed higher levels of TNF-α, IL-10, and TF. There was no clear relationship between cytokines and endothelial injury markers among the three studied groups; however, in SEVERE COVID-19 patients, there is a positive relationship between INF-γ with TF and a negative relationship between IL-10 and vWF. In conclusion, COVID-19 and septic patients have a similar pattern of cytokines and endothelial dysfunction markers. These findings highlight the importance of endothelium dysfunction in COVID-19 and suggest that endothelium should be better evaluated as a therapeutic target for the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/blood , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers , Blood Cell Count , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , E-Selectin/blood , Female , Humans , Interferon-gamma/blood , Interleukin-10/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Sepsis/blood , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/physiopathology , Severity of Illness Index , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Thromboplastin/analysis , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/analysis , von Willebrand Factor/analysis
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(23)2021 Nov 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561718

ABSTRACT

S100A9, a pro-inflammatory alarmin, is up-regulated in inflamed tissues. However, the role of S100A9 in regulating neutrophil activation, inflammation and lung damage in sepsis is not known. Herein, we hypothesized that blocking S100A9 function may attenuate neutrophil recruitment in septic lung injury. Male C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with the S100A9 inhibitor ABR-238901 (10 mg/kg), prior to cercal ligation and puncture (CLP). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were harvested for analysis of neutrophil infiltration as well as edema and CXC chemokine production. Blood was collected for analysis of membrane-activated complex-1 (Mac-1) expression on neutrophils as well as CXC chemokines and IL-6 in plasma. Induction of CLP markedly increased plasma levels of S100A9. ABR-238901 decreased CLP-induced neutrophil infiltration and edema formation in the lung. In addition, inhibition of S100A9 decreased the CLP-induced up-regulation of Mac-1 on neutrophils. Administration of ABR-238901 also inhibited the CLP-induced increase of CXCL-1, CXCL-2 and IL-6 in plasma and lungs. Our results suggest that S100A9 promotes neutrophil activation and pulmonary accumulation in sepsis. Targeting S100A9 function decreased formation of CXC chemokines in circulation and lungs and attenuated sepsis-induced lung damage. These novel findings suggest that S100A9 plays an important pro-inflammatory role in sepsis and could be a useful target to protect against the excessive inflammation and lung damage associated with the disease.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/prevention & control , Calgranulin B/metabolism , Neutrophil Infiltration/drug effects , Sepsis/complications , Acute Lung Injury/etiology , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Animals , Chemokines, CXC/metabolism , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Male , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Sepsis/immunology , Sepsis/metabolism
9.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 31(2): 106238, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536936

ABSTRACT

COVID 19 infection continues to afflict people worldwide. Neurological complications of COVID infection are common. We report a case of fulminant reversible cerebrovascular constriction syndrome (RCVS) in a patient with breakthrough COVID 19 infection who was fully vaccinated. A 64 year old lady, fully vaccinated 2 months back, presented with headache, drowsiness, partial seizures, visual impairment and quadriplegia. Her nasopharyngeal swab was tested positive for SARS COV2 on real time PCR assay. MRI brain FLAIR images showed multifocal hyperintensities with MR angiogram showing arterial vasoconstriction suggestive of RCVS. Despite initiation of nimodipine, patient's symptoms worsened and she succumbed to sepsis. RCVS following COVID infection has been reported to have a benign outcome. However, despite vaccination, fulminant RCVS following a breakthrough COVID infection was observed in our patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Sepsis , Vasospasm, Intracranial/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cerebrovascular Disorders , Fatal Outcome , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/mortality , Vasoconstriction , Vasospasm, Intracranial/diagnostic imaging , Vasospasm, Intracranial/etiology
10.
Crit Care Med ; 49(7): 1149-1158, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494026

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Circulating nucleosomes and their component histones have been implicated as pathogenic in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. However, their role in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome is unknown. DESIGN: We performed a prospective cohort study in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome, with plasma collection within 24 hours of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. We associated nucleosome levels with severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome and with nonpulmonary organ failures and tested for association of nucleosomes with PICU mortality and ventilator-free days at 28 days in univariate and multivariable analyses. We also performed proteomics of DNA-bound plasma proteins in a matched case-control study of septic children with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome in order to identify specific histone proteins elevated in acute respiratory distress syndrome. SETTING: Large academic tertiary-care PICU. PATIENTS: Intubated children meeting Berlin criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We enrolled 333 children with acute respiratory distress syndrome, with 69 nonsurvivors (21%). Plasma nucleosomes were correlated with acute respiratory distress syndrome severity and with the number of nonpulmonary organ failures at acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. Nucleosomes were higher (p < 0.001) in nonsurvivors (0.40 [interquartile range, 0.20-0.71] arbitrary units) relative to survivors (0.10 [interquartile range, 0.04-0.25] arbitrary units). Nucleosomes were associated with PICU mortality in multivariable analysis (adjusted odds ratio 1.84 per 1 sd increase; 95% CI, 1.38-2.45; p < 0.001). Nucleosomes were also associated with a lower probability of being extubated alive by day 28 after multivariable adjustment (adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63-0.88; p = 0.001). Proteomic analysis demonstrated higher levels of the core nucleosome histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 in septic children with acute respiratory distress syndrome, relative to septic children without acute respiratory distress syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma nucleosomes are associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome severity, nonpulmonary organ failures, and worse outcomes in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome.


Subject(s)
Histones/blood , Nucleosomes/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Adolescent , Airway Extubation , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , DNA/blood , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Male , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Proteomics , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Sepsis/blood , Sepsis/complications , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480798

ABSTRACT

Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a severe condition characterized by the systemic formation of microthrombi complicated with bleeding tendency and organ dysfunction. In the last years, it represents one of the most frequent consequences of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The pathogenesis of DIC is complex, with cross-talk between the coagulant and inflammatory pathways. The objective of this study is to investigate the anti-inflammatory action of ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide (um-PEA) in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced DIC model in rats. Experimental DIC was induced by continual infusion of LPS (30 mg/kg) for 4 h through the tail vein. Um-PEA (30 mg/kg) was given orally 30 min before and 1 h after the start of intravenous infusion of LPS. Results showed that um-PEA reduced alteration of coagulation markers, as well as proinflammatory cytokine release in plasma and lung samples, induced by LPS infusion. Furthermore, um-PEA also has the effect of preventing the formation of fibrin deposition and lung damage. Moreover, um-PEA was able to reduce the number of mast cells (MCs) and the release of its serine proteases, which are also necessary for SARS-CoV-2 infection. These results suggest that um-PEA could be considered as a potential therapeutic approach in the management of DIC and in clinical implications associated to coagulopathy and lung dysfunction, such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Amides/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Ethanolamines/therapeutic use , Palmitic Acids/therapeutic use , Sepsis/complications , Amides/chemistry , Amides/pharmacology , Animals , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Ethanolamines/chemistry , Ethanolamines/pharmacology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Male , Mast Cells/cytology , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/metabolism , Palmitic Acids/chemistry , Palmitic Acids/pharmacology , Partial Thromboplastin Time , Prothrombin Time , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sepsis/pathology , Serine Proteases/metabolism
12.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(19)2021 Sep 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463705

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: Sepsis is one of the most common critical care illnesses with increasing survivorship. The quality of life in sepsis survivors is adversely affected by several co-morbidities, including increased incidence of dementia, stroke, cardiac disease and at least temporary deterioration in cognitive dysfunction. One of the potential explanations for their progression is the persistence of lipid profile abnormalities induced during acute sepsis into recovery, resulting in acceleration of atherosclerosis. (2) Methods: This is a targeted review of the abnormalities in the long-term lipid profile abnormalities after sepsis; (3) Results: There is a well-established body of evidence demonstrating acute alteration in lipid profile (HDL-c ↓↓, LDL-C -c ↓↓). In contrast, a limited number of studies demonstrated depression of HDL-c levels with a concomitant increase in LDL-C -c in the wake of sepsis. VLDL-C -c and Lp(a) remained unaltered in few studies as well. Apolipoprotein A1 was altered in survivors suggesting abnormalities in lipoprotein metabolism concomitant to overall lipoprotein abnormalities. However, most of the studies were limited to a four-month follow-up and patient groups were relatively small. Only one study looked at the atherosclerosis progression in sepsis survivors using clinical correlates, demonstrating an acceleration of plaque formation in the aorta, and a large metanalysis suggested an increase in the risk of stroke or acute coronary event between 3% to 9% in sepsis survivors. (4) Conclusions: The limited evidence suggests an emergence and persistence of the proatherogenic lipid profile in sepsis survivors that potentially contributes, along with other factors, to the clinical sequel of atherosclerosis.


Subject(s)
Atherosclerosis/metabolism , Cholesterol/metabolism , Lipoproteins/metabolism , Sepsis/metabolism , Apolipoproteins/metabolism , Atherosclerosis/complications , Cholesterol, HDL/metabolism , Cholesterol, LDL/metabolism , Disease Progression , Humans , Sepsis/complications , Triglycerides/metabolism
13.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(SI-1): 3301-3311, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444380

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a major alteration in the medical literature including the sepsis discussion. From the outset of the pandemic, various reports have indicated that although there are some unique features pertinent to COVID-19, many of its acute manifestations are similar to sepsis caused by other pathogens. As a consequence, the old definitions now require consideration of this new etiologic agent, namely SARS-CoV-2. Although the pathogenesis of COVID-19 has not been fully explained, the data obtained so far in hospitalized patients has revealed that serum cytokine and chemokine levels are high in severe COVID-19 patients, similar to those found with sepsis. COVID-19 may involve multiple organ systems. In addition to the lungs, the virus has been isolated from blood, urine, faeces, liver, and gallbladder. Results from autopsy series in COVID-19 patients have demonstrated a wide range of findings, including vascular involvement, congestion, consolidation, and hemorrhage as well as diffuse alveolar damage in lung tissue consistent with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The presence of viral cytopathic-like changes, infiltration of inflammatory cells (mononuclear cells and macrophages), and viral particles in histopathological samples are considered a consequence of both direct viral infection and immune hyperactivation. Thromboembolism and hyper-coagulopathy are other components in the pathogenesis of severe COVID-19. Although the pathogenesis of hypercoagulability is not fully understood, it has been pointed out that all three components of Virchow's triad (endothelial injury, stasis, and hypercoagulable state) play a major role in contributing to clot formation in severe COVID-19 infection. In severe COVID-19 cases, laboratory parameters such as hematological findings, coagulation tests, liver function tests, D-dimer, ferritin, and acute phase reactants such as CRP show marked alterations, which are suggestive of a cytokine storm. Another key element of COVID-19 pathogenesis in severe cases is its similarity or association with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). SARS-CoV-2 induced cytokine storm has significant clinical and laboratory findings overlapping with HLH. Viral sepsis has some similarities but also some differences when compared to bacterial sepsis. In bacterial sepsis, systemic inflammation affecting multiple organs is more dominant than in COVID-19 sepsis. While bacterial sepsis causes an early and sudden onset clinical deterioration, viral diseases may exhibit a relatively late onset and chronic course. Consideration of severe COVID-19 disease as a sepsis syndrome has relevance and may assist in terms of determining treatments that will modulate the immune response, limit intrinsic damage to tissue and organs, and potentially improve outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Inflammation , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic , Sepsis/complications , Chemokines/blood , Cytokines/blood , Humans , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/immunology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/blood
14.
Arch Med Res ; 52(8): 788-797, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1329672

ABSTRACT

The diagnostic criteria of overt disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) were established by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) in 2001. Since then, DIC has long been associated with adverse outcomes. However, recent advances in sepsis shed light on the role of coagulation disorders in the progression of sepsis. Currently, inflammation and coagulation are recognized as the two drivers that promote organ dysfunction in sepsis and septic shock. The ISTH has published new diagnostic criteria for improved management, namely sepsis-induced coagulopathy (SIC), in 2017. SIC is a pragmatic scoring system composed of platelet count, prothrombin time, and organ dysfunction score to detect the early-stage of sepsis-associated DIC. Since overt DIC represents an uncompensated coagulation disorder, a two-step approach using SIC and overt DIC criteria is a novel strategy to evaluate the severity and manage this challenging complication. Although there is no globally agreed on anticoagulant therapy for DIC, the Japanese Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines 2020 recommend using antithrombin and recombinant thrombomodulin for sepsis associated DIC. Since research in this area has been previously reported, an international collaborative study is necessary to develop future diagnostic tools and treatment strategies.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation , Sepsis , Shock, Septic , Thrombosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/diagnosis , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/therapy , Humans , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/diagnosis
15.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 236, 2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1298056

ABSTRACT

Infectious diseases may affect brain function and cause encephalopathy even when the pathogen does not directly infect the central nervous system, known as infectious disease-associated encephalopathy. The systemic inflammatory process may result in neuroinflammation, with glial cell activation and increased levels of cytokines, reduced neurotrophic factors, blood-brain barrier dysfunction, neurotransmitter metabolism imbalances, and neurotoxicity, and behavioral and cognitive impairments often occur in the late course. Even though infectious disease-associated encephalopathies may cause devastating neurologic and cognitive deficits, the concept of infectious disease-associated encephalopathies is still under-investigated; knowledge of the underlying mechanisms, which may be distinct from those of encephalopathies of non-infectious cause, is still limited. In this review, we focus on the pathophysiology of encephalopathies associated with peripheral (sepsis, malaria, influenza, and COVID-19), emerging therapeutic strategies, and the role of neuroinflammation.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/complications , Cytokines/immunology , Influenza, Human/complications , Malaria/complications , Sepsis/complications , Blood-Brain Barrier/immunology , Brain Diseases/prevention & control , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Influenza, Human/immunology , Malaria/immunology , Sepsis/immunology
16.
Anaesthesist ; 70(9): 795-808, 2021 09.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283771

ABSTRACT

Peripartum emergencies that require intensive medical care represent a major challenge for the interdisciplinary treatment team. Due to physiological changes in pregnant women symptoms can be masked and the initiation of treatment is delayed. Peripartum sepsis has a relatively high incidence. The anti-infective treatment depends on the spectrum of pathogens to be expected. Endocrinological emergencies are rare but can be fulminant and fatal. The development of ketoacidosis is favored by decreased bicarbonate buffer and placental hormones. In the case of thyrotoxicosis, propylthiouracil and thiamazole are available for treatment depending on the stage of gestation. Sheehan's syndrome is an infarction of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland during a hemorrhage. Due to the loss of production of vital hormones, this can be fatal. The development of pulmonary edema is just as acute. This is favored by physiological changes during pregnancy. The differentiation between hypertensive and hypotensive pulmonary edema is important for the causal treatment.


Subject(s)
Pulmonary Edema , Sepsis , Emergencies , Female , Humans , Peripartum Period , Placenta , Pregnancy , Pulmonary Edema/therapy , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/therapy
17.
Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl ; 32(1): 84-91, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278586

ABSTRACT

Patients with more severe cases of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) may be at greater risk for developing acute kidney injury (AKI). The aim of our study was to analyze incidence and outcomes of AKI in critically ill patients with COVID-19. Our study prospectively followed about 198 patients with COVID-19 admitted to intensive care unit (ICU), Al Adan Hospital, Kuwait, for developing AKI and outcomes. Age, gender, nationality, history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, bronchial asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were analyzed. The need for mechanical ventilation (MV), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, inotropes, and medications was recorded. Causes of AKI, indication of dialysis, dialysis modality, dialysis outcomes, and mortality were analyzed. Our study reported that61 out of 198 (30.8%) ICU patients positive for COVID-19, developed AKI according to the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes definition of AKI. Forty-eight out of 61 (79%) patients need continuous renal replacement therapy using continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration. Thirty-seven (61%) out of 61 patients were with severe sepsis syndrome. The most common cause of AKI was sepsis, cytokine storm, hypovolemia, heart failure, MV, and nephrotoxic drugs. Twenty-four patients (39%) out of 61 patients died, and the most common cause of death was sepsis, cytokine storm with respiratory failure, heart failure, and AKI. The outcome of AKI was as follows: six patients (10%) had complete recovery, five patients had partial recovery (8%), and 26 (43%) patients became dialysis dependent. Incidence of AKI is high in ICU COVID-19 patients and is associated with poor outcomes and high mortality. Early detection and specific therapy of kidney changes, including adequate hemodynamic support and avoidance of nephrotoxic drugs, may help to improve critically ill patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Care , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Incidence , Kuwait/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/complications , Survival Rate , Treatment Outcome
18.
Vasc Health Risk Manag ; 17: 273-298, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262578

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 sepsis is characterized by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as a consequence of pulmonary tropism of the virus and endothelial heterogeneity of the host. ARDS is a phenotype among patients with multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS) due to disseminated vascular microthrombotic disease (VMTD). In response to the viral septicemia, the host activates the complement system which produces terminal complement complex C5b-9 to neutralize pathogen. C5b-9 causes pore formation on the membrane of host endothelial cells (ECs) if CD59 is underexpressed. Also, viral S protein attraction to endothelial ACE2 receptor damages ECs. Both affect ECs and provoke endotheliopathy. Disseminated endotheliopathy activates two molecular pathways: inflammatory and microthrombotic. The former releases inflammatory cytokines from ECs, which lead to inflammation. The latter initiates endothelial exocytosis of unusually large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF) multimers and FVIII from Weibel-Palade bodies. If ADAMTS13 is insufficient, ULVWF multimers activate intravascular hemostasis of ULVWF path. In activated ULVWF path, ULVWF multimers anchored to damaged endothelial cells recruit circulating platelets and trigger microthrombogenesis. This process produces "microthrombi strings" composed of platelet-ULVWF complexes, leading to endotheliopathy-associated VMTD (EA-VMTD). In COVID-19, microthrombosis initially affects the lungs per tropism causing ARDS, but EA-VMTD may orchestrate more complex clinical phenotypes, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP)-like syndrome, hepatic coagulopathy, MODS and combined micro-macrothrombotic syndrome. In this pandemic, ARDS and pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) have often coexisted. The analysis based on two hemostatic theories supports ARDS caused by activated ULVWF path is EA-VMTD and PTE caused by activated ULVWF and TF paths is macrothrombosis. The thrombotic disorder of COVID-19 sepsis is consistent with the notion that ARDS is virus-induced disseminated EA-VMTD and PTE is in-hospital vascular injury-related macrothrombosis which is not directly  related to viral pathogenesis. The pathogenesis-based therapeutic approach is discussed for the treatment of EA-VMTD with antimicrothrombotic regimen and the potential need of anticoagulation therapy for coinciding macrothrombosis in comprehensive COVID-19 care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Hemostasis/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/complications , Thrombosis/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Pandemics , Phenotype , Sepsis/metabolism , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/metabolism
19.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(11)2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256567

ABSTRACT

High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) are a class of blood particles, principally involved in mediating reverse cholesterol transport from peripheral tissue to liver. Omics approaches have identified crucial mediators in the HDL proteomic and lipidomic profile, which are involved in distinct pleiotropic functions. Besides their role as cholesterol transporter, HDLs display anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-thrombotic, and anti-infection properties. Experimental and clinical studies have unveiled significant changes in both HDL serum amount and composition that lead to dysregulated host immune response and endothelial dysfunction in the course of sepsis. Most SARS-Coronavirus-2-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit showed common features of sepsis disease, such as the overwhelmed systemic inflammatory response and the alterations in serum lipid profile. Despite relevant advances, episodes of mild to moderate acute kidney injury (AKI), occurring during systemic inflammatory diseases, are associated with long-term complications, and high risk of mortality. The multi-faceted relationship of kidney dysfunction with dyslipidemia and inflammation encourages to deepen the clarification of the mechanisms connecting these elements. This review analyzes the multifaced roles of HDL in inflammatory diseases, the renal involvement in lipid metabolism, and the novel potential HDL-based therapies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Lipoproteins, HDL/metabolism , Sepsis/pathology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cholesterol/metabolism , Complement System Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Lipid Metabolism , Lipoproteins, HDL/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/metabolism , Virus Internalization
20.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 10793, 2021 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242045

ABSTRACT

Finding novel biomarkers for human pathologies and predicting clinical outcomes for patients is challenging. This stems from the heterogeneous response of individuals to disease and is reflected in the inter-individual variability of gene expression responses that obscures differential gene expression analysis. Here, we developed an alternative approach that could be applied to dissect the disease-associated molecular changes. We define gene ensemble noise as a measure that represents a variance for a collection of genes encoding for either members of known biological pathways or subunits of annotated protein complexes and calculated within an individual. The gene ensemble noise allows for the holistic identification and interpretation of gene expression disbalance on the level of gene networks and systems. By comparing gene expression data from COVID-19, H1N1, and sepsis patients we identified common disturbances in a number of pathways and protein complexes relevant to the sepsis pathology. Among others, these include the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I and peroxisomes. This suggests a Warburg effect and oxidative stress as common hallmarks of the immune host-pathogen response. Finally, we showed that gene ensemble noise could successfully be applied for the prediction of clinical outcome namely, the mortality of patients. Thus, we conclude that gene ensemble noise represents a promising approach for the investigation of molecular mechanisms of pathology through a prism of alterations in the coherent expression of gene circuits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Gene Expression , Influenza, Human/pathology , Sepsis/pathology , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Electron Transport Complex I/genetics , Electron Transport Complex I/metabolism , Gene Regulatory Networks/genetics , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/isolation & purification , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/virology , Oxidative Stress/genetics , Peroxisomes/genetics , Peroxisomes/metabolism , Proportional Hazards Models , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/mortality , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate , User-Computer Interface
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