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1.
Lancet ; 399(10334): 1459, 2022 04 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1882653
2.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 75(5): e20210586, 2022.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855075

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the critical alarms predictors of clinical deterioration/sepsis for clinical decision making in patients admitted to a reference hospital complex. METHODS: An observational retrospective cohort study. The Machine Learning (ML) tool, Robot Laura®, scores changes in vital parameters and lab tests, classifying them by severity. Inpatients and patients over 18 years of age were included. RESULTS: A total of 122,703 alarms were extracted from the platform, classified as 2 to 9. The pre-selection of critical alarms (6 to 9) indicated 263 urgent alerts (0.2%), from which, after filtering exclusion criteria, 254 alerts were delimited for 61 inpatients. Patient mortality from sepsis was 75%, of which 52% was due to sepsis related to the new coronavirus. After the alarms were answered, 82% of the patients remained in the sectors. CONCLUSIONS: Far beyond technology, ML models can speed up assertive clinical decisions by nurses, optimizing time and specialized human resources.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Sepsis , Adolescent , Adult , Clinical Decision-Making , Humans , Machine Learning , Retrospective Studies , Sepsis/diagnosis
4.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr ; 147(8): 485-491, 2022 04.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1805706

ABSTRACT

Hundreds of thousands of individuals who experience lasting sequelae after sepsis and infections in Germany do not receive optimal care. In this White Paper we present measures for improvement, which were developed by a multidisciplinary expect panel as part of the SEPFROK project. Improved care rests on four pillars: 1. cross-sectoral assessment of sequelae and a structured discharge and transition management, 2. interdisciplinary rehabilitation and aftercare with structural support, 3. strengthening the specific health literacy of patients and families, and 4. increased research into causes, prevention and treatment of sequelae. To achieve this, appropriate cross-sectoral care structures and legal frameworks must be created.


Subject(s)
Aftercare , Sepsis , Germany , Humans , Patient Discharge , Sepsis/diagnosis , Sepsis/therapy
5.
J Assoc Physicians India ; 70(4): 11-12, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1801779

ABSTRACT

The recent outbreak of COVID 19 is a great threat to public health. Because of limitation of resources, the number of patients that can be monitored and treated in Intensive Care Units is restricted. Hence identifying medical patients at risk of deterioration at the initial stage by means of simple protocols based on physiological parameters is crucial. The qSOFA score was introduced as a rapid bedside clinical score to identify patients with a suspected infection that are at greater risk for a poor outcome. The National Early Warning Score (NEWS) was developed to improve the detection of and response to clinical deterioration in patients with acute illness. There is paucity of literature regarding the use of these scores in patients with COVID 19 infection. This study aims at comparing the scoring systems qSOFA and NEWS in the setting of COVID-19 infection and its correlation with the final outcome of the illness. MATERIAL: It is a retrospective study in which patients presenting with COVID 19 infection(diagnosed by RT-PCR testing of nasopharyngeal and oral swab) between April 2021 to June 2021 were included. Scoring was done using both the scores at admission and the patients were followed up till the outcome. Outcome was defined as 5-day, 10-day and 15-day mortality after presentation. Predictive performance was expressed as discrimination (AUC). Subsequently, sensitivity and specificity were calculated. OBSERVATION: A total of 100 patients were included in the study, of whom 17 died within 5 days and 37 died within 10 days and 30 died within 15 days after presentation. q SOFA had the best performance, compared to NEWS (5 day auc : .668, .621, 10-day auc: .580, .569, 15-day auc: .625, .511) with q SOFA having sensitivity of 90.2% while that of news being 95.1% where as specificity of q SOFA is 40.7% and that of NEWS is 47.5%. CONCLUSION: qSOFA score is more accurate in predicting 5, 10 and 15-day mortality than NEWS score in COVID 19 patients. In resource limited settings, it is an inexpensive and simple tool for early identification of high risk COVID 19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Early Warning Score , Sepsis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Sepsis/diagnosis
6.
Clin Lab ; 68(5)2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798753

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a sudden rise in infectious diseases, with special concern to the most recent SARS-CoV 2 outbreak. A retrospective study was conducted to study the effect of this outbreak on neonatal sepsis as a global issue that poses a challenge for pediatric management and to identify its risk factors, microbial profile, and mortality rate at King Faisal Medical Complex, Taif, KSA, a COVID-19-tertiary care segregation hospital. METHODS: This research included 111 neonates with a culture-proven diagnosis of neonatal sepsis (4 and 62 cases during 2019 and 2020, respectively). RESULTS: During 2019 early onset sepsis (EOS) occurred in 6/49 (12.2%) while in 2020 22/62 (35.5%), and during 2019 late onset sepsis (LOS) occurred in 43/49 (87.7%) while in 2020 40/62 (64.5%). Premature rupture of membrane was the major neonatal risk factor for EOS during 2019 and 2020 with proportions of 4 (66.7%), 20 (90.9%); respectively. As regards LOS, the peripherally inserted central catheters and peripheral lines were the top neonatal risk factors. In the two-year outbreak, the most prevalent causative organism for EOS neonates was Escherichia coli and for LOS neonates it was Klebsiella. There was non-significant change in the mortality rate of neonatal sepsis between 2019 and 2020. However, the mortality rate was higher in EOS 9/22 (40.9%) in 2020 in comparison to 2/6 (33.3%) in 2019. CONCLUSIONS: Neonatal sepsis remains a major health problem causing serious morbidity and mortality, and health care policy makers have to implement EOS preventive measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neonatal Sepsis , Sepsis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Escherichia coli , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Neonatal Sepsis/diagnosis , Neonatal Sepsis/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Sepsis/diagnosis , Sepsis/epidemiology
7.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(4): e35058, 2022 04 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793153

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Improving interprofessional communication and collaboration is necessary to facilitate the early identification and treatment of patients with sepsis. Preparing undergraduate medical and nursing students for the knowledge and skills required to assess, escalate, and manage patients with sepsis is crucial for their entry into clinical practice. However, the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing measures have created the need for interactive distance learning to support collaborative learning. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of sepsis interprofessional education on medical and nursing students' sepsis knowledge, team communication skills, and skill use in clinical practice. METHODS: A mixed methods design using a 1-group pretest-posttest design and focus group discussions was used. This study involved 415 undergraduate medical and nursing students from a university in Singapore. After a baseline evaluation of the participants' sepsis knowledge and team communication skills, they underwent didactic e-learning followed by virtual telesimulation on early recognition and management of sepsis and team communication strategies. The participants' sepsis knowledge and team communication skills were evaluated immediately and 2 months after the telesimulation. In total, 4 focus group discussions were conducted using a purposive sample of 18 medical and nursing students to explore their transfer of learning to clinical practice. RESULTS: Compared with the baseline scores, both the medical and nursing students demonstrated a significant improvement in sepsis knowledge (P<.001) and team communication skills (P<.001) in immediate posttest scores. At the 2-month follow-up, the nursing students continued to have statistically significantly higher sepsis knowledge (P<.001) and communication scores (P<.001) than the pretest scores, whereas the medical students had no significant changes in test scores between the 2-month follow-up and pretest time points (P=.99). A total of three themes emerged from the qualitative findings: greater understanding of each other's roles, application of mental models in clinical practice, and theory-practice gaps. The sepsis interprofessional education-particularly the use of virtual telesimulation-fostered participants' understanding and appreciation of each other's interprofessional roles when caring for patients with sepsis. Despite noting some incongruities with the real-world clinical practice and not encountering many sepsis scenarios in clinical settings, participants shared the application of mental models using interprofessional communication strategies and the patient assessment framework in their daily clinical practice. CONCLUSIONS: Although the study did not show long-term knowledge retention, the use of virtual telesimulation played a critical role in facilitating the application of mental models for learning transfer and therefore could serve as a promising education modality for sepsis training. For a greater clinical effect, future studies could complement virtual telesimulation with a mannequin-based simulation and provide more evidence on the long-term retention of sepsis knowledge and clinical skills performance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sepsis , Students, Nursing , Humans , Interprofessional Education , Interprofessional Relations , Pandemics , Patient Care Team , Sepsis/diagnosis , Sepsis/therapy
8.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 205, 2022 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779611

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Early identification of sepsis is mandatory. However, clinical presentation is sometimes misleading given the lack of infection signs. The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact on the 28-day mortality of the so-called "vague" presentation of sepsis. DESIGN: Single centre retrospective observational study. SETTING: One teaching hospital Intensive Care Unit. SUBJECTS: All the patients who presented at the Emergency Department (ED) and were thereafter admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with a final diagnosis of sepsis were included in this retrospective observational three-year study. They were classified as having exhibited either "vague" or explicit presentation at the ED according to previously suggested criteria. Baseline characteristics, infection main features and sepsis management were compared. The impact of a vague presentation on 28-day mortality was then evaluated. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Among the 348 included patients, 103 (29.6%) had a vague sepsis presentation. Underlying chronic diseases were more likely in those patients [e.g., peripheral arterial occlusive disease: adjusted odd ratio (aOR) = 2.01, (1.08-3.77) 95% confidence interval (CI); p = 0.028], but organ failure was less likely at the ED [SOFA score value: 4.7 (3.2) vs. 5.2 (3.1), p = 0.09]. In contrast, 28-day mortality was higher in the vague presentation group (40.8% vs. 26.9%, p = 0.011), along with longer time-to-diagnosis [18 (31) vs. 4 (11) h, p < 0.001], time-to-antibiotics [20 (32) vs. 7 (12) h, p < 0.001] and time to ICU admission [71 (159) vs. 24 (69) h, p < 0.001]. Whatever, such a vague presentation independently predicted 28-day mortality [aOR = 2.14 (1.24-3.68) 95% CI; p = 0.006]. CONCLUSIONS: Almost one third of septic patient requiring ICU had a vague presentation at the ED. Despite an apparent lower level of severity when initially assessed, those patients had an increased risk of mortality that could not be fully explained by delayed diagnosis and management of sepsis.


Subject(s)
Intensive Care Units , Sepsis , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Sepsis/diagnosis
10.
J Hosp Infect ; 125: 44-47, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1773503

ABSTRACT

Transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) biopsy of the prostate is associated with increased risk of post-procedural sepsis with associated morbidity, mortality, re-admission to hospital, and increased healthcare costs. In the study institution, active surveillance of post-procedural infection complications is performed by clinical nurse specialists for prostate cancer under the guidance of the infection prevention and control team. To protect hospital services for acute medical admissions related to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, TRUS biopsy services were reduced nationally, with exceptions only for those patients at high risk of prostate cancer. In the study institution, this change prompted a complete move to transperineal (TP) prostate biopsy performed in outpatients under local anaesthetic. TP biopsies eliminated the risk of post-procedural sepsis and, consequently, sepsis-related admission while maintaining a service for prostate cancer diagnosis during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prostatic Neoplasms , Sepsis , Anesthetics, Local , Biopsy/adverse effects , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prostate/diagnostic imaging , Prostate/pathology , Prostatic Neoplasms/complications , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Sepsis/diagnosis , Sepsis/epidemiology , Sepsis/prevention & control , Ultrasonography, Interventional/adverse effects
11.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(3)2022 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765786

ABSTRACT

Sepsis is an emergent infectious disease and a leading cause of death despite immediate intervention. While Delta neutrophil index (DNI) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) are known as a prodiagnostic marker of sepsis, the preclinical evidence of the best marker of sepsis is unclear. For this, using a well-designed cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis mouse model, we comparatively measured the level and cost-effectiveness of sepsis biomarkers such as DNI, myeloperoxidase (MPO), procalcitonin (PCT), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). First, we found that the optimal time point for early detection is at 6 h, 24 h post-CLP. Strikingly, the peak level and fold change of DNI was revealed at 24 h, further showing the best fold change as compared with other biomarker levels. Given the fold change at 6, 24 h, PCT was next to DNI. Third, a cost-effectiveness survey showed that DNI was the best, with PCT next. Further, DNI level was moderate positively associated with PCT (ρ = 0.697, p = 0.012) and TNF-α (ρ = 0.599, p = 0.040). Collectively, these data indicate that DNI in CLP-induced sepsis mice is as effective as the existent inflammatory biomarkers such as MPO, PCT and TNF-α to predict the prognosis of sepsis. This might have clinically important implications that DNI is cost effective, thus quickly and rationally applying to diverse types of imminent sepsis regardless of species. This might be the first report on the validity of DNI in preclinical CLP-induced murine sepsis.


Subject(s)
Neutrophils , Sepsis , Animals , Biomarkers , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Mice , Punctures/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/diagnosis
12.
Trials ; 23(1): 170, 2022 Feb 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705006

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sepsis is a common cause for admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), and its incidence has been increasing. It is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory biomarkers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and cytokines such as interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Sepsis is also associated with pathophysiological changes that include fluid accumulation in the lungs, eventually leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), tissue edema, hypotension, and acute kidney injury (AKI). Conventional therapies include antibiotics, but these may have important adverse effects, so novel therapeutic approaches are required. In animal studies, L-carnitine improves antioxidant status, and in some clinical trials, it has been shown to reduce inflammation. It has also been shown to improve respiratory distress and help maintain coenzyme A homeostasis, metabolic flexibility, promoting the normal function of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and oxidation of fatty acids by peroxisomes. We aim to determine the effects of very high doses of L-carnitine on inflammatory factors, oxidative stress, and clinical outcomes of patients with sepsis in ICU. METHOD AND DESIGN: In this double-blind, randomized controlled clinical trial, we will use block randomization of 60 patients with sepsis, aged between 20 and 65 years from Al-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. The intervention group (n = 30) will receive three capsules of L-carnitine (each capsule contains 1000 mg L-carnitine; totally 3000 mg/day) for 7 days, and a control group (n = 30) will receive a placebo with the same dose and for the same duration in addition to usual care. At baseline, scores for clinical and nutritional status (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA), Quick SOFA (qSOFA), and NUTRIC Score) will be assessed. At beginning and end point of the study, inflammatory markers (CRP, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)), oxidative stress status (total oxidative stress (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC)), and clinical variables will be evaluated also. The mortality rate will be assessed within 28 days of the beginning of the intervention. DISCUSSION: Because of the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of L-carnitine, it is possible that using a high dose of 3000 mg daily of this nutritional supplement may reduce inflammation and oxidative stress and improve subsequent mortality of critically ill patients with sepsis. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials IRCT20201129049534N1 . Registered on 2 May 2021.


Subject(s)
Sepsis , Adult , Aged , Carnitine , Dietary Supplements , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Iran , Middle Aged , Oxidative Stress , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Sepsis/diagnosis , Sepsis/drug therapy , Young Adult
13.
Appl Clin Inform ; 13(1): 189-202, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671703

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sepsis is associated with high mortality, especially during the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Along with high monetary health care costs for sepsis treatment, there is a lasting impact on lives of sepsis survivors and their caregivers. Early identification is necessary to reduce the negative impact of sepsis and to improve patient outcomes. Prehospital data are among the earliest information collected by health care systems. Using these untapped sources of data in machine learning (ML)-based approaches can identify patients with sepsis earlier in emergency department (ED). OBJECTIVES: This integrative literature review aims to discuss the importance of utilizing prehospital data elements in ED, summarize their current use in developing ML-based prediction models, and specifically identify those data elements that can potentially contribute to early identification of sepsis in ED when used in ML-based approaches. METHOD: Literature search strategy includes following two separate searches: (1) use of prehospital data in ML models in ED; and (2) ML models that are developed specifically to predict/detect sepsis in ED. In total, 24 articles are used in this review. RESULTS: A summary of prehospital data used to identify time-sensitive conditions earlier in ED is provided. Literature related to use of ML models for early identification of sepsis in ED is limited and no studies were found related to ML models using prehospital data in prediction/early identification of sepsis in ED. Among those using ED data, ML models outperform traditional statistical models. In addition, the use of the free-text elements and natural language processing (NLP) methods could result in better prediction of sepsis in ED. CONCLUSION: This study reviews the use of prehospital data in early decision-making in ED and suggests that researchers utilize such data elements for prediction/early identification of sepsis in ML-based approaches.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sepsis , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Machine Learning , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/diagnosis
15.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 204, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643891

ABSTRACT

Sepsis is common and represents a major public health burden with significant associated morbidity and mortality. However, despite substantial advances in sepsis recognition and management in well-resourced health systems, there remains a distinct lack of research into sepsis in Africa. The lack of evidence affects all levels of healthcare delivery from individual patient management to strategic planning at health-system level. This is particular pertinent as African countries experience some of the highest global burden of sepsis. The 2017 World Health Assembly resolution on sepsis and the creation of the Africa Sepsis Alliance provided an opportunity for change. However, progress so far has been frustratingly slow. The recurrent Ebola virus disease outbreaks and the COVID-19 pandemic on the African continent further reinforce the need for urgent healthcare system strengthening. We recommend that African countries develop national action plans for sepsis which should address the needs of all critically ill patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sepsis , Africa/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/diagnosis , Sepsis/epidemiology , Sepsis/therapy
17.
J Hosp Infect ; 122: 84-95, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1620835

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sepsis is an important global healthcare problem that is a key challenge faced by healthcare professionals face worldwide. One key effort aimed at reducing the global burden of sepsis is educating healthcare professionals about early identification and management of sepsis. AIM: To provide a comprehensive evaluation of sepsis education among healthcare professionals and students. METHODS: Six databases (PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus) were searched. We included studies that described and evaluated any form of education or training on sepsis delivered to healthcare professionals and students. Study outcomes were summarized according to the adapted Kirkpatrick model of training evaluation. RESULTS: Thirty-two studies were included in the review. The learning contents were reported to be in accordance with the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines. Seven studies included the topic of interprofessional teamwork and communication in their sepsis education content. Most educational programmes were effective and reported positive effects on immediate knowledge outcomes. Interventions that were delivered through an active learning approach such as simulation and game-based learning generally produced greater gains than didactic teaching. Improvements in patient care processes and patient outcomes were associated with the concomitant existence or implementation of a hospital sepsis care bundle. CONCLUSION: Incorporating active learning strategies into sepsis education interventions has the potential to improve learners' long-term outcomes. In addition, sepsis education and a protocol-based sepsis care bundle act in synergy to augment greater improvements in care processes and patient benefits.


Subject(s)
Health Personnel , Sepsis , Clinical Competence , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel/education , Humans , Sepsis/diagnosis , Sepsis/therapy , Students
18.
BMJ Open Qual ; 11(1)2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613016

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Sepsis is a common cause of emergency department (ED) presentation and hospital admission, accounting for a disproportionate number of deaths each year relative to its incidence. Sepsis outcomes have improved with increased recognition and treatment standards promoted by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. Due to delay in recognition and other barriers, sepsis bundle compliance remains low nationally. We hypothesised that a targeted education intervention regarding use of an electronic health record (EHR) tool for identification and management of sepsis would lead to increased EHR tool utilisation and increased sepsis bundle compliance. METHODS: We created a multidisciplinary quality improvement team to provide training and feedback on EHR tool utilisation within our ED. A prospective evaluation of the rate of EHR tool utilisation was monitored from June through December 2020. Simultaneously, we conducted two retrospective cohort studies comparing overall sepsis bundle compliance for patients when EHR tool was used versus not used. The first cohort was all patients with intention-to-treat for any sepsis severity. The second cohort of patients included adult patients with time of recognition of sepsis in the ED admitted with a diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock. RESULTS: EHR tool utilisation increased from 23.3% baseline prior to intervention to 87.2% during the study. In the intention-to-treat cohort, there was a statistically significant difference in compliance between EHR tool utilisation versus no utilisation in overall bundle compliance (p<0.001) and for several individual components: initial lactate (p=0.009), repeat lactate (p=0.001), timely antibiotics (p=0.031), blood cultures before antibiotics (p=0.001), initial fluid bolus (p<0.001) and fluid reassessment (p<0.001). In the severe sepsis and septic shock cohort, EHR tool use increased from 71.2% pre-intervention to 85.0% post-intervention (p=0.008). CONCLUSION: With training, feedback and EHR optimisation, an EHR tool can be successfully integrated into current workflows and appears to increase sepsis bundle compliance.


Subject(s)
Sepsis , Shock, Septic , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Electronic Health Records , Emergency Service, Hospital , Guideline Adherence , Humans , Lactic Acid , Retrospective Studies , Sepsis/diagnosis , Sepsis/therapy , Shock, Septic/drug therapy
19.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 27, 2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603460

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) is a highly transmittable virus which causes the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Monocyte distribution width (MDW) is an in-vitro hematological parameter which describes the changes in monocyte size distribution and can indicate progression from localized infection to systemic infection. In this study we evaluated the correlation between the laboratory parameters and available clinical data in different quartiles of MDW to predict the progression and severity of COVID-19 infection. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of clinical data collected in the Emergency Department of Rashid Hospital Trauma Center-DHA from adult individuals tested for SARS-CoV-2 between January and June 2020. The patients (n = 2454) were assigned into quartiles based on their MDW value on admission. The four groups were analyzed to determine if MDW was an indicator to identify patients who are at increased risk for progression to sepsis. RESULTS: Our data showed a significant positive correlation between MDW and various laboratory parameters associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. The study also revealed that MDW ≥ 24.685 has a strong correlation with poor prognosis of COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Monitoring of monocytes provides a window into the systemic inflammation caused by infection and can aid in evaluating the progression and severity of COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sepsis , Adult , Biomarkers , Humans , Monocytes , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/diagnosis
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