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1.
Immunity ; 54(11): 2632-2649.e6, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549842

ABSTRACT

The incidence and severity of sepsis is higher among individuals of African versus European ancestry. We found that genetic risk variants (RVs) in the trypanolytic factor apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1), present only in individuals of African ancestry, were associated with increased sepsis incidence and severity. Serum APOL1 levels correlated with sepsis and COVID-19 severity, and single-cell sequencing in human kidneys revealed high expression of APOL1 in endothelial cells. Analysis of mice with endothelial-specific expression of RV APOL1 and in vitro studies demonstrated that RV APOL1 interfered with mitophagy, leading to cytosolic release of mitochondrial DNA and activation of the inflammasome (NLRP3) and the cytosolic nucleotide sensing pathways (STING). Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of NLRP3 and STING protected mice from RV APOL1-induced permeability defects and proinflammatory endothelial changes in sepsis. Our studies identify the inflammasome and STING pathways as potential targets to reduce APOL1-associated health disparities in sepsis and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Apolipoprotein L1/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Sepsis/genetics , Animals , Apolipoprotein L1/blood , COVID-19/pathology , DNA, Mitochondrial/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/pathology , Membrane Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Mitophagy/genetics , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/genetics , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Risk Factors , Sepsis/pathology , Severity of Illness Index , /statistics & numerical data
2.
Nat Med ; 27(6): 1012-1024, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472229

ABSTRACT

Age is the dominant risk factor for infectious diseases, but the mechanisms linking age to infectious disease risk are incompletely understood. Age-related mosaic chromosomal alterations (mCAs) detected from genotyping of blood-derived DNA, are structural somatic variants indicative of clonal hematopoiesis, and are associated with aberrant leukocyte cell counts, hematological malignancy, and mortality. Here, we show that mCAs predispose to diverse types of infections. We analyzed mCAs from 768,762 individuals without hematological cancer at the time of DNA acquisition across five biobanks. Expanded autosomal mCAs were associated with diverse incident infections (hazard ratio (HR) 1.25; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.15-1.36; P = 1.8 × 10-7), including sepsis (HR 2.68; 95% CI = 2.25-3.19; P = 3.1 × 10-28), pneumonia (HR 1.76; 95% CI = 1.53-2.03; P = 2.3 × 10-15), digestive system infections (HR 1.51; 95% CI = 1.32-1.73; P = 2.2 × 10-9) and genitourinary infections (HR 1.25; 95% CI = 1.11-1.41; P = 3.7 × 10-4). A genome-wide association study of expanded mCAs identified 63 loci, which were enriched at transcriptional regulatory sites for immune cells. These results suggest that mCAs are a marker of impaired immunity and confer increased predisposition to infections.


Subject(s)
Aging/genetics , Communicable Diseases/genetics , Pneumonia/genetics , Sepsis/genetics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging/pathology , Biological Specimen Banks , Chromosome Aberrations , Communicable Diseases/complications , Communicable Diseases/microbiology , Digestive System Diseases/epidemiology , Digestive System Diseases/genetics , Digestive System Diseases/microbiology , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genome-Wide Association Study , Genotype , Hematologic Neoplasms/complications , Hematologic Neoplasms/genetics , Hematologic Neoplasms/microbiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mosaicism , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/microbiology , Risk Factors , Sepsis/epidemiology , Sepsis/microbiology , Urogenital Abnormalities/epidemiology , Urogenital Abnormalities/genetics , Urogenital Abnormalities/microbiology , Young Adult
3.
Front Immunol ; 12: 744799, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448731

ABSTRACT

Sepsis is a global health emergency, which is caused by various sources of infection that lead to changes in gene expression, protein-coding, and metabolism. Advancements in "omics" technologies have provided valuable tools to unravel the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. In this study, we performed shotgun mass spectrometry in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from septic patients (N=24) and healthy controls (N=9) and combined these results with two public microarray leukocytes datasets. Through combination of transcriptome and proteome profiling, we identified 170 co-differentially expressed genes/proteins. Among these, 122 genes/proteins displayed the same expression trend. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed pathways related to lymphocyte functions with decreased status, and defense processes that were predicted to be strongly increased. Protein-protein interaction network analyses revealed two densely connected regions, which mainly included down-regulated genes/proteins that were related to the transcription of RNA, translation of proteins, and mitochondrial translation. Additionally, we identified one module comprising of up-regulated genes/proteins, which were mainly related to low-density neutrophils (LDNs). LDNs were reported in sepsis and in COVID-19. Changes in gene expression level were validated using quantitative real-time PCR in PBMCs from patients with sepsis. To further support that the source of the upregulated module of genes/proteins found in our results were derived from LDNs, we identified an increase of this population by flow cytometry in PBMC samples obtained from the same cohort of septic patients included in the proteomic analysis. This study provides new insights into a reprioritization of biological functions in response to sepsis that involved a transcriptional and translational shutdown of genes/proteins, with exception of a set of genes/proteins related to LDNs and host-defense system.


Subject(s)
Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Neutrophils/metabolism , Sepsis/metabolism , Databases, Factual , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/cytology , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/cytology , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/metabolism , Neutrophils/cytology , Protein Interaction Maps , Proteomics , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/immunology
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 683879, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369666

ABSTRACT

Diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria in animals (e.g., bacterial pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis) and plants (e.g., bacterial wilt, angular spot and canker) lead to high prevalence and mortality, and decomposition of plant leaves, respectively. Melatonin, an endogenous molecule, is highly pleiotropic, and accumulating evidence supports the notion that melatonin's actions in bacterial infection deserve particular attention. Here, we summarize the antibacterial effects of melatonin in vitro, in animals as well as plants, and discuss the potential mechanisms. Melatonin exerts antibacterial activities not only on classic gram-negative and -positive bacteria, but also on members of other bacterial groups, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Protective actions against bacterial infections can occur at different levels. Direct actions of melatonin may occur only at very high concentrations, which is at the borderline of practical applicability. However, various indirect functions comprise activation of hosts' defense mechanisms or, in sepsis, attenuation of bacterially induced inflammation. In plants, its antibacterial functions involve the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway; in animals, protection by melatonin against bacterially induced damage is associated with inhibition or activation of various signaling pathways, including key regulators such as NF-κB, STAT-1, Nrf2, NLRP3 inflammasome, MAPK and TLR-2/4. Moreover, melatonin can reduce formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS), promote detoxification and protect mitochondrial damage. Altogether, we propose that melatonin could be an effective approach against various pathogenic bacterial infections.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Inflammasomes/metabolism , Melatonin/pharmacology , Sepsis/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Animals , Humans , Inflammasomes/drug effects , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/drug effects , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , NF-kappa B/drug effects , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Plant Leaves , Reactive Oxygen Species , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/immunology
5.
Exp Mol Med ; 53(7): 1116-1123, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307318

ABSTRACT

Interleukin-6 (IL-6) plays a crucial role in host defense against infection and tissue injuries and is a bioindicator of multiple distinct types of cytokine storms. In this review, we present the current understanding of the diverse roles of IL-6, its receptors, and its signaling during acute severe systemic inflammation. IL-6 directly affects vascular endothelial cells, which produce several types of cytokines and chemokines and activate the coagulation cascade. Endothelial cell dysregulation, characterized by abnormal coagulation and vascular leakage, is a common complication in cytokine storms. Emerging evidence indicates that a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab, can effectively block IL-6 signaling and has beneficial effects in rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile systemic idiopathic arthritis, and Castleman's disease. Recent work has also demonstrated the beneficial effect of tocilizumab in chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy-induced cytokine storms as well as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Here, we highlight the distinct contributions of IL-6 signaling to the pathogenesis of several types of cytokine storms and discuss potential therapeutic strategies for the management of cytokine storms, including those associated with sepsis and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Interleukin-6/genetics , Receptors, Interleukin-6/genetics , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/immunology , Humans , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/immunology , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Interleukin-6/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/immunology , Sepsis/pathology , Sepsis/prevention & control
6.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 202, 2021 06 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266500

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The mechanisms driving acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill COVID-19 patients are unclear. We collected kidney biopsies from COVID-19 AKI patients within 30 min after death in order to examine the histopathology and perform mRNA expression analysis of genes associated with renal injury. METHODS: This study involved histopathology and mRNA analyses of postmortem kidney biopsies collected from patients with COVID-19 (n = 6) and bacterial sepsis (n = 27). Normal control renal tissue was obtained from patients undergoing total nephrectomy (n = 12). The mean length of ICU admission-to-biopsy was 30 days for COVID-19 and 3-4 days for bacterial sepsis patients. RESULTS: We did not detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA in kidney biopsies from COVID-19-AKI patients yet lung tissue from the same patients was PCR positive. Extensive acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and peritubular thrombi were distinct histopathology features of COVID-19-AKI compared to bacterial sepsis-AKI. ACE2 mRNA levels in both COVID-19 (fold change 0.42, p = 0.0002) and bacterial sepsis patients (fold change 0.24, p < 0.0001) were low compared to control. The mRNA levels of injury markers NGAL and KIM-1 were unaltered compared to control tissue but increased in sepsis-AKI patients. Markers for inflammation and endothelial activation were unaltered in COVID-19 suggesting a lack of renal inflammation. Renal mRNA levels of endothelial integrity markers CD31, PV-1 and VE-Cadherin did not differ from control individuals yet were increased in bacterial sepsis patients (CD31 fold change 2.3, p = 0.0006, PV-1 fold change 1.5, p = 0.008). Angiopoietin-1 mRNA levels were downregulated in renal tissue from both COVID-19 (fold change 0.27, p < 0.0001) and bacterial sepsis patients (fold change 0.67, p < 0.0001) compared to controls. Moreover, low Tie2 mRNA expression (fold change 0.33, p = 0.037) and a disturbed VEGFR2/VEGFR3 ratio (fold change 0.09, p < 0.0001) suggest decreased microvascular flow in COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: In a small cohort of postmortem kidney biopsies from COVID-19 patients, we observed distinct histopathological and gene expression profiles between COVID-19-AKI and bacterial sepsis-AKI. COVID-19 was associated with more severe ATN and microvascular thrombosis coupled with decreased microvascular flow, yet minimal inflammation. Further studies are required to determine whether these observations are a result of true pathophysiological differences or related to the timing of biopsy after disease onset.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Gene Expression/genetics , Kidney/pathology , Kidney/physiopathology , Sepsis/pathology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Analysis of Variance , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/physiopathology , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/physiopathology , Simplified Acute Physiology Score
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 10793, 2021 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242045

ABSTRACT

Finding novel biomarkers for human pathologies and predicting clinical outcomes for patients is challenging. This stems from the heterogeneous response of individuals to disease and is reflected in the inter-individual variability of gene expression responses that obscures differential gene expression analysis. Here, we developed an alternative approach that could be applied to dissect the disease-associated molecular changes. We define gene ensemble noise as a measure that represents a variance for a collection of genes encoding for either members of known biological pathways or subunits of annotated protein complexes and calculated within an individual. The gene ensemble noise allows for the holistic identification and interpretation of gene expression disbalance on the level of gene networks and systems. By comparing gene expression data from COVID-19, H1N1, and sepsis patients we identified common disturbances in a number of pathways and protein complexes relevant to the sepsis pathology. Among others, these include the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I and peroxisomes. This suggests a Warburg effect and oxidative stress as common hallmarks of the immune host-pathogen response. Finally, we showed that gene ensemble noise could successfully be applied for the prediction of clinical outcome namely, the mortality of patients. Thus, we conclude that gene ensemble noise represents a promising approach for the investigation of molecular mechanisms of pathology through a prism of alterations in the coherent expression of gene circuits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Gene Expression , Influenza, Human/pathology , Sepsis/pathology , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Electron Transport Complex I/genetics , Electron Transport Complex I/metabolism , Gene Regulatory Networks/genetics , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/isolation & purification , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/virology , Oxidative Stress/genetics , Peroxisomes/genetics , Peroxisomes/metabolism , Proportional Hazards Models , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/mortality , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate , User-Computer Interface
8.
Respir Res ; 22(1): 99, 2021 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169963

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pneumonia has been associated with severe acute hypoxia, sepsis-like states, thrombosis and chronic sequelae including persisting hypoxia and fibrosis. The molecular hypoxia response pathway has been associated with such pathologies and our recent observations on anti-hypoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of whole aqueous extract of Adhatoda Vasica (AV) prompted us to explore its effects on relevant preclinical mouse models. METHODS: In this study, we tested the effect of whole aqueous extract of AV, in murine models of bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis, Cecum Ligation and Puncture (CLP) induced sepsis, and siRNA induced hypoxia-thrombosis phenotype. The effect on lung of AV treated naïve mice was also studied at transcriptome level. We also determined if the extract may have any effect on SARS-CoV2 replication. RESULTS: Oral administration AV extract attenuates increased airway inflammation, levels of transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGF-ß1), IL-6, HIF-1α and improves the overall survival rates of mice in the models of pulmonary fibrosis and sepsis and rescues the siRNA induced inflammation and associated blood coagulation phenotypes in mice. We observed downregulation of hypoxia, inflammation, TGF-ß1, and angiogenesis genes and upregulation of adaptive immunity-related genes in the lung transcriptome. AV treatment also reduced the viral load in Vero cells infected with SARS-CoV2. CONCLUSION: Our results provide a scientific rationale for this ayurvedic herbal medicine in ameliorating the hypoxia-hyperinflammation features and highlights the repurposing potential of AV in COVID-19-like conditions.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Justicia , Lung/drug effects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Pneumonia/prevention & control , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Sepsis/drug therapy , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/isolation & purification , Bleomycin , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cecum/microbiology , Cecum/surgery , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Hypoxia/genetics , Hypoxia/metabolism , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/genetics , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases/genetics , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Justicia/chemistry , Ligation , Lung/metabolism , Lung/microbiology , Lung/pathology , Male , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification , Pneumonia/genetics , Pneumonia/metabolism , Pneumonia/microbiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/chemically induced , Pulmonary Fibrosis/genetics , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , RNA Interference , RNA, Small Interfering/genetics , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/metabolism , Sepsis/microbiology , Transcriptome
10.
Genomics ; 113(3): 1219-1233, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118728

ABSTRACT

Sepsis is a leading cause of mortality in intensive care unit worldwide, it's accompanied by immune cell dysfunction induced by multiple factors. However, little is known about the specific alterations in immune cells in the dynamic pathogenesis of sepsis secondary to bacterial pneumonia. Here, we used single cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) to profile peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a healthy control and two patients with sepsis secondary to bacterial pneumonia, including acute, stable and recovery stage. We analyzed the quantity and function of immune cells. During disease course, interferon gamma response was upregulated; T/NK cell subtypes presented activation and exhaustion properties, which might be driven by monocytes through IL-1ß signaling pathways; The proportion of plasma cells was increased, which might be driven by NK cells through IFN signaling pathways; Additionally, interferon gamma response was upregulated to a greater degree in sepsis secondary to pneumonia induced by SARS-COV-2 compared with that induced by influenza virus and bacteria.


Subject(s)
Pneumonia, Bacterial , Sepsis , Sequence Analysis, RNA/methods , Single-Cell Analysis/methods , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Cells, Cultured , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/immunology , Leukocytes/immunology , Leukocytes/metabolism , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , Pneumonia, Bacterial/complications , Pneumonia, Bacterial/genetics , Pneumonia, Bacterial/immunology , RNA-Seq , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/immunology , Sepsis/microbiology , Sepsis/virology
11.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 50, 2021 02 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068599

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although the immune function of neutrophils in sepsis has been well described, the heterogeneity of neutrophils remains unclear during the process of sepsis. METHODS: In this study, we used a mouse CLP model to simulate the clinical scenario of patients with sepsis, neutrophil infiltration, abnormal distribution and dysfunction was analyzed. LPS was used to stimulate neutrophils in vitro to simulate sepsis; single-cell gene sequencing technology was used to explore the immunological typing. To explore the immunological function of immunosuppressive neutrophils, PD-L1 knockout neutrophils were cocultured with lymphocytes from wild-type mice. RESULTS: We found that neutrophils presented variant dysfunction at the late stage of sepsis, including inhibition of apoptosis, seriously damaged chemotaxis and extensive infiltration into the tissues. Single-cell RNA sequencing revealed that multiple subclusters of neutrophils were differentiated after LPS stimulation. The two-dimensional spatial distribution analysis showed that Foxp3+ T cells were much closer to Ly-6G than the CD4+ and CD8+ cells, indicating that infiltrated neutrophils may play immunomodulatory effect on surrounding T-regs. Further observations showed that LPS mediates PD-L1 over expression through p38α-MSK1/-MK2 pathway in neutrophils. The subsets of highly expressed PD-L1 exert immunosuppressive effect under direct contact mode, including inhibition of T cell activation and induction of T cell apoptosis and trans-differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our data identify a previously unknown immunosuppressive subset of neutrophils as inhibitory neutrophil in order to more accurately describe the phenotype and characteristics of these cells in sepsis.


Subject(s)
Genetic Heterogeneity , Neutrophils/classification , Sepsis/blood , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Leukocyte Count/methods , Leukocyte Count/statistics & numerical data , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Neutrophils/physiology , Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Sepsis/genetics
12.
J Cell Mol Med ; 24(20): 12054-12064, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-755303

ABSTRACT

Cell-free microRNAs (miRNAs) are transferred in disease state including inflammatory lung diseases and are often packed into extracellular vesicles (EVs). To assess their suitability as biomarkers for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and severe secondary complications such as sepsis, we studied patients with CAP (n = 30), sepsis (n = 65) and healthy volunteers (n = 47) subdivided into a training (n = 67) and a validation (n = 75) cohort. After precipitating crude EVs from sera, associated small RNA was profiled by next-generation sequencing (NGS) and evaluated in multivariate analyses. A subset of the thereby identified biomarker candidates was validated both technically and additionally by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Differential gene expression (DGE) analysis revealed 29 differentially expressed miRNAs in CAP patients when compared to volunteers, and 25 miRNAs in patients with CAP, compared to those with sepsis. Sparse partial-least discriminant analysis separated groups based on 12 miRNAs. Three miRNAs proved as a significant biomarker signature. While expression levels of miR-1246 showed significant changes with an increase in overall disease severity from volunteers to CAP and to sepsis, miR-193a-5p and miR-542-3p differentiated patients with an infectious disease (CAP or sepsis) from volunteers. Cell-free miRNAs are potentially novel biomarkers for CAP and may help to identify patients at risk for progress to sepsis, facilitating early intervention and treatment.


Subject(s)
Circulating MicroRNA/blood , Community-Acquired Infections/diagnosis , Community-Acquired Infections/genetics , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Pneumonia/genetics , Sepsis/blood , Sepsis/complications , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Circulating MicroRNA/genetics , Community-Acquired Infections/blood , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/genetics , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/complications , Reproducibility of Results , Reverse Transcription/genetics , Sepsis/genetics
14.
Crit Care Med ; 49(2): e170-e178, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-930107

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Complex critical syndromes like sepsis and coronavirus disease 2019 may be composed of underling "endotypes," which may respond differently to treatment. The aim of this study was to test whether a previously defined bacterial sepsis endotypes classifier recapitulates the same clinical and immunological endotypes in coronavirus disease 2019. DESIGN: Prospective single-center observational cohort study. SETTING: Patients were enrolled in Athens, Greece, and blood was shipped to Inflammatix (Burlingame, CA) for analysis. PATIENTS: Adult patients within 24 hours of hospital admission with coronavirus disease 2019 confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and chest radiography. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We studied 97 patients with coronavirus disease 2019, of which 50 went on to severe respiratory failure (SRF) and 16 died. We applied a previously defined 33-messenger RNA classifier to assign endotype (Inflammopathic, Adaptive, or Coagulopathic) to each patient. We tested endotype status against other clinical parameters including laboratory values, severity scores, and outcomes. Patients were assigned as Inflammopathic (29%), Adaptive (44%), or Coagulopathic (27%), similar to our prior study in bacterial sepsis. Adaptive patients had lower rates of SRF and no deaths. Coagulopathic and Inflammopathic endotypes had 42% and 18% mortality rates, respectively. The Coagulopathic group showed highest d-dimers, and the Inflammopathic group showed highest C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels. CONCLUSIONS: Our predefined 33-messenger RNA endotypes classifier recapitulated immune phenotypes in viral sepsis (coronavirus disease 2019) despite its prior training and validation only in bacterial sepsis. Further work should focus on continued validation of the endotypes and their interaction with immunomodulatory therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sepsis/classification , Sepsis/genetics , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Insufficiency , Severity of Illness Index
15.
Platelets ; 32(3): 314-324, 2021 Apr 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-748271

ABSTRACT

Platelets are increasingly being recognized for playing roles beyond thrombosis and hemostasis. Today we know that they mediate inflammation by direct interactions with innate immune cells or secretion of cytokines/chemokines. Here we review their interactions with neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages in infection and sepsis, stroke, myocardial infarction and venous thromboembolism. We discuss new roles for platelet surface receptors like GPVI or GPIb and also look at platelet contributions to the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) as well as to deep vein thrombosis during infection, e.g. in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Myocardial Infarction/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , Sepsis/immunology , Stroke/immunology , Venous Thromboembolism/immunology , Blood Platelets/pathology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Communication/genetics , Cell Communication/immunology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Extracellular Traps/genetics , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Inflammation , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/pathology , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/pathology , Myocardial Infarction/genetics , Myocardial Infarction/pathology , Neutrophils/pathology , Platelet Glycoprotein GPIb-IX Complex/genetics , Platelet Glycoprotein GPIb-IX Complex/immunology , Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins/genetics , Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins/immunology , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/pathology , Stroke/genetics , Stroke/pathology , Venous Thromboembolism/genetics , Venous Thromboembolism/pathology
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