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1.
Cell ; 185(5): 916-938.e58, 2022 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1654147

ABSTRACT

Treatment of severe COVID-19 is currently limited by clinical heterogeneity and incomplete description of specific immune biomarkers. We present here a comprehensive multi-omic blood atlas for patients with varying COVID-19 severity in an integrated comparison with influenza and sepsis patients versus healthy volunteers. We identify immune signatures and correlates of host response. Hallmarks of disease severity involved cells, their inflammatory mediators and networks, including progenitor cells and specific myeloid and lymphocyte subsets, features of the immune repertoire, acute phase response, metabolism, and coagulation. Persisting immune activation involving AP-1/p38MAPK was a specific feature of COVID-19. The plasma proteome enabled sub-phenotyping into patient clusters, predictive of severity and outcome. Systems-based integrative analyses including tensor and matrix decomposition of all modalities revealed feature groupings linked with severity and specificity compared to influenza and sepsis. Our approach and blood atlas will support future drug development, clinical trial design, and personalized medicine approaches for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Proteome/analysis , Adult , Blood Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/pathology , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Machine Learning , Male , Middle Aged , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 14/genetics , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 14/metabolism , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , Principal Component Analysis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sepsis/blood , Sepsis/pathology , Severity of Illness Index , Transcription Factor AP-1/genetics , Transcription Factor AP-1/metabolism
2.
Biochem Pharmacol ; 197: 114909, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616378

ABSTRACT

Vascular endothelial cells are major participants in and regulators of immune responses and inflammation. Vascular endotheliitis is regarded as a host immune-inflammatory response of the endothelium forming the inner surface of blood vessels in association with a direct consequence of infectious pathogen invasion. Vascular endotheliitis and consequent endothelial dysfunction can be a principle determinant of microvascular failure, which would favor impaired perfusion, tissue hypoxia, and subsequent organ failure. Emerging evidence suggests the role of vascular endotheliitis in the pathogenesis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and its related complications. Thus, once initiated, vascular endotheliitis and resultant cytokine storm cause systemic hyperinflammation and a thrombotic phenomenon in COVID-19, leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome and widespread organ damage. Vascular endotheliitis also appears to be a contributory factor to vasculopathy and coagulopathy in sepsis that is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a dysregulated response of the host to infection. Therefore, protecting endothelial cells and reversing vascular endotheliitis may be a leading therapeutic goal for these diseases associated with vascular endotheliitis. In this review, we outline the etiological and pathogenic importance of vascular endotheliitis in infection-related inflammatory diseases, including COVID-19, and possible mechanisms leading to vascular endotheliitis. We also discuss pharmacological agents which may be now considered as potential endotheliitis-based treatment modalities for those diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Vascular Diseases/pathology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Endothelial Cells/immunology , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/immunology , Glucocorticoids/pharmacology , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sepsis/drug therapy , Sepsis/etiology , Sepsis/immunology , Sepsis/pathology , Vascular Diseases/drug therapy , Vascular Diseases/etiology , Vascular Diseases/immunology
3.
J Mol Biol ; 434(4): 167409, 2022 Feb 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587212

ABSTRACT

The discovery of pyroptosis and its subsequent implications in infection and immunity has uncovered a new angle of host-defence against pathogen assault. At its most simple, gasdermin-mediated pyroptosis in bacterial infection would be expected to remove pathogens from the relative safety of the cytosol or pathogen containing vacuole/phagosome whilst inducing a rapid and effective immune response. Differences in gasdermin-mediated pyroptosis between cell types, stimulation conditions, pathogen and even animal species, however, make things more complex. The excessive inflammation associated with the pathogen-induced gasdermin-mediated pyroptosis contributes to a downward spiral in sepsis. With no currently approved effective treatment options for sepsis understanding how gasdermin-mediated pyroptotic pathways are regulated provides an opportunity to identify novel therapeutic candidates against this complex disease. In this review we cover recent advances in the field of gasdermin-mediated pyroptosis with a focus on bacterial infection and sepsis models in the context of humans and other animal species. Importantly we also consider why there is considerable redundancy set into these ancient immune pathways.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections , Phosphate-Binding Proteins , Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins , Pyroptosis , Sepsis , Animals , Bacterial Infections/metabolism , Bacterial Infections/pathology , Humans , Inflammasomes , Phosphate-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins/metabolism , Sepsis/metabolism , Sepsis/pathology
4.
Microvasc Res ; 140: 104303, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1568955

ABSTRACT

Systemic inflammatory response, as observed in sepsis and severe COVID-19, may lead to endothelial damage. Therefore, we aim to compare the extent of endothelial injury and its relationship to inflammation in both diseases. We included patients diagnosed with sepsis (SEPSIS group, n = 21), mild COVID-19 (MILD group, n = 31), and severe COVID-19 (SEVERE group, n = 24). Clinical and routine laboratory data were obtained, circulating cytokines (INF-γ, TNF-α, and IL-10) and endothelial injury markers (E-Selectin, Tissue Factor (TF) and von Willebrand factor (vWF)) were measured. Compared to the SEPSIS group, patients with severe COVID-19 present similar clinical and laboratory data, except for lower circulating IL-10 and E-Selectin levels. Compared to the MILD group, patients in the SEVERE group showed higher levels of TNF-α, IL-10, and TF. There was no clear relationship between cytokines and endothelial injury markers among the three studied groups; however, in SEVERE COVID-19 patients, there is a positive relationship between INF-γ with TF and a negative relationship between IL-10 and vWF. In conclusion, COVID-19 and septic patients have a similar pattern of cytokines and endothelial dysfunction markers. These findings highlight the importance of endothelium dysfunction in COVID-19 and suggest that endothelium should be better evaluated as a therapeutic target for the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/blood , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers , Blood Cell Count , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , E-Selectin/blood , Female , Humans , Interferon-gamma/blood , Interleukin-10/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Sepsis/blood , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/physiopathology , Severity of Illness Index , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Thromboplastin/analysis , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/analysis , von Willebrand Factor/analysis
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(23)2021 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559206

ABSTRACT

Cytokine storm is a phenomenon characterized by strong elevated circulating cytokines that most often occur after an overreactive immune system is activated by an acute systemic infection. A variety of cells participate in cytokine storm induction and progression, with profiles of cytokines released during cytokine storm varying from disease to disease. This review focuses on pathophysiological mechanisms underlying cytokine storm induction and progression induced by pathogenic invasive infectious diseases. Strategies for targeted treatment of various types of infection-induced cytokine storms are described from both host and pathogen perspectives. In summary, current studies indicate that cytokine storm-targeted therapies can effectively alleviate tissue damage while promoting the clearance of invading pathogens. Based on this premise, "multi-omics" immune system profiling should facilitate the development of more effective therapeutic strategies to alleviate cytokine storms caused by various diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokines/blood , Sepsis/pathology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Bacteria/immunology , Bacterial Infections/pathology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Macrophages/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sepsis/microbiology
7.
Immunity ; 54(11): 2632-2649.e6, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549842

ABSTRACT

The incidence and severity of sepsis is higher among individuals of African versus European ancestry. We found that genetic risk variants (RVs) in the trypanolytic factor apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1), present only in individuals of African ancestry, were associated with increased sepsis incidence and severity. Serum APOL1 levels correlated with sepsis and COVID-19 severity, and single-cell sequencing in human kidneys revealed high expression of APOL1 in endothelial cells. Analysis of mice with endothelial-specific expression of RV APOL1 and in vitro studies demonstrated that RV APOL1 interfered with mitophagy, leading to cytosolic release of mitochondrial DNA and activation of the inflammasome (NLRP3) and the cytosolic nucleotide sensing pathways (STING). Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of NLRP3 and STING protected mice from RV APOL1-induced permeability defects and proinflammatory endothelial changes in sepsis. Our studies identify the inflammasome and STING pathways as potential targets to reduce APOL1-associated health disparities in sepsis and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Apolipoprotein L1/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Sepsis/genetics , Animals , Apolipoprotein L1/blood , COVID-19/pathology , DNA, Mitochondrial/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/pathology , Membrane Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Mitophagy/genetics , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/genetics , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Risk Factors , Sepsis/pathology , Severity of Illness Index , /statistics & numerical data
8.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 96(10): 2561-2575, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1521396

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) acute kidney injury (AKI) to sepsis-AKI (S-AKI). The morphology and transcriptomic and proteomic characteristics of autopsy kidneys were analyzed. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Individuals 18 years of age and older who died from COVID-19 and had an autopsy performed at Mayo Clinic between April 2020 to October 2020 were included. Morphological evaluation of the kidneys of 17 individuals with COVID-19 was performed. In a subset of seven COVID-19 cases with postmortem interval of less than or equal to 20 hours, ultrastructural and molecular characteristics (targeted transcriptome and proteomics analyses of tubulointerstitium) were evaluated. Molecular characteristics were compared with archived cases of S-AKI and nonsepsis causes of AKI. RESULTS: The spectrum of COVID-19 renal pathology included macrophage-dominant microvascular inflammation (glomerulitis and peritubular capillaritis), vascular dysfunction (peritubular capillary congestion and endothelial injury), and tubular injury with ultrastructural evidence of mitochondrial damage. Investigation of the spatial architecture using a novel imaging mass cytometry revealed enrichment of CD3+CD4+ T cells in close proximity to antigen-presenting cells, and macrophage-enriched glomerular and interstitial infiltrates, suggesting an innate and adaptive immune tissue response. Coronavirus disease 2019 AKI and S-AKI, as compared to nonseptic AKI, had an enrichment of transcriptional pathways involved in inflammation (apoptosis, autophagy, major histocompatibility complex class I and II, and type 1 T helper cell differentiation). Proteomic pathway analysis showed that COVID-19 AKI and to a lesser extent S-AKI were enriched in necroptosis and sirtuin-signaling pathways, both involved in regulatory response to inflammation. Upregulation of the ceramide-signaling pathway and downregulation of oxidative phosphorylation in COVID-19 AKI were noted. CONCLUSION: This data highlights the similarities between S-AKI and COVID-19 AKI and suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a pivotal role in COVID-19 AKI. This data may allow the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Kidney/pathology , Sepsis/pathology , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Adult , Autopsy , Humans , Kidney Tubules, Proximal/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Sepsis/virology
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480798

ABSTRACT

Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a severe condition characterized by the systemic formation of microthrombi complicated with bleeding tendency and organ dysfunction. In the last years, it represents one of the most frequent consequences of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The pathogenesis of DIC is complex, with cross-talk between the coagulant and inflammatory pathways. The objective of this study is to investigate the anti-inflammatory action of ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide (um-PEA) in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced DIC model in rats. Experimental DIC was induced by continual infusion of LPS (30 mg/kg) for 4 h through the tail vein. Um-PEA (30 mg/kg) was given orally 30 min before and 1 h after the start of intravenous infusion of LPS. Results showed that um-PEA reduced alteration of coagulation markers, as well as proinflammatory cytokine release in plasma and lung samples, induced by LPS infusion. Furthermore, um-PEA also has the effect of preventing the formation of fibrin deposition and lung damage. Moreover, um-PEA was able to reduce the number of mast cells (MCs) and the release of its serine proteases, which are also necessary for SARS-CoV-2 infection. These results suggest that um-PEA could be considered as a potential therapeutic approach in the management of DIC and in clinical implications associated to coagulopathy and lung dysfunction, such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Amides/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Ethanolamines/therapeutic use , Palmitic Acids/therapeutic use , Sepsis/complications , Amides/chemistry , Amides/pharmacology , Animals , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Ethanolamines/chemistry , Ethanolamines/pharmacology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Male , Mast Cells/cytology , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/metabolism , Palmitic Acids/chemistry , Palmitic Acids/pharmacology , Partial Thromboplastin Time , Prothrombin Time , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sepsis/pathology , Serine Proteases/metabolism
10.
Blood ; 138(25): 2702-2713, 2021 12 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365304

ABSTRACT

Multiple organ dysfunction is the most severe outcome of sepsis progression and is highly correlated with a worse prognosis. Excessive neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are critical players in the development of organ failure during sepsis. Therefore, interventions targeting NET release would likely effectively prevent NET-based organ injury associated with this disease. Herein, we demonstrate that the pore-forming protein gasdermin D (GSDMD) is active in neutrophils from septic humans and mice and plays a crucial role in NET release. Inhibition of GSDMD with disulfiram or genic deletion abrogated NET formation, reducing multiple organ dysfunction and sepsis lethality. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that during sepsis, activation of the caspase-11/GSDMD pathway controls NET release by neutrophils during sepsis. In summary, our findings uncover a novel therapeutic use for disulfiram and suggest that GSDMD is a therapeutic target to improve sepsis treatment.


Subject(s)
Extracellular Traps/genetics , Gene Deletion , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics , Multiple Organ Failure/genetics , Phosphate-Binding Proteins/genetics , Sepsis/genetics , Acetaldehyde Dehydrogenase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Adoptive Transfer , Aged , Animals , Cells, Cultured , Disulfiram/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Male , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/pathology , Multiple Organ Failure/therapy , Phosphate-Binding Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Sepsis/pathology , Sepsis/therapy
11.
Cytokine ; 148: 155628, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347569

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes a potentially life-threatening disease, defined as Coronavirus Disease 19 (COVID-19). The most common signs and symptoms of this pathological condition include cough, fever, shortness of breath, and sudden onset of anosmia, ageusia, or dysgeusia. The course of COVID-19 is mild or moderate in more than 80% of cases, but it is severe or critical in about 14% and 5% of infected subjects respectively, with a significant risk of mortality. SARS-CoV-2 related infection is characterized by some pathogenetic events, resembling those detectable in other pathological conditions, such as sepsis and severe acute pancreatitis. All these syndromes are characterized by some similar features, including the coexistence of an exuberant inflammatory- as well as an anti-inflammatory-response with immune depression. Based on current knowledge concerning the onset and the development of acute pancreatitis and sepsis, we have considered these syndromes as a very interesting paradigm for improving our understanding of pathogenetic events detectable in patients with COVID-19. The aim of our review is: 1)to examine the pathogenetic mechanisms acting during the emergence of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory processes in human pathology; 2)to examine inflammatory and anti-inflammatory events in sepsis, acute pancreatitis, and SARS-CoV-2 infection and clinical manifestations detectable in patients suffering from these syndromes also according to the age and gender of these individuals; as well as to analyze the possible common and different features among these pathological conditions; 3)to obtain insights into our knowledge concerning COVID-19 pathogenesis. This approach may improve the management of patients suffering from this disease and it may suggest more effective diagnostic approaches and schedules of therapy, depending on the different phases and/or on the severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Aging/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Pancreatitis/pathology , Sepsis/pathology , Sex Characteristics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Exp Mol Med ; 53(7): 1116-1123, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307318

ABSTRACT

Interleukin-6 (IL-6) plays a crucial role in host defense against infection and tissue injuries and is a bioindicator of multiple distinct types of cytokine storms. In this review, we present the current understanding of the diverse roles of IL-6, its receptors, and its signaling during acute severe systemic inflammation. IL-6 directly affects vascular endothelial cells, which produce several types of cytokines and chemokines and activate the coagulation cascade. Endothelial cell dysregulation, characterized by abnormal coagulation and vascular leakage, is a common complication in cytokine storms. Emerging evidence indicates that a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab, can effectively block IL-6 signaling and has beneficial effects in rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile systemic idiopathic arthritis, and Castleman's disease. Recent work has also demonstrated the beneficial effect of tocilizumab in chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy-induced cytokine storms as well as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Here, we highlight the distinct contributions of IL-6 signaling to the pathogenesis of several types of cytokine storms and discuss potential therapeutic strategies for the management of cytokine storms, including those associated with sepsis and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Interleukin-6/genetics , Receptors, Interleukin-6/genetics , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/immunology , Humans , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/immunology , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Interleukin-6/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/immunology , Sepsis/pathology , Sepsis/prevention & control
13.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 141: 111823, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272313

ABSTRACT

Here, we demonstrate that the two distinct formulations of our anti-sepsis drug candidate Rejuveinix (RJX), have a very favorable safety profile in Wistar Albino rats at dose levels comparable to the projected clinical dose levels. 14-day treatment with RJX-P (RJX PPP.18.1051) or RJX-B (RJX-B200702-CLN) similarly elevated the day 15 tissue levels of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) as well as ascorbic acid in both the lungs and liver in a dose-dependent fashion. The activity of SOD and ascorbic acid levels were significantly higher in tissues of RJX-P or RJX-B treated rats than vehicle-treated control rats (p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference between tissue SOD activity or ascorbic acid levels of rats treated with RJX-P vs. rats treated with RJX-B (p > 0.05). The observed elevations of the SOD and ascorbic acid levels were transient and were no longer detectable on day 28 following a 14-day recovery period. These results demonstrate that RJX-P and RJX-B are bioequivalent relative to their pharmacodynamic effects on tissue SOD and ascorbic acid levels. Furthermore, both formulations showed profound protective activity in a mouse model of sepsis. In agreement with the PD evaluations in rats and their proposed mechanism of action, both RJX-P and RJX-B exhibited near-identical potent and dose-dependent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity in the LPS-GalN model of ARDS and multi-organ failure in mice.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/chemistry , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , Magnesium Sulfate/chemistry , Magnesium Sulfate/therapeutic use , Niacinamide/chemistry , Niacinamide/therapeutic use , Pantothenic Acid/chemistry , Pantothenic Acid/therapeutic use , Pyridoxine/chemistry , Pyridoxine/therapeutic use , Riboflavin/chemistry , Riboflavin/therapeutic use , Sepsis/drug therapy , Sepsis/metabolism , Thiamine/chemistry , Thiamine/therapeutic use , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antioxidants/chemistry , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , Dogs , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Combinations , Drug Compounding , Female , Humans , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Magnesium Sulfate/pharmacology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Niacinamide/pharmacology , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Oxidative Stress/physiology , Pantothenic Acid/pharmacology , Pyridoxine/pharmacology , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Rats, Wistar , Riboflavin/pharmacology , Sepsis/pathology , Superoxide Dismutase/metabolism , Thiamine/pharmacology
14.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 202, 2021 06 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266500

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The mechanisms driving acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill COVID-19 patients are unclear. We collected kidney biopsies from COVID-19 AKI patients within 30 min after death in order to examine the histopathology and perform mRNA expression analysis of genes associated with renal injury. METHODS: This study involved histopathology and mRNA analyses of postmortem kidney biopsies collected from patients with COVID-19 (n = 6) and bacterial sepsis (n = 27). Normal control renal tissue was obtained from patients undergoing total nephrectomy (n = 12). The mean length of ICU admission-to-biopsy was 30 days for COVID-19 and 3-4 days for bacterial sepsis patients. RESULTS: We did not detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA in kidney biopsies from COVID-19-AKI patients yet lung tissue from the same patients was PCR positive. Extensive acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and peritubular thrombi were distinct histopathology features of COVID-19-AKI compared to bacterial sepsis-AKI. ACE2 mRNA levels in both COVID-19 (fold change 0.42, p = 0.0002) and bacterial sepsis patients (fold change 0.24, p < 0.0001) were low compared to control. The mRNA levels of injury markers NGAL and KIM-1 were unaltered compared to control tissue but increased in sepsis-AKI patients. Markers for inflammation and endothelial activation were unaltered in COVID-19 suggesting a lack of renal inflammation. Renal mRNA levels of endothelial integrity markers CD31, PV-1 and VE-Cadherin did not differ from control individuals yet were increased in bacterial sepsis patients (CD31 fold change 2.3, p = 0.0006, PV-1 fold change 1.5, p = 0.008). Angiopoietin-1 mRNA levels were downregulated in renal tissue from both COVID-19 (fold change 0.27, p < 0.0001) and bacterial sepsis patients (fold change 0.67, p < 0.0001) compared to controls. Moreover, low Tie2 mRNA expression (fold change 0.33, p = 0.037) and a disturbed VEGFR2/VEGFR3 ratio (fold change 0.09, p < 0.0001) suggest decreased microvascular flow in COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: In a small cohort of postmortem kidney biopsies from COVID-19 patients, we observed distinct histopathological and gene expression profiles between COVID-19-AKI and bacterial sepsis-AKI. COVID-19 was associated with more severe ATN and microvascular thrombosis coupled with decreased microvascular flow, yet minimal inflammation. Further studies are required to determine whether these observations are a result of true pathophysiological differences or related to the timing of biopsy after disease onset.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Gene Expression/genetics , Kidney/pathology , Kidney/physiopathology , Sepsis/pathology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Analysis of Variance , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/physiopathology , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/physiopathology , Simplified Acute Physiology Score
15.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(11)2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256567

ABSTRACT

High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) are a class of blood particles, principally involved in mediating reverse cholesterol transport from peripheral tissue to liver. Omics approaches have identified crucial mediators in the HDL proteomic and lipidomic profile, which are involved in distinct pleiotropic functions. Besides their role as cholesterol transporter, HDLs display anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-thrombotic, and anti-infection properties. Experimental and clinical studies have unveiled significant changes in both HDL serum amount and composition that lead to dysregulated host immune response and endothelial dysfunction in the course of sepsis. Most SARS-Coronavirus-2-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit showed common features of sepsis disease, such as the overwhelmed systemic inflammatory response and the alterations in serum lipid profile. Despite relevant advances, episodes of mild to moderate acute kidney injury (AKI), occurring during systemic inflammatory diseases, are associated with long-term complications, and high risk of mortality. The multi-faceted relationship of kidney dysfunction with dyslipidemia and inflammation encourages to deepen the clarification of the mechanisms connecting these elements. This review analyzes the multifaced roles of HDL in inflammatory diseases, the renal involvement in lipid metabolism, and the novel potential HDL-based therapies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Lipoproteins, HDL/metabolism , Sepsis/pathology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cholesterol/metabolism , Complement System Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Lipid Metabolism , Lipoproteins, HDL/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/metabolism , Virus Internalization
16.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 10793, 2021 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242045

ABSTRACT

Finding novel biomarkers for human pathologies and predicting clinical outcomes for patients is challenging. This stems from the heterogeneous response of individuals to disease and is reflected in the inter-individual variability of gene expression responses that obscures differential gene expression analysis. Here, we developed an alternative approach that could be applied to dissect the disease-associated molecular changes. We define gene ensemble noise as a measure that represents a variance for a collection of genes encoding for either members of known biological pathways or subunits of annotated protein complexes and calculated within an individual. The gene ensemble noise allows for the holistic identification and interpretation of gene expression disbalance on the level of gene networks and systems. By comparing gene expression data from COVID-19, H1N1, and sepsis patients we identified common disturbances in a number of pathways and protein complexes relevant to the sepsis pathology. Among others, these include the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I and peroxisomes. This suggests a Warburg effect and oxidative stress as common hallmarks of the immune host-pathogen response. Finally, we showed that gene ensemble noise could successfully be applied for the prediction of clinical outcome namely, the mortality of patients. Thus, we conclude that gene ensemble noise represents a promising approach for the investigation of molecular mechanisms of pathology through a prism of alterations in the coherent expression of gene circuits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Gene Expression , Influenza, Human/pathology , Sepsis/pathology , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Electron Transport Complex I/genetics , Electron Transport Complex I/metabolism , Gene Regulatory Networks/genetics , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/isolation & purification , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/virology , Oxidative Stress/genetics , Peroxisomes/genetics , Peroxisomes/metabolism , Proportional Hazards Models , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/mortality , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate , User-Computer Interface
17.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(10)2021 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1116057

ABSTRACT

Blood pH is tightly maintained between 7.35 and 7.45, and acidosis (pH <7.3) indicates poor prognosis in sepsis, wherein lactic acid from anoxic tissues overwhelms the buffering capacity of blood. Poor sepsis prognosis is also associated with low zinc levels and the release of High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) from activated and/or necrotic cells. HMGB1 added to whole blood at physiological pH did not bind leukocyte receptors, but lowering pH with lactic acid to mimic sepsis conditions allowed binding, implying the presence of natural inhibitor(s) preventing binding at normal pH. Testing micromolar concentrations of divalent cations showed that zinc supported the robust binding of sialylated glycoproteins with HMGB1. Further characterizing HMGB1 as a sialic acid-binding lectin, we found that optimal binding takes place at normal blood pH and is markedly reduced when pH is adjusted with lactic acid to levels found in sepsis. Glycan array studies confirmed the binding of HMGB1 to sialylated glycan sequences typically found on plasma glycoproteins, with binding again being dependent on zinc and normal blood pH. Thus, HMGB1-mediated hyperactivation of innate immunity in sepsis requires acidosis, and micromolar zinc concentrations are protective. We suggest that the potent inflammatory effects of HMGB1 are kept in check via sequestration by plasma sialoglycoproteins at physiological pH and triggered when pH and zinc levels fall in late stages of sepsis. Current clinical trials independently studying zinc supplementation, HMGB1 inhibition, or pH normalization may be more successful if these approaches are combined and perhaps supplemented by infusions of heavily sialylated molecules.


Subject(s)
Acidosis/blood , HMGB1 Protein/blood , Sepsis/blood , Sialoglycoproteins/blood , Zinc/blood , Acidosis/immunology , Acidosis/metabolism , Acidosis/pathology , Carrier Proteins , HMGB1 Protein/pharmacology , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Immunity, Innate , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Polysaccharides/chemistry , Sepsis/immunology , Sepsis/pathology , Sialic Acids/chemistry , Sialoglycoproteins/chemistry , Zinc/metabolism
19.
Biofactors ; 47(1): 6-18, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-950385

ABSTRACT

Specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs) are endogenous lipid metabolites of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids that are involved in promoting the resolution of inflammation. Many disease conditions characterized by excessive inflammation have impaired or altered SPM biosynthesis, which may lead to chronic, unresolved inflammation. Exogenous administration of SPMs in infectious conditions has been shown to be effective at improving infection clearance and survival in preclinical models. SPMs have also shown tremendous promise in the context of inflammatory lung conditions, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mostly in preclinical settings. To date, SPMs have not been studied in the context of the novel Coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), however their preclinical efficacy in combatting infections and improving acute respiratory distress suggest they may be a valuable resource in the fight against Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19). Overall, while the research on SPMs is still evolving, they may offer a novel therapeutic option for inflammatory conditions.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Docosahexaenoic Acids/therapeutic use , Lipoxins/therapeutic use , Lung Injury/drug therapy , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Herpes Simplex/drug therapy , Herpes Simplex/metabolism , Herpes Simplex/pathology , Humans , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/metabolism , Influenza, Human/pathology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung Injury/metabolism , Lung Injury/pathology , Lung Injury/virology , Periodontitis/drug therapy , Periodontitis/metabolism , Periodontitis/pathology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/pathology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sepsis/drug therapy , Sepsis/metabolism , Sepsis/pathology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/drug therapy , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/metabolism , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/pathology
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