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1.
Eur J Med Res ; 27(1): 26, 2022 Feb 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704356

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of polymorphisms and mutations in angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and Type 2 transmembrane serine proteases (TMPRSS2) genes on susceptibility to corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and patient prognosis. INTRODUCTION: From December 2019 to the current time, an outbreak of epidemic of COVID-19, characterized by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has occurred around the world. It is now clear that SARS-CoV-2 binds to human ACE2 receptors, with expression of these receptors correlated with the rate of SARS-CoV-2 infection and mortality. Polymorphisms in individual patient factors, such as ACE2 and TMPRSS2 genes have been linked with an increase in negative outcomes, although evidence to affirm remains debatable. METHODS: Here, we performed a systematic review, based on guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) criteria, with the aim of assessing whether polymorphisms in ACE2 and TMPRSS2 genes affect the COVID-19 condition. We extensively searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science databases, for relevant articles and reports published in English between December 2019 and December 2021. RESULTS: A total of 495 full-text articles were downloaded, of which 185 were excluded after preliminary examination as they were duplicates. Finally, 310 articles were evaluated, by reading their titles and abstracts, and 208 of them eliminated based on our selection criteria. Finally, 33 articles met our inclusion criteria and were included in the final assessment. Genetic data from 33,923 patients with COVID-19 drawn from the general population and deriving from over 160 regions and 50 countries, as well as approximately 560,000 samples from global-public genetic databases, were included in our analysis. Ultimately, we identified 10 SNPs and 21 mutations in the ACE2 gene, along with 13 SNPs and 12 variants in the TMPRSS2 gene, which may be associated with COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: ACE2 and TMPRSS2 play vital roles in the onset, development, and prognosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and have both been strongly associated with vulnerability, intensity, and the clinical result of COVID-19. Overall, these genetic factors may have potential for future development of personalized drugs and vaccines against COVID-19. TRIAL REGISTRATION: CRD42021239400 in PROSPERO 2021.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Mutation , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , COVID-19/etiology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Jan 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667192

ABSTRACT

This review article was designed to evaluate the existing evidence related to the molecular processes of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the oral cavity. The World Health Organization stated that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and transmission is produced by respiratory droplets and aerosols from the oral cavity of infected patients. The oral cavity structures, keratinized and non-keratinized mucosa, and salivary glands' epithelia express SARS-CoV-2 entry and transmission factors, especially angiotensin converting enzyme Type 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2). Replication of the virus in cells leads to local and systemic infection spread, and cellular damage is associated with clinical signs and symptoms of the disease in the oral cavity. Saliva, both the cellular and acellular fractions, holds the virus particles and contributes to COVID-19 transmission. The review also presents information about the factors modifying SARS-CoV-2 infection potential and possible local pharmacotherapeutic interventions, which may confine SARS-CoV-2 virus entry and transmission in the oral cavity. The PubMed and Scopus databases were used to search for suitable keywords such as: SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, oral virus infection, saliva, crevicular fluid, salivary gland, tongue, oral mucosa, periodontium, gingiva, dental pulp, ACE2, TMPRSS2, Furin, diagnosis, topical treatment, vaccine and related words in relevant publications up to 28 December 2021. Data extraction and quality evaluation of the articles were performed by two reviewers, and 63 articles were included in the final review.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Mouth , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Mouth/metabolism , Mouth/pathology , Mouth/virology , Mouth Mucosa/metabolism , Mouth Mucosa/pathology , Mouth Mucosa/virology , Pathology, Oral , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Signal Transduction/genetics , Virus Internalization
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Jan 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650980

ABSTRACT

TMPRSS2 is a type II transmembrane protease with broad expression in epithelial cells of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, the prostate, and other organs. Although the physiological role of TMPRSS2 remains largely elusive, several endogenous substrates have been identified. TMPRSS2 serves as a major cofactor in SARS-CoV-2 entry, and primes glycoproteins of other respiratory viruses as well. Consequently, inhibiting TMPRSS2 activity is a promising strategy to block viral infection. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of TMPRSS2 in the entry processes of different respiratory viruses. We then review the different classes of TMPRSS2 inhibitors and their clinical development, with a focus on COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Molecular Targeted Therapy/trends , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , COVID-19/genetics , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Proteinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Serine Proteinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Virus Internalization/drug effects
4.
Hipertens Riesgo Vasc ; 37(4): 169-175, 2020.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322115

ABSTRACT

The first case of COVID-19 was reported on 31 December 2019 in Wuhan, China. Ever since there has been unprecedented and growing interest in learning about all aspects of this new disease. Debate has been generated as to the association between antihypertensive therapy with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors and SARS-CoV-2 infection. While many questions as yet remain unanswered, the aim of this report is to inform health professionals about the current state of knowledge. Because this is an ever-evolving topic, the recommendation is that it be updated as new evidence becomes available. Below, we provide a review of pre-clinical and clinical studies that link coronavirus to the RAAS.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , ADAM17 Protein/physiology , Angiotensin II/physiology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antihypertensive Agents/adverse effects , Antihypertensive Agents/pharmacology , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/physiopathology , Lung/physiopathology , Models, Biological , Pandemics/prevention & control , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/drug effects , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/physiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Receptors, Virus/drug effects , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Viral Vaccines , Virus Internalization/drug effects
5.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(12): 15770-15784, 2021 06 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282781

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and is highly contagious and pathogenic. TMPRSS2 and Neuropilin-1, the key components that facilitate SARS-CoV-2 infection, are potential targets for treatment of COVID-19. Here we performed a comprehensive analysis on NRP1 and TMPRSS2 in lung to provide information for treating comorbidity of COVID-19 with lung cancer. NRP1 is widely expressed across all the human tissues while TMPRSS2 is expressed in a restricted pattern. High level of NRP1 associates with worse prognosis in multiple cancers, while high level of TMPRSS2 is associated with better survival of Lung Adenocarcinoma (LUAD). Moreover, NRP1 positively correlates with the oncogenic Cancer Associated Fibroblast (CAF), macrophage and endothelial cells infiltration, negatively correlates with infiltration of CD8+ T cell, the tumor killer cell in Lung Squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC). TMPRSS2 shows negative correlation with the oncogenic events in LUAD. RNA-seq data show that NRP1 level is slightly decreased in peripheral blood of ICU admitted COVID-19 patients, unaltered in lung, while TMPRSS2 level is significantly decreased in lung of COVID-19 patients. Our analysis suggests NRP1 as a potential therapeutic target, while sets an alert on targeting TMPRSS2 for treating comorbidity of COVID-19 and lung cancers.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma of Lung/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Lung Neoplasms/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Adenocarcinoma of Lung/mortality , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts/metabolism , Computer Simulation , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/mortality , Macrophages/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/genetics , RNA-Seq , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics
6.
Cells ; 10(6)2021 06 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270010

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a global pandemic, is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is the receptor for SARS-CoV-2 and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) facilitates ACE2-mediated virus entry. Moreover, the expression of ACE2 in the testes of infertile men is higher than normal, which indicates that infertile men may be susceptible to be infected and SARS-CoV-2 may cause reproductive disorder through the pathway induced by ACE2 and TMPRSS2. Little is known about the pathway regulation of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression in male reproductive disorder. Since the regulation of gene expression is mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) at the post-transcriptional level, the aim of this study was to analyze the dysregulated miRNA-lncRNA interactions of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in male reproductive disorder. Using bioinformatics analysis, we speculate that the predicted miRNAs including miR-125a-5p, miR-125b-5p, miR-574-5p, and miR-936 as regulators of ACE2 and miR-204-5p as a modulator of TMPRSS2 are associated with male infertility. The lncRNAs with a tissue-specific expression for testis including GRM7-AS3, ARHGAP26-AS1, BSN-AS1, KRBOX1-AS1, CACNA1C-IT3, AC012361.1, FGF14-IT1, AC012494.1, and GS1-24F4.2 were predicted. The identified miRNAs and lncRNAs are proposed as potential biomarkers to study the possible association between COVID-19 and male infertility. This study encourages further studies of miRNA-lncRNA interactions to explain the molecular mechanisms of male infertility in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Gene Regulatory Networks , Infertility, Male/virology , MicroRNAs/genetics , RNA, Long Noncoding/genetics , Adult , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , COVID-19/genetics , Computational Biology/methods , Computer Simulation , Gene-Environment Interaction , Humans , Infertility, Male/genetics , Male , MicroRNAs/metabolism , RNA, Long Noncoding/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Testis/metabolism , Testis/pathology , Testis/virology , Virus Internalization
7.
Int J Biol Sci ; 17(8): 1925-1939, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266906

ABSTRACT

Background: Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) allow entry of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) into host cells and play essential roles in cancer therapy. However, the functions of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in kidney cancer remain unclear, especially as kidneys are targets for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods: UCSC Xena project, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) databases (GSE30589 and GSE59185) were searched for gene expression in human tissues, gene expression data, and clinical information. Several bioinformatics methods were utilized to analyze the correlation between ACE2 and TMPRSS2 with respect to the prognosis of kidney renal clear cell carcinoma (KIRC) and kidney renal papillary cell carcinoma (KIRP). Results: ACE2 expression was significantly upregulated in tumor tissue, while its downregulation was associated with low survival in KIRC and KIRP patients. TMPRSS2 was downregulated in KIRC and KIRP, and its expression was not correlated with patient survival. According to clinical risk factor-based prediction models, ACE2 exhibits predictive accuracy for kidney cancer prognosis and is correlated with metabolism and immune infiltration. In an animal model, ACE2 expression was remarkably downregulated in SARS-CoV-2-infected cells compared to in the control. Conclusion: ACE2 expression is highly correlated with various metabolic pathways and is involved in immune infiltration.it plays a crucial role than TMPRSS2 in diagnosing and prognosis of kidney cancer patients. The overlap in ACE2 expression between kidney cancer and SARS-CoV-2 infection suggests that patients with KIRC or KIRP are at high risk of developing serious symptoms.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/biosynthesis , COVID-19/complications , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/complications , Kidney Neoplasms/complications , Receptors, Virus/biosynthesis , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Animals , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/immunology , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/metabolism , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/mortality , Chlorocebus aethiops , Down-Regulation , Drug Resistance, Neoplasm , Female , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Gene Regulatory Networks , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Kidney Neoplasms/immunology , Kidney Neoplasms/metabolism , Kidney Neoplasms/mortality , Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Animal , Neoplasm Proteins/biosynthesis , Neoplasm Proteins/genetics , Organ Specificity , Prognosis , Proportional Hazards Models , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/biosynthesis , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Tissue Array Analysis , Vero Cells
8.
Endocrinology ; 162(8)2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259229

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is characterized by a gender disparity in severity, with men exhibiting higher hospitalization and mortality rates than women. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus responsible for COVID-19, infects cells following recognition and attachment of the viral spike glycoprotein to the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 transmembrane protein, followed by spike protein cleavage and activation by cell surface transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2). In prostate cancer cells, androgen acting on the androgen receptor increases TMPRSS2 expression, which has led to the hypothesis that androgen-dependent expression of TMPRSS2 in the lung may increase men's susceptibility to severe COVID-19 and that, accordingly, suppressing androgen production or action may mitigate COVID-19 severity by reducing SARS-CoV-2 amplification. Several ongoing clinical trials are testing the ability of androgen deprivation therapies or anti-androgens to mitigate COVID-19. This perspective discusses clinical and molecular advances on the rapidly evolving field of androgen receptor (AR) action on cell surface transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) expression and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, and the potential effect of anti-androgens on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity in male patients. It discusses limitations of current studies and offers insight for future directions.


Subject(s)
Androgen Antagonists/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Gene Expression/drug effects , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Male , Mice , Prostatic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Receptors, Androgen/drug effects , Receptors, Androgen/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/drug effects , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Sex Factors
9.
Mol Neurobiol ; 58(9): 4535-4563, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252224

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a devastating viral infection caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The incidence and mortality of COVID-19 patients have been increasing at an alarming rate. The mortality is much higher in older individuals, especially the ones suffering from respiratory distress, cardiac abnormalities, renal diseases, diabetes, and hypertension. Existing evidence demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 makes its entry into human cells through angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE-2) followed by the uptake of virions through cathepsin L or transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2). SARS-CoV-2-mediated abnormalities in particular cardiovascular and neurological ones and the damaged coagulation systems require extensive research to develop better therapeutic modalities. As SARS-CoV-2 uses its S-protein to enter into the host cells of several organs, the S-protein of the virus is considered as the ideal target to develop a potential vaccine. In this review, we have attempted to highlight the landmark discoveries that lead to the development of various vaccines that are currently under different stages of clinical progression. Besides, a brief account of various drug candidates that are being tested to mitigate the burden of COVID-19 was also covered. Further, in a dedicated section, the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on neuronal inflammation and neuronal disorders was discussed. In summary, it is expected that the content covered in this article help to understand the pathophysiology of COVID-19 and the impact on neuronal complications induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection while providing an update on the vaccine development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/complications , Inflammation/etiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cell Line , Comorbidity , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Female , Hormesis , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Mice , Models, Neurological , Murine hepatitis virus/pathogenicity , Nervous System/virology , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Organ Specificity , Organoids , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Receptors, Virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/physiology
10.
Part Fibre Toxicol ; 18(1): 11, 2021 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133602

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Air pollution exposure and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) cause a poor prognosis after SARS-CoV-2 infection, but the underlying mechanisms are not well explored. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) are the keys to the entry of SARS-CoV-2. We therefore hypothesized that air pollution exposure and IPF may increase the expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in the lung alveolar region. We measured their expression levels in lung tissues of control non-IPF and IPF patients, and used murine animal models to study the deterioration of IPF caused by particulate matter (PM) and the molecular pathways involved in the expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2. RESULTS: In non-IPF patients, cells expressing ACE2 and TMPRSS2 were limited to human alveolar cells. ACE2 and TMPRSS2 were largely upregulated in IPF patients, and were co-expressed by fibroblast specific protein 1 (FSP-1) + lung fibroblasts in human pulmonary fibrotic tissue. In animal models, PM exposure increased the severity of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. ACE2 and TMPRSS2 were also expressed in FSP-1+ lung fibroblasts in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and when combined with PM exposure, they were further upregulated. The severity of pulmonary fibrosis and the expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 caused by PM exposure were blocked by deletion of KC, a murine homologue of IL-8, or treatment with reparixin, an inhibitor of IL-8 receptors CXCR1/2. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggested that risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 disease severity increased by air pollution exposure and underlying IPF. It can be mediated through upregulating ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in pulmonary fibroblasts, and prevented by blocking the IL-8/CXCR1/2 pathway.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/etiology , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/complications , Particulate Matter/toxicity , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Animals , Humans , Interleukin-8/physiology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Pulmonary Alveoli/enzymology , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Up-Regulation
12.
Int J Mol Med ; 47(4)2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1112802

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus­2 (SARS­CoV­2), the causative viral agent for the ongoing COVID­19 pandemic, enters its host cells primarily via the binding of the SARS­CoV­2 spike (S) proteins to the angiotensin­converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). A number of other cell entry mediators have also been identified, including neuropilin­1 (NRP1) and transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2). More recently, it has been demonstrated that transmembrane protease serine 4 (TMPRSS4) along with TMPRSS2 activate the SARS­CoV­2 S proteins, and enhance the viral infection of human small intestinal enterocytes. To date, a systematic analysis of TMPRSS4 in health and disease is lacking. In the present study, using in silico tools, the gene expression and genetic alteration of TMPRSS4 were analysed across numerous tumours and compared to controls. The observations were also expanded to the level of the central nervous system (CNS). The findings revealed that TMPRSS4 was overexpressed in 11 types of cancer, including lung adenocarcinoma, lung squamous cell carcinoma, cervical squamous cell carcinoma, thyroid carcinoma, ovarian cancer, cancer of the rectum, pancreatic cancer, colon and stomach adenocarcinoma, uterine carcinosarcoma and uterine corpus endometrial carcinoma, whilst it was significantly downregulated in kidney carcinomas, acute myeloid leukaemia, skin cutaneous melanoma and testicular germ cell tumours. Finally, a high TMPRSS4 expression was documented in the olfactory tubercle, paraolfactory gyrus and frontal operculum, all brain regions which are associated with the sense of smell and taste. Collectively, these data suggest that TMPRSS4 may play a role in COVID­19 symptomatology as another SARS­CoV­2 host cell entry mediator responsible for the tropism of this coronavirus both in the periphery and the CNS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Virus Internalization , Brain/enzymology , COVID-19/virology , Central Nervous System/enzymology , Computer Simulation , Databases, Genetic , Female , Gastrointestinal Tract/enzymology , Gene Expression Profiling , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , Humans , Male , Membrane Proteins/physiology , Neoplasms/enzymology , Neoplasms/genetics , Pandemics , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology
13.
Andrologia ; 53(1): e13914, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087946

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic leads to health challenges globally, and its diverse aspects need to be uncovered. Multi-organ injuries have been reported by describing potential SARS-CoV-2 entrance routes: ACE2 and TMPRSS2. Since these cell surface receptors' expression has been disclosed within the male reproductive system, its susceptibility to being infected by SARS-CoV-2 has been summarised through this literature review. Expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 at RNA or protein level has been reported across various investigations indicates that the male genitalia potentially is vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Presence of SARS-CoV-2 within semen samples and following direct viral damage, secondary inflammatory response causing orchitis or testicular discomfort and finally the amount of viral load leading testicular damage and immune response activation are among probable underlying mechanisms. Therefore, genital examination and laboratory tests should be considered to address the male reproductive tract complications and fertility issues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Genitalia, Male/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Genitalia, Male/enzymology , Humans , Infertility, Male/virology , Male , Orchitis/virology , RNA, Messenger/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Semen/virology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Testis/enzymology , Testis/virology
15.
Genes (Basel) ; 12(1)2020 12 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021948

ABSTRACT

The human serine protease serine 2 TMPRSS2 is involved in the priming of proteins of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and represents a possible target for COVID-19 therapy. The TMPRSS2 gene may be co-expressed with SARS-CoV-2 cell receptor genes angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and Basigin (BSG), but only TMPRSS2 demonstrates tissue-specific expression in alveolar cells according to single-cell RNA sequencing data. Our analysis of the structural variability of the TMPRSS2 gene based on genome-wide data from 76 human populations demonstrates that a functionally significant missense mutation in exon 6/7 in the TMPRSS2 gene is found in many human populations at relatively high frequencies, with region-specific distribution patterns. The frequency of the missense mutation encoded by rs12329760, which has previously been found to be associated with prostate cancer, ranged between 10% and 63% and was significantly higher in populations of Asian origin compared with European populations. In addition to single-nucleotide polymorphisms, two copy number variants were detected in the TMPRSS2 gene. A number of microRNAs have been predicted to regulate TMPRSS2 and BSG expression levels, but none of them is enriched in lung or respiratory tract cells. Several well-studied drugs can downregulate the expression of TMPRSS2 in human cells, including acetaminophen (paracetamol) and curcumin. Thus, the interactions of TMPRSS2 with SARS-CoV-2, together with its structural variability, gene-gene interactions, expression regulation profiles, and pharmacogenomic properties, characterize this gene as a potential target for COVID-19 therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic/drug effects , Molecular Targeted Therapy , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Acetaminophen/pharmacology , Acetaminophen/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/biosynthesis , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Asia/epidemiology , Basigin/biosynthesis , Basigin/genetics , Basigin/physiology , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/genetics , Curcumin/pharmacology , Curcumin/therapeutic use , Europe/epidemiology , Exons/genetics , Gene Frequency , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genetic Variation , Humans , MicroRNAs/genetics , Mutation, Missense , Pharmacogenomic Testing , Protein Interaction Mapping , Receptors, Virus/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Virus/biosynthesis , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/biosynthesis , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Single-Cell Analysis , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
18.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(2): 451-455, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-947035

ABSTRACT

The ACE2 receptor is, so far, the best-known host factor for SARS-CoV-2 entry, but another essential element, the TMPRSS2 protease, has recently been identified. Here, we have analysed TMPRSS2 expression data in the lung correlating them with age, sex, diabetes, smoking habits, exposure to pollutant and other stimuli, in order to highlight which factors might alter TMPRSS2 expression, and thus impact the susceptibility to infection and COVID-19 prognosis. Moreover, we reported TMPRSS2 polymorphisms affecting its expression and suggested the ethnic groups more prone to COVID-19. Finally, we also highlighted a gender-specific co-expression between TMPRSS2 and other genes related to SARS-CoV-2 entry, maybe explaining the higher observed susceptibility of infection in men. Our results could be useful in designing potential prevention and treatment strategies regarding the COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Aged , Female , Humans , Lung/enzymology , Male , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Quantitative Trait Loci , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Virus Internalization
19.
Endocrine ; 71(1): 3-8, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-920061

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Throughout the SARS-CoV2 pandemic, multiple reports show higher percentages of hospitalization, morbidity, and mortality among men than women, indicating that men are more affected by COVID-19. The pathophysiology of this difference is yet not established, but recent studies suggest that sex hormones may influence the viral infectivity process. Here, we review the current evidence of androgen sensitivity as a decisive factor for COVID-19 disease severity. METHODS: Relevant literature investigating the role of androgens in COVID-19 was assessed. Further, we describe several drugs suggested as beneficial for COVID-19 treatment related to androgen pathways. Lastly, we looked at androgen sensitivity as a predictor for COVID-19 progression and ongoing clinical trials on androgen suppression therapies as a line of treatment. RESULTS: SARS-COV2 virus spike proteins utilize Transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) for host entry. Androgen receptors are transcription promoters for TMPRSS2 and can, therefore, facilitate SARS-COV2 entry. Variants in the androgen receptor gene correlate with androgen sensitivity and are implicated in diseases like androgenetic alopecia and prostate cancer, conditions that have been associated with worse COVID-19 outcomes and hospitalization. CONCLUSION: Androgen's TMPRSS2-mediated actions might explain both the low fatalities observed in prepubertal children and the differences between sexes regarding SARS-COV2 infection. Androgen sensitivity may be a critical factor in determining COVID-19 disease severity, and sensitivity tests can, therefore, help in predicting patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
Androgens/physiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , Sex Characteristics , Adult , Child , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Virus Internalization
20.
Med Hypotheses ; 146: 110394, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-919589

ABSTRACT

No definitive treatment for COVID-19 exists although promising results have been reported with remdesivir and glucocorticoids. Short of a truly effective preventive or curative vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, it is becoming increasingly clear that multiple pathophysiologic processes seen with COVID-19 as well as SARS-CoV-2 itself should be targeted. Because alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) embraces a panoply of biologic activities that may antagonize several pathophysiologic mechanisms induced by SARS-CoV-2, we hypothesize that this naturally occurring molecule is a promising agent to ameliorate COVID-19. We posit at least seven different mechanisms by which AAT may alleviate COVID-19. First, AAT is a serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN) shown to inhibit TMPRSS-2, the host serine protease that cleaves the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, a necessary preparatory step for the virus to bind its cell surface receptor ACE2 to gain intracellular entry. Second, AAT has anti-viral activity against other RNA viruses HIV and influenza as well as induces autophagy, a known host effector mechanism against MERS-CoV, a related coronavirus that causes the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. Third, AAT has potent anti-inflammatory properties, in part through inhibiting both nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) activation and ADAM17 (also known as tumor necrosis factor-alpha converting enzyme), and thus may dampen the hyper-inflammatory response of COVID-19. Fourth, AAT inhibits neutrophil elastase, a serine protease that helps recruit potentially injurious neutrophils and implicated in acute lung injury. AAT inhibition of ADAM17 also prevents shedding of ACE2 and hence may preserve ACE2 inhibition of bradykinin, reducing the ability of bradykinin to cause a capillary leak in COVID-19. Fifth, AAT inhibits thrombin, and venous thromboembolism and in situ microthrombi and macrothrombi are increasingly implicated in COVID-19. Sixth, AAT inhibition of elastase can antagonize the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), a complex extracellular structure comprised of neutrophil-derived DNA, histones, and proteases, and implicated in the immunothrombosis of COVID-19; indeed, AAT has been shown to change the shape and adherence of non-COVID-19-related NETs. Seventh, AAT inhibition of endothelial cell apoptosis may limit the endothelial injury linked to severe COVID-19-associated acute lung injury, multi-organ dysfunction, and pre-eclampsia-like syndrome seen in gravid women. Furthermore, because both NETs formation and the presence of anti-phospholipid antibodies are increased in both COVID-19 and non-COVID pre-eclampsia, it suggests a similar vascular pathogenesis in both disorders. As a final point, AAT has an excellent safety profile when administered to patients with AAT deficiency and is dosed intravenously once weekly but also comes in an inhaled preparation. Thus, AAT is an appealing drug candidate to treat COVID-19 and should be studied.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Models, Biological , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/therapeutic use , Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antithrombins/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Apoptosis/drug effects , COVID-19/physiopathology , Extracellular Traps/drug effects , Host Microbial Interactions/drug effects , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , Humans , Leukocyte Elastase/antagonists & inhibitors , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/drug effects , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Virus Internalization/drug effects , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/administration & dosage
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