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1.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e052752, 2022 01 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613004

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: It has been suggested that ethnic minorities have been disproportionally affected by the COVID-19. We aimed to determine whether prevalence and correlates of past SARS-CoV-2 exposure varied between six ethnic groups in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS: Participants aged 25-79 years enrolled in the Healthy Life in an Urban Setting population-based prospective cohort (n=16 889) were randomly selected within ethnic groups and invited to participate in a cross-sectional COVID-19 seroprevalence substudy. OUTCOME MEASURES: We tested participants for SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies and collected information on SARS-CoV-2 exposures. We estimated prevalence and correlates of SARS-CoV-2 exposure within ethnic groups using survey-weighted logistic regression adjusting for age, sex and calendar time. RESULTS: Between 24 June and 9 October 2020, we included 2497 participants. Adjusted SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence was comparable between ethnic Dutch (24/498; 5.1%, 95% CI 2.8% to 7.4%), South-Asian Surinamese (22/451; 4.9%, 95% CI 2.2% to 7.7%), African Surinamese (22/400; 8.3%, 95% CI 3.1% to 13.6%), Turkish (30/408; 7.9%, 95% CI 4.4% to 11.4%) and Moroccan (32/391; 7.2%, 95% CI 4.2% to 10.1%) participants, but higher among Ghanaians (95/327; 26.3%, 95% CI 18.5% to 34.0%). 57.1% of SARS-CoV-2-positive participants did not suspect or were unsure of being infected, which was lowest in African Surinamese (18.2%) and highest in Ghanaians (90.5%). Correlates of SARS-CoV-2 exposure varied across ethnic groups, while the most common correlate was having a household member suspected of infection. In Ghanaians, seropositivity was associated with older age, larger household sizes, living with small children, leaving home to work and attending religious services. CONCLUSIONS: No remarkable differences in SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence were observed between the largest ethnic groups in Amsterdam after the first wave of infections. The higher infection seroprevalence observed among Ghanaians, which passed mostly unnoticed, warrants wider prevention efforts and opportunities for non-symptom-based testing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ghana , Humans , Netherlands/epidemiology , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Seroepidemiologic Studies
2.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(11): e807-e812, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605104

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Despite having close contact with the general public, members of the San Francisco Fire Department (SFFD) reported relatively few cases of COVID-19 during the first half of 2020. Our objective was to explore evidence for prior undetected infections by conducting a seroprevalence survey, and to document both risk and protective factors for prior COVID-19 infection. METHODS: This cross-sectional study assessed workplace practices and exposures of SFFD personnel during the first 6 months of 2020 via questionnaire and documented prior COVID-19 infections by serologic antibody testing using an orthogonal testing protocol. RESULTS: Of 1231 participating emergency responders, three (0.25%) had confirmed positive COVID-19 antibody results. CONCLUSIONS: Safe workplace practices, community public health intervention, and low community infection rates appear to have been protective factors for emergency responders in San Francisco during our study period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Firefighters , Allied Health Personnel , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , San Francisco/epidemiology , Seroepidemiologic Studies
3.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 10, 2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608186

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Serosurveillance is crucial in estimating the range of SARS-CoV-2 infections, predicting the possibility of another wave, and deciding on a vaccination strategy. To understand the herd immunity after the COVID-19 pandemic, the seroprevalence was measured in 3062 individuals with or without COVID-19 from the clinic. METHODS: The levels of SARS-CoV-2 antibody IgM and IgG were measured by the immuno-colloidal gold method. A fusion fragment of nucleocapsid and spike protein was detected by a qualitative test kit with sensitivity (89%) and specificity (98%). RESULTS: The seroprevalence rate for IgM and IgG in all outpatients was 2.81% and 7.51%, respectively. The sex-related prevalence rate of IgG was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in women than men. The highest positive rate of IgM was observed in individuals < 20 years of age (3.57%), while the highest seroprevalence for IgG was observed in persons > 60 years of age (8.61%). Positive rates of IgM and IgG in the convalescent patients were 31.82% and 77.27%, respectively, which was significantly higher than individuals with suspected syndromes or individuals without any clinical signs (P < 0.01). Seroprevalence for IgG in medical staff was markedly higher than those in residents. No significant difference of seroprevalence was found among patients with different comorbidities (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The low positive rate of the SARS-CoV-2 IgM and nucleic acid (NA) test indicated that the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak is subsiding after 3 months, and the possibility of reintroduction of the virus from an unidentified natural reservoir is low. Seroprevalence provides information for humoral immunity and vaccine in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Immunoglobulin M , Male , Pandemics , Seroepidemiologic Studies
4.
Front Public Health ; 9: 801609, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604379

ABSTRACT

As of November 17, 2021, SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome CoronaVirus 2), the causative agent of COVID-19 (COronaVIrus Disease 19), has infected ~250 million people worldwide, causing around five million deaths. Titers of anti-SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies were relatively stable for at least 9 months in a population-based study conducted in Wuhan, China, both in symptomatic and in asymptomatic individuals. In the mass screening campaign conducted in the town of Ariano Irpino (Avellino, Italy) in May, 2020, 5.7% (95% CI: 5.3-6-1) of the 13,444 asymptomatic citizens screened were positive for anti-nucleocapsid antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. Among these, 422 citizens were re-tested for anti SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in January, 2021 and/or in April, 2021 and enrolled in this longitudinal observational study. Median (interquartile range) age of the study cohort was 46 years (29-59), with 47 (11.1%) participants of minor age, while 217 (51.4%) participants were females. There was no evidence of re-infection in any of the subjects included. Presence of anti-nuclear antibodies antibodies (Elecysis, Roche) was reported in 95.7 and 93.7% of evaluable participants in January and April, 2021. Multiple logistic regression analysis used to explore associations between age, sex and seroprevalence showed that adults vs. minors had significantly lower odds of having anti-S1 antibodies (Biorad) both in January, 2021 and in April, 2021. Our findings showed that antibodies remained detectable at least 11.5 months after infection in >90% of never symptomatic cases. Further investigation is required to establish duration of immunity against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Middle Aged , Seroepidemiologic Studies
5.
Front Public Health ; 9: 753487, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598895

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and immunity remains uncertain in populations. The state of Texas ranks 2nd in infection with over 2.71 million cases and has seen a disproportionate rate of death across the state. The Texas CARES project was funded by the state of Texas to estimate the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibody status in children and adults. Identifying strategies to understand natural as well as vaccine induced antibody response to COVID-19 is critical. Materials and Methods: The Texas CARES (Texas Coronavirus Antibody Response Survey) is an ongoing prospective population-based convenience sample from the Texas general population that commenced in October 2020. Volunteer participants are recruited across the state to participate in a 3-time point data collection Texas CARES to assess antibody response over time. We use the Roche Elecsys® Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Immunoassay to determine SARS-CoV-2 antibody status. Results: The crude antibody positivity prevalence in Phase I was 26.1% (80/307). The fully adjusted seroprevalence of the sample was 31.5%. Specifically, 41.1% of males and 21.9% of females were seropositive. For age categories, 33.5% of those 18-34; 24.4% of those 35-44; 33.2% of those 45-54; and 32.8% of those 55+ were seropositive. In this sample, 42.2% (89/211) of those negative for the antibody test reported having had a COVID-19 test. Conclusions: In this survey we enrolled and analyzed data for 307 participants, demonstrating a high survey and antibody test completion rate, and ability to implement a questionnaire and SARS-CoV-2 antibody testing within clinical settings. We were also able to determine our capability to estimate the cross-sectional seroprevalence within Texas's federally qualified community centers (FQHCs). The crude positivity prevalence for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in this sample was 26.1% indicating potentially high exposure to COVID-19 for clinic employees and patients. Data will also allow us to understand sex, age and chronic illness variation in seroprevalence by natural and vaccine induced. These methods are being used to guide the completion of a large longitudinal survey in the state of Texas with implications for practice and population health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Antibody Formation , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Texas/epidemiology , Vulnerable Populations , Young Adult
6.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(12)2021 Dec 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598306

ABSTRACT

Human toxocariasis is a helminthozoonosis caused by the migration of Toxocara species larvae through an organism. The infection in humans is transmitted either by direct ingestion of the eggs of the parasite, or by consuming undercooked meat infested with Toxocara larvae. This parasitosis can be found worldwide, but there are significant differences in seroprevalence in different areas, depending mainly on hot climate conditions and on low social status. However, the literature estimates of seroprevalence are inconsistent. Infected patients commonly present a range of symptoms, e.g., abdominal pain, decreased appetite, restlessness, fever, and coughing. This manuscript presents a case report of a polytraumatic patient who underwent a two-phase spinal procedure for a thoracolumbar fracture. After the second procedure, which was a vertebral body replacement via thoracotomy, the patient developed a pathologic pleural effusion. A microscopic cytology examination of this effusion revealed the presence of Toxocara species larvae. Although the patient presented no specific clinical symptoms, and the serological exams (Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot) were negative, the microscopic evaluation enabled a timely diagnosis. The patient was successfully treated with albendazole, with no permanent sequelae of the infection.


Subject(s)
Parasites , Toxocariasis , Animals , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Humans , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Toxocara , Toxocariasis/diagnosis , Toxocariasis/drug therapy
7.
Am J Public Health ; 112(1): 38-42, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594448

ABSTRACT

We conducted a community seroprevalence survey in Arizona, from September 12 to October 1, 2020, to determine the presence of antibodies to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We used the seroprevalence estimate to predict SARS-CoV-2 infections in the jurisdiction by applying the adjusted seroprevalence to the county's population. The estimated community seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infections was 4.3 times greater (95% confidence interval = 2.2, 7.5) than the number of reported cases. Field surveys with representative sampling provide data that may help fill in gaps in traditional public health reporting. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(1):38-42. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306568).


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Serological Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Arizona/epidemiology , Child , Family Characteristics , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Public Health Practice , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies
8.
CMAJ ; 193(49): E1868-E1877, 2021 12 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591952

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected health care workers. We sought to estimate SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence among hospital health care workers in Quebec, Canada, after the first wave of the pandemic and to explore factors associated with SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity. METHODS: Between July 6 and Sept. 24, 2020, we enrolled health care workers from 10 hospitals, including 8 from a region with a high incidence of COVID-19 (the Montréal area) and 2 from low-incidence regions of Quebec. Eligible health care workers were physicians, nurses, orderlies and cleaning staff working in 4 types of care units (emergency department, intensive care unit, COVID-19 inpatient unit and non-COVID-19 inpatient unit). Participants completed a questionnaire and underwent SARS-CoV-2 serology testing. We identified factors independently associated with higher seroprevalence. RESULTS: Among 2056 enrolled health care workers, 241 (11.7%) had positive SARS-CoV-2 serology. Of these, 171 (71.0%) had been previously diagnosed with COVID-19. Seroprevalence varied among hospitals, from 2.4% to 3.7% in low-incidence regions to 17.9% to 32.0% in hospitals with outbreaks involving 5 or more health care workers. Higher seroprevalence was associated with working in a hospital where outbreaks occurred (adjusted prevalence ratio 4.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.63-6.57), being a nurse or nursing assistant (adjusted prevalence ratio 1.34, 95% CI 1.03-1.74) or an orderly (adjusted prevalence ratio 1.49, 95% CI 1.12-1.97), and Black or Hispanic ethnicity (adjusted prevalence ratio 1.41, 95% CI 1.13-1.76). Lower seroprevalence was associated with working in the intensive care unit (adjusted prevalence ratio 0.47, 95% CI 0.30-0.71) or the emergency department (adjusted prevalence ratio 0.61, 95% CI 0.39-0.98). INTERPRETATION: Health care workers in Quebec hospitals were at high risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection, particularly in outbreak settings. More work is needed to better understand SARS-CoV-2 transmission dynamics in health care settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Demography , Health Personnel , Hospitals , Humans , Incidence , Occupational Diseases/blood , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Pandemics , Quebec/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Euro Surveill ; 26(50)2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591830

ABSTRACT

BackgroundSerosurveys for SARS-CoV-2 aim to estimate the proportion of the population that has been infected.AimThis observational study assesses the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in Ontario, Canada during the first pandemic wave.MethodsUsing an orthogonal approach, we tested 8,902 residual specimens from the Public Health Ontario laboratory over three time periods during March-June 2020 and stratified results by age group, sex and region. We adjusted for antibody test sensitivity/specificity and compared with reported PCR-confirmed COVID-19 cases.ResultsAdjusted seroprevalence was 0.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.1-1.5) from 27 March-30 April, 1.5% (95% CI: 0.7-2.2) from 26-31 May, and 1.1% (95% CI: 0.8-1.3) from 5-30 June 2020. Adjusted estimates were highest in individuals aged ≥ 60 years in March-April (1.3%; 95% CI: 0.2-4.6), in those aged 20-59 years in May (2.1%; 95% CI: 0.8-3.4) and in those aged ≥ 60 years in June (1.6%; 95% CI: 1.1-2.1). Regional seroprevalence varied, and was highest for Toronto in March-April (0.9%; 95% CI: 0.1-3.1), for Toronto in May (3.2%; 95% CI: 1.0-5.3) and for Toronto (1.5%; 95% CI: 0.9-2.1) and Central East in June (1.5%; 95% CI: 1.0-2.0). We estimate that COVID-19 cases detected by PCR in Ontario underestimated SARS-CoV-2 infections by a factor of 4.9.ConclusionsOur results indicate low population seroprevalence in Ontario, suggesting that public health measures were effective at limiting the spread of SARS-CoV-2 during the first pandemic wave.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , Ontario/epidemiology , Pandemics , Seroepidemiologic Studies
10.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 151: w30116, 2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591700

ABSTRACT

AIMS OF THE STUDY: A new emerging severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was first identified in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 and then spread rapidly, causing a global pandemic. In Europe, the first case was identified in Italy on 21 February 2020, in the Lombardy region bordering on the southern part of Switzerland (Canton Ticino), where 4 days later the first case was identified . Ticino was the most affected canton in Switzerland during the first wave of pandemic. In order to provide a reliable indicator for the spread of the virus in this region and help decision making at the public health level, a seroprevalence study of SARS-CoV-2 was conducted. METHODS: A cohort study was implemented on a randomly selected sample of 1500 persons. The sample is representative of the general population of the Canton of Ticino, stratified by sex and age from 5 years old. Antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein were detected using a rapid qualitative test in 4 data collection periods over the course of 12 months (from May-June 2020 to May-June 2021). RESULTS: The seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 was estimated at 9.0% in spring 2020 (weeks 20-26), 8.4% in summer 2020 (weeks 32-38), 14.1% in autumn 2020 (weeks 45-52) and 22.3% in spring 2021 (weeks 18-23). In none of these four phases was evidence of an association between sex or specific age groups and presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies detected. For risk factors, the only strong and significant association found was with diabetes in the first three data collection periods but not in the fourth. Among people who participated in all four phases of the study and tested positive anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in the first test, 61.8% were still positive even in the fourth, 12 months later. CONCLUSIONS: The results support the hypothesis that, after one year and despite the severe burden in terms of hospitalisations and deaths experienced by the Canton Ticino, SARS-CoV-2 infection affected only a minority of the population (20%) and also suggest that the anti-nucleocapsid antibodies persist after 12 months in the majority of infected persons.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Humans , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Switzerland/epidemiology
11.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260989, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581765

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Camps of forcibly displaced populations are considered to be at risk of large COVID-19 outbreaks. Low screening rates and limited surveillance led us to conduct a study in Dagahaley camp, located in the Dadaab refugee complex in Kenya to estimate SARS-COV-2 seroprevalence and, mortality and to identify changes in access to care during the pandemic. METHODS: To estimate seroprevalence, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among a sample of individuals (n = 587) seeking care at the two main health centres and among all household members (n = 619) of community health workers and traditional birth attendants working in the camp. A rapid immunologic assay was used (BIOSYNEX® COVID-19 BSS [IgG/IgM]) and adjusted for test performance and mismatch between the sampled population and that of the general camp population. To estimate mortality, all households (n = 12860) were exhaustively interviewed in the camp about deaths occurring from January 2019 through March 2021. RESULTS: In total 1206 participants were included in the seroprevalence study, 8% (95% CI: 6.6%-9.7%) had a positive serologic test. After adjusting for test performance and standardizing on age, a seroprevalence of 5.8% was estimated (95% CI: 1.6%-8.4%). The mortality rate for 10,000 persons per day was 0.05 (95% CI 0.05-0.06) prior to the pandemic and 0.07 (95% CI 0.06-0.08) during the pandemic, representing a significant 42% increase (p<0.001). Médecins Sans Frontières health centre consultations and hospital admissions decreased by 38% and 37% respectively. CONCLUSION: The number of infected people was estimated 67 times higher than the number of reported cases. Participants aged 50 years or more were among the most affected. The mortality survey shows an increase in the mortality rate during the pandemic compared to before the pandemic. A decline in attendance at health facilities was observed and sustained despite the easing of restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Refugee Camps/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Kenya/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Young Adult
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580777

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In this work, we aimed to evaluate antibody-response longevity to SARS-CoV-2 infection and/or vaccination in one of the Greek communities that was worst hit by the pandemic, Deskati, five months after a previous serosurveillance and nine months after the pandemic wave initiation (October 2020). METHODS: The SARS-CoV-2 IgG II Quant method (Architect, Abbott, IL, USA) was used for antibody testing. RESULTS: A total of 69 subjects, who previously tested positive or negative for COVID-19 antibodies, participated in the study. We found that 48% of participants turned positive due to vaccination. 27% of participants were both previously infected and vaccinated. However, all previously infected participants retained antibodies to the virus, irrespective of their vaccination status. The antibody titers were significantly higher in previously infected participants that had been vaccinated than those who were unvaccinated and in those that had been previously hospitalized for COVID-19 than those with mild disease. CONCLUSIONS: Antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection were maintained nine months after the pandemic. Vaccination alone had generated an immune response in almost half of the population. Higher antibody titers were found in the case of vaccination in previously infected subjects and especially in those with severe disease leading to hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antibodies, Viral , Greece/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Vaccination
13.
J Clin Virol ; 146: 105061, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587310

ABSTRACT

Many SARS-CoV-2 antibody detection assays have been developed but their differential performance is not well described. In this study we compared an in-house (KWTRP) ELISA which has been used extensively to estimate seroprevalence in the Kenyan population with WANTAI, an ELISA which has been approved for widespread use by the WHO. Using a wide variety of sample sets including pre-pandemic samples (negative gold standard), SARS-CoV-2 PCR positive samples (positive gold standard) and COVID-19 test samples from different periods (unknowns), we compared performance characteristics of the two assays. The overall concordance between WANTAI and KWTRP was 0.97 (95% CI, 0.95-0.98). For WANTAI and KWTRP, sensitivity was 0.95 (95% CI 0.90-0.98) and 0.93 (95% CI 0.87-0.96), respectively. Specificity for WANTAI was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.96-0.99) and 0.99 (95% CI 0.96-1.00) while KWTRP specificity was 0.99 (95% CI, 0.98-1.00) and 1.00 using pre-pandemic blood donors and pre-pandemic malaria cross-sectional survey samples respectively. Both assays show excellent characteristics to detect SARS-CoV-2 antibodies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Antibodies, Viral , Carrier Proteins , Cross-Sectional Studies , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Kenya/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Seroepidemiologic Studies
14.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(3): e0133021, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583201

ABSTRACT

"Testing Denmark" is a national, large-scale, epidemiological surveillance study of SARS-CoV-2 in the Danish population. Between September and October 2020, approximately 1.3 million people (age >15 years) were randomly invited to fill in an electronic questionnaire covering COVID-19 exposures and symptoms. The prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies was determined by point-of care rapid test (POCT) distributed to participants' home addresses. In total, 318,552 participants (24.5% invitees) completed the study and 2,519 (0.79%) were seropositive. Of the participants with a prior positive PCR test (n = 1,828), 29.1% were seropositive in the POCT. Although seropositivity increased with age, participants 61 years and over reported fewer symptoms and were tested less frequently. Seropositivity was associated with physical contact with SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals (risk ratio [RR] 7.43, 95% CI: 6.57-8.41), particular in household members (RR 17.70, 95% CI: 15.60-20.10). A greater risk of seropositivity was seen in home care workers (RR 2.09, 95% CI: 1.58-2.78) compared to office workers. A high degree of adherence with national preventive recommendations was reported (e.g., >80% use of face masks), but no difference were found between seropositive and seronegative participants. The seroprevalence result was somewhat hampered by a lower-than-expected performance of the POCT. This is likely due to a low sensitivity of the POCT or problems reading the test results, and the main findings therefore relate to risk associations. More emphasis should be placed on age, occupation, and exposure in local communities. IMPORTANCE To date, including 318,522 participants, this is the largest population-based study with broad national participation where tests and questionnaires have been sent to participants' homes. We found that more emphasis from national and local authorities toward the risk of infection should be placed on age of tested individuals, type of occupation, as well as exposure in local communities and households. To meet the challenge that broad nationwide information can be difficult to gather. This study design sets the stage for a novel way of conducting studies. Additionally, this study design can be used as a supplementary model in future general test strategy for ongoing monitoring of COVID-19 immunity in the population, both from past infection and from vaccination against SARS-CoV-2, however, with attention to the complexity of performing and reading the POCT at home.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/immunology , Denmark , Female , Humans , Immunity , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Point-of-Care Testing , Population Surveillance , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
BMJ Open ; 11(12): e056853, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583091

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The current COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the entire world with increasing morbidity and mortality and has resulted in serious economic and social consequences. Assessing the burden of COVID-19 is essential for developing efficient pandemic preparedness and response strategies and for determining the impact of implemented control measures. Population-based seroprevalence surveys are critical to estimate infection rates, monitor the progression of the epidemic and to allow for the identification of persons exposed to the infection who may either have been asymptomatic or were never tested. This is especially important for countries where effective testing and tracking systems could not be established and where non-severe cases or under-reported deaths might have blurred the true burden of COVID-19. Most seroprevalence surveys performed in sub-Saharan Africa have targeted specific high risk or more easily accessible populations such as healthcare workers or blood donors, and household-based estimates are rarely available. Here, we present the study protocol for a SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence estimation in the general population of Burkina Faso, Ghana and Madagascar in 2021. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The SeroCoV study is a household-based cross-sectional prevalence investigation in persons aged 10 years and older living in urban areas in six cities using a two-stage geographical cluster sampling method stratified by age and sex. The presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies will be determined using a sensitive and specific SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISA. In addition, questionnaires will cover sociodemographic information, episodes of diseases and history of testing and treatment for COVID-like symptoms, travel history and safety measures. We will estimate the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2, taking into account test performance and adjusting for the age and sex of the respective populations. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was received for all participating countries. Results will be disseminated through reports and presentations at the country level as well as peer-reviewed publications and international scientific conferences presentations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Burkina Faso , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , Seroepidemiologic Studies
16.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(12): 3009-3019, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556406

ABSTRACT

Resolving the role of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission in households with members from different generations is crucial for containing the current pandemic. We conducted a large-scale, multicenter, cross-sectional seroepidemiologic household transmission study in southwest Germany during May 11-August 1, 2020. We included 1,625 study participants from 405 households that each had ≥1 child and 1 reverse transcription PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2-infected index case-patient. The overall secondary attack rate was 31.6% and was significantly higher in exposed adults (37.5%) than in children (24.6%-29.2%; p = <0.015); the rate was also significantly higher when the index case-patient was >60 years of age (72.9%; p = 0.039). Other risk factors for infectiousness of the index case-patient were SARS-CoV-2-seropositivity (odds ratio [OR] 27.8, 95% CI 8.26-93.5), fever (OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.14-3.31), and cough (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.21-3.53). Secondary infections in household contacts generate a substantial disease burden.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Seroepidemiologic Studies
17.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(12): 3020-3029, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556378

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections may be underestimated because of limited access to testing. We measured SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence in South Africa every 2 months during July 2020-March 2021 in randomly selected household cohorts in 2 communities. We compared seroprevalence to reported laboratory-confirmed infections, hospitalizations, and deaths to calculate infection-case, infection-hospitalization, and infection-fatality ratios in 2 waves of infection. Post-second wave seroprevalence ranged from 18% in the rural community children <5 years of age, to 59% in urban community adults 35-59 years of age. The second wave saw a shift in age distribution of case-patients in the urban community (from persons 35-59 years of age to persons at the extremes of age), higher attack rates in the rural community, and a higher infection-fatality ratio in the urban community. Approximately 95% of SARS-CoV-2 infections were not reported to national surveillance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Child , Humans , Middle Aged , Rural Population , Seroepidemiologic Studies , South Africa/epidemiology
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(18)2021 09 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547341

ABSTRACT

The proper recruitment of subjects for population-based epidemiological studies is critical to the external validity of the studies and, above all, to the sound and correct interpretation of the findings. Since 2020, the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has been a new factor that has been, additionally, hindering studies. Therefore, the aim of our study is to compare demographic, socio-economic, health-related characteristics and the frequency of SARS-CoV-2 infection occurrence among the randomly selected group and the group composed of volunteers. We compare two groups of participants from the cross-sectional study assessing the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, which was conducted in autumn 2020, in three cities of the Silesian Voivodeship in Poland. The first group consisted of a randomly selected, nationally representative, age-stratified sample of subjects (1167 participants, "RG" group) and was recruited using personal invitation letters and postal addresses obtained from a national registry. The second group (4321 volunteers, "VG" group) included those who expressed their willingness to participate in response to an advertisement published in the media. Compared with RG subjects, volunteers were more often females, younger and professionally active, more often had a history of contact with a COVID-19 patient, post-contact nasopharyngeal swab, fewer comorbidities, as well as declared the occurrence of symptoms that might suggest infection with SARS-CoV-2. Additionally, in the VG group the percentage of positive IgG results and tuberculosis vaccination were higher. The findings of the study confirm that surveys limited to volunteers are biased. The presence of the bias may seriously affect and distort inference and make the generalizability of the results more than questionable. Although effective control over selection bias in surveys, including volunteers, is virtually impossible, its impact on the survey results is impossible to predict. However, whenever possible, such surveys could include a small component of a random sample to assess the presence and potential effects of selection bias.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Volunteers
19.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6611-6618, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544309

ABSTRACT

The objective of this longitudinal cohort study was to determine the seroprevalence of antibodies to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) in healthcare workers employed at healthcare settings in three rural counties in eastern South Dakota and western Minnesota from May 13, 2020, through December 22, 2020. Three blood draws were performed at five clinical sites and tested for the presence of antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2. Serum samples were tested for the presence of antibodies using a fluorescent microsphere immunoassay (FMIA), neutralization of SARS-CoV-2 spike-pseudotyped particles (SARS-CoV-2pp) assay, and serum virus neutralization (SVN) assay. The seroprevalence was determined to be 1/336 (0.29%) for samples collected from 5/13/20 to 7/13/20, 5/260 (1.92%) for samples collected from 8/13/20 to 9/25/20, and 35/235 (14.89%) for samples collected from 10/16/20 to 12/22/20. Eight of the 35 (22.8%) seropositive individuals identified in the final draw did not report a previous diagnosis with COVID-19. There was a high correlation (>90%) between the FMIA and virus neutralization assays. Each clinical site's seroprevalence was higher than the cumulative incidence for the general public in the respective county as reported by state public health agencies. As of December 2020, there was a high percentage (85%) of seronegative individuals in the study population.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Rural Health Services/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Minnesota/epidemiology , Neutralization Tests , Seroepidemiologic Studies , South Dakota/epidemiology , Young Adult
20.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 93, 2021.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547720

ABSTRACT

Introduction: SARS-CoV-2 serology tests could play a crucial role in estimating the prevalence of COVID-19. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of COVID-19 among travellers and workers in Bukavu, a city in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. Methods: between May and August 2020, the Cellex qSARS-CoV-2 IgG/IgM Rapid Test (Cellex, Inc., USA), lateral flow immunoassay was used to rapidly detect and differentiate antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 among travellers and workers seeking medical certification. Results: among the 684 residents of the city of Bukavu screened for COVID-19 (4.2% Hispanic, 2.8% other African, 0.9% Asian), the seroprevalence anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies was 40.8% (IgG+/IgM+: 34.6%; IgG+/IgM-: 0.5%; IgG-/IgM+: 5.4%). Cumulative seroprevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies increased from 24.5% to 35.2% from May to August 2020. Independent predictors of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were age > 60 years [adjusted OR = 2.07(1.26-3.38)] and non-membership of the medical staff [adjusted OR = 2.28 (1.22-4.26)]. Thirteen point nine percent of patients seropositive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were symptomatic and hospitalized. Conclusion: this study shows a very high seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies among travellers and workers in Bukavu, a city in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, which may positively affect community immunity in the study population. Thus, the management of COVID-19 should be contextualized according to local realities.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Travel , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Democratic Republic of the Congo/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Immunoassay , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Seroepidemiologic Studies
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