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1.
Front Immunol ; 12: 689966, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441106

ABSTRACT

Background: Most of the explanatory and prognostic models of COVID-19 lack of a comprehensive assessment of the wide COVID-19 spectrum of abnormalities. The aim of this study was to unveil novel biological features to explain COVID-19 severity and prognosis (death and disease progression). Methods: A predictive model for COVID-19 severity in 121 patients was constructed by ordinal logistic regression calculating odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for a set of clinical, immunological, metabolomic, and other biological traits. The accuracy and calibration of the model was tested with the area under the curve (AUC), Somer's D, and calibration plot. Hazard ratios with 95% CI for adverse outcomes were calculated with a Cox proportional-hazards model. Results: The explanatory variables for COVID-19 severity were the body mass index (BMI), hemoglobin, albumin, 3-Hydroxyisovaleric acid, CD8+ effector memory T cells, Th1 cells, low-density granulocytes, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, plasma TRIM63, and circulating neutrophil extracellular traps. The model showed an outstanding performance with an optimism-adjusted AUC of 0.999, and Somer's D of 0.999. The predictive variables for adverse outcomes in COVID-19 were severe and critical disease diagnosis, BMI, lactate dehydrogenase, Troponin I, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, serum levels of IP-10, malic acid, 3, 4 di-hydroxybutanoic acid, citric acid, myoinositol, and cystine. Conclusions: Herein, we unveil novel immunological and metabolomic features associated with COVID-19 severity and prognosis. Our models encompass the interplay among innate and adaptive immunity, inflammation-induced muscle atrophy and hypoxia as the main drivers of COVID-19 severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Blood Coagulation , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokines/blood , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Female , Hemoglobins/analysis , Humans , Male , Metabolome , Middle Aged , Muscular Atrophy , Neutrophils/immunology , Phenotype , Prognosis , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Valerates/blood
2.
Oxid Med Cell Longev ; 2021: 6648199, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211620

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Mortality among critically ill COVID-19 patients remains relatively high despite different potential therapeutic modalities being introduced recently. The treatment of critically ill patients is a challenging task, without identified credible predictors of mortality. METHODS: We performed an analysis of 160 consecutive patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection admitted to the Respiratory Intensive Care Unit between June 23, 2020, and October 2, 2020, in University Hospital Center Bezanijska kosa, Belgrade, Serbia. Patients on invasive, noninvasive ventilation and high flow oxygen therapy with moderate to severe ARDS, according to the Berlin definition of ARDS, were selected for the study. Demographic data, past medical history, laboratory values, and CT severity score were analyzed to identify predictors of mortality. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess potential predictors of mortality in critically ill COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: The mean patient age was 65.6 years (range, 29-92 years), predominantly men, 68.8%. 107 (66.9%) patients were on invasive mechanical ventilation, 31 (19.3%) on noninvasive, and 22 (13.8%) on high flow oxygen therapy machine. The median total number of ICU days was 10 (25th to 75th percentile: 6-18), while the median total number of hospital stay was 18 (25th to 75th percentile: 12-28). The mortality rate was 60% (96/160). Univariate logistic regression analysis confirmed the significance of age, CRP, and lymphocytes at admission to hospital, serum albumin, D-dimer, and IL-6 at admission to ICU, and CT score. Serum albumin, D-dimer, and IL-6 at admission to ICU were independently associated with mortality in the final multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: In the present study of 160 consecutive critically ill COVID-19 patients with moderate to severe ARDS, IL-6, serum albumin, and D-dimer at admission to ICU, accompanied by chest CT severity score, were marked as independent predictors of mortality.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/complications , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care , Critical Illness , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Interleukin-6/blood , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Serbia/epidemiology , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
3.
Int J Lab Hematol ; 43(5): 1243-1251, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211529

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Although factors such as age, sex, diabetes, obesity and changes in certain laboratory investigations are important prognostic factors in COVID-19 infection, these may not apply to all ethnic/racial groups. We hypothesized differences in routine biochemistry and haematology indices in Caucasian and a combined group of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) patients who tested positive for COVID-19 who died, compared to survivors. METHODS: We tested our hypothesis in 445 patients (229 Caucasian, 216 BAME) admitted to secondary care with proven COVID-19 infection, in whom standard routine laboratory indices were collected on admission. RESULTS: After 28 weeks, 190 (42.7%) had died within 28 days of COVID diagnosis (97 Caucasians [42.4%], 93 BAMEs [43.1%], P = .923). A general linear model analysis found the ethnicity interaction with mortality to be significant for fibrinogen, ferritin and HbA1 c (after controlling for age). In a multivariate analysis, a neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio > 7.4 and a urea/albumin ratio > 0.28 increased the odds of death for both the Caucasian and the BAME group. Additional factors increasing the odds ratio in the BAME group included age >60 years and being diabetic. CONCLUSION: Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and urea/albumin ratio are simple metrics that predict death to aid clinicians in determining the prognosis of COVID-19 and help provide early intensive intervention to reduce mortality. In the BAME groups, intensive monitoring even at younger age and those with diabetes may also help reduce COVID-19 associated mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Ferritins/analysis , Fibrinogen/analysis , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis , Urea/blood
4.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0250906, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209497

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The data on the COVID-19 patients who were discharged to self-quarantine is lacking. AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate the percentage of COVID-19 positive patients that were hospitalized within a three-week period after discharge from ED to self-quarantine. METHODS: The patients who had confirmed SARS-CoV-2 on RT-PCR of the nasopharyngeal swab and were discharged from ED of a tertiary care hospital in the USA to self-quarantine from March 01- July 31, 2020, were included. Patients were divided into two groups based on serum albumin levels and were followed up for three weeks to see if low level of albumin increased the risk of hospitalization. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to study the effect of albumin level and outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 112 patients were included in the study out of which 65 had low serum albumin (<3.5 g/dL) and 47 had normal serum albumin (≥3.5 g/dL). More than 10% of patients discharged to self-quarantine needed hospitalization within three weeks. The Low albumin group had more co-morbidities at baseline. The low serum albumin group had 10 (15.38%) vs 2 (4.26%), p = 0.06 hospitalizations as compared to the normal serum albumin group. The multivariate logistic regression analysis did not reveal lower odds of hospitalization in the group with normal albumin, (OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.03-1.92, p = 0.19) after controlling for age, sex, and various co-morbidities. CONCLUSION: The low serum albumin was not associated with the risk of hospitalization in COVID-19 patients who were initially discharged to self-quarantine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Case-Control Studies , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Angiology ; 72(10): 947-952, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1204018

ABSTRACT

Hypertension is one of the main morbidity and mortality risk factors in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We investigated the association between the C-reactive protein (CRP) to albumin ratio (CAR) and in-hospital mortality in patients with hypertensive COVID-19. A total of 176 patients with hypertension diagnosed with COVID-19 were included in this study. The CAR was compared between survivors and nonsurvivors. Logistic regression analysis was used to detect independent predictors of mortality due to COVID-19 in patients with hypertension. A cutoff value of CAR was obtained for predicting in-hospital death in patients with hypertensive COVID-19. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed for survival analysis in the study population. The CAR values were significantly higher in nonsurvivors than in survivors with hypertension. Moreover, the CAR was an independent predictor of in-hospital death in patients with hypertensive COVID-19, as shown in multivariable logistic regression analysis. Receiver operating characteristic analysis yielded a cutoff value of 20.75 for the CAR for predicting in-hospital death in patients with hypertension. Kaplan-Meier curve analysis showed that patients with hypertensive COVID-19 with a CAR value of ≥20.75 had a higher incidence of in-hospital death. The CAR might be used as an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality in patients with hypertensive COVID-19.


Subject(s)
C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Hypertension/mortality , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Hypertension/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
6.
Clin Lab ; 67(4)2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190626

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since December 2019, an outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) began in Wuhan and rapidly spread globally. The speed and scope of the spread of COVID-19 makes it urgent to define clinical characteristics, serological and radiological changes of the affected patients. METHODS: Seven patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 who were admitted to the Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University Yuedong Hospital from January 2020 to March 2020 were retrospectively enrolled and their clinical features, serological and radiological longitudinal changes were analyzed. RESULTS: Among the 7 patients, all (100%) had a clear epidemiological history. The most common symptoms were respiratory symptoms 6 (85.7%), and only 2 (28.6%) of the patients had fever at their first visit. The cohort included 4 (57.1%) common types and 3 (42.9%) severe types. Two (28.6%) common type patients developed to severe type in a short time. All of the 7 patients (100%) had abnormal liver function, normal renal function, and normal procalcitonin. The detection time of specific antibody in 7 patients was 5 - 13 days after symptoms. Before the specific antibody could be detected, the absolute value of lymphocytes decreased in 2 (28.6%) common type cases transferred to severe type cases accompanied with obvious progress in pulmonary imaging. The phenomenon of decreased albumin and elevated globulin occurred in 6 patients (85.7%). The predominant pattern of lung lesions observed was bilateral (71.4%) and mainly near the pleura at the first diagnosis. Bilateral pulmonary involvement occurred in 6 cases (85.7%) during the course of disease. In 4 cases (57.1%) with obvious pulmonary lesions, the absolute value of lymphocytes decreased, albumin decreased, and globulin increased during the course of the disease. CONCLUSIONS: Serum specific antibodies can be detected within 2 weeks of onset. Close observation of the dynamic changes of absolute value of blood lymphocytes, serum albumin, and globulin which were related to pulmonary imaging changes in patients will contribute to assessment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Antibodies, Viral/blood , China , Fever , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Lymphocyte Count , Retrospective Studies , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis , Serum Globulins/analysis
7.
Clin Lab ; 67(1)2021 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045294

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since December 2019, a series of pneumonia cases caused by COVID-19 emerged in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. People are generally susceptible to COVID-19 because people lack immunity to this new virus. With the spread of this epidemic disease from Wuhan, a national outbreak soon appeared, and now many countries have this disease. Unfortunately, no effective drug for COVID-19 treatment has been found so far. METHODS: We designed a retrospective study based on patients admitted to The Affiliated Infectious Hospital of Soochow University from January 22, 2020, to February 25, 2020, with diagnosed COVID-19. We analyzed correlations between RT-PCR negative time and laboratory indicators, then divided all cases into 2 groups according to oxygenation index, data of RT-PCR negative time and related laboratory indicators of the two groups were com-pared. RESULTS: We collected 84 confirmed patients whose RT-PCR had turned negative, including 23 patients with the lowest oxygenation index ≤ 300 mmHg and 61 patients had > 300 mmHg. There was a positive correlation between the RT-PCR negative time and age, WBC count, LDH, SCr. There were statistically significant differences in fever numbers, WBC count, lymphocyte count, CRP, ALT, AST, albumin, LDH, SCr, D-dimer, and fibrinogen between the two groups based on the oxygenation index. CONCLUSIONS: Age, WBC count, LDH, and SCr may be related to the duration of COVID-19 disease. Fever, WBC count, lymphocyte count, CRP, ALT, AST, albumin, LDH, SCr, D-dimer, and fibrinogen are related to the severity of acute lung injury.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/diagnosis , Blood Chemical Analysis , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/complications , Acute Lung Injury/blood , Acute Lung Injury/virology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Creatinine/blood , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/blood , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Retrospective Studies , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , Young Adult
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(45): e22971, 2020 Nov 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990916

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has rapidly spread on a global scale. Therefore, it is urgent to identify risk factors that could be associated with severe type of COVID-19 from common type.For this retrospective study, we recruited patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan and Zhoukou. Patients were classified into a severe group and common group based on guidelines after admission. Clinical manifestations and laboratory tests were compared, and univariate binary logistic regression and multivariate regression analyses were applied to assess potential risk factors.A total of 126 patients were recruited from January 23 to March 23, 2020. Ninety cases were identified as the common type and 36 as the severe type. The average age in the severe group was significantly older than that in the common group (P = .008). Patients with severe COVID-19 exhibited higher proportions of dyspnea (P = .001), weakness (P = .023), and diarrhea (P = .046). Moreover, there were more patients with hypertension (P = .01) or coinfection (P = .001) in the severe group than in the common group. Additionally, severe COVID-19 was associated with increased neutrophil counts (P < .001), C-reactive protein (P < .001), procalcitonin (P = .024) and decreased lymphocyte counts (P = .001), hemoglobin (P < .001), total protein (TP) (P < .001), and albumin (ALB) (P < .001). Based on logistic regression analysis, dyspnea (P < .001), TP (P = .042), and ALB (P = .003) were independent risk factors for severe disease.Patients with lower TP, ALB, and dyspnea should be carefully monitored, and early intervention should be implemented to prevent the development of severe disease.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Disease Progression , Hospitalization , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Blood Proteins/analysis , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , China , Dyspnea/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis , Young Adult
9.
Ren Fail ; 43(1): 49-57, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-975122

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is limited information about the clinical characteristics, treatment and outcome of maintenance hemodialysis patients with COVID-19. Moreover, regional differences are also conceivable since the extend and severity of outbreaks varied among countries. METHODS: In this retrospective, observational, single-center study, we analyzed the clinical course and outcomes of 37 maintenance hemodialysis patients (median age 64 years, 51% men) hospitalized with COVID-19 from 24 March to 22 May 2020 as confirmed by real-time PCR. RESULTS: The most common symptoms at admission were fatigue (51%), fever (43%), dyspnea (38%) and cough (35%). There were 59% mild/moderate patients and 41% severe/critical patients. Patients in the severe/critical group had a significantly higher atherosclerotic burden since diabetic kidney disease and vascular nephropathies were the most common primary kidney diseases and eighty percent of them had coronary heart disease. Also, Charlson comorbidity score was higher in this group. At admission chest X-ray, 46% had ground-glass abnormalities. Overall, 60% patients received hydroxychloroquine, 22% lopinavir-ritonavir, 11% tocilizumab, 24% systemic glucocorticoids, and 54% received prophylactic anticoagulation. Seven (19%) patients died during hospitalization and 30 were discharged. The main causes of death were cardiovascular (5 patients) and respiratory distress syndrome (2 patients). In Cox regression analysis, lower oxygen saturation, anemia and hypoalbuminemia at admission were associated with increased mortality. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we observed a high mortality rate among maintenance hemodialysis patients hospitalized for COVID-19. Anemia, lower serum albumin and lower basal oxygen saturation at admission were factors associated with poor prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Renal Dialysis , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cause of Death , Comorbidity , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/blood , Kidney Failure, Chronic/etiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/blood , Patient Admission , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Romania/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis , Severity of Illness Index
10.
Bioorg Chem ; 105: 104429, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893618

ABSTRACT

Human serum albumin (HSA) as the most abundant protein in human blood plasma, can be a good indicator for evaluating severity of some diseases in the clinic. HSA can be find in two forms: reduced albumin (human mercaptalbumin (HMA)) and oxidized albumin (human non-mercaptalbumin (HNA)). The rate of oxidized albumin to total albumin can be enhanced in multiple diseases. Increase in HNA level have been demonstrated in liver, diabetes plus fatigue and coronary artery diseases. In liver patients, this enhancement can reach to 50-200 percent which can then lead to bacterial/viral infections and eventually death in severe conditions. Due to the induction of cytokine storm, we can say that the level of HNA in serum of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients may be a positive predictor of mortality, especially in patients with underlying diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, aging and other inflammatory diseases. We suggest that checking oxidized albumin in COVID-19 patients may provide new therapeutic and diagnostic opportunities to better combat COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/cytology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Liver/metabolism , Oxidation-Reduction , Reactive Oxygen Species/chemistry , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Serum Albumin/analysis , Serum Albumin/chemistry , Serum Albumin, Human/chemistry
11.
Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand) ; 66(6): 15-18, 2020 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-846312

ABSTRACT

Evaluation of cytokine production in COVIID-19 disease, in which the cytokine storm is one of the most important pathological features in complicated cases, especially interleukin 6 as a pre-inflammatory cytokine that exacerbates the immune response, could help determine the pathophysiology of the disease. Examining the level of this cytokine along with other related factors can help to better understand the pathogenesis of this disease. In this cross-sectional study, 48 patients with COVID-19 whose disease was confirmed by swap testing were evaluated. The demographic information of the individuals, the symptoms of the disease, and the ward in which they were admitted were recorded. Blood samples were taken from patients to test for interleukin-6 levels by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA, Roche Diagnostics). Due to the lack of specific treatment protocols for patients and the use of supportive treatments based on meeting the nutritional needs for all patients, blood albumin levels and nutritional status of patients were also evaluated using Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) Form. Their calorie intake was assessed by calculating the number of calories received based on the type of nutrition and compared to the required amount calculated through the Harris-Benedict equation. 48 laboratory-confirmed 2019-nCoV infected patients were included in the study with the mean age of 46.4 ± 8.3 years. 21 patients were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). There was no significant difference between the ICU admitted and patients admitted inward in terms of demographic characteristics, and history of previous diseases (p > 0.05). The average interleukin 6 (IL-6) in patients was 72.3±34.4 pg/ml. ICU admitted patients had higher IL6 levels (p=0.001). The mean interleukin 6 level was 89.04±34.1 pg/ml in patients admitted for less than 7 days and it was significantly higher (119.2±28.3) in patients hospitalized for more than 7 days (p=0.001). there was no significant difference in terms of nutritional status and albumin level between ICU admitted and ward admitted patients (p >0.05). Our study shows that there may be possible associations of IL6 and disease severity and ICU stay length.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units , Interleukin-6/blood , Length of Stay , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Energy Intake , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nutritional Status , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis
12.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(5): 555-559, 2020 May 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745320

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To analyze the clinical characteristics in patients of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) complicated with liver injury, to explore the relationship between COVID-19 clinical classification and liver injury, and to elucidate whether COVID-19 complicated with hepatitis B virus can aggravate liver injury. METHODS: The abnormal liver function in 110 patients in the First Hospital of Changsha, who were confirmed COVID-19 and admitted to the designated hospital from January 17, 2020 to February 20, 2020, wereretrospectively analyzed. The detection indexes included serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), albumin (ALB), and total bilirubin (TBIL). RESULTS: A total of 49.1% of the COVID-19 patients had liver injury. There were significant difference in the ALT, AST, ALB (all P<0.05), but there was no significant difference in the TBIL (P>0.05) between the severe (critical) patients and the general (light) patients. There was also no significant difference in the liver function injury between the HBsAg-positive COVID-19 patients and HBsAg-negative COVID-19 patients (P>0.05). Acute liver injury was not found to be a direct cause of death in the patients. CONCLUSIONS: In the COVID-19 patients, the incidence of liver injury is high with the increase of ALT and AST and the decrease of ALB. Severe and critical patients have obvious liver injury, and those patients complicated with hepatitis B virus infection don't show aggravated liver injury.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Liver Diseases/virology , Liver/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Betacoronavirus , Bilirubin/blood , COVID-19 , Humans , Liver/virology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis
13.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 567, 2020 Aug 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-692264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To assess the dynamic changes in clinical and CT characteristics of COVID-19 patients with different epidemiology histories. METHODS: Fifty-three discharged COVID-19 patients were enrolled at Beijing YouAn Hospital, Capital Medical University, between January 21 and March 10, 2020. Spearman correlation analysis was performed between CT scores and laboratory indicators. Patients were divided into the Wuhan group (lived in or with travel to Wuhan, numbering 30 cases) and non-Wuhan group (close contacts or unknown exposure, totaling 23 cases). The CT and laboratory findings were compared between and within groups during the clinical process. RESULTS: Fever (88.7%), cough (64.2%), fatigue (34%), and abnormal laboratory indicators, including lymphopenia, reduced albumin, albumin/globulin (A/G), and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), were mainly observed. Subpleural ground-glass opacities (86.8%) were usually detected at admission. The CT scores were highly correlated with lymphocytes, CRP, albumin, and A/G at initial and follow-ups (all p < 0.05). Four days after admission, most patients (66.7% Wuhan, 47.8% non-Wuhan) showed progression, and the CT scores of Wuhan significantly increased (p = 0.015). Eight days after admission, the vast majority of patients (69.2% Wuhan, 100% non-Wuhan, p = 0.006) presented improvement, and the CT scores of non-Wuhan were significantly lower than Wuhan (p = 0.006). Pneumonia was completely absorbed in most patients 2-4 weeks after discharge. CONCLUSIONS: CT plays a crucial role in the early diagnosis and monitoring of changes in COVID-19. Lymphocytes, CRP, albumin, and A/G are expected to predict disease severity and prognosis. Viral pathogenicity in non-endemic areas may be weaker than core-infected areas. In most patients, lung lesions can disappear around 4 weeks after discharge.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Cough/epidemiology , Fever/epidemiology , Lymphopenia/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis , Serum Globulins/analysis , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cough/virology , Disease Progression , Female , Fever/virology , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Travel
14.
Clin Chem Lab Med ; 58(8): 1172-1181, 2020 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-608457

ABSTRACT

Objective Recently, there have been several studies on the clinical characteristics of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19); however, these studies have mainly been concentrated in Wuhan, China; the sample sizes of each article were different; and the reported clinical characteristics, especially blood biochemical indices, were quite different. This study aimed to summarize the blood biochemistry characteristics of COVID-19 patients by performing a systemic review and meta-analysis of published studies. Methods Comprehensive studies were screened from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library through March 11, 2020. The inclusion criteria included studies investigating the biochemical indexes of patients with COVID-19. The statistical software R3.6.3 was used for meta-analysis. Results Ten studies including 1745 COVID-19 patients met the inclusion criteria for our meta-analysis. Meta-analysis showed that 16% and 20% of patients with COVID-19 had alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels higher than the normal range, respectively. Thirty-four percent of patients showed albumin (ALB) levels lower than the normal range, and 6% of patients showed abnormal total bilirubin (TBil) levels. The levels of creatinine (CRE) were increased in 8% of patients. The creatine kinase (CK) level of 13% of patients exceeded the normal range, and 52% of patients had elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. In addition, six studies met the inclusion criteria for the systemic review evaluating the relevance between LDH levels and the severity of COVID-19, and all six studies showed a positive association between these two factors. Conclusions Some patients with COVID-19 had different degrees of blood biochemical abnormalities, which might indicate multiple organ dysfunction. Some biochemical indexes, such as abnormal ALB and LDH, could reflect the severity of the disease to a certain extent. These blood biochemical indicators should be considered in the clinical management of the disease.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Blood Chemical Analysis/statistics & numerical data , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Pandemics , Regression Analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis
16.
PLoS One ; 15(6): e0234764, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-601962

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) in Wuhan have affected more than 250 countries and regions worldwide. However, most of the clinical studies have been focused on Wuhan, and little is known about the disease outside of Wuhan in China. In this retrospective cohort study, we report the early clinical features of 80 patients with COVID-19 admitted to the hospital in Beijing. The results show that 27 (33.8%) patients had severe illness. Six (7.5%) patients were admitted to the ICU, and 3 (3.8%) patients died. Forty-eight percent (39/80) of the patients had a history of living/traveling in Wuhan. Patients with severe- illness were significantly older (average age, 71 years old vs 44 years old) and had a high incidence of expectoration (59.3% vs 34.0%), shortness of breath (92.6% vs 9.4%), anorexia (51.9% vs 18.9%) and confusion(18.5% vs 0%) compared with nonsevere patients. The systolic blood pressure (median, 130 mmHg vs 120 mmHg) was higher and the oxygen saturation (median, 98.3% vs 92.0%) was significantly lower in severe patients than nonsevere patients. In addition, myoglobin (median, 56.0 ng/mL vs 35.0 ng/mL), troponin I (median, 0.02 pg/mL vs 0.01 pg/mL), C-reactive protein (median, 69.7 mg/L vs 12.9 mg/L) and neutrophils (median, 3.3×109/L vs 2.2×109/L) were significantly increased, while lymphocytes (median, 0.8×109/L vs 1.2×109/L), albumin (mean, 32.8 g/L vs 36.8 g/L) and the creatinine clearance rate (median, 91.2 vs 108.2 ml/min/1.73m2) were significantly decreased among severe patients. Our study revealed that older patients with high levels of C-reactive protein, myoglobin, troponin I, and neutrophil and high systolic blood pressure as well as low levels of lymphocytes, and albumin and a low creatinine clearance rate and oxygen saturation were more likely to have severe disease.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Beijing/epidemiology , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Creatinine/blood , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypertension , Lymphocytes , Male , Middle Aged , Myoglobin/blood , Neutrophils , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis , Troponin I/blood
17.
Clin Chem Lab Med ; 58(7): 1100-1105, 2020 06 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-360981

ABSTRACT

Background Comprehensive information has been published on laboratory tests which may predict worse outcome in Asian populations with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The aim of this study is to describe laboratory findings in a group of Italian COVID-19 patients in the area of Valcamonica, and correlate abnormalities with disease severity. Methods The final study population consisted of 144 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 (70 who died during hospital stay and 74 who survived and could be discharged) between March 1 and 30, 2020, in Valcamonica Hospital. Demographical, clinical and laboratory data were collected upon hospital admission and were then correlated with outcome (i.e. in-hospital death vs. discharge). Results Compared to patients who could be finally discharged, those who died during hospital stay displayed significantly higher values of serum glucose, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), urea, creatinine, high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hscTnI), prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), D-dimer, C reactive protein (CRP), ferritin and leukocytes (especially neutrophils), whilst values of albumin, hemoglobin and lymphocytes were significantly decreased. In multiple regression analysis, LDH, CRP, neutrophils, lymphocytes, albumin, APTT and age remained significant predictors of in-hospital death. A regression model incorporating these variables explained 80% of overall variance of in-hospital death. Conclusions The most important laboratory abnormalities described here in a subset of European COVID-19 patients residing in Valcamonica are highly predictive of in-hospital death and may be useful for guiding risk assessment and clinical decision-making.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arginine/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Betacoronavirus , Blood Glucose/analysis , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Carnosine/blood , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Creatine Kinase/blood , Creatinine/blood , Drug Combinations , Female , Ferritins/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Italy , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Leukocytes , Lymphocytes , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils , Pandemics , Partial Thromboplastin Time , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Prothrombin Time , SARS-CoV-2 , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis , Troponin I/blood , Urea/blood
18.
Platelets ; 31(5): 674-679, 2020 Jul 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-175735

ABSTRACT

Concomitant coagulation disorder can occur in severe patients withCOVID-19, but in-depth studies are limited. This study aimed to describe the parameters of coagulation function of patients with COVID-19 and reveal the risk factors of developing severe disease. This study retrospectively analyzed 113patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection in Taizhou Public Health Center. Clinical characteristics and indexes of coagulation function were collected. A multivariate Cox analysis was performed to identify potential biomarkers for predicting disease progression. Based on the results of multivariate Cox analysis, a Nomogram was built and the predictive accuracy was evaluated through the calibration curve, decision curve, clinical impact curve, and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values were calculated to assess the clinical value. The data showed that Fibrinogen, FAR, and D-dimer were higher in the severe patients, while PLTcount, Alb were much lower. Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that FAR and PLT count were independent risk factors for disease progression. The optimal cutoff values for FAR and PLT count were 0.0883 and 135*109/L, respectively. The C-index [0.712 (95% CI = 0.610-0.814)], decision curve, clinical impact curve showed that Nomogram could be used to predict the disease progression. In addition, the Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that potential risk decreased in patients with FAR<0.0883 and PLT count>135*109/L.The model showed a good negative predictive value [(0.9474 (95%CI = 0.845-0.986)].This study revealed that FAR and PLT count were independent risk factors for severe illness and the severity of COVID-19 might be excluded when FAR<0.0883 and PLT count>135*109/L.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Fibrinogen/analysis , Nomograms , Pandemics , Platelet Count , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Serum Albumin, Human/analysis , Adult , Area Under Curve , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation Tests , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Progression , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Proportional Hazards Models , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Symptom Assessment
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