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2.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 39 Suppl 130(3): 72-77, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2101115

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is a complex disease that is mainly characterised by chronic widespread pain, fatigue and sleep disturbances and may be precipitated or worsened by many stressors. The aim of this study was to observe the behaviour of FM symptoms during the course of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: Patients who had been diagnosed as having FM for ≥3 months were recruited between February and May 2020. The collected data were age, sex, educational level and marital status; height and weight; and the scores of the revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR), the modified Fibromyalgia Assessment Status 2019 (FASmod), and the Polysymptomatic Distress Scale (PDS). The patients were divided into those with or without concomitant COVID-19 infection. RESULTS: Eight hundred and ninety-seven (93%) of the 965 patients (881 women [91.3%] and 84 men [8.7%]) were followed up on an outpatient basis because of FM and 68 (7.0%) were either followed up as out-patients or hospitalised because of COVID-19. There was no difference in the sociodemographic data of the two groups, but there were statistically significant between-group differences in the results of the clinimetric tests. The major differences between the score of the items (those with the greatest disease impact) were the following related symptoms: sleep quality (FIQR15), fatigue/energy (FIQR13), pain (FIQR12), stiffness (FIQR14). CONCLUSIONS: The mean total and subdomain scores of all the tests were significantly higher in the patients with COVID-19, which suggests that global FM symptoms are more severe in patients with infection. Further studies of the post-COVID19 patients are being carried out in order to discover whether the worsened symptomatology continues because of their hypersensitised state.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibromyalgia , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Fibromyalgia/diagnosis , Fibromyalgia/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med ; 28(1): 66, 2020 Jul 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098371

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a need for validated clinical risk scores to identify patients at risk of severe disease and to guide decision-making during the covid-19 pandemic. The National Early Warning Score 2 (NEWS2) is widely used in emergency medicine, but so far, no studies have evaluated its use in patients with covid-19. We aimed to study the performance of NEWS2 and compare commonly used clinical risk stratification tools at admission to predict risk of severe disease and in-hospital mortality in patients with covid-19. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study in a public non-university general hospital in the Oslo area, Norway, including a cohort of all 66 patients hospitalised with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection from the start of the pandemic; 13 who died during hospital stay and 53 who were discharged alive. Data were collected consecutively from March 9th to April 27th 2020. The main outcome was the ability of the NEWS2 score and other clinical risk scores at emergency department admission to predict severe disease and in-hospital mortality in covid-19 patients. We calculated sensitivity and specificity with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for NEWS2 scores ≥5 and ≥ 6, quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) score ≥ 2, ≥2 Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) criteria, and CRB-65 score ≥ 2. Areas under the curve (AUCs) for the clinical risk scores were compared using DeLong's test. RESULTS: In total, 66 patients (mean age 67.9 years) were included. Of these, 23% developed severe disease. In-hospital mortality was 20%. Tachypnoea, hypoxemia and confusion at admission were more common in patients developing severe disease. A NEWS2 score ≥ 6 at admission predicted severe disease with 80.0% sensitivity and 84.3% specificity (Area Under the Curve (AUC) 0.822, 95% CI 0.690-0.953). NEWS2 was superior to qSOFA score ≥ 2 (AUC 0.624, 95% CI 0.446-0.810, p < 0.05) and other clinical risk scores for this purpose. CONCLUSION: NEWS2 score at hospital admission predicted severe disease and in-hospital mortality, and was superior to other widely used clinical risk scores in patients with covid-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Early Warning Score , Hospital Mortality , Patient Admission , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Norway/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Severity of Illness Index
4.
Ultrasound Med Biol ; 47(2): 214-221, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096090

ABSTRACT

In this study, the utility of point-of-care lung ultrasound for clinical classification of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) was prospectively assessed. Twenty-seven adult patients with COVID-19 underwent bedside lung ultrasonography (LUS) examinations three times each within the first 2 wk of admission to the isolation ward. We divided the 81 exams into three groups (moderate, severe and critically ill). Lung scores were calculated as the sum of points. A rank sum test and bivariate correlation analysis were carried out to determine the correlation between LUS on admission and clinical classification of COVID-19. There were dramatic differences in LUS (p < 0.001) among the three groups, and LUS scores (r = 0.754) correlated positively with clinical severity (p < 0.01). In addition, moderate, severe and critically ill patients were more likely to have low (≤9), medium (9-15) and high scores (≥15), respectively. This study provides stratification criteria of LUS scores to assist in quantitatively evaluating COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Point-of-Care Systems , Ultrasonography/instrumentation , Ultrasonography/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 28(11): 2270-2280, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089723

ABSTRACT

Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, different SARS-CoV-2 variants have been identified and associated with higher transmissibility than the ancestral nonvariant strain. During January 1, 2021-January 15, 2022, we assessed differences in clinical and viral parameters in a convenience sample of COVID-19 outpatients and inpatients 0-21 years of age in Columbus, Ohio, USA, according to the infecting variant, identified using a mutation-specific reverse transcription PCR assay. Of the 676 patients in the study, 17.75% were infected with nonvariant strains, 18.49% with the Alpha variant, 41.72% with Delta, and 16.42% with Omicron. Rates of SARS-COV-2/viral co-infections were 15.66%-29.41% and were comparable across infecting variants. Inpatients with acute Delta and Omicron infections had lower SARS-CoV-2 cycle threshold values and more frequent fever and respiratory symptoms than those with nonvariant strain infections. In addition, SARS-COV-2/viral co-infections and the presence of underlying conditions were independently associated with worse clinical outcomes, irrespective of the infecting variant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Child , Humans , Adolescent , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Pandemics , Severity of Illness Index
6.
BMJ ; 379: o2516, 2022 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088791
7.
EBioMedicine ; 85: 104315, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086128

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hepatic steatosis (HS) identified on CT may provide an integrated cardiometabolic and COVID-19 risk assessment. This study presents a deep-learning-based hepatic fat assessment (DeHFt) pipeline for (a) more standardised measurements and (b) investigating the association between HS (liver-to-spleen attenuation ratio <1 in CT) and COVID-19 infections severity, wherein severity is defined as requiring invasive mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, death. METHODS: DeHFt comprises two steps. First, a deep-learning-based segmentation model (3D residual-UNet) is trained (N.ß=.ß80) to segment the liver and spleen. Second, CT attenuation is estimated using slice-based and volumetric-based methods. DeHFt-based mean liver and liver-to-spleen attenuation are compared with an expert's ROI-based measurements. We further obtained the liver-to-spleen attenuation ratio in a large multi-site cohort of patients with COVID-19 infections (D1, N.ß=.ß805; D2, N.ß=.ß1917; D3, N.ß=.ß169) using the DeHFt pipeline and investigated the association between HS and COVID-19 infections severity. FINDINGS: The DeHFt pipeline achieved a dice coefficient of 0.95, 95% CI [0.93...0.96] on the independent validation cohort (N.ß=.ß49). The automated slice-based and volumetric-based liver and liver-to-spleen attenuation estimations strongly correlated with expert's measurement. In the COVID-19 cohorts, severe infections had a higher proportion of patients with HS than non-severe infections (pooled OR.ß=.ß1.50, 95% CI [1.20...1.88], P.ß<.ß.001). INTERPRETATION: The DeHFt pipeline enabled accurate segmentation of liver and spleen on non-contrast CTs and automated estimation of liver and liver-to-spleen attenuation ratio. In three cohorts of patients with COVID-19 infections (N.ß=.ß2891), HS was associated with disease severity. Pending validation, DeHFt provides an automated CT-based metabolic risk assessment. FUNDING: For a full list of funding bodies, please see the Acknowledgements.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Learning , Fatty Liver , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Fatty Liver/diagnostic imaging , Severity of Illness Index
8.
J Postgrad Med ; 68(4): 199-206, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080671

ABSTRACT

Background: : Risk assessment with prognostic scoring, though important, is scarcely studied in emergency surgical patients with COVID-19 infection. Methods and Material: We conducted a retrospective cohort study on adult emergency surgical patients with COVID-19 infection in our institute from 1 May 2020 to 31 October 2021 to find the 30-day postoperative mortality and predictive accuracy of prognostic scores. We assessed the demographic data, prognostic risk scores (American Society of Anesthesiologists-Physical Classification (ASA-PS), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA), Quick SOFA (qSOFA), Physiologic and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM) and Portsmouth-POSSUM (P-POSSUM) scores), surgical and anesthetic factors. We assessed the postoperative morbidity using the Clavien-Dindo scale and recorded the 30-day mortality. Correlation of prognostic scores and mortality was evaluated using Univariate Cox proportional hazards regression, receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC), Youden's index and Hosmer- Lemeshow goodness of fit model. Results: Emergency surgery was performed in 67 COVID-19 patients with postoperative complication and 30-day mortality rate of 33% and 19%, respectively. A positive qSOFA and ASAPS IIIE/IVE had a 9.03- and 12.7-times higher risk of mortality compared to a negative qSOFA and ASA-PS IE/IIE (P < 0.001), respectively. Every unit increase of SOFA, POSSUM and P-POSSUM scores was associated with a 50%, 18% and 17% higher risk of mortality, respectively. SOFA, POSSUM and P-POSSUM AUCROC curves showed good discrimination between survivors and non-survivors (AUC 0.8829, 0.85 and 0.86, respectively). Conclusions: SOFA score has a higher sensitivity to predict 30-day postoperative mortality as compared to POSSUM and P-POSSUM. However, in absence of a control group of non-COVID-19 patients, actual risk attributable to COVID-19 infection could not be determined.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Prognosis , Postoperative Period , Risk Assessment/methods , ROC Curve , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Severity of Illness Index
9.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0275815, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079752

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic and ensuing public health emergency has emphasized the need to study SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis. The human microbiome has been shown to regulate the host immune system and may influence host susceptibility to viral infection, as well as disease severity. Several studies have assessed whether compositional alterations in the nasopharyngeal microbiota are associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, the results of these studies were varied, and many did not account for disease severity. This study aims to examine whether compositional differences in the nasopharyngeal microbiota are associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection status and disease severity. METHODS: We performed Nanopore full-length 16S rRNA sequencing on 194 nasopharyngeal swab specimens from hospitalized and community-dwelling SARS-CoV-2-infected and uninfected individuals. Sequence data analysis was performed using the BugSeq 16S analysis pipeline. RESULTS: We found significant beta (PERMANOVA p < 0.05), but not alpha (Kruskal-Wallis p > 0.05) diversity differences in the nasopharyngeal microbiota among our study groups. We identified several differentially abundant taxa associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection status and disease severity using ALDEx2. Finally, we observed a trend towards higher abundance of Enterobacteriaceae in specimens from hospitalized SARS-CoV-2-infected patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified several alterations in the nasopharyngeal microbiome associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection status and disease severity. Understanding the role of the microbiome in infection susceptibility and severity may open new avenues of research for disease prevention and treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Microbiota , Humans , Nasopharynx , Pandemics/prevention & control , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
10.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0272839, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079726

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has been the most important public health concern worldwide since 2020. Several vaccines are now available to help in controlling COVID-19 associated morbidity and mortality. This study will aim to provide the global and regional prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection as well as an estimate of disease severity among COVID-19 vaccinated individuals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In order to determine the global burden of SARS-CoV-2 infection among vaccinated individuals, we will systematically extract and review papers from PubMed/MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica database (EMBASE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Science direct and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). All the studies describing the prevalence and/or disease severity (hospitalization and case fatality rate) data of COVID-19 among individuals who received a partial or complete dose of WHO-approved COVID-19 vaccines will be eligible. A random effect model will be used to calculate the pooled prevalence and to estimate the disease severity. Subgroup analysis will be performed to explore the association between the number of vaccine doses received and the COVID-19 burdens. DISCUSSION: This systematic review and meta-analysis will provide the global estimate data on pooled prevalence, hospitalization and case fatality rates of COVID-19 among vaccinated individuals. Moreover, the factors associated with reinfection and disease severity will be equally investigated in the meta-analysis. The results of this study will contribute in the understanding and estimation of the global burden of COVID-19 among vaccinated individuals. Findings will provide meaningful information for the success of the current global rollout of COVID-19 vaccination strategies and pave the way for future interventions. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: CRD42021273074.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Hospitalization , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Systematic Reviews as Topic
11.
BMC Med ; 20(1): 400, 2022 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079421

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Limited data are available on the effectiveness of inactivated and Ad5-nCoV COVID-19 vaccines in real-world use-especially against Omicron variants in SARS-CoV-2 infection-naïve population. METHODS: A matched case-control study was conducted among people aged ≥ 3 years between 2 December 2021 and 13 May 2022. Cases were SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals, individuals with severe/critical COVID-19, or COVID-19-related deaths. Controls were selected from consecutively test-negative individuals at the same time as cases were diagnosed and were exact-matched on year-of-age, gender, birthplace, illness onset date, and residential district in ratios of 1:1 with infected individuals and 4:1 with severe/critical COVID-19 and COVID-19-related death. Additionally, two subsets were constructed to analyze separate vaccine effectiveness (VE) of inactivated vaccines (subset 1) and Ad5-vectored vaccine (subset 2) against each of the three outcomes. RESULTS: Our study included 612,597 documented SARS-CoV-2 infections, among which 1485 progressed to severe or critical illness and 568 died. Administering COVID-19 vaccines provided limited protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection across all age groups (overall VE: 16.0%, 95% CI: 15.1-17.0%) but high protection against severe/critical illness (88.6%, 85.8-90.8%) and COVID-19-related death (91.6%, 86.8-94.6%). In subset 1, inactivated vaccine showed 16.3% (15.4-17.2%) effective against infection, 88.6% (85.8-90.9%) effective against severe/critical COVIID-19, and 91.7% (86.9-94.7%) against COVID-19 death. Booster vaccination with inactivated vaccines enhanced protection against severe COVID-19 (92.7%, 90.1-94.6%) and COVID-19 death (95.9%, 91.4-98.1%). Inactivated VE against infection began to wane 12 weeks after the last dose, but two and three doses sustained high protection levels (> 80%) against severe/critical illness and death, while subset 2 showed Ad5-vectored vaccine was 13.2% (10.9-15.5%) effective against infection and 77.9% (15.6-94.2%) effective against severe/critical COVIID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Our real-world study found high and durable two- and three-dose inactivated VE against Omicron-associated severe/critical illness and death across all age groups, but lower effectiveness against Omicron infection, which reinforces the critical importance of full-series vaccination and timely booster dose administration for all eligible individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Vaccines , Humans , Antibodies, Viral , Case-Control Studies , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Critical Illness , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, Inactivated , Severity of Illness Index
12.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 792, 2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079396

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 infections have a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations whose causes are not completely understood. Some human conditions predispose to severe outcome, like old age or the presence of comorbidities, but many other facets, including coinfections with other viruses, remain poorly characterized. METHODS: In this study, the eukaryotic fraction of the respiratory virome of 120 COVID-19 patients was characterized through whole metagenomic sequencing. RESULTS: Genetic material from respiratory viruses was detected in 25% of all samples, whereas human viruses other than SARS-CoV-2 were found in 80% of them. Samples from hospitalized and deceased patients presented a higher prevalence of different viruses when compared to ambulatory individuals. Small circular DNA viruses from the Anneloviridae (Torque teno midi virus 8, TTV-like mini virus 19 and 26) and Cycloviridae families (Human associated cyclovirus 10), Human betaherpesvirus 6, were found to be significantly more abundant in samples from deceased and hospitalized patients compared to samples from ambulatory individuals. Similarly, Rotavirus A, Measles morbillivirus and Alphapapilomavirus 10 were significantly more prevalent in deceased patients compared to hospitalized and ambulatory individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Results show the suitability of using metagenomics to characterize a broader peripheric virological landscape of the eukaryotic virome in SARS-CoV-2 infected patients with distinct disease outcomes. Identified prevalent viruses in hospitalized and deceased patients may prove important for the targeted exploration of coinfections that may impact prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Viruses , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Coinfection/epidemiology , Viruses/genetics , DNA, Circular , Severity of Illness Index
14.
Clin Infect Dis ; 75(Supplement_2): S159-S166, 2022 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077717

ABSTRACT

Background . Adults in the United States (US) began receiving the adenovirus vector coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine, Ad26.COV2.S (Johnson & Johnson [Janssen]), in February 2021. We evaluated Ad26.COV2.S vaccine effectiveness (VE) against COVID-19 hospitalization and high disease severity during the first 10 months of its use. Methods . In a multicenter case-control analysis of US adults (≥18 years) hospitalized 11 March to 15 December 2021, we estimated VE against susceptibility to COVID-19 hospitalization (VEs), comparing odds of prior vaccination with a single dose Ad26.COV2.S vaccine between hospitalized cases with COVID-19 and controls without COVID-19. Among hospitalized patients with COVID-19, we estimated VE against disease progression (VEp) to death or invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), comparing odds of prior vaccination between patients with and without progression. Results . After excluding patients receiving mRNA vaccines, among 3979 COVID-19 case-patients (5% vaccinated with Ad26.COV2.S) and 2229 controls (13% vaccinated with Ad26.COV2.S), VEs of Ad26.COV2.S against COVID-19 hospitalization was 70% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 63-75%) overall, including 55% (29-72%) among immunocompromised patients, and 72% (64-77%) among immunocompetent patients, for whom VEs was similar at 14-90 days (73% [59-82%]), 91-180 days (71% [60-80%]), and 181-274 days (70% [54-81%]) postvaccination. Among hospitalized COVID-19 case-patients, VEp was 46% (18-65%) among immunocompetent patients. Conclusions . The Ad26.COV2.S COVID-19 vaccine reduced the risk of COVID-19 hospitalization by 72% among immunocompetent adults without waning through 6 months postvaccination. After hospitalization for COVID-19, vaccinated immunocompetent patients were less likely to require IMV or die compared to unvaccinated immunocompetent patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Ad26COVS1 , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Hospitalization , Humans , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Severity of Illness Index , United States/epidemiology
15.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 17480, 2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077107

ABSTRACT

Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, increasing cases with variable outcomes continue globally because of variants and despite vaccines and therapies. There is a need to identify at-risk individuals early that would benefit from timely medical interventions. DNA methylation provides an opportunity to identify an epigenetic signature of individuals at increased risk. We utilized machine learning to identify DNA methylation signatures of COVID-19 disease from data available through NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus. A training cohort of 460 individuals (164 COVID-19-infected and 296 non-infected) and an external validation dataset of 128 individuals (102 COVID-19-infected and 26 non-COVID-associated pneumonia) were reanalyzed. Data was processed using ChAMP and beta values were logit transformed. The JADBio AutoML platform was leveraged to identify a methylation signature associated with severe COVID-19 disease. We identified a random forest classification model from 4 unique methylation sites with the power to discern individuals with severe COVID-19 disease. The average area under the curve of receiver operator characteristic (AUC-ROC) of the model was 0.933 and the average area under the precision-recall curve (AUC-PRC) was 0.965. When applied to our external validation, this model produced an AUC-ROC of 0.898 and an AUC-PRC of 0.864. These results further our understanding of the utility of DNA methylation in COVID-19 disease pathology and serve as a platform to inform future COVID-19 related studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/genetics , DNA Methylation , Pandemics , Machine Learning , Severity of Illness Index
16.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 13483, 2022 08 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077085

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has caused the recent pandemic of respiratory infection, which threatened global health. The severity of the symptoms varies among affected individuals, from asymptotic or mild signs to severe or critical illness. Genetic predisposition explains the variation in disease severity among patients who suffer from severe symptoms without any known background risk factors. The present study was performed to show the association between APOE genotype and the severity of COVID-19 disease. The APOE genotype of 201 COVID-19 patients (101 patients with asymptomatic to mild form of the disease as the control group and 100 patients with severe to critical illness without any known background risk factors as the case group) were detected via multiplex tetra-primer ARMS-PCR method. Results showed that the e4 allele increased the risk of the COVID-19 infection severity more than five times and the e4/e4 genotype showed a 17-fold increase in the risk of severe disease. In conclusion, since our study design was based on the exclusion of patients with underlying diseases predisposing to severe form of COVID-19 and diseases related to the APOE gene in the study population, our results showed that the e4 genotype is independently associated with the severity of COVID-19 disease. However, further studies are needed to confirm these findings in other nations and to demonstrate the mechanisms behind the role of these alleles in disease severity.


Subject(s)
Apolipoproteins E , COVID-19 , Alleles , Apolipoprotein E4/genetics , Apolipoproteins E/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Critical Illness , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genotype , Humans , Severity of Illness Index
17.
Ann Clin Lab Sci ; 52(5): 781-787, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2072746

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The prognosis value of fibrosis-4 score (FIB-4) in COVID-19 is controversial. Hence, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the association between the FIB-4 index and COVID-19 disease progression. METHODS: We performed meta-analysis using the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases. A fixed- or random-effects model was used for evaluating heterogeneity. RESULTS: Thirteen studies were included. The meta-analysis of unadjusted results showed that compared to lower FIB-4 index, patients with higher FIB-4 index had increased odds of mortality (OR=5.1, 95%CI 3.67-7.09; P<0.001), ICU admission (OR=2.32, 95%CI: 1.65-3.25, P<0.00001) and need for mechanical ventilator support (OR=3.51, 95%CI: 2.1-5.85, P<0.001). In addition, the meta-analysis of adjusted results showed patients with higher FIB-4 index was associated with increased risk of mortality (OR=3.01, 95%CI: 2.21-4.09, P<0.001) and need for mechanical ventilator support (OR=3.76, 95%CI: 2.08-6.82, P<0.001) compared to patients with lower FIB-4 index. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis indicated that high FIB-4 index score was associated with the severity and mortality in COVID-19 infected patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibrosis , Humans , Prognosis , Severity of Illness Index
18.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 82(4)2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066794

ABSTRACT

Objective: The conditions created by the COVID-19 pandemic could negatively affect maternal mental health and the mother-infant relationship. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on depression, anxiety, and mother-infant bonding among women seeking treatment for postpartum depression (PPD).Methods: Baseline data collected in two separate randomized controlled trials of a psychoeducational intervention for PPD in the same geographic region, one prior to COVID-19 (March 2019-March 2020) and one during the COVID-19 pandemic (April-October 2020), were compared. Eligible participants had an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score of ≥ 10, were ≥ 18 years of age, had an infant < 12 months old, and were fluent in English. Outcomes included PPD (EPDS), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 [GAD-7]), and mother-infant relationship (Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire [PBQ]). All were measured continuously and dichotomized at accepted clinical cutoffs.Results: Of the 603 participants (305 pre-COVID-19; 298 during COVID-19), mothers enrolled during the COVID-19 pandemic reported higher levels of symptoms of PPD (B = 1.35; 95% CI, 0.64 to 2.06; Cohen d = 0.31) and anxiety (B = 1.52; 95% CI, 0.72 to 2.32; Cohen d = 0.30). During COVID-19, women had 65% higher odds of clinically significant levels of depression symptoms (OR = 1.65; 95% CI, 1.13 to 2.31) and 46% higher odds of clinically relevant anxiety symptoms (OR = 1.46; 95% CI, 1.05 to 2.05). However, there were no statistically significant differences in mother-infant bonding.Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that rates and severity of PPD and anxiety symptoms among women seeking treatment for PPD have worsened in Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, treatment-seeking mothers have consistently maintained good relationships with their infants. Considering the difficulties women with PPD face when accessing treatment, it is important that strategies are developed and disseminated to safely identify and manage PPD to mitigate potential long-term adverse consequences for mothers and their families.Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT03654261 and NCT04485000.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression, Postpartum/etiology , Mother-Child Relations/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Object Attachment , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Depression, Postpartum/psychology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Ontario/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Self Report , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
19.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 82(1)2020 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066784

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of and risk factors for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study between March and May 2020 at the Lille University Hospital (France), including all patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19. Psychological distress symptoms were measured 3 weeks after onset of COVID-19 symptoms using the Impact of Event Scale-6 items (IES-6). The evaluation of PTSD symptoms using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5) took place 1 month later. Bivariate analyses were performed to analyze the relationship between PCL-5 scores and the demographic and health variables. The significant variables were then introduced into a multivariable linear regression analysis to establish their relative contributions to the severity of PTSD symptoms. RESULTS: 180 patients were included in this study, and 138 patients completed the 2 evaluations. Among the 180 patients, 70.4% patients required hospitalization, and 30.7% were admitted to the intensive care unit. The prevalence of PTSD was 6.5%, and the predictive factors of PTSD included psychological distress at the onset of the illness and a stay in an intensive care unit. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of PTSD in patients with COVID-19 is not as high as that reported among patients during previous epidemics. Initial psychological responses were predictive of a PTSD diagnosis, even though most patients showing acute psychological distress (33.5% of the sample) improved in the following weeks. PTSD symptoms also increased following a stay in an intensive care unit. Future studies should assess the long-term consequences of COVID-19 on patients' mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Psychological Distress , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Acute Disease , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Follow-Up Studies , France/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Severity of Illness Index , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
20.
Kardiologiia ; 62(9): 67-73, 2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067422

ABSTRACT

Aim    Comprehensive studies on the coexistence of COVID-19 and pericardial effusion (PEff) are limited. In this study, we investigated the relationship between pneumonia severity and PEff, predisposing factors, and the effect of PEff on clinical prognosis and mortality in COVID-19 patients.Material and methods    Between March and November 2020, 5 575 patients were followed up in our pandemic hospital due to COVID-19. 3 794 patients with positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test results and thoraxcomputerized tomography (CT) imaging at admission were included in the study. The clinical and demographic characteristics, CT images, hematological and biochemical parameters of these patients were retrospectively examined. Pulmonary involvement of 3794 patients was divided into three groups and its relationship with PEff was investigated retrospectively.Results    There were 560 patients who did not have pulmonary involvement, 2 639 patients with pulmonary involvement below 50 %, and 595 patients with 50 % or more pulmonary involvement. As pulmonaryinvolvement or the severity of the disease increased, male gender and advanced age become statistically significant. The mean age of patients with PEff was higher, and PEff was more common in males. Patients with PEff had more comorbid diseases and significantly elevated serum cardiac and inflammatory biomarkers. The need for intensive care and mortality rates were higher in these patients. While the in-hospital mortality rate was 56.9 % in patients with PEff and pulmonary involvement above 50 %, in-hospital mortality rate was 34.4 % in patients with pulmonary involvement above 50 % and without PEff (p<0.001).The presence of PEff during admission for COVID-19 disease, the appearance of PEff or increase in the degree of PEff during follow-up were closely related to mortality and prognosis.Conclusion    As the severity of pulmonary involvement or the clinical severity of the disease increased, PEff occurred in patients or the degree of PEff increased. The clinical prognosis of patients presenting with PEff was quite poor, and the frequency of intensive care admissions and mortality were significantly higher. PEff was an important finding in the follow-up and management of patients with COVID-19, and it reflected the clinical prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pericardial Effusion , Biomarkers , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Male , Pericardial Effusion/diagnosis , Pericardial Effusion/epidemiology , Pericardial Effusion/etiology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
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