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1.
J Assist Reprod Genet ; 39(2): 493-504, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653606

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to explore the perceived changes in sexual behaviour during COVID-19 lockdown, anxiety symptoms, and couple relationship of patients with infertility. METHODS: We performed an observational cross-sectional study between 20 November 2020 and 15 January 2021. We used stratified analysis of different stress levels and Quality of Marriage Index (QMI) scores to compare the perceived changes in sexual behaviour, anxiety symptoms, and couple relationship. The logistic regression model was performed to assess factors correlated with couples' relationship quality during the lockdown. Furthermore, we performed pathway analyses to assess whether the changes in sexual behaviour, stress level, or psychological anxiety during the lockdown could predict the quality of couple relationship. RESULTS: A total of 940 patients with infertility were included in this study. When we conducted a stratified analysis of the participants, significant differences were found between the changes in their sexual behaviour, stress levels, and couple relationship quality. The logistic regression model showed that sex, anxiety symptoms, decreased sexual satisfaction, sexual activity frequency, and income levels were closely related to couple relationship quality. Pathway analyses indicated that changes in their sexual behaviour, anxiety symptoms, and stress levels could all predict the quality of couple relationship. CONCLUSIONS: The perceived changes in sexual behaviour with different stress levels and couple relationship quality showed significant differences. Analysing the related factors that affect the quality of couple relationship, especially in times of crisis, is of great significance as this information can contribute to the improvement of treatment for patients with infertility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Infertility , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Infertility/therapy , Sexual Behavior/psychology
2.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262472, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650442

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Some of community mitigation efforts on COVID-19 created challenges to ongoing public health programs, including HIV care and prevention services among men who have sex with men (MSM). The goal of the current study was to explore sociodemographic factors and the impact of COVID-19 on HIV testing among Chinese MSM during state-enforced quarantine. METHODS: We conducted a community based survey between May 1st to June 30th, 2020 on COVID-19 related impacts on HIV testing among 436 China MSM during the COVID-19 state-enforced quarantine. RESULTS: One-third (33.7%) of MSM received HIV testing during the quarantine period. Few participants reported difficulty accessing facility-based testing (n = 13, 3.0%) or obtaining HIV self-test kit online (n = 22, 5.0%). However, 12.1% of participants reported being afraid of getting facility-based HIV test due to concerns about the risk of COVID-19. In the multivariate logistic regression model, participants who were married (aOR: 1.89, 95%CI: 1.19-3.01), reported increased quality of sleep (aOR: 2.07, 95%CI: 1.11-3.86), and increased difficulty in accessing health care (aOR: 2.34, 95%CI: 1.37-3.99) were more likely to get an HIV test during the state-enforced quarantine. CONCLUSION: The mitigation measures of COVID-19 have created various barriers to access HIV related prevention services in China, including HIV testing. To mitigate these impacts on HIV prevention and care services, future programs need to address barriers to HIV-related services, such as providing high-quality HIV self-testing. Meanwhile, psychological services or other social services are needed to those experiencing mental distress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Testing/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Sexual and Gender Minorities/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quarantine/psychology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
3.
Arch Sex Behav ; 51(1): 183-195, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605311

ABSTRACT

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, most U.S. colleges closed their campuses-including residence halls-causing significant disruption to students' lives. Two waves of data were collected from undergraduate students enrolled at a large U.S. Midwestern university: Wave 1 was a confidential online survey of 4989 randomly sampled undergraduate students collected in January/February 2020; Wave 2 was collected in April/May 2020 following campus closure. Our research aimed to: (1) assess how the COVID-19 related campus closure affected college students' romantic/sexual relationships, (2) examine students' past month sexual behaviors prior to the pandemic in comparison with their sexual behaviors during campus closure, and (3) compare participants' pre-pandemic event-level sexual behaviors with those occurring during campus closure. Of 2137 participants who completed both waves (49.8% women, mean age = 20.9), 2.6% were living at home in Wave 1 compared to 71.0% at Wave 2. Of those in relationships, 14.5% experienced a breakup and 25.3% stayed in their relationship but returned home to different cities. There were no statistically significant differences in participants' prior month reports of solo masturbation or sending/receiving nude/sexy images between Waves 1 and 2; however, participation in oral, vaginal, and anal sex significantly decreased across waves. Examining participants' most recent sexual events, Wave 2 sex more often occurred with a cohabiting or relationship partner and was rated as more wanted, emotionally intimate, and orgasmic. Implications for sexual health professionals are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Sampling Studies , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Students/psychology , Universities , Young Adult
4.
Lancet ; 397(10279): 1116-1126, 2021 03 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525995

ABSTRACT

Men who have sex with men (MSM) in the USA were the first population to be identified with AIDS and continue to be at very high risk of HIV acquisition. We did a systematic literature search to identify the factors that explain the reasons for the ongoing epidemic in this population, using a social-ecological perspective. Common features of the HIV epidemic in American MSM include role versatility and biological, individual, and social and structural factors. The high-prevalence networks of some racial and ethnic minority men are further concentrated because of assortative mixing, adverse life experiences (including high rates of incarceration), and avoidant behaviour because of negative interactions with the health-care system. Young MSM have additional risks for HIV because their impulse control is less developed and they are less familiar with serostatus and other risk mitigation discussions. They might benefit from prevention efforts that use digital technologies, which they often use to meet partners and obtain health-related information. Older MSM remain at risk of HIV and are the largest population of US residents with chronic HIV, requiring culturally responsive programmes that address longer-term comorbidities. Transgender MSM are an understudied population, but emerging data suggest that some are at great risk of HIV and require specifically tailored information on HIV prevention. In the current era of pre-exposure prophylaxis and the undetectable equals untransmittable campaign, training of health-care providers to create culturally competent programmes for all MSM is crucial, since the use of antiretrovirals is foundational to optimising HIV care and prevention. Effective control of the HIV epidemic among all American MSM will require scaling up programmes that address their common vulnerabilities, but are sufficiently nuanced to address the specific sociocultural, structural, and behavioural issues of diverse subgroups.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male/statistics & numerical data , Sexual and Gender Minorities/psychology , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/drug therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , HIV Infections/transmission , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Minority Groups/psychology , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/methods , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Sexual Partners/psychology , Transgender Persons/psychology , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
5.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 304(3): 791-805, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453729

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of cancer diagnosis and treatment on sexual quality of life (SQoL) is a well-established survivorship issue for gynaecological cancer survivors (GCS), yet little is known on how to intervene. PURPOSE: The aim of this systematic review was to identify the factors explaining the variability in SQoL for GCS. METHODS: We used the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) framework and the software Covidence. Electronic databases Scopus, Web of Science, PUBMED and CINAHL were searched for original research on GCS published between 2002 and 2018. We performed a two-stage screening process against selection criteria and quality assessment of individual studies. The Salutogenic Theory and the PRECEDE-PROCEED model were used as theoretical frameworks to identify and categorise factors. RESULTS: The initial search yielded 3,505 articles resulting in a total of 46 studies used to examine the association between factors of SQoL and gynaecological cancers. Our findings suggested that SQoL varies across subgroups based on age, menopausal status, relationship status, and treatment modality. Protective factors included clinicians' knowledge and confidence, preventive medical approach, risk and needs assessment, patient-clinician communication, relationship quality, psychosocial support, symptom management, accessibility of psychosexual care, and self-efficacy in the rediscovery of sexuality. CONCLUSION: Despite the high incidence and long-term impact of sexual health issues on quality of life, supportive care needs are not being met. A better understanding of the evidence base around the factors of SQoL can help health professionals take steps to protect and improve SQoL in GCS.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors/psychology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological/psychology , Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/psychology , Australia , Female , Humans , Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological/etiology , Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/etiology
6.
Chem Senses ; 462021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343678

ABSTRACT

Olfactory impairment is one of the more unique symptoms of COVID-19 infection and has therefore enjoyed increased public attention in recent months. Olfactory impairment has various implications and consequences ranging from difficulty detecting dangerous pathogens to hindering social functioning and social behaviors. We provide an overview of how olfactory impairment can impact 3 types of close social relationships: family relationships, friendships, and romantic relationships. Evidence is divided into several categories representing potential mechanisms by which olfactory impairment can impact close social relationships: bonding disruptions, decreased social support, missed group-eating experiences, hygiene concerns, and altered sexual behaviors. We conclude with a discussion of emerging future research questions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Olfaction Disorders/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Family Relations/psychology , Female , Friends/psychology , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Loneliness , Male , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Social Behavior , Stress, Psychological/psychology
7.
J Addict Dis ; 40(1): 84-91, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290105

ABSTRACT

In the early 2020s, the world was challenged by the COVID-19 emergency. Due to the dangerousness of the virus, the main intent of each country involved was to limit the diffusion in order to contain the damage caused by the pandemic. An aspect that has been deeply changed by self-isolation -used as a measure of containment of the virus- is related to sexuality. A practice that assumes importance in this sense is sexting, i.e., the act of sending/receiving sexually explicit messages, photos or videos via device. This practice allows a certain level of intimate behavior while eliminating the possibility of contagion. This study aims - through a qualitative survey - to investigate whether sexting is perceived as a potential addiction or adaptive sexual behavior to social distancing and lockdown policies by COVID-19. In order to do this, 37 subjects aged between 19 and 39 years were recruited - through probability sampling. We used the semi-structured interview method and then, through thematic analysis of the interviews, it emerged that, according to our sample, sexting was perceived to be more of an addiction than an adaptive behavior; despite this, it is possible that the practice of sexting has changed with the current societal situation.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Behavior, Addictive , COVID-19 , Sexual Behavior , Text Messaging , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Physical Distancing , Policy , Qualitative Research , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Young Adult
8.
Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw ; 24(7): 488-492, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291304

ABSTRACT

Research on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on communication on Tinder is presented in this article. This research examines reported changes in communication about sex and health during COVID-19 and the potential implications of those changes on hookup culture and sexual health communication beyond the pandemic. Data from 29 in-depth qualitative interviews with 20 female and 9 male college students are reported. Results include discussion of how college students are managing uncertainty, particularly uncertainty about health status, changes in communication and information-seeking strategies, different COVID-19 safety measures they have employed, and the future impact on communication about sexual health post-COVID-19. Participants in this study use uncertainty reduction communication strategies to gauge whether the risks of remaining on Tinder or meeting in person are worth the benefit. Results show that the quality and quantity of communication around first time in-person meetings have been modified, as the traditional public spaces for meeting have been reduced or eliminated and replaced by private spaces. Participants stated that they communicate more frequently and more directly about health, sexual health, and infection transmission. Finally, results indicate that participants have a strong desire to be more cautious and cognizant of health and safety in the future by using some of the communication strategies they developed during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Sexual Health , Students/psychology , Uncertainty , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Negotiating , Young Adult
9.
Am J Mens Health ; 15(3): 15579883211022180, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259149

ABSTRACT

Little is known about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic and control measures on gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) couples. The goal of this study was to investigate individual-level relationship satisfaction during the COVID-19 pandemic in a sample of 209 coupled GBMSM in the United States. We analyzed reported happiness and feelings about a relationship's future and assessed the odds of changing relationship happiness and investment associated with pandemic-related life changes (pandemic-related employment change; COVID-19 illness; high-risk of severe illness), using logistic and multinomial logit models. Fifty-five percent of participants (N = 114) reported that their relationship happiness had not changed during the pandemic, but 30% (N = 62) reported increased relationship happiness. 25% (N = 53) reported they had become more invested in their relationship's future during the pandemic, and only one participant reported decreased investment. The odds of increased relationship investment was significantly associated with pandemic-related employment change (adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.19 [1.04, 4.61]) and increased sex during the pandemic (aOR: 4.38 [1.55, 12.41]). Those with a pandemic-related employment change also had significantly higher odds of increased relationship happiness than those without a change (aOR: 2.10 [1.01, 4.35]). COVID-19 cases that reported being at higher risk of serious COVID-19 disease had higher odds of decreased relationship happiness than high-risk non-cases (aOR: 6.58 [1.10, 39.39]). Additional research in this area is warranted to minimize the long-term impacts of the pandemic on coupled GBMSM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Homosexuality, Male/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Personal Satisfaction , Physical Distancing , Sexual and Gender Minorities/psychology , Adult , Happiness , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Sexual Behavior/psychology , United States
10.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 150(1): 98-102, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188000

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on female sexual behavior in women in Turkey. METHODS: An observational study using data from a previous study conducted prior to the pandemic. We compared frequency of sexual intercourse, desire for pregnancy, Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) score, contraception type, and menstrual abnormalities among women during the pandemic with 6-12 months prior to the pandemic. Participants were contacted by telephone for questioning. RESULTS: Average frequency of sexual intercourse was significantly increased during the pandemic compared with 6-12 months prior (2.4 vs 1.9, P=0.001). Before the pandemic 19 (32.7%) participants desired to become pregnant, whereas during the pandemic it had decreased to 3 (5.1%) (P=0.001). Conversely, use of contraception during the pandemic significantly decreased among participants compared with prior (24 vs 10, P=0.004). Menstrual disorders were more common during the pandemic than before (27.6% vs 12.1%, P=0.008). Participants had significantly better FSFI scores before the pandemic compared with scores during the pandemic (20.52 vs 17.56, P=0.001). CONCLUSION: Sexual desire and frequency of intercourse significantly increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, whereas quality of sexual life significantly decreased. The pandemic is associated with decreased desire for pregnancy, decreased female contraception, and increased menstrual disorders.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Family Characteristics , Female , Humans , Libido , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pregnancy , Quality of Life/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Turkey
11.
Psychiatry Res ; 299: 113855, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1131763

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused unprecedented isolation and mental health effects; few studies have characterized this in sexual and gender (SGM) minority young people, a particularly vulnerable population. This cross-sectional study sought to analyze the mental health outcomes of SGM young people (18-30 years) during the early stages of the pandemic in the United States (April 13-June 18, 2020) and to explore how factors related to SGM identity impact mental health, such as lifetime discrimination, family support, and pre-existing mental health conditions. An online survey collected socio-demographic information and assessed for both mental health (depression (PHQ-8), anxiety (GAD-7), PTSD (PCL-C)) and COVID-19-related outcomes (COVID-19-related worries and COVID-19-related grief). Out of 981 participants, 320 (32.6%) identified as SGM. SGM had significantly higher levels of depression and PTSD symptoms as well as COVID-19-related worries and grief than non-SGM, even after controlling for family support, lifetime discrimination, and pre-existing mental health diagnoses. These findings suggest that not only has the COVID-19 pandemic disproportionately impacted SGM mental health, but that minority stress factors cannot fully explain this impact. Thus, clinicians and societal stakeholders (schools, employers, policymakers) must think beyond traditional minority stress factors (family support, discrimination) and pre-pandemic disparities to support this vulnerable population as the pandemic progresses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Global Burden of Disease , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Sex Factors , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Sexual and Gender Minorities/psychology , Adolescent , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Patient Health Questionnaire , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
12.
J Sex Marital Ther ; 47(5): 446-459, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127223

ABSTRACT

Studies have shown sexual intimacy enhancement-training with cognitive-behavioral can affect women's sexual intimacy. Interventional study to compare online and face-to-face sexual enhancement-training with cognitive-behavioral approach on sexual intimacy was conducted on 48 pregnant women with sexual intimacy scores < 75 who were randomly divided online (n = 25) and face-to-face (n = 23). Six 90-minute session sexual intimacy enhancement-training were conducted. Data were collected Botlani's sexual intimacy questionnaire (primary outcome) and counseling satisfaction scale (secondary outcome) measured baseline and after 6 and 10 weeks. In each group sexual intimacy in 10th week increased significantly compared to baseline (65.88 ± 5.51 vs 87.36 ± 8.39, p < 0.001) and (67.39 ± 5.26 vs 83.70 ± 5.61, p < 0.001) respectively. There was no significant difference between two groups in sexual intimacy scores in 6th (82.32 ± 9.25 vs 79.87 ± 6.35, p = 0.29) and 10th weeks (87.36 ± 8.39 vs 83.70 ± 5.61, p = 0.08) but totally intervention caused significant increase in sexual intimacy in 10th week compared to baseline (p = 0.04). Satisfaction from intervention was significantly different in 6th (65.72 ± 2.57 vs 61.21 ± 7.17, p = 0.021) and 10th weeks (68.92 ± 2.79 vs 64.26 ± 5.15, p = 0.001). Intervention improved sexual intimacy in pregnant women via both online and face-to-face counseling, with more sexual intimacy and satisfaction in online group, could be useful in COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Internet-Based Intervention , Pregnant Women/psychology , Sex Counseling/methods , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Adult , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy , Spouses , Treatment Outcome
13.
Body Image ; 37: 6-13, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064896

ABSTRACT

In the present paper, we tested an objectification theory model including compliance with COVID-19 safety measures as an outcome. Safety measures recommended by governments and health organizations include monitoring one's body and interpersonal and social distance from others. We contend that the diffuse safety anxiety stemming from sexual and self-objectification encourages targets to broadly adopt behaviors that protect against body-based dangers, including COVID-19. Accordingly, safety anxiety should predict greater compliance with COVID-19 safety measures. U.S. residents (N = 501) were recruited online and completed measures of sexual objectification, self-objectification, safety anxiety, appearance anxiety, and COVID-19 safety compliance. Two-step mediation analyses revealed a positive indirect effect of sexual objectification on safety anxiety through internalization of observers' perspectives (self-objectification Factor 1); in turn, there was a positive indirect effect of internalized others on COVID-19 body-based safety compliance through safety anxiety. Moreover, women (vs. men) reported higher levels of sexual objectification, internalization of observers' perspectives, safety anxiety, appearance anxiety, and COVID-19 safety measure compliance. Not only is safety anxiety relevant to cautionary behaviors protective against sexual objectification threat, but it also predicts compliance with measures that reduce the risk of contracting COVID-19. Implications for objectification theory are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Guideline Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Anxiety , Body Image/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Psychological , Psychological Theory , Safety , Sexual Behavior/psychology , United States/epidemiology
16.
Sex Transm Infect ; 97(7): 521-524, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1035225

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic and its related restrictions have affected attendance to and delivery of UK sexual healthcare services (SHS). We surveyed the impact on sexual behaviour of men having sex with men (MSM) to inform future SHS provision. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous, web-based survey among HIV-negative MSM at high risk of HIV infection who attended 56 Dean Street, a sexual health and HIV clinic. The survey was conducted over a 7-day period in August 2020. Data on sociodemographic characteristics, sexual behaviour and related mental well-being experienced during lockdown (defined as 23 March-30 June 2020) were extracted. Categorical and non-categorical variables were compared according to HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) use. RESULTS: 814 MSM completed the questionnaire: 75% were PrEP users; 76% reported they have been sexually active, of which 76% reported sex outside their household. 75% reported fewer partners than prior to lockdown. Isolation/loneliness (48%) and anxiety/stress (27%) triggered sexual activity, and 73% had discussed COVID-19 transmission risks with their sexual partners. While 46% reported no change to emotions ordinarily experienced following sex, 20% reported guilt for breaching COVID-19 restrictions. 76% implemented one or more changes to their sexual behaviour, while 58% applied one or more steps to reduce COVID-19 transmission during sex. 36% accessed SHS and 30% reported difficulties in accessing testing/treatment. Of those who accessed SHS, 28% reported an STI diagnosis. PrEP users reported higher partner number, engagement in 'chemsex' and use of SHS than non-PrEP users. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 restrictions had a considerable impact on sexual behaviour and mental well-being in our survey respondents. High rates of sexual activity and STI diagnoses were reported during lockdown. Changes to SHS provision for MSM must respond to high rates of psychological and STI-related morbidity and the challenges faced by this population in accessing services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/psychology , Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Homosexuality, Male/psychology , Humans , London/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Sexual Health/statistics & numerical data , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Nat Rev Urol ; 17(10): 547-553, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023931

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting social changes that were required to slow the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2) have resulted in lockdowns across many countries and led to substantial numbers of people being quarantined. For single people, their opportunities to meet a partner were completely lost. For couples who lived apart, this meant that they were not able to see their partner for many months. However, by contrast, for cohabiting couples, lockdown meant that they were forced to spend 24 h a day with each other, and perhaps their children or housemates, for months at a time. As lockdowns have loosened around the world, the possibility of a second wave arises, and lockdowns are being reinstated in many regions. The prospect of potential long-term lockdowns means that adjusting to this new normal in relationships is an important consideration. In this Viewpoint, three specialists in sexology and psychology discuss the effects of lockdown on intimacy and consider how it can be considered an opportunity as well as an obstacle for making love in the time of corona.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Quarantine/psychology , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Behavior
20.
J Sex Marital Ther ; 46(8): 747-762, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744440

ABSTRACT

In early 2020, the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) spread across the United States and mitigation measures drastically affected the daily lives of Americans. In this study, we assessed the association between COVID-related relationship conflict and changes in intimate and sexual behaviors and experiences. Using data from an online nationally representative probability survey of 1,010 American adults in April 2020, we estimated the impact of coronavirus-related relationship conflict on changes in intimate and sexual behaviors among those in any type of romantic or sexual relationship (Nweighted=742). Further, we assessed the association between conflict and experience of orgasm and feeling emotionally close to partner. Among individuals in relationships, 34% reported some degree of conflict with their romantic partners due to the spread of COVID-19 and its related restrictions. Those experiencing frequent coronavirus-related conflict with their partner were significantly more likely to report decreased frequency of several solo and partnered intimate and sexual behaviors compared to those not experiencing any such conflict, exhibiting a dose-response trend among partnered sexual behaviors. Since the spread of coronavirus and associated social distancing measures in the United States, Americans have experienced escalations in conflict in their romantic partnerships, which was associated with changes to their intimate and sexual lives.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Personal Satisfaction , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Sexual Partners/psychology , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Object Attachment , Pandemics , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
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