Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 29
Filter
1.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 71(5): 171-176, 2022 Feb 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1675341

ABSTRACT

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations have higher prevalences of health conditions associated with severe COVID-19 illness compared with non-LGBT populations (1). The potential for low vaccine confidence and coverage among LGBT populations is of concern because these persons historically experience challenges accessing, trusting, and receiving health care services (2). Data on COVID-19 vaccination among LGBT persons are limited, in part because of the lack of routine data collection on sexual orientation and gender identity at the national and state levels. During August 29-October 30, 2021, data from the National Immunization Survey Adult COVID Module (NIS-ACM) were analyzed to assess COVID-19 vaccination coverage and confidence in COVID-19 vaccines among LGBT adults aged ≥18 years. By sexual orientation, gay or lesbian adults reported higher vaccination coverage overall (85.4%) than did heterosexual adults (76.3%). By race/ethnicity, adult gay or lesbian non-Hispanic White men (94.1%) and women (88.5%), and Hispanic men (82.5%) reported higher vaccination coverage than that reported by non-Hispanic White heterosexual men (74.2%) and women (78. 6%). Among non-Hispanic Black adults, vaccination coverage was lower among gay or lesbian women (57.9%) and bisexual women (62.1%) than among heterosexual women (75.6%). Vaccination coverage was lowest among non-Hispanic Black LGBT persons across all categories of sexual orientation and gender identity. Among gay or lesbian adults and bisexual adults, vaccination coverage was lower among women (80.5% and 74.2%, respectively) than among men (88.9% and 81.7%, respectively). By gender identity, similar percentages of adults who identified as transgender or nonbinary and those who did not identify as transgender or nonbinary were vaccinated. Gay or lesbian adults and bisexual adults were more confident than were heterosexual adults in COVID-19 vaccine safety and protection; transgender or nonbinary adults were more confident in COVID-19 vaccine protection, but not safety, than were adults who did not identify as transgender or nonbinary. To prevent serious illness and death, it is important that all persons in the United States, including those in the LGBT community, stay up to date with recommended COVID-19 vaccinations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Gender Identity , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Sexual and Gender Minorities/psychology , Vaccination Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Heterosexuality/psychology , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , United States/epidemiology
2.
Am J Public Health ; 111(9): 1610-1619, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1666846

ABSTRACT

Objectives. To describe disparities in depression, anxiety, and problem drinking by sexual orientation, sexual behavior, and gender identity during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods. Data were collected May 21 to July 15, 2020, from 3245 adults living in 5 major US metropolitan areas (Atlanta, Georgia; Chicago, Illinois; New Orleans, Louisiana; New York, New York; and Los Angeles, California). Participants were characterized as cisgender straight or LGBTQ+ (i.e., lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people, and men who have sex with men, and women who have sex with women not identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender). Results. Cisgender straight participants had the lowest levels of depression, anxiety, and problem drinking compared with all other sexual orientation, sexual behavior, and gender identity groups, and, in general, LGBTQ+ participants were more likely to report that these health problems were "more than usual" during the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusions. LGBTQ+ communities experienced worse mental health and problem drinking than their cisgender straight counterparts during the COVID-19 pandemic. Future research should assess the impact of the pandemic on health inequities. Policymakers should consider resources to support LGBTQ+ mental health and substance use prevention in COVID-19 recovery efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Sexual and Gender Minorities/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Alcoholism/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , United States , Urban Population/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
4.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259583, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505858

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infectious disease outbreaks like COVID-19 and their mitigation measures can exacerbate underlying gender disparities, particularly among adolescents and young adults in densely populated urban settings. METHODS: An existing cohort of youth ages 16-26 in Nairobi, Kenya completed a phone-based survey in August-October 2020 (n = 1217), supplemented by virtual focus group discussions and interviews with youth and stakeholders, to examine economic, health, social, and safety experiences during COVID-19, and gender disparities therein. RESULTS: COVID-19 risk perception was high with a gender differential favoring young women (95.5% vs. 84.2%; p<0.001); youth described mixed concern and challenges to prevention. During COVID-19, gender symmetry was observed in constrained access to contraception among contraceptive users (40.4% men; 34.6% women) and depressive symptoms (21.8% men; 24.3% women). Gender disparities rendered young women disproportionately unable to meet basic economic needs (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.21; p<0.05) and in need of healthcare during the pandemic (aOR = 1.59; p<0.001). At a bivariate level, women had lower full decisional control to leave the house (40.0% vs. 53.2%) and less consistent access to safe, private internet (26.1% vs. 40.2%), while men disproportionately experienced police interactions (60.1%, 55.2% of which included extortion). Gender-specific concerns for women included menstrual hygiene access challenges (52.0%), increased reliance on transactional partnerships, and gender-based violence, with 17.3% reporting past-year partner violence and 3.0% non-partner sexual violence. Qualitative results contextualize the mental health impact of economic disruption and isolation, and, among young women, privacy constraints. IMPLICATIONS: Youth and young adults face gendered impacts of COVID-19, reflecting both underlying disparities and the pandemic's economic and social shock. Economic, health and technology-based supports must ensure equitable access for young women. Gender-responsive recovery efforts are necessary and must address the unique needs of youth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Cohort Studies , Contraception/methods , Contraception Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Hygiene , Kenya/epidemiology , Male , Menstruation/physiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Urban Population , Young Adult
5.
Sex Transm Infect ; 97(5): 357-362, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318194

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Australia recorded its first case of COVID-19 in late January 2020. On 22P March 2020, amid increasing daily case numbers, the Australian Government implemented lockdown restrictions to help 'flatten the curve'. Our study aimed to understand the impact of lockdown restrictions on sexual and reproductive health. Here we focus on sexual practices. METHODS: An online survey was open from the 23PP April 2020 to 11P May 2020. Participants were recruited online via social media and other networks and were asked to report on their sexual practices in 2019 and during lockdown. Logistic regression was used to calculate the difference (diff) (including 95% CIs) in the proportion of sex practices between time periods. RESULTS: Of the 1187 who commenced the survey, 965 (81.3%) completed it. Overall, 70% were female and 66.3% were aged 18-29 years. Most (53.5%) reported less sex during lockdown than in 2019. Compared with 2019, participants were more likely to report sex with a spouse (35.3% vs 41.7%; diff=6.4%; 95% CI 3.6 to 9.2) and less likely to report sex with a girl/boyfriend (45.1% vs 41.8%; diff=-3.3%; 95% CI -7.0 to -0.4) or with casual hook-up (31.4% vs 7.8%; 95% CI -26.9 to -19.8). Solo sex activities increased; 14.6% (123/840) reported using sex toys more often and 26.0% (218/838) reported masturbating more often. Dating app use decreased during lockdown compared with 2019 (42.1% vs 27.3%; diff= -14.8%; 95% CI -17.6 to -11.9). Using dating apps for chatting/texting (89.8% vs 94.5%; diff=4.7%; 95% CI 1.0 to 8.5) and for setting up virtual dates (2.6% vs 17.2%; diff=14.6%; 95% CI 10.1 to 19.2) increased during lockdown. CONCLUSION: Although significant declines in sexual activity during lockdown were reported, people did not completely stop engaging in sexual activities, highlighting the importance of ensuring availability of normal sexual and reproductive health services during global emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Australia , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Online Social Networking , Online Systems , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
6.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(6): e2113787, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274644

ABSTRACT

Importance: COVID-19 lockdowns may affect economic and health outcomes, but evidence from low- and middle-income countries remains limited. Objective: To assess the economic security, food security, health, and sexual behavior of women at high risk of HIV infection in rural Kenya during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design, Setting, and Participants: This survey study of women enrolled in a randomized trial in a rural county in Kenya combined results from phone interviews, conducted while social distancing measures were in effect between May 13 and June 29, 2020, with longitudinal, in-person surveys administered between September 1, 2019, and March 25, 2020. Enrolled participants were HIV-negative and had 2 or more sexual partners within the past month. Surveys collected information on economic conditions, food security, health status, and sexual behavior. Subgroup analyses compared outcomes by reliance on transactional sex for income and by educational attainment. Data were analyzed between May 2020 and April 2021. Main Outcomes and Measures: Self-reported income, employment hours, numbers of sexual partners and transactional sex partners, food security, and COVID-19 prevention behaviors. Results: A total of 1725 women participated, with a mean (SD) age of 29.3 (6.8) years and 1170 (68.0%) reporting sex work as an income source before the COVID-19 pandemic. During the pandemic, participants reported experiencing a 52% decline in mean (SD) weekly income, from $11.25 (13.46) to $5.38 (12.51) (difference, -$5.86; 95% CI, -$6.91 to -$4.82; P < .001). In all, 1385 participants (80.3%) reported difficulty obtaining food in the past month, and 1500 (87.0%) worried about having enough to eat at least once. Reported numbers of sexual partners declined from a mean (SD) total of 1.8 (1.2) partners before COVID-19 to 1.1 (1.0) during (difference, -0.75 partners; 95% CI, -0.84 to -0.67 partners; P < .001), and transactional sex partners declined from 1.0 (1.1) to 0.5 (0.8) (difference, -0.57 partners; 95% CI, -0.64 to -0.50 partners; P < .001). In subgroup analyses, women reliant on transactional sex for income were 18.3% (95% CI, 11.4% to 25.2%) more likely to report being sometimes or often worried that their household would have enough food than women not reliant on transactional sex (P < .001), and their reported decline in employment was 4.6 hours (95% CI, -7.9 to -1.2 hours) greater than women not reliant on transactional sex (P = .008). Conclusions and Relevance: In this survey study, COVID-19 was associated with large reductions in economic security among women at high risk of HIV infection in Kenya. However, shifts in sexual behavior may have temporarily decreased their risk of HIV infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections/etiology , Income/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Humans , Kenya , Longitudinal Studies , Poverty/statistics & numerical data , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Risk-Taking , Rural Population/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Work/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Partners , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
7.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 87(1): 639-643, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169725

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had unforeseen consequences on the delivery of HIV and sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention services. However, little is known about how the pandemic has impacted pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)-using men who have sex with men (MSM). METHODS: Data come from an online cohort of PrEP-using MSM in the Southern United States from October 2019 to July 2020. Participants were administered 10 surveys in total, including 1 ad hoc survey specifically on COVID-19. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of this ad hoc survey (n = 56) and present changes in sexual behaviors and utilization of and access to sexual health services. Using linear mixed-effect regression models, we also analyzed data from the larger cohort and document how sexual behaviors and PrEP use varied longitudinally across several months. RESULTS: A fifth of participants discontinued or changed how often they take PrEP because of COVID-19. A quarter of the cohort documented challenges when attempting to access PrEP, HIV testing, or STD testing. For all sexual behaviors examined longitudinally-number of male sexual partners, anal sex acts, condomless anal sex, and oral sex (all measured in the past 2 weeks)-there was a decrease from February to April followed by an increase from April to June. DISCUSSION: Our findings suggest reduced access to and utilization of STD and HIV services coupled with a continuation of behaviors which confer STD/HIV risk. Ensuring appropriate delivery of STD/HIV prevention services during this pandemic is imperative.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Homosexuality, Male/statistics & numerical data , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Anti-HIV Agents/therapeutic use , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Medication Adherence , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Safe Sex , Sexual and Gender Minorities/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
8.
J Infect Dis ; 223(6): 1019-1028, 2021 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1155785

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global COVID-19 pandemic has the potential to indirectly impact transmission dynamics and prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). It is unknown what combined impact reductions in sexual activity and interruptions in HIV/STI services will have on HIV/STI epidemic trajectories. METHODS: We adapted a model of HIV, gonorrhea, and chlamydia for a population of approximately 103 000 men who have sex with men (MSM) in the Atlanta area. Model scenarios varied the timing, overlap, and relative extent of COVID-19-related sexual distancing and service interruption within 4 service categories (HIV screening, preexposure prophylaxis, antiretroviral therapy, and STI treatment). RESULTS: A 50% relative decrease in sexual partnerships and interruption of all clinical services, both lasting 18 months, would generally offset each other for HIV (total 5-year population impact for Atlanta MSM, -227 cases), but have net protective effect for STIs (-23 800 cases). If distancing lasted only 3 months but service interruption lasted 18 months, the total 5-year population impact would be an additional 890 HIV cases and 57 500 STI cases. CONCLUSIONS: Immediate action to limit the impact of service interruptions is needed to address the indirect effects of the global COVID-19 pandemic on the HIV/STI epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Bacterial/epidemiology , Georgia/epidemiology , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Incidence , Male , Models, Statistical , Pandemics , Sexual Partners , Sexual and Gender Minorities
10.
J Infect Dis ; 223(6): 1019-1028, 2021 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052200

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global COVID-19 pandemic has the potential to indirectly impact transmission dynamics and prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). It is unknown what combined impact reductions in sexual activity and interruptions in HIV/STI services will have on HIV/STI epidemic trajectories. METHODS: We adapted a model of HIV, gonorrhea, and chlamydia for a population of approximately 103 000 men who have sex with men (MSM) in the Atlanta area. Model scenarios varied the timing, overlap, and relative extent of COVID-19-related sexual distancing and service interruption within 4 service categories (HIV screening, preexposure prophylaxis, antiretroviral therapy, and STI treatment). RESULTS: A 50% relative decrease in sexual partnerships and interruption of all clinical services, both lasting 18 months, would generally offset each other for HIV (total 5-year population impact for Atlanta MSM, -227 cases), but have net protective effect for STIs (-23 800 cases). If distancing lasted only 3 months but service interruption lasted 18 months, the total 5-year population impact would be an additional 890 HIV cases and 57 500 STI cases. CONCLUSIONS: Immediate action to limit the impact of service interruptions is needed to address the indirect effects of the global COVID-19 pandemic on the HIV/STI epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Bacterial/epidemiology , Georgia/epidemiology , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Incidence , Male , Models, Statistical , Pandemics , Sexual Partners , Sexual and Gender Minorities
11.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 86(2): 153-156, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1050219

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A second wave of COVID-19 began in late June in Victoria, Australia. Stage 3 then Stage 4 restrictions were introduced in July-August. This study aimed to compare the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and sexual practices among men who have sex with men taking PrEP between May-June (post-first lockdown) and July-August (second lockdown). METHODS: This was an online survey conducted among men who have sex with men who had their PrEP managed at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Australia. A short message service with a link to the survey was sent to 503 PrEP clients who provided consent to receive a short message service from Melbourne Sexual Health Centre in August 2020. RESULTS: Of the 192 participants completed the survey, 153 (80%) did not change how they took PrEP. Of the 136 daily PrEP users, 111 (82%) continued to take daily PrEP, 3 (2%) switched to on-demand PrEP, and 22 (16%) stopped PrEP in July-August. Men generally reported that they had no partners or decreased sexual activities during second lockdown compared with post-first lockdown; the number of casual sex partners (43% decreased vs. 3% increased) and the number of kissing partners (36% decreased vs. 3% increased). Most men reported no chemsex (79%) or group sex (77%) in May-August. 10% (13/127) of men had ever worn face masks during sex in May-August. CONCLUSION: During the second wave of COVID-19 in Victoria, most men did not change the way they used PrEP but the majority had no risks or reduced sexual practices while one in 10 men wore a face mask during sex.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Homosexuality, Male/statistics & numerical data , Masks , Safe Sex , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Australia , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Sex Transm Infect ; 97(7): 521-524, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1035225

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic and its related restrictions have affected attendance to and delivery of UK sexual healthcare services (SHS). We surveyed the impact on sexual behaviour of men having sex with men (MSM) to inform future SHS provision. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous, web-based survey among HIV-negative MSM at high risk of HIV infection who attended 56 Dean Street, a sexual health and HIV clinic. The survey was conducted over a 7-day period in August 2020. Data on sociodemographic characteristics, sexual behaviour and related mental well-being experienced during lockdown (defined as 23 March-30 June 2020) were extracted. Categorical and non-categorical variables were compared according to HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) use. RESULTS: 814 MSM completed the questionnaire: 75% were PrEP users; 76% reported they have been sexually active, of which 76% reported sex outside their household. 75% reported fewer partners than prior to lockdown. Isolation/loneliness (48%) and anxiety/stress (27%) triggered sexual activity, and 73% had discussed COVID-19 transmission risks with their sexual partners. While 46% reported no change to emotions ordinarily experienced following sex, 20% reported guilt for breaching COVID-19 restrictions. 76% implemented one or more changes to their sexual behaviour, while 58% applied one or more steps to reduce COVID-19 transmission during sex. 36% accessed SHS and 30% reported difficulties in accessing testing/treatment. Of those who accessed SHS, 28% reported an STI diagnosis. PrEP users reported higher partner number, engagement in 'chemsex' and use of SHS than non-PrEP users. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 restrictions had a considerable impact on sexual behaviour and mental well-being in our survey respondents. High rates of sexual activity and STI diagnoses were reported during lockdown. Changes to SHS provision for MSM must respond to high rates of psychological and STI-related morbidity and the challenges faced by this population in accessing services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/psychology , Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Homosexuality, Male/psychology , Humans , London/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Sexual Health/statistics & numerical data , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Sex Med Rev ; 9(1): 3-14, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-974642

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: A novel coronavirus (COVID-19) reached pandemic levels by March 11th, 2020, with a destructive impact across socioeconomic domains and all facets of global health, but little is known of its impact on sexual health. OBJECTIVE: To review current knowledge on sexual health-related containment measures during pandemics, specifically COVID-19, and focus on 2 main areas: intimacy and relational dynamics and clinical effects on sexual health. METHODS: We carried out a literature search encompassing sexual health and pandemic issues using Entrez-PubMed and Google Scholar. We reviewed the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic on sexual health regarding transmission and safe sex practices, pregnancy, dating and intimacy amid the pandemic, benefits of sex, and impact on sexual dysfunctions. RESULTS: Coronavirus transmission occurs via inhalation and touching infected surfaces. Currently, there is no evidence it is sexually transmitted, but there are sexual behaviors that pose a higher risk of infectivity due to asymptomatic carriers. Nonmonogamy plays a key role in transmission hubs. New dating possibilities and intimacy issues are highlighted. Sexual activity has a positive impact on the immune response, psychological health, and cognitive function and could mitigate psychosocial stressors. COVID-19 pandemic affects indirectly the sexual function with implications on overall health. CONCLUSION: Increased awareness of health-care providers on sexual health implications related to the COVID-19 pandemic is needed. Telemedicine has an imperative role in allowing continued support at times of lockdown and preventing worsening of the sexual, mental, and physical health after the pandemic. This is a broad overview addressing sexual issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic. As this is an unprecedented global situation, little is known on sexuality related to pandemics. Original research is needed on the topic to increase the understanding of the impact the current pandemic may have on sexual health and function. Pennanen-Iire C, Prereira-Lourenço M, Padoa A, et al. Sexual Health Implications of COVID-19 Pandemic. Sex Med Rev 2021;9:3-14.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Health/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Awareness , Female , Humans , Male , Telemedicine/organization & administration
15.
Int J Impot Res ; 33(1): 102-109, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-970938

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 outbreak, which is effective worldwide, the psychological conditions of healthcare professionals deteriorate. The aim of this study was to examine health professionals' changes in their sexual lives due to the COVID-19 outbreak in Istanbul, Turkey. This online survey was conducted between 2 and 26 May 2020 with 232 healthcare professionals working in a pandemic hospital. After obtaining informed consent, a questionnaire was sent online from the hospital database and health institutions social media accounts (Twitter®, Facebook®, Instagram®, WhatsApp® etc.) and e-mail addresses. The first section of the four-part questionnaire included demographic data, the second and third sections of pre-and post-COVID-19 attitudes, and the last section to assess sexual functions (International Index of Erecile Function for male and Female Sexual Function Index for female), anxiety and depression. Dependent sample t-test, Mc Nemar test, and multivariate analysis were used.The study was completed with 185 participants in total. Healthcare workers' sexual desire (3.49 ± 1.12 vs. 3.22 ± 1.17; p = 0.003), weekly sexual intercourse/masturbation number (2.53 ± 1.12 vs. 1.32 ± 1.27; p < 0.001), foreplay time (16.38 ± 12.35 vs. 12.02 ± 12.14; p < 0.001), sexual intercourse time (24.65 ± 19.58 vs. 19.38 ± 18.85; p < 0.001) decreased compared to the Pre-COVID-19 outbreak. In addition, participants prefer less foreplay (p < 0.001), less oral sex (p < 0.001) and anal sex (p = 0.007) during COVID-19 and more non-face to face sexual intercourse positions (p < 0.001). When factors affecting sexual dysfunction were analyzed as univariate and multivariate, sexual dysfunction was shown to be significantly more common in males (OR = 0.053) and alcohol users (OR = 2.925). During the COVID-19 outbreak, healthcare workers' sexual desires decreased, the number of sexual intercourses decreased, their foreplay times decreased, and their sexual intercourse positions changed to less face to face.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Partners/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
16.
Sex Transm Infect ; 97(6): 414-419, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-919096

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine changes in the occurrence of physical sex with non-steady partners among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Belgium during the first weeks of the COVID-19 lockdown and associations with sociodemographic factors, sexual practices, drug, alcohol and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) use. A secondary objective was to explore changes in PrEP use and the need for PrEP follow-up. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey. The questionnaire was available in Dutch, French and English, between April 10 and 27 (2020), and disseminated via sexual health and lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer or intersex organisations throughout Belgium. Eligibility criteria included being 18 years or older, not being exclusively heterosexual and living or being born in Belgium. RESULTS: The sample included 694 MSM. Physical sex with non-steady partners decreased from 59.1% to 8.9% during the first weeks of the lockdown. Those who had sex with non-steady partners were significantly more likely to be HIV positive, to use PrEP or to have engaged in sexual practices such as group sex, chemsex and sex work before the lockdown, compared with their counterparts. Among those who used PrEP before the lockdown, 47.0% stopped using PrEP, 19.7% used event-driven PrEP and 33.3% used daily PrEP during the lockdown. Almost two-thirds of PrEP users had a PrEP care appointment in the weeks before the lockdown and a minority received follow-up elsewhere or online. Some PrEP users had concerns regarding their follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: MSM in our survey substantially reduced sexual contact with non-steady partners during the first weeks of the COVID-19 lockdown, suggesting that the risk for HIV and STI transmission in this period was low. We recommend ensuring access to sexual health services, such as HIV testing and follow-up for PrEP for the small group having multiple sex partners and engaging in sexual practices such as chemsex, or group sex, even in times of a pandemic threat.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Partners , Sexual and Gender Minorities/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Belgium/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Sex Transm Infect ; 97(2): 85-87, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-792131

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe the early impact of COVID-19 and associated control measures on the sexual behaviour of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) users in Wales. METHODS: Data were obtained from an ecological momentary assessment study of PrEP use and sexual behaviour. Participants were individuals accessing PrEP through the National Health Service (NHS) sexual health clinics across four health boards in Wales. Weekly data documenting condomless sex in the preceding week were analysed between 03/02/2020 and 10/05/2020. The introduction of social distancing measures and changes to sexual health clinics in Wales occurred on the week starting 16/03/2020. Two-level logistic regression models were fitted to condomless sex (yes/no) over time, included an indicator for the week starting 16/03/2020, and were extended to explore differential associations by relationship status and sexual health clinic. RESULTS: Data were available from 56 participants and included 697 person-weeks (89% of the maximum number that could have been obtained). On average, 42% of participants reported condomless sex in the period prior to the introduction of social distancing measures and 20% reported condomless sex after (OR=0.16, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.37, p<0.001). There was some evidence to suggest that this association was moderated by relationship status (OR for single participants=0.09, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.23; OR for not single participants=0.46, 95% CI 0.16 to 1.25). CONCLUSIONS: The introduction of social distancing measures and changes to PrEP services across Wales was associated with a marked reduction in reported instances of condomless sexual intercourse among respondents, with a larger reduction in those who were single compared with those who were not. The long-term impact of COVID-19 and associated control measures on this population's physical and mental health and well-being requires close examination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Physical Distancing , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , Unsafe Sex/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Condoms/statistics & numerical data , Ecological Momentary Assessment , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Wales
18.
BMC Med Res Methodol ; 20(1): 159, 2020 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-628826

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to assess the feasibility of using multiple technologies to recruit and conduct cognitive interviews among young people across the United States to test items measuring sexual and reproductive empowerment. We sought to understand whether these methods could achieve a diverse sample of participants. With more researchers turning to approaches that maintain social distancing in the context of COVID-19, it has become more pressing to refine these remote research methods. METHODS: We used several online sites to recruit for and conduct cognitive testing of survey items. To recruit potential participants we advertised the study on the free online bulletin board, Craigslist, and the free online social network, Reddit. Interested participants completed an online Qualtrics screening form. To maximize diversity, we purposefully selected individuals to invite for participation. We used the video meeting platform, Zoom, to conduct the cognitive interviews. The interviewer opened a document with the items to be tested, shared the screen with the participant, and gave them control of the mouse and keyboard. After the participant self-administered the survey, the interviewer asked about interpretation and comprehension. After completion of the interviews we sent participants a follow-up survey about their impressions of the research methods and technologies used. We describe the processes, the advantages and disadvantages, and offer recommendations for researchers. RESULTS: We recruited and interviewed 30 young people from a range of regions, gender identities, sexual orientations, ages, education, and experiences with sexual activity. These methods allowed us to recruit a purposefully selected diverse sample in terms of race/ethnicity and region. It also may have offered potential participants a feeling of safety and anonymity leading to greater participation from gay, lesbian, and transgender people who would not have agreed to participate in-person. Conducting the interviews using video chat may also have facilitated the inclusion of individuals who would not volunteer for in-person meetings. Disadvantages of video interviewing included participant challenges to finding a private space for the interview and problems with electronic devices. CONCLUSIONS: Online technologies can be used to achieve a diverse sample of research participants, contributing to research findings that better respond to young people's unique identities and situations.


Subject(s)
Cognition/physiology , Health Surveys/statistics & numerical data , Interviews as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Psychometrics/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Sexual and Gender Minorities/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Feasibility Studies , Female , Health Surveys/methods , Humans , Internet , Interviews as Topic/methods , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Psychometrics/methods , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
19.
J Sex Marital Ther ; 46(8): 747-762, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744440

ABSTRACT

In early 2020, the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) spread across the United States and mitigation measures drastically affected the daily lives of Americans. In this study, we assessed the association between COVID-related relationship conflict and changes in intimate and sexual behaviors and experiences. Using data from an online nationally representative probability survey of 1,010 American adults in April 2020, we estimated the impact of coronavirus-related relationship conflict on changes in intimate and sexual behaviors among those in any type of romantic or sexual relationship (Nweighted=742). Further, we assessed the association between conflict and experience of orgasm and feeling emotionally close to partner. Among individuals in relationships, 34% reported some degree of conflict with their romantic partners due to the spread of COVID-19 and its related restrictions. Those experiencing frequent coronavirus-related conflict with their partner were significantly more likely to report decreased frequency of several solo and partnered intimate and sexual behaviors compared to those not experiencing any such conflict, exhibiting a dose-response trend among partnered sexual behaviors. Since the spread of coronavirus and associated social distancing measures in the United States, Americans have experienced escalations in conflict in their romantic partnerships, which was associated with changes to their intimate and sexual lives.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Personal Satisfaction , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Sexual Partners/psychology , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Object Attachment , Pandemics , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
20.
AIDS Behav ; 25(1): 40-48, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739667

ABSTRACT

This paper presents data from a recent cross-sectional survey of gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) in the US, to understand changes in sexual behavior and access to HIV prevention options (i.e. condoms and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)) during the COVID-19 lockdown period. The Love and Sex in the Time of COVID-19 survey was conducted online from April to May, 2020. GBMSM were recruited through advertisements featured on social networking platforms, recruiting a sample size of 518 GBMSM. Analysis considers changes three in self-reported measures of sexual behavior: number of sex partners, number of anal sex partners and number of anal sex partners not protected by pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) or condoms. Approximately two-thirds of the sample reported that they believed it was possible to contract COVID-19 through sex, with anal sex reported as the least risky sex act. Men did not generally feel it was important to reduce their number of sex partners during COVID-19, but reported a moderate willingness to have sex during COVID-19. For the period between February and April-May 20,202, participants reported a mean increase of 2.3 sex partners during COVID-19, a mean increase of 2.1 anal sex partners (range - 40 to 70), but a very small increase in the number of unprotected anal sex partners. Increases in sexual behavior during COVID-19 were associated with increases in substance use during the same period. High levels of sexual activity continue to be reported during the COVID-19 lockdown period and these high levels of sexual activity are often paralleled by increases in substance use and binge drinking. There is a clear need to continue to provide comprehensive HIV prevention and care services during COVID-19, and telehealth and other eHealth platforms provide a safe, flexible mechanism for providing services.


Subject(s)
Bisexuality/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male/psychology , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Condoms/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Partners , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Unsafe Sex/psychology , Unsafe Sex/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL